Sample records for water unit risk

  1. Arsenic in your water?: Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic in water?your tx H2O | pg. 27 Story by Kathy Wythe Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic In several ?hot spots? across the United States people may be drinking water with high levels of naturally... occurring arsenic without understanding the associated risks, according to agricultural economists. ?Many households in arsenic ?hot spots? are in fact being exposed to harmful doses of arsenic,? said Dr. Douglass Shaw, professor of agricultural...

  2. Estimated Water Flows in 2005: United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow charts depicting water use in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of water use patterns. Approximately 410,500 million gallons per day of water are managed throughout the United States for use in farming, power production, residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Water is obtained from four major resource classes: fresh surface-water, saline (ocean) surface-water, fresh groundwater and saline (brackish) groundwater. Water that is not consumed or evaporated during its use is returned to surface bodies of water. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states in addition to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and one national water flow chart representing a comprehensive systems view of national water resources, use, and disposition.

  3. RIS0-M-2319 RISK ANALYSIS OF A DISTILLATION UNIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIS0-M-2319 RISK ANALYSIS OF A DISTILLATION UNIT J. R. Taylor**, 0. Hansen*, C. Jensen*, 0. F. A risk analysis of a batch distillation unit is de- scribed. The analysis has been carried out at several.2. Objectives and organisation 5 1.2.2. Philosophy and approach 6 1.3.1. The distillation unit 8 1

  4. Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    risk Quality of life Health Noncancer risk Costs Cost Technology availability Health risk Testing Management factors Environmental quality Treatment Chemical performance Fairness Cost of technology & Management 48:6, 2005 · Evaluation of drinking water treatment technology: An entropy-based fuzzy application

  5. Unit 15: Risk Management To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    1 Unit 15: Risk Management Objectives Đ To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role within the software development process Đ To introduce the use of risk management as a means of identifying Ą Techniques & heuristics for the identification, analysis, treatment & monitoring of risk Ą Risk management

  6. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vukelich, S.E. [Golder Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 operable unit on the Hanford Reservation. 100-HR-3 is a ground water unit. The purpose of the QRA at the 100-HR-3 operable unit is to focus on a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios in order to provides sufficient information that will assist the Tri-Party signatories (Washington State Department of Ecology, EPA and US DOE) in making defensible decisions on the necessity of Interim Remedial Measures. Frequent- and occasional-use exposure scenarios are evaluated in the human health risk assessment to provide bounding estimates of risk. The ecological risk assessment consists of an evaluation of the risks to riparian and aquatic receptors which live in or near the Columbia River.

  7. Occurrence of Low-Temperature Geothermal Waters in the United...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occurrence of Low-Temperature Geothermal Waters in the United States, in Assessment of Geothermal Resources of the United States -- 1978 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  8. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. A. Owca

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

  9. Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, Liam D.; Kohn, Nancy P.

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in January 1998 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for the first post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and DDT were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared to pre-remediation data available from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissues) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Biomonitoring results indicated that pesticides were still bioavailable in the water column, and have not been reduced from pre-remediation levels. Annual biomonitoring will continue to assess the effectiveness of remedial actions at the United Heckathorn Site.

  10. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility...

  11. Eielson Air Force Base Operable Unit 2 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, R.E.; Jarvis, T.T.; Jarvis, M.R.; Whelan, G.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operable Unit 2 at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, is one of several operable units characterized by petroleum, oil, and lubricant contamination, and by the presence of organic products floating at the water table, as a result of Air Force operations since the 1940s. The base is approximately 19,270 acres in size, and comprises the areas for military operations and a residential neighborhood for military dependents. Within Operable Unit 2, there are seven source areas. These source areas were grouped together primarily because of the contaminants released and hence are not necessarily in geographical proximity. Source area ST10 includes a surface water body (Hardfill Lake) next to a fuel spill area. The primary constituents of concern for human health include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Monitored data showed these volatile constituents to be present in groundwater wells. The data also showed an elevated level of trace metals in groundwater.

  12. 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    , and so risks of water shortage appear. The preservation of these resources is important because73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

  13. 33 CFR 2.36: Navigable Waters of the United States, navigable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigable waters, and territorial watersLegal Abstract This regulation provides the definition for "navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial...

  14. 2 Risk perceptions of arsenic in tap water and consumption 3 of bottled water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, W. Douglass

    's sales, with nearly 10% growth in per capita consump- 27 tion between 1999 and 2005 and the share2 Risk perceptions of arsenic in tap water and consumption 3 of bottled water 4 Paul M. Jakus,1 W studies on bottled water consumption have used simple scale measures of 11 perceived risk that do

  15. STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1) for BUILDING 90 USER TEST BED FACILITY.G., GEOLOGIST/QSD (530) 222-4339 SWPPP Preparation Date: JUNE 10, 2012 #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan) 222-4339 Name and Title Telephone Number #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Building 90 User

  16. Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water and Energy Sustainability Denis AELBRECHT Sustainability ­ D. Aelbrecht et al. Western Energy-Water Forum, Santa Barbara, March 2007 Or subtitle 1 ... How and Energy Sustainability ­ D. Aelbrecht et al. Western Energy-Water Forum, Santa Barbara, March 2007

  17. Analyzing risk and uncertainty for improving water distribution system security from malevolent water supply contamination events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Jacob Manuel

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous efforts to apply risk analysis for water distribution systems (WDS) have not typically included explicit hydraulic simulations in their methodologies. A risk classification scheme is here employed for identifying vulnerable WDS components...

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium.

  19. Water resources. Bureau of Reclamation's Bonneville Unit: future repayment arrangements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GAO is convinced that: the Bureau of Reclamation's use of the Water Supply Act of 1958 to defer a portion of municipal and industrial (M and I) costs of the Bonneville Unit was illegal, the Bureau's use of ad valorem (percentage of value) tax revenues from property owners to increase the Bonneville Unit's M and I customers repayment obligation under the 1965 contract was improper, and the Department of Energy Organization Act 1977 requires congressional approval of the modified cost allocation of the Bonneville Unit initiated by the Bureau in 1984.

  20. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    condensing furnaces and water heaters and power vent waterheater, electric water heaters and furnaces, which includeResidential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States

  1. Prioritizing Water Pipe Replacement and Rehabilitation by Evaluating Failure Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Hyun

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    PRIORITIZING WATER PIPE REPLACEMENT AND REHABILITATION BY EVALUATING FAILURE RISK A Thesis by SANG HYUN LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... 2011 Sang Hyun Lee PRIORITIZING WATER PIPE REPLACEMENT AND REHABILITATION BY EVALUATING FAILURE RISK A Thesis by SANG HYUN LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  2. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  3. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  5. United States General Accounting Office GAO High-Risk Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    -risk areas. This report focuses on major, multibillion dollar information system development, and/or performance goals. Such problems are all too common in federal automation projects. Agencies have obligated over $145 billion during the past 6 years building, buying, #12;and maintaining computer

  6. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Uncertainty in Quantitative Risk and Policy Analysis.of Uncertainty." Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 5(4): 297-Carbone (2005). "Feeling at risk matters: Water managers and

  7. Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LD Antrim; NP Kohn

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, PNNL-11911 Rev. 1, was published in July 2000 and replaces PNNL-11911, which was published in September 1998. The revision corrects tissue concentration units that were reported as dry weight but were actually wet weight, and updates conclusions based on the correct reporting units. Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in January 1998 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for the first post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and DDT were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared to pre-remediation data available from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissues) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Chlorinated pesticide concentrations in water samples were similar to pre-remediation levels and did not meet remediation goals. Mean dieldrin concentrations in water ranged from 0.65 ng/L to 18.1 ng/L and were higher than the remediation goal (0.14 ng/L) at all stations. Mean total DDT concentrations in water ranged from 0.65 ng/L to 103 ng/L and exceeded the remediation goal of 0.59 ng/L. The highest concentrations of both pesticides were found in Lauritzen Canal, and the lowest levels were from the Richmond Inner Harbor Channel water. Unusual amounts of detritus in the water column at the time of sampling, particularly in Lauritzen Canal, could have contributed to the elevated pesticide concentrations and poor analytical precision.

  8. United Nations Association -Nebraska Division Hears Roger Gold's "World's Water Problems"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    water problem there is the lack of water during the dry season. In the monsoons, water is collectedUnited Nations Association - Nebraska Division Hears Roger Gold's "World's Water Problems Dictionary (1980), and the New York Times Everyday Dictionary (1982). One-toorders are many of the 54 Water

  9. Generic risk insights for General Electric boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, R.; Taylor, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Chung, J. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation)

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology has been developed to extract generic risk-based information from probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of General Electric boiling water rectors and applying the insights gained to plants that have not been subjected to a PRA. The available risk assessments (six plants) were examined to identify the most probable, i.e., dominant accident sequences at each plants. The goal was to include all sequences which represented at least 80% of core damage frequency. If the same plant specific dominant accident sequence appeared within this boundary in at least two plant PRAs, the sequence was considered to be a representative sequence. Eight sequences met this definition. From these sequences, the most important component failures and human error that contributed to each sequence have been prioritized. Guidance is provided to prioritize the representative sequences and modify selected basic events that have been shown to be sensitive to the plant specific design or operating variations of the contributing PRAs. This risk-based guidance can be used for utility and NRC activities including operator training, maintenance, design review, and inspections. 13 refs., 6 tabs.

  10. Characterizing Water Risks and Solutions Cross-Culturally: Results from the Global Ethnohydrology Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    ) & quantity (lack of water ) · Solutions: individual behaviors, collective technologies & policies How doCharacterizing Water Risks and Solutions Cross-Culturally: Results from the Global Ethnohydrology State University Four Study Sites Classified by Water Scarcity & Development Levels Background

  11. Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, Kenneth M.

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

  12. Water Management, Risk, and Uncertainty: Things We Wish We Knew in the 21st

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, W. Douglass

    Water Management, Risk, and Uncertainty: Things We Wish We Knew in the 21st Century [Forthcoming;1 Introduction A survey is offered of the most difficult and challenging issues to water managers in the 21st Century, focusing on the economics of risks and more so, uncertainty. Risk and uncertainty is addressed

  13. Energy, Water and Fish: Biodiversity Impacts of Energy-Sector Water Demand in the United States Depend on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    for electricity generation from coal. Historical water use by the energy sector is related to patterns of fishEnergy, Water and Fish: Biodiversity Impacts of Energy- Sector Water Demand in the United States Rising energy consumption in coming decades, combined with a changing energy mix, have the potential

  14. An Analysis of the Risks of a Terrorist Attack on LNG Receiving Facilities in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    An Analysis of the Risks of a Terrorist Attack on LNG Receiving Facilities in the United States #12;An Analysis of the Risks of a Terrorist Attack on LNG Receiving Facilities in the United States 3-D Aerial View from Proposed SES LNG Receiving Facility Site to Downtown Long Beach [White line is 2

  15. Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR-322 2008 Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College... Station Guy Fipps Texas AgriLife Extension Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station March 20, 2007 Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation...

  16. Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

    TR-322 2008 Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College... Station Guy Fipps Texas AgriLife Extension Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station March 20, 2007 Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation...

  17. Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States -- Climatic and Geologic and semiarid southwest- ern United States results from the complex interplay of climate, geology and Range subregions. Introduction The arid and semiarid southwestern United States is among the fastest

  18. Baseline risk assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. Cleanup of the site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU), consisting of the Weldon Spring quarry and its surrounding area, is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE is conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the proper response to address various contaminated media that constitute the QROU. Specifically, the operable unit consists of the following areas and media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and the bulk waste; groundwater underlying the quarry and surrounding area; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including surface water and sediment at Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek. An initial evaluation of conditions at the quarry area identified remaining data requirements needed to support the conceptual site exposure and hydrogeological models. These data requirements are discussed in the RI/FS work plan issued in January 1994. Soil contamination located at a property adjacent to the quarry, referred to as Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), was originally part of the scope of the QROU, as discussed in the work plan. However, a decision was subsequently made to remediate this vicinity property as part of cleanup activities for the chemical plant operable unit, as provided for in the Record of Decision (ROD). Remediation of VP9 was completed in early 1996. Hence, this baseline risk assessment (BRA) does not address VP9.

  19. Risk-Based Ranking Experiences for Cold War Legacy Facilities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, a number of government agencies in the United States have faced increasing public scrutiny for their efforts to address the wide range of potential environmental issues related to Cold War legacies. Risk-based ranking was selected as a means of defining the relative importance of issues. Ambitious facility-wide risk-based ranking applications were undertaken. However, although facility-wide risk-based ranking efforts can build invaluable understanding of the potential issues related to Cold War legacies, conducting such efforts is difficult because of the potentially enormous scope and the potentially strong institutional barriers. The U.S. experience is that such efforts are worth undertaking to start building a knowledge base and infrastructure that are based on a thorough understanding of risk. In both the East and the West, the legacy of the Cold War includes a wide range of potential environmental issues associated with large industrial complexes of weapon production facilities. The responsible agencies or ministries are required to make decisions that could benefit greatly from information on the relative importance of these potential issues. Facility-wide risk-based ranking of potential health and environmental issues is one means to help these decision makers. The initial U.S. risk-based ranking applications described in this chapter were “ground-breaking” in that they defined new methodologies and approaches to meet the challenges. Many of these approaches fit the designation of a population-centred risk assessment. These U.S. activities parallel efforts that are just beginning for similar facilities in the countries of the former Soviet Union. As described below, conducting a facility-wide risk-based ranking has special challenges and potential pitfalls. Little guidance exists to conduct major risk-based rankings. For those considering undertaking such efforts, the material contained in this chapter should be useful background information.

  20. u.s. Water Institutes/Centers Celebrate 25th Anniversary United Kingdom Geophysicist Now

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of ground and surface water by heavy metals, excessive nutrient levels in lakes that lead to eutrophicationu.s. Water Institutes/Centers Celebrate 25th Anniversary United Kingdom Geophysicist Now Head of UNL Geology Department Groundwater quality remains a major emphasis for study at water resources

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  2. Potential importance of water pathways for spent fuel transportation accident risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostmeyer, R.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes the potential importance of water pathway contamination for spent fuel transportation accident risk using a ''worst-case'' water contamination scenario. The scenario used for the analysis involves an accident release that occurs near a reservoir. Water pathway doses are compared to doses for accident releases in urban or agricultural areas. The results of the analysis indicate that water pathways are not important for assessing the risk of transporting spent reactor fuel by truck or by rail.

  3. Risk-based modelling of surface water quality: a case study of the Charles River, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagener, Thorsten

    : Water quality; Risk; Monte Carlo; Sensitivity analysis; Eutrophication 1. Introduction 1.1. Motivation recognised in the development of some decision-support tools, for example, QUAL2E- UNCAS (Brown and BarnwellRisk-based modelling of surface water quality: a case study of the Charles River, Massachusetts

  4. PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1 , Andrew M. Parsons2 , Loren R. Anderson3 and Terry F. Glover4 ABSTRACT This paper summarises the Portfolio Risk Assessment (PRA and an initial prioritisation of future investigations and possible risk reduction measures. The PRA comprised

  5. Evaluation of severe accident risk during mid-loop operation at Surry unit-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mubayi, V.; Jo, J.; Lin, C.C.; Neymotin, L.; Pratt, W.T.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past most probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events which could potentially lead to core damage and containment failure during normal full power operation. However, recent studies and operational experience during periods while plants were shutdown for maintenance or refueling indicated that potential accidents initiated during low power operation or shutdown conditions could also potentially become important contributors to risk. In 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) began an extensive program to assess the risk during low power and shutdown operation. Two plants, Surry (a pressurized water reactor, PWR) and Grand Gulf (a boiling water reactor ,BWR) were selected as the plants to be studied.This paper describes an analysis of accident progression and offsite consequences (level 3 PRA) carried out for the Surry plant. The focus of the level 3 PRA was on mid-loop operation, which is a plant operational state (POS) that can occur while the plant is shutdown for maintenance or refueling. Mid-loop refers to a configuration when the reactor coolant system is lowered to the mid-plane of the hot leg to allow essential maintenance to be performed. This operational state was selected after an initial coarse screening study indicated that reduced inventory during mid-loop operation could pose higher risk than other POSs.

  6. Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern Evan Torline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern of its residents are living without access to clean drinking water. This simple issue causes terrible community of Mol, Haiti before the implementation of a chlorine water filtration system in it. A handful

  7. Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides and Other Contaminants in Marine Waters and Sediment Near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LD Antrim; NP Kohn

    2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, PNNL-1 3059 Rev. 1, was published in July 2000 and replaces PNNL-1 3059 which is dated October 1999. The revision corrects tissue concentration units that were reported as dry weight but were actually wet weight, and updates conclusions based on the correct reporting units. Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in February 1999 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for Year 2 of post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathom Site. Dieldrin and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared with Year 1 of post-remediation monitoring, and with preremediation data from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissue s) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Mussel tissues were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which were detected in sediment samples. Chlorinated pesticide concentrations in water samples were similar to preremediation levels and did not meet remediation goals. Mean dieldrin concentrations in water ranged from 0.62 ng/L to 12.5 ng/L and were higher than the remediation goal (0.14 ng/L) at all stations. Mean total DDT concentrations in water ranged from 14.4 ng/L to 62.3 ng/L and exceeded the remediation goal (0.59 ng/L) at all stations. The highest concentrations of both DDT and dieldrin were found at the Lauritzen Canal/End station. Despite exceedence of the remediation goals, chlorinated pesticide concentrations in Lauritzen Canal water samples were notably lower in 1999 than in 1998. PCBS were not detected in water samples in 1999.

  8. Risk Perception and Willingness to Pay for Removing Arsenic in Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sihong

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , THMs, radon as Ill as PCBs, are similar. First, they can cause many diseases (the effects on the probability of mortality and morbidity are confounded) and the latency of diseases is long (this suggests a discount rate should be elicited). Second... of uncer- tainty in risk assessment. They got the results based on a multiplicative model for cancer risk from ingestion of radon in drinking water, where the risk R was the product of n risk 16 factors. These risk factors were assumed to follow a...

  9. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyhow energy planners might better address and manage the risk

  10. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyhow energy planners might better address and manage the risk

  11. Water clarity, maternal behavior, and physiology combine to eliminate UV radiation risk to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palen, Wendy J.

    Water clarity, maternal behavior, and physiology combine to eliminate UV radiation risk for review November 10, 2009) Increasing UV-B radiation (UV-B; 290­320 nm) due to stratospheric across natural landscapes. amphibian declines | ultraviolet radiation | risk analysis | dissolved organic

  12. Incorporation of Agricultural Risk into Water Resource Planning Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, J. R.

    Federal, state and local planners in the United States have come to realize that our rapidly growing population, and the increased agricultural, municipal, recreational and industrial expansion caused by this population growth, is increasing...

  13. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The condition of a water well and its proximity to contamination sources determine the risk it poses to ground water. Topics covered include well location, well construction, well age and type, well depth, well maintenance, water testing...

  14. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

  15. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

  16. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

  17. Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

  18. The role of the United States Water Resources Engineering Community in responding to the water related needs of the developing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ormond, Timothy Paul

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THK ROLE OF THK UNITED STATES WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING COMMUNITY IN RESPONDING TO THE WATER- RELATED NEEDS OF THK DEVELOPING WORLD A Thesis by TIMOTHY PAUL ORMOND Submitted to thc Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM Vnivcrsdy... in partial fulfdlmcnt of the requirements for thc dcgrcc of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THF. ROLE OF THE UNITED STATES WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING COMMUNITY IN RESPONDING TO THE WATER-RELATED NEEDS OF THE DEVELOPING...

  19. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  1. Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

  3. Improved water allocation utilizing probabilistic climate forecasts: Short-term water contracts in a risk management framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    . Thus, integrated supply and demand management can be achieved. In this paper, a single period multiuser, forecast consumers, water managers and reservoir operators, have difficulty interpreting such products in a risk management framework A. Sankarasubramanian,1 Upmanu Lall,2 Francisco Assis Souza Filho,3

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  5. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates the possibility of health and environmental risks from contaminated ground water at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. The former uranium processing site`s contaminated soil and material were removed and placed at a disposal site located in Body Canyon, Colorado, during 1986--1991 by the US Departments of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach similar to that used by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The first step is to determine what site-related contaminants are found in ground water samples. The next step in the risk assessment is to determine how much of these contaminants people might ingest if they got their drinking water from a well on the site. In accordance with standard practice for this type of risk assessment, the highest contaminant concentrations from the most contaminated wells are used. The risk assessment then explains the possible health problems that could result from this amount of contamination.

  6. Ann Williamson, Deputy Director, Office of Environmental Assessment Mike Cox, Manager, Risk Assessment Unit, Office of Environmental Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ann Williamson, Deputy Director, Office of Environmental Assessment Mike Cox, Manager, Risk Assessment Unit, Office of Environmental Assessment U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ­ Region 10 Greg, WA Ann Williamson and Mike Cox, EPA Region 10 Office of Environmental Assessment, will be presenting

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

  8. Design and Operation of Fan-Coil Units in Using River Water as Chilled Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, A.; Chen, H.; Ma, W.; Zhu, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) in the system. An approximate formula is proposed for computing the cooling capacity of FCUs when the temperature of water supply is a little higher than designed temperature. Finally, recommendations are given for the design of the FCUs to follow dry operating...

  9. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

  10. Water Loss Test Results: West Main Canal United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

    IRRIGATION TECHNOLOGY CENTER Texas Cooperative Extension ? Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Texas A&M University System 1 Extension Associate, and Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer... Table 3. Data for Test UN1: West Main District: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County Test ID: UN1 Canal: West Main Lining Type: Lined Starting Water Span Widths: SG1: 11.21 ft, SG3: 11.24 ft, SG5: 11.26 ft Date...

  11. A Risk-based Optimization Modeling Framework for Mitigating Fire Events for Water and Fire Response Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanta, Lufthansa Rahman

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    as one of the United States' critical infrastructures and are vulnerable to various threats caused by natural disasters or malevolent actions. The primary goals of urban water distribution systems are reliable delivery of water during normal and emergency...

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates the potential for impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site caused by the burning of coal containing uranium to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities and not for those constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Because background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking, any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background. The incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination and disposing of the contaminated soils in an engineered disposal cell. The UMTRA Ground Water Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under the UMTRA Ground Water Project, results of this risk assessment will help determine what ground water compliance strategy may be applied at the site.

  13. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  14. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market research on solar water heaters. National Renewabletankless combined space/water heaterds, solar water heaters,combined solar space/water heater, electric water heaters

  15. Characterization of solids in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor defueling water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, D. O.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the impact of poor water clarity on defueling operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station, a study was undertaken to characterize suspended particulates in the reactor defueling water. The examination included cascade filtration through Nuclepore filters of progressively smaller pore sizes, using three water samples obtained at different times and after varying degrees of clarification. The solids collected on the filters were examined with a scanning electron microscope and analyzed with energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence. A wide variety of solids was observed, and 26 elements were detected. These included all the materials expected from the reactor system (uranium, zirconium, silver, cadmium, indium, iron, chromium, and nickel), chemicals and zeolites used to decontaminate the water (aluminum, silicon, sodium), common impurities (potassium, chlorine, sulfur, magnesium, calcium, and others), as well as some unexpected metals (molybdenum, manganese, bromine, and lead). There was also evidence for the presence of organic material. A diverse assortment of particles with widely varying surface properties was found to be present.

  16. Year 5 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides and other Contaminants in Marine Waters near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site in Richmond, California, was completed in April 1997. The Record of Decision included a requirement for five years of post-remediation monitoring be conducted in the waterways near the site. The present monitoring year, 2001? 2002, is the fifth and possibly final year of post-remediation monitoring. In March 2002, water and mussel tissues were collected from the four stations in and near Lauritzen Channel that have been routinely monitored since 1997-98. A fifth station in Parr Canal was sampled in Year 5 to document post-remediation water and tissue concentrations there. Dieldrin and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) were analyzed in water samples and in tissue samples from resident (i.e., naturally occurring) mussels. As in Years 3 and 4, mussels were not transplanted to the study area in Year 5. Year 5 concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared with those from Years 1 through 4 of post-remediation monitoring, and with preremediation data from the California State Mussel Watch Program and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site. Year 5 water samples and mussel tissues were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which were detected in sediment samples during Year 2 monitoring and were added to the water and mussel tissue analyses in 1999. Contaminants of concern in Year 5 water samples were analyzed in both bulk (total) phase and dissolved phase, as were total suspended solids, to evaluate the contribution of particulates to the total contaminant concentration.

  17. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in-place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Currently, no points of exposure (e.g. a drinking water well); and no receptors of contaminated ground water have been identified at the Maybell site. Therefore, there are no current human health and ecological risks associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Furthermore, if current site conditions and land- and water-use patterns do not change, it is unlikely that contaminated ground water would reach people or the ecological communities in the future.

  18. Risk-informed applications and online maintenance in France and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdier, Edouard (Edouard Pierre Emmanuel)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past twenty-five years, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been progressing toward a more risk-informed, performance-based regulation. This regulatory framework has effectively supported the development ...

  19. Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project sites are near Slick Rock, Colorado: the North Continent site and the Union Carbide site. Currently, no one uses the contaminated ground water at either site for domestic or agricultural purposes. However, there may be future land development. This risk assessment evaluates possible future health problems associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Since some health problems could occur, it is recommended that the contaminated ground water not be used as drinking water.

  1. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    the risk it poses to your ground water. For example, a cracked well casing may allow fertilizer, nitrates, oil or pesticides to enter the well if these materials are spilled near the well. Feedlots, animal yards, septic systems and waste storage areas also... can release large amounts of bacteria, nitrates and other contam- inants that could pollute well water. The Texas Water Well Drillers Act (1985), the Water Well Pump Installer Act (1991) and vari- ous other legislative actions have guided devel- opment...

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Durango, Colorado (the Durango site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1986 to 1991. An evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. Exposure could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. In addition, environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Durango site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Durango site will be used to determine what is necessary to protect public health and the environment, and to comply with the EPA standards.

  5. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

  6. Environmental risk management and preparations for the first deep water well in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, F.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Statoil is among the leaders in protecting health, environment and safety in all aspects of the business. The evaluations of business opportunities and development of blocks opened by authorities for petroleum exploration, are assessed in accordance with the goals for environmental protection. Progressive improvement of environmental performance is secured through proper environmental risk management. In 1995, Statoil, the technical operator on Block 210 off the Nigerian coast, was the first company to drill in deep waters in this area. An exploration well was drilled in a water depth of about 320 meters. The drilling preparations included environmental assessment, drillers Hazop, oil spill drift calculations, oil spill response plans and environmental risk analysis. In the environmental preparations for the well, Statoil adhered to local and national government legislation, as well as to international guidelines and company standards. Special attention was paid to the environmental sensitivity of potentially affected areas. Statoil co-operated with experienced local companies, with the authorities and other international and national oil companies. This being the first deep water well offshore Nigeria, it was a challenge to co-operate with other operators in the area. The preparations that were carried out, will set the standard for future environmental work in the area. Co-operation difficulties in the beginning were turned positively into a attitude to the environmental challenge.

  7. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forester, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

  8. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heaterds, solar water heaters, combined solar space/watermarket research on solar water heaters. National Renewableheaters, combined space heating and water heating appliances 3 , solar

  9. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004). Heat pump water heater technology: Experiences ofStar Residential Water Heaters: Final criteria analysis.market research on solar water heaters. National Renewable

  10. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    around 25% of the gas water heating market by 2015. DOE alsoSpace Heating and Water Heating Market Characterization Thespace heating and water heating market differs significantly

  11. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas space heating and water heating technologies. 3.Heating and Gas Water Heating Technology Characterizationspace and water heating technologies. It also shows that

  12. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change and global water resources. Global Environmentalin Managing International Water Resources (No. WPS 1303):Darcy Lecture Tour. Ground Water, 45(4), 390-391. Sadoff,

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface cleanup at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lakeview, Oregon was completed in 1989. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  14. Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive decline: findings of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive,2 , Commenges Daniel1,2 , Helmer Catherine2,3 , Jean-François Dartigues2,3 . Abbreviations: Al, Aluminum; AD, Alzheimer's Disease; MMSE, Mini Mental State Examination; Si, Silica Running head: Aluminum, silica in water

  15. The Mobile Test and Demonstration Unit, A Cooperative Project Between EPRI, Utilities and Industry to Demonstrate New Water Treatment Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strasser, J.; Mannapperuma, J.

    THE MOBILE TEST AND DEMONSTRATION UNIT, A COOPERATIVE PROJECT BETWEEN EPRl, UTll.JTIES AND INDUSTRY TO DEMONSTRATE NEW WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES Jurgen Strasser Consultant to the EPRI Food Office Process & Equipment Technology... agencies are encouraging the reduction of the discharge of high BOD and TSS waste water to the local mlUlicipalities and/or waterways. EPRI collaborated with utilities, the US Dept. of Energy, food processor trade groups, and scientists from the Calif...

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, evaluates potential public health and environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former North Continent (NC) and Union Carbide (UC) uranium mill processing sites. The tailings at these sites will be placed in a disposal cell at the proposed Burro Canyon, Colorado, site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates the start of the first phase remedial action by the spring of 1995 under the direction of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project will evaluate ground water contamination. This baseline risk assessment is the first site-specific document for these sites under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the compliance strategy for contaminated ground water at the site. In addition, surface water and sediment are qualitatively evaluated in this report.

  17. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

  19. Generic risk insights for Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, R.; Taylor, J.; Fresco, A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Chung, J. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology has been developed to extract generic risk-based information from probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering (CE) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and apply the insights gained to Westinghouse and Ce plants have not been subjected to a PRA. The available PRAs (five Westinghouse plants and one CE plant) were examined to identify the most probable, i.e., dominant accident sequences at each plant. The goal was to include all sequences which represented at least 80% of core damage frequency. If the same plant specific dominant accident sequence appeared within this boundary in at least two plant PRAs, the sequence was considered to be a representative sequence. Eleven sequences met this definition. From these sequences, the most important component failures and human errors that contributed to each sequence have been prioritized. Guidance is provided to prioritize the representative sequences and modify selected basic events that have been shown to be sensitive to the plant specific design or operating variations of the contributing PRAs. This risk-based guidance can be used for utility and NRC activities including operator training maintenance, design review, and inspections.

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  1. A Critical Review of the Risks to Water Resources from Unconventional Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States Avner Vengosh,*, Robert B. Jackson,, Nathaniel Warner,§ Thomas H: The rapid rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has hydraulic fracturing. This paper provides a critical review of the potential risks that shale gas operations

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the UMTRA Project site near Lakeview, Oregon, was completed in 1989. The mill operated from February 1958 to November 1960. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  4. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in United States New Construction Market Alex B. Lekov,in United States New Construction Market Alex B. Lekov,New single-family home construction represents a significant

  5. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have been caused to a lack of water; rather it is believedconsider how, given a lack of clear water management goals,incomplete due to a lack of surface water measurements. Not

  6. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F. Southworh. (2004). Heat pump water heater technology:a larger market for heat pump water heaters (U.S. Departmentfurnace or heat pump and electric water heater (26%). (U.S.

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the Surface Project and the Ground Water Project. At the UMTRA Project site near Riverton, Wyoming, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1990. Tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were taken from the Riverton site to a disposal cell in the Gas Hills area, about 60 road miles (100 kilometers) to the east. The surface cleanup reduces radon and other radiation emissions and minimizes further ground water contamination. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the Riverton site that has resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. Such evaluations are used at each site to determine a strategy for complying with UMTRA ground water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and if human health risks could result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could hypothetically occur if drinking water were pumped from a well drilled in an area where ground water contamination might have occurred. Human health and environmental risks may also result if people, plants, or animals are exposed to surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water.

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1990 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine what remedial actions are necessary for contaminated ground water at the site.

  10. Chapter 16: Log-linear regression for Poisson counts Exposure to ionizing radiation is recognized as a cancer risk. In the United States, EPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    as a cancer risk. In the United States, EPA sets guidelines specifying upper limits on the amount of exposure groups than low exposure. The objective of regression analysis is to estimate the rate of cancer deaths cases or deaths attributable to cancer) using a number of explanatory variables believed to be related

  11. Post-remediation biomonitoring of pesticides and other contaminants in marine waters and sediment near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LD Antrim; NP Kohn

    2000-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in February 1999 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for Year 2 of post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared with Year 1 of post-remediation monitoring, and with preremediation data from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissues) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Mussel tissues were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which were detected in sediment samples. Chlorinated pesticide concentrations in water samples were similar to preremediation levels and did not meet remediation goals. Mean dieidrin concentrations in water ranged from 0.62 rig/L to 12.5 ng/L and were higher than the remediation goal (0.14 ng/L) at all stations. Mean total DDT concentrations in water ranged from 14.4 ng/L to 62.3 ng/L and exceeded the remediation goal (0.59 ng/L) at all stations. The highest concentrations of both pesticides were found at the Lauritzen Canal/End station. Despite exceedence of the remediation goals, chlorinated pesticide concentrations in Lauritzen Canal water samples were notably lower in 1999 than in 1998. Tissue samples from biomonitoring organisms (mussels) provide an indication of the longer-term integrated exposure to contaminants in the water column, which overcomes the limitations of grab samples of water. Biomonitoring results indicated that the bioavailability of chlorinated pesticides has been reduced from preremediation levels both in the dredged area and throughout Richmond Harbor. Total DDT and dieldrin concentrations in mussel tissues were dramatically lower than measured levels from preremediation surveys and also lower than Year 1 levels from post-remediation biomonitoring. The lowest levels were found at the Richmond Inner Harbor Channel station (4.1 {micro}g/kg total DDT and 0.59 {micro}g/kg dieldrin, wet weight; mean of resident and transplant mussels). Mean chlorinated pesticide concentrations were highest at Lauritzen Canal/End (82 {micro}g/kg total DDT and 7.1 {micro}g/kg dieldrin, wet weight), followed by Lauritzen Canal/Mouth (22 {micro}/kg total DDT and 1.7 {micro}g/kg dieldrin, wet weight) and Santa Fe Channel/End (7.5 {micro}g/kg total DOT and 0.61 {micro}g/kg dieldrin, wet weight). These levels are 95% to 99% lower than those recorded by the California State Mussel Watch program prior to EPA's response actions. The levels of PCBs in mussel tissue were also reduced by 93% to 97% from preremediation levels. Surface sediment concentrations of dieldrin and DDT in November 1998 were highest in samples from the head or north end of Lauritzen Canal and progressively lower toward the mouth, or south end. Total DDT ranged from 130 ppm (dry weight) at the north end to 3 ppm at the south end. Dieldrin concentrations decreased from 3,270 ppb (dry weight) at the north end to 52 ppb at the south end. These results confirmed elevated pesticide concentrations in sediments collected from Lauritzen Channel by Anderson et al. (1999). The pesticide concentrations were lower than maximum concentrations found in the 1993 Remedial Investigation but comparable to the median levels measured before remediation was completed. Sediment analyses also showed the presence of elevated PCB aroclor 1254, and very high levels of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in Lauritzen Channel.

  12. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  14. Dresden Unit 2 hydrogen water chemistry: Chemical surveillance, oxide-film characterization, and recontamination during Cycle 10: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, C.P.; Peterson, J.P.; Robinson, R.N.; Sundberg, L.L.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an Executive Summary of work performed under Project RP1930-7, BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry - Chemical Surveillance. It describes the work performed to monitor chemical and radiological performance at Commonwealth Edison's Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 2 during Cycle 10, its second full fuel cycle on Hydrogen Water Chemistry. It includes the results of water chemistry measurements, shutdown gamma scan/dose rate measurements, and the results of stainless steel oxide film characterization. This experience at Dresden-2 continues to demonstrate that a plant can operate on Hydrogen Water Chemistry with only minor impact on plant parameters, compared with the beneficial effect on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of sensitized stainless steel components. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mapping water availability, projected use and cost in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent C. Tidwell; Barbara D. Moreland; Katie M. Zemlick; Barry L. Roberts; Howard D. Passell; Daniel Jensen; Christopher Forsgren; Gerald Sehlke; Margaret A. Cook; Carey W. King

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New demands for water can be satisfied through a variety of source options. In some basins surface and/or groundwater may be available through permitting with the state water management agency (termed unappropriated water), alternatively water might be purchased and transferred out of its current use to another (termed appropriated water), or non-traditional water sources can be captured and treated (e.g., wastewater). The relative availability and cost of each source are key factors in the development decision. Unfortunately, these measures are location dependent with no consistent or comparable set of data available for evaluating competing water sources. With the help of western water managers, water availability was mapped for over 1200 watersheds throughout the western US. Five water sources were individually examined, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water, municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped was projected change in consumptive water use from 2010 to 2030. Associated costs to acquire, convey and treat the water, as necessary, for each of the five sources were estimated. These metrics were developed to support regional water planning and policy analysis with initial application to electric transmission planning in the western US.

  16. Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy through temperature and pressure to drive the mercury into a vapor phase. Mercury is a heavy metal, and is regulated in drinking water by the EPA through the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). If an on-line lamp break historically the U.S. has been skeptical to implement UV into drinking water systems, many areas of Europe

  17. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1989 by the US DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination in this risk assessment.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  19. Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A, and I-22 Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fipps, G.; Leigh, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR-330 2008 Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A and I-22 Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 By: Eric Leigh, Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering... Guy Fipps, Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report October 2008 Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A, and I...

  20. Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A, and I-22 Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fipps, G.; Leigh, E.

    TR-330 2008 Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A and I-22 Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 By: Eric Leigh, Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering... Guy Fipps, Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report October 2008 Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A, and I...

  1. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. B. Lammers (2000). "Global water resources: Vulnerabilityin two small watersheds." Water Resources Research 18(3).of a warming climate on water availability in snow-dominated

  2. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture in2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture infuture climate change impacts on water for agriculture and

  3. Sandia Energy - Security Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Risk Assessment Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Security Risk Assessment Security Risk Assessmentcwdd2015-05-04T21:...

  4. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water heater includes the cost of changes to the heat exchanger and the tank.water heaters, included in Options 3 and 6, are not yet available for residential storage tankand water heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and limited availability of power vent and condensing storage-tank

  5. The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in water and energy efficient technologies and policies between water and energy and to use and allocate both more efficiently. Collaborating with partners

  6. Reckoning with risk: a rhetorical analysis of the social construction of risk associated with Texas drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedrich, Cynthia Juanita Matthes

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of drinking water at a time when they assert that they are doing a "better job than ever before. " John B. Mannion, Executive Director of American Water Works Association, talks like a man besieged by enemy agents: "On the one hand, we' ve got... an assortment of special interests undermining public confidence in the safety of drinking water. On the other hand, we' ve got the federal government issuing truckloads of regulations ? some of them of dubious merit and all of them accompanied by enormous...

  7. Incorporating Perceived Mortality Risks from Arsenic into Models of Drinking Water Behavior and Valuation of Arsenic Risk Reductions: Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, W. Douglass

    and estimating values for arsenic reduction risks. Several studies have been undertaken to examine the costs of compliance with the new standard, mainly in the form of capital cost for improved or new public system of Economics Texas A&M University Mark Walker, Associate Professor Dept. of Natural Resource and Environmental

  8. Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie M.; Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

  9. Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

  10. A SCOPING STUDY: Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Reactivity Insertion Accidents During Shutdown In U.S. Commercial Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Khericha

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the scoping study of developing generic simplified fuel damage risk models for quantitative analysis from inadvertent reactivity insertion events during shutdown (SD) in light water pressurized and boiling water reactors. In the past, nuclear fuel reactivity accidents have been analyzed both mainly deterministically and probabilistically for at-power and SD operations of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since then, many NPPs had power up-rates and longer refueling intervals, which resulted in fuel configurations that may potentially respond differently (in an undesirable way) to reactivity accidents. Also, as shown in a recent event, several inadvertent operator actions caused potential nuclear fuel reactivity insertion accident during SD operations. The set inadvertent operator actions are likely to be plant- and operation-state specific and could lead to accident sequences. This study is an outcome of the concern which arose after the inadvertent withdrawal of control rods at Dresden Unit 3 in 2008 due to operator actions in the plant inadvertently three control rods were withdrawn from the reactor without knowledge of the main control room operator. The purpose of this Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Model development project is to develop simplified SPAR Models that can be used by staff analysts to perform risk analyses of operating events and/or conditions occurring during SD operation. These types of accident scenarios are dominated by the operator actions, (e.g., misalignment of valves, failure to follow procedures and errors of commissions). Human error probabilities specific to this model were assessed using the methodology developed for SPAR model human error evaluations. The event trees, fault trees, basic event data and data sources for the model are provided in the report. The end state is defined as the reactor becomes critical. The scoping study includes a brief literature search/review of historical events, developments of a small set of comprehensive event trees and fault trees and recommendation for future work.

  11. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiences of residential consumers and utilities. OakStar (2008). Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

  12. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total...

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  15. early 300 species of mussels inhabit fresh-water rivers, streams, and lakes in the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    remnant populations of mussels. Dam construction, siltation, water pollution, mining and industrial wastes important commercial value in the cul- tured pearl and jewelry industry. Our pearly mussels are of unique mussels are underway. However, water pollution continues to threaten streams crucial to their survival

  16. Comparison of Advanced Residential Water Heating Technologies in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Fang, X.; Wilson, E.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage, gas tankless, condensing, electric storage, heat pump, and solar water heaters were simulated in several different climates across the US installed in both conditioned and unconditioned space and subjected to several different draw profiles. While many preexisting models were used, new models of condensing and heat pump water heaters were created specifically for this work.

  17. Impacts of Water Loop Management on Simultaneous Heating and Cooling in Coupled Control Air Handling Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guan, W.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    across the hot water control valve is 5 psi and 2 psi for the coil and pipeline. The flow coefficient of the control valves are 9 GPIW~S~~,~ for hot water valve and 13 GPIW~S~~.~ for the chilled water control valve. The designed loop pressure is 7... 14: Using dry coil model will introduce certain error for the cooling coil simulation since the heat transfer coefficient is higher when the coil is wet. Thermostat Model: The thermostat generates a pneumatic pressure signal from 3 to 15 psig...

  18. The Economic Value of Irrigation Water in the Western United States: An Application to Ridge Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, M. D.; Beattie, B. R.

    the form of a multiplicative function with nine domain variables, i.e., irrigation water applied, value of land and buildings, hired labor expenditures, fuel and lubricant expenditures, fertilizer and lime expenditures, feed expenditures, value of machinery...

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Supporting MELCOR calculations, Volume 6, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Brown, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain a better understanding of the risk significance of low power and shutdown modes of operation, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research at the NRC established programs to investigate the likelihood and severity of postulated accidents that could occur during low power and shutdown (LP&S) modes of operation at commercial nuclear power plants. To investigate the likelihood of severe core damage accidents during off power conditions, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) were performed for two nuclear plants: Unit 1 of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, which is a BWR-6 Mark III boiling water reactor (BWR), and Unit 1 of the Surry Power Station, which is a three-loop, subatmospheric, pressurized water reactor (PWR). The analysis of the BWR was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories while the analysis of the PWR was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This multi-volume report presents and discusses the results of the BWR analysis. The subject of this part presents the deterministic code calculations, performed with the MELCOR code, that were used to support the development and quantification of the PRA models. The background for the work documented in this report is summarized, including how deterministic codes are used in PRAS, why the MELCOR code is used, what the capabilities and features of MELCOR are, and how the code has been used by others in the past. Brief descriptions of the Grand Gulf plant and its configuration during LP&S operation and of the MELCOR input model developed for the Grand Gulf plant in its LP&S configuration are given.

  20. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (the Canonsburg site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1983 to 1985, and involved removing the uranium processing mill tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials from their original locations and placing them in a disposal cell located on the former Canonsburg uranium mill site. This disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The Ground Water Project will evaluate the nature and the extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing at the former Canonsburg uranium mill site, and will determine a ground water strategy for complying with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Canonsburg site, an evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Canonsburg site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Canonsburg site will be used to determine how to protect public health and the environment, and how to comply with the EPA standards.

  2. Recommendations for at-risk water supplies in Capiz Province, Philippines : using water source and community assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, Jessica Molly

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Provincial Health Office (PHO) in Capiz Province, Philippines for expert advice to support its drinking water quality testing ...

  3. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

  4. USGS Professional Paper 1703--Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water at the land surface can occur at discreet locations, such as in stream channels, or be distributed on temperature include viscosity, density, and surface tension, all of which affect hydraulic conductivity the sun, radiant cooling into space, and evapotranspi- ration, in addition to the advective and conductive

  5. Impacts of Water Loop Management on Simultaneous Heating and Cooling in Coupled Control Air Handling Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guan, W.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of the water loop management on the heating and cooling energy consumption are investigated by using model simulation. The simulation results show that the total thermal energy consumption can be increased by 24% for a typical AHU in San...

  6. Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal Energy- and Water-Saving Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Risk," in the context of measurement and verification (M&V), refers to the uncertainty that expected savings will be realized. Assumption of risk implies acceptance of the potential monetary consequences. Energy service companies (ESCOs) and agencies are each reluctant to assume responsibility for factors they cannot control, and holding certain parameters fixed in the M&V plan can match up responsibilities.

  7. Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yong B.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors related to operations of a well that impact drilling uncertainties in the shallow water region of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) can be directly linked to the site specific issues; such as water depth and local geological ...

  8. Managing political risk through increased local participation : innovations in water sector PSP from Tirupur, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael D. (Michael David)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using primary data from an innovative water project in Tirupur, India with findings from two well-documented water projects in Latin America, this thesis asks: How might greater equity participation and decision-making ...

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  10. Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RECHARD,ROBERT P.

    2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

  11. Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yong B.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . Earlier risk assessment tools and general engineering practice guidelines for the determination of the conductor casing design were based more on traditional practices rather than sound engineering practices. This study focuses on the rudimentary...

  12. Analysis of the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant: Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Volume 8, Seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, J.E.; Lappa, D.A.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Chuang, T.Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Johnson, J.J.; Campbell, R.D.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Tiong, L.W.; Ravindra, M.K.; Kincaid, R.H. [EQE, International, Irvine, CA (United States); Sues, R.H.; Putcha, C.S. [NTS Engineering, Long Beach, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used and the results obtained from the application of a simplified seismic risk methodology to the LaSalle County Nuclear Generating Station Unit 2. This study is part of the Level I analysis being performed by the Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Using the RMIEP developed event and fault trees, the analysis resulted in a seismically induced core damage frequency point estimate of 6.OE-7/yr. This result, combined with the component importance analysis, indicated that system failures were dominated by random events. The dominant components included diesel generator failures (failure to swing, failure to start, failure to run after started), and condensate storage tank.

  13. Occurrence of Low-Temperature Geothermal Waters in the United States, in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn,andOasys Water JumpOccoquan,

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With"...

  15. 9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 26-30 October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    director plans. Keywords Management; decision support systems; sustainable development; geopolitics; social9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 26-30 October 2009 Brazilian Regulatory Process: including groundwater in urban water

  16. Guidance on risk analysis and safety implications of a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Gerald William; Melof, Brian Matthew; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Irwin, Michael James; Kaneshige, Michael Jiro; Morrow, Charles W.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While recognized standards exist for the systematic safety analysis of potential spills or releases from LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) storage terminals and facilities on land, no equivalent set of standards or guidance exists for the evaluation of the safety or consequences from LNG spills over water. Heightened security awareness and energy surety issues have increased industry's and the public's attention to these activities. The report reviews several existing studies of LNG spills with respect to their assumptions, inputs, models, and experimental data. Based on this review and further analysis, the report provides guidance on the appropriateness of models, assumptions, and risk management to address public safety and property relative to a potential LNG spill over water.

  17. Critical risk points of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis processes in water recycling applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nghiem, Long D.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NF/RO membrane filtration processes have been recognized as an important technology to facilitate water recycling. Those processes are well-proven technologies, which can be used to remove a wide range of contaminants including trace contaminants...

  18. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Products such as paints, solvents, adhesives, oils, cleaners, batteries, pesticides and wood preservatives are commonly used in households and on farms, but they can be hazardous to ground water if handled improperly. This publication explains...

  19. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Household wastewater treatment systems (septic systems) can contaminate ground water unless they are properly designed, constructed and maintained. This publication describes various kinds of systems and guides the homeowner in assessing...

  20. Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasekh, Amin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    are investigated. Pressure-driven hydraulic analysis is performed to simulate the complicated system hydraulics under pressure-deficit conditions. Performance of a novel preventive response action ? injection of food-grade dye directly into drinking water...

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  2. Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of structural storm-water best management practices. Waterbest management practices (BMPs) for removing them. Storm-water

  3. Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    @BCL@A8059DC2.DOC (DO NOT DELETE) 8/17/2009 7:50 AM 428 COMPARATIVE WATER LAW AND MANAGEMENT: THE YELLOW RIVER BASIN IN WESTERN CHINA AND THE STATE OF KANSAS IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Burke W. Griggs Counsel, Division of Water Resources... Kansas Department of Agriculture John C. Peck Professor of Law, University of Kansas School of Law Special Counsel, Foulston Siefkin, LLP Xue Yunpeng Deputy Division Chief / Senior Engineer Department of Water Resources Management and Regulation Yellow...

  4. Application of the bioecological model and health belief model to self-reported health risk behaviors of adolescents in the united states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleary, Sasha A.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    incorporates these three sources of risk-taking, however it lacks explanatory power. For this reason, this thesis focused on explaining risk perception of health risk behaviors (smoking cigarette, alcohol and marijuana use), and health risk behaviors...

  5. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 3: Appendixes E and F -- Risk assessment information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  6. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 3. Risk assessment information. Appendixes E, F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 3 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  7. 8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-2008: Urban waters: resource or risks? 13-16 May 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Keywords water resources; contaminants; pollution; modeling; quality INTRODUCTION In the UK, groundwater or risks? 13-16 May 2008 Measuring groundwater parameters to improve modeling and regulation Alison H accurate groundwater flow models can be created. The results from standard techniques are compared to other

  8. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  9. EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

  10. Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Squillace, P. J. (2005). MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbonsP. J. (2004). The risk of MTBE relative to other VOCs inEPA to Settle Santa Monica MTBE Cleanup Costs, Press release

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

  15. Polymer treatments for D Sand water injection wells: Sooner D Sand Unit Weld County, Colorado. Final report, April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, T.J.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer-gel treatments in injection wells were evaluated for improving sweep efficiency in the D Sandstone reservoir at the Sooner Unit, Weld County, Colorado. Polymer treatments of injection wells at the Sooner Unit were expected to improve ultimate recovery by 1.0 percent of original-oil-in-place of 70,000 bbl of oil. The Sooner D Sand Unit was a demonstration project under the US Department of Energy Class I Oil Program from which extensive reservoir data and characterization were obtained. Thus, successful application of polymer-gel treatments at the Sooner Unit would be a good case-history example for other operators of waterfloods in Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs in the Denver Basin.

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Water...

  17. POST-REMEDIATION BIOMONITORING OF PESTICIDES AND OTHER CONTAMINANTS IN MARINE WATERS AND SEDIMENT NEAR THE UNITED HECKATHORN SUPERFUND SITE, RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, Liam D.; Kohn, Nancy P.

    2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in February 1999 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for Year 2 of post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Mussel tissues were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which were detected in sediment samples. Chlorinated pesticide concentrations in water samples were similar to preremediation levels and did not meet remediation goals. Biomonitoring results indicated that the bioavailability of chlorinated pesticides has been reduced from preremediation levels both in the dredged area and throughout Richmond Harbor. Total DDT and dieldrin concentrations in mussel tissues were lower than measured levels from preremediation surveys and also lower than Year 1 levels from post-remediation biomonitoring. Sediment analyses showed the presence of elevated DDT, dieldrin, PCB aroclor 1254, and very high levels of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in Lauritzen Channel.

  18. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

  19. From Emergency to Fix: Point-of-Use Water Filtration Technology in Colonias Along the United States-Mexico Border

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandewalle, Emily Lauren

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale decentralized facilities and technologies are rapidly becoming a dominant technological fix to deliver water to underserved populations in developing nations. This project examines the case of a university partnership with government...

  20. Correlation between water-vapor transport from the Gulf of Mexico and precipitation in the eastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, John Vinson

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    precipitation inland, are very much appreciated. There is little doubt that the Gulf has a great influence on the amount and character of precipit. tion that does occur in the eastern United States, i. e. , the area generally east of the Rocky Mountains... moisture flux. Cobb found that precipitation which is signif icantly greater than normal did not occur when the flux of moisture was unusually small, and that a large moisture flux does not result in abnormally high precipitation if it is associated...

  1. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , accumulating manure in a con- centrated area can be risky to the environment and to human and animal health unless done properly. Federal and state drinking water standards state that nitrate levels in drinking water should not exceed 10 milligrams per liter... (equivalent to parts per million for water mea- sure). Nitrate nitrogen levels higher than this can pose health problems for infants under 6 months of age, including the condition known as methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome). Nitrate also can affect adults...

  2. Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

  3. "Table HC4.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8 Water Heating

  4. Risk assessment of surface vs subsea blowout preventers (bops) on mobile offshore drilling units focusing on riser failure and the use of subsea shear rams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melendez, Jorge Luis

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -pressure system was accomplished through a detailed qualitative (assigned frequency) and quantitative (reported incidents) risk analysis using generic fault tree models to statistically determine the reliability of the system based on metocean conditions from...

  5. Risk assessment of surface vs subsea blowout preventers (bops) on mobile offshore drilling units focusing on riser failure and the use of subsea shear rams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melendez, Jorge Luis

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a slim, high-pressure drilling riser for surface blowout preventer operations in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico was assessed as an alternative to conventional drilling procedures from floating units. Comparison ...

  6. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Pesticide Storage and Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper pesticide management is important to preventing ground water contamination. This publication contains helpful information about pesticide storage facilities, mixing and loading practices, and spill cleanup. A chart lists pesticides according...

  7. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Fertilizer Storage and Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fertilizer is a major source of ground water contamination. This publication emphasizes the best management practices for storing fertilizers, whether you are building a new facility or modifying an existing one. It also includes information on safe...

  8. Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Hall

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MW) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MW) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

  9. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    -tight design, stalled according to according to accepted medium-textured soils coarse-textured above ground) accepted engineering engineering standards (silt loam, loam). soils (sands, sandy standards and specifi- and specifications. Not Water table deeper... loam). Water table cations. Properly maintained. than 20 feet. or fractured bed- maintained. rock shallower than 20 feet. Concrete (liquid- Designed and in- Designed and installed Concrete cracked, Concrete cracked, tight design) stalled according...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

  15. Economic and Financial Costs of Saving Water and Energy: Preliminary Analysis for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdivant, Allen W.; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of replacing aged mortar-joint pipe in pipeline units I-7A, I-18, and I-22 with new rubber-gasketed, reinforced concrete pipe. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified...

  16. The impact of sexual experiences of young minority group members in the United States, and the associated risks of sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission among adults in the United States and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ginny Elizabeth

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , and a comparative analysis of urine-based results versus self-reported responses among the Chinese adults. The use of logistic regression is employed in order to model the odds of the risk of transmission among the different groups. The results from... of the 1 Data are limited for two reasons. The first is that the bacterial infections are detectable in urine and we have access to the urine results for the Chinese sample population. Second, we have no access to any kind of results other than self...

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  18. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Holding Pen Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of yard surface 7) Manure storage and utilization 8) Abandoned livestock yards 9) Evaluation table A glossary in the back of this publication will clarify the terminology used. Separation Distance From Well Wells should be located in an elevated area..., so it remains relatively dry except during and immediately after rainfall. Manure typically accumulates on the surface, and decaying or decomposing manure is mixed into the soil by animal traffic, sealing the sur- face and reducing infiltration. Water...

  19. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Milking Center Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    be affected by manure, milk solids, ammonia, phosphorus, and detergents. Wastewater from the dairy milking center is made up of waste from the milking parlor (manure, feed solids, hoof dirt, bulk tank rinse water and detergent used in cleaning), and should... topics: 1. Combining wastes 2. Application methods 3. Slow surface infiltration Combining Wastes When milking center wastes are combined with manure a common disposal system can be used for both types of waste. A liquid manure storage facility, properly...

  20. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

  1. Response of the water balance to climate change in the United States over the 20th and 21st centuries: Results from the VEMAP Phase 2 model intercomparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, W. S; Famiglietti, J. S

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution: The role of the water balance, Am. Nat. , 135,NPP): The importance of water avail- ability, Global Change1982a), Ecological optimality in water-limited natural soil-

  2. ?Framework for a Risk-Informed Groundwater Compliance Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sam Marutzky

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This document was prepared before the NTS was renamed the Nevada National Security Site (August 23, 2010); thus, all references to the site herein remain NTS. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98, Frenchman Flat, at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was the location of ten underground nuclear tests between 1965 and 1971. As a result, radionuclides were released in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Corrective Action Unit 98 and other CAUs at the NTS and offsite locations are being investigated. The Frenchman Flat CAU is one of five Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs at the NTS that are being evaluated as potential sources of local or regional impact to groundwater resources. For UGTA sites, including Frenchman Flat, contamination in and around the test cavities will not be remediated because it is technologically infeasible due to the depth of the test cavities (150 to 2,000 feet [ft] below ground surface) and the volume of contaminated groundwater at widely dispersed locations on the NTS. Instead, the compliance strategy for these sites is to model contaminant flow and transport, estimate the maximum spatial extent and volume of contaminated groundwater (over a period of 1,000 years), maintain institutional controls, and restrict access to potentially contaminated groundwater at areas where contaminants could migrate beyond the NTS boundaries.

  3. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United...

  4. Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development Mitchell J. Small,*, Paul C, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada 89512, United States 1. INTRODUCTION The recent U.S. shale gas Issue: Understanding the Risks of Unconventional Shale Gas Development Published: July 1, 2014 A broad

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  6. Earthquake risk reduction in the United States: An assessment of selected user needs and recommendations for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Assessment was conducted to improve the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) by providing NEHRP agencies with information that supports their user-oriented setting of crosscutting priorities in the NEHRP strategic planning process. The primary objective of this Assessment was to take a ``snapshot`` evaluation of the needs of selected users throughout the major program elements of NEHRP. Secondary objectives were to conduct an assessment of the knowledge that exists (or is being developed by NEHRP) to support earthquake risk reduction, and to begin a process of evaluating how NEHRP is meeting user needs. An identification of NEHRP`s strengths also resulted from the effort, since those strengths demonstrate successful methods that may be useful to NEHRP in the future. These strengths are identified in the text, and many of them represent important achievements since the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act was passed in 1977.

  7. Year 4 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides and Other Contaminants in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Kropp, Roy

    2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is fourth in a series of annual reports describing the results of biomonitoring following remediation of the United Heckathorn Superfund Site.

  8. Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) for the Rework Unit (RW), Du Pont Water (DW) Plant, Moderator Processing Facility (MPF), and Technical Purification Facility (TPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horne, R.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Heavy Water portion of D Area (or 400 Area) at SRS is to purify the site inventory of heavy water for storage in the Reactor Areas for future DOE missions.

  9. PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, R.B.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

  10. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risk during mid-loop operations. Main report. Volume 6. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, J.; Lin, C.C.; Neymotin, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1 which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis including internal fire and flood was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The results of the phase 2 level 2/3 study are the subject of this volume of NUREG/CR-6144, Volume 6.

  11. 8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-2008: Urban waters: resource or risks? 13-16 May 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    consequence of water lack is unhealthy. Water-borne diseases caused by pathogen agents appear in this city so endemic. Keywords lack, pathogens, quality, water borne disease, water supply, well INTRODUCTION8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-2008: Urban waters: resource

  12. Estimating radiogenic cancer risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

  13. UNIT NUMBER:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

  14. 8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-2008: Urban waters: resource or risks? 13-16 May 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    support systems; sustainable development; developing countries. INTRODUCTION Urban water provision poses prevention, complicate the urban water system's environment. In this context, facing the challenges8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-2008: Urban waters: resource

  15. 9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 26-30 October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Selected significant findings to be discussed include water consumption per capita distribution user; and the conflicts related with the water supply and sewage systems; Water consumption per capita. However, most of the time, the mean or average value of water consumption per c

  16. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States...

  17. adolescents perceived risk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Versus Actual Water Scarcity Risks in Phoenix, Arizona Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: is a key concern among risk perception scholars and...

  18. Efficiency United (Gas)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Efficiency United program is intended to provide assistance and incentives to customers who employ energy efficient measures. Programs offer rebates on natural gas water heaters, clothes...

  19. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  20. The challenges of a water system management handover in eastern Ethiopia : from the United Nations Refugee Agency to a local community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Christophe (Christopher J.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the height of a political crisis in the late 1980s, hundreds of thousands of Somali refugees crossed into eastern Ethiopia. A humanitarian crisis soon unfolded as water was in short supply in the arid region. In ...

  1. UNIT NUMBER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Diesel Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately southeast of C-611 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 1000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL...

  2. Retrieval of Cloud Ice Water Content Profiles from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B Brightness Temperatures Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, E-K.; Liu, G.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program important goals is to develop and test radiation and cloud parameterizations of climate models using single column modeling (SCMs) (Randall et al. 1996). As forcing terms, SCMs need advection tendency of cloud condensates besides the tendencies of temperature, moisture and momentum. To compute the tendency terms of cloud condensates, 3D distribution of cloud condensates over a scale much larger than the climate model's grid scale is needed. Since they can cover a large area within a short time period, satellite measurements are useful utilities to provide advection tendency of cloud condensates for SCMs. However, so far, most satellite retrieval algorithms only retrieve vertically integrated quantities, for example, in the case of cloud ice, ice water path (IWP). To fulfill the requirement of 3D ice water content field for computing ice water advection, in this study, we develop an ice water content profile retrieval algorithm by combining the vertical distribution characteristics obtained from long-term surface radar observations and satellite high-frequency microwave observations that cover a large area. The algorithm is based on the Bayesian theorem using a priori database derived from analyzing cloud radar observations at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The end product of the algorithm is a 3D ice water content covering 10{sup o} x 10{sup o} surrounding the SGP site during the passage of the satellite. This 3D ice water content, together with wind field analysis, can be used to compute the advection tendency of ice water for SCMs.

  3. 8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES 2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 2-5 June 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that cross the urban-rural divide. Also, an easy-to use model can support decision making at the local urban water planning and policy level. This paper describes ongoing research on the urban water system8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES 2009: Urban waters: resource

  4. Measure Guideline: Transitioning to a Tankless Water Heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brozyna, K.; Rapport, A.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Measure Guideline provides information to help residential builders and retrofitters with the design, specification, selection, implementation, installation, and maintenance issues of transitioning from tank-type water heaters to tankless water heaters. The report compares the differences between tankless and tank-type water heaters, highlighting the energy savings that can be realized by adopting tankless water heaters over tank-type water heaters. Selection criteria and risks discussed include unit sizing and location, water distribution system, plumbing line length and diameter, water quality, electrical backup, and code issues. Cost and performance data are provided for various types of tankless and tank-type water heaters, both natural gas fired and electric. Also considered are interactions between the tankless water heater and other functional elements of a house, such as cold water supply and low-flow devices. Operating costs and energy use of water distribution systems for single- and two-story houses are provided, along with discussion of the various types of distribution systems that can be used with tankless water heaters. Finally, details to prepare for proper installation of a tankless water heater are described.

  5. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

  6. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M W of geothermal, and 3 M W of landfill gas. The wind powerwind, geothermal, and landfill gas generators, provide theRISK: SUMMARY advance. Landfill gas and geothermal resources

  7. UNIT NUMBER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 C-750B Diesel UST UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-750 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 10,000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL STATUS: Removed...

  8. Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

  9. Eielson Air Force Base OU-1 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, M.T.; Jarvis, T.T.; Van Houten, N.C.; Lewis, R.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment report is the second volume in a set of three volumes for operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The companion documents contain the Remedial Investigation and the Feasibility Study. Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) is one of several groups of hazardous waste sites located at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, Alaska. The operable units at Eielson are typically characterized by petroleum, oil, lubricant/solvent contamination, and by the presence of organics floating at the water table. In 1989 and 1990, firms under contract to the Air Force conducted field studies to gather information about the extent of chemical contamination in soil, groundwater, and soil air pore space (soil gas) at the site. This report documents the results of a baseline risk assessment, which uses the 1989 and 1991 site characterization database to quantify the potential human health risk associated with past Base industrial activities in the vicinity of OU-1. Background data collected in 1992 were also used in the preparation of this report.

  10. UNIT NUMBER:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 feet wide by 30 feet long FUNCTION: Provide cooling water for computer systems and HVAC systems various plant buildings. OPERATIONAL STATUS: Active DATES OPERATED: 1953 to...

  11. Adapting California's water management to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    and ecosystems, to reducing flood risks, to generating hydropower. Although state and federal agencies have roles, with important implications for water demand, water quality management, and flood risk. Over 150 hydropower

  12. 9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 26-30 October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . INTRODUCTION Problem The landfilling is an attractive method for the municipal solid waste management due9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters problems of the urban water management in developing countries C. Madera* and Viviana Valencia

  13. U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program Funding in the United States: Conventional Hydropower Projects, FY 2008 Â… FY 2010

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 -Helicopter Accident at RatonU.S.Adoption ofWind and Water Power

  14. 8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES 2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 2-5 June 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    like India. Leachate generated from these landfills contains variety of contaminants, which even or risks? 2-5 June 2009 Toxicity Analysis and Public Health Aspects of Municipal Landfill Leachate: A Case Study of Okhla Landfill, Delhi V. Singh* and A. K. Mittal* * Department of Civil Engineering, Indian

  15. 8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-2008: Urban waters: resource or risks? 13-16 May 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    or risks? 13-16 May 2008 Urban wastewater reuse for irrigated agriculture in Jordan: Soil sustainability that suitable soil management strategies, such as periodic leaching and nutrient management are required on soil sustainability was investigated by means of soil sampling and analysis combined with interviews

  16. A Framework for Analysis of the Uncertainty of Socioeconomic Growth and Climate Change on the Risk of Water Stress: a Case Study in Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.

    The sustainability of future water resources is of paramount importance and is affected by many factors, including population, wealth and climate. Inherent in how these factors change in the future is the uncertainty of ...

  17. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

  18. Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

  19. Health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additives-methyl tertiary butyl ether [MTBE]. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Special Hearing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This hearing focuses on an Alaskan study by the Centers for Disease Control which examines possible health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additive know as MTBE. Testimony is given by Dr. William Roper, Director, CDC.

  20. Risk assessment of hurricane storm surge for New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, N,

    Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States. We apply a model-based risk assessment methodology to investigate hurricane storm surge risk for New York City (NYC). We couple a statistical/deterministic ...

  1. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters.

  2. 9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 26-30 October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    supply, sanitation and waste management facilities. Urban context of the Mingoa River watershed9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters on the Municipal Lake of Yaoundé, Cameroon Marielle Naah* *Laboratoire Eau Environnement et Systčmes Urbains (LEESU

  3. 8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES 2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 2-5 June 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to salt under intensive use context Nizar Omrani* *Institute of Arid Regions Medenine (IRA), Tunisia management. These oases observed a lightening development. The improvement in drilling techniques reinforced in the oases, drillings had been multiplied and spread across the oases. The development of the water

  4. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

  5. Optimization of Cooling Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems....

  6. The Evolution of Medical Spending Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruber, Jonathan

    How has the economic risk of health spending changed over time for U.S. households? We describe trends in aggregate health spending in the United States and how private insurance markets and public insurance programs have ...

  7. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  8. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  9. Risk Assessment Risk communication 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    · 1 1997 2003 WHO #12;6060 NTU Alumni Bimonthly No.87 Fault tree Event tree [2] Nuclear reactor of nuclear power plants. Reliability Engineering and Safety System, 52:297-314. [4] Jonas Hagmann. 2012. Fukushima: probing the analytical and epistemological limits of risk analysis. Journal of Risk Research. 15

  10. Incorporating Equipment Condition Assessment in Risk Monitors for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can complement the current fleet of large light-water reactors in the USA for baseload and peak demand power production and process heat applications (e.g., water desalination, shale oil extraction, hydrogen production). The day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance (O&M); however, the effect of diverse operating missions and unit modularity on O&M is not fully understood. These costs could potentially be reduced by optimized scheduling, with risk-informed scheduling of maintenance, repair, and replacement of equipment. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a “living” probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant and combine event probabilities with population-based probability of failure (POF) for key components. “Risk monitors” extend the PRA by incorporating the actual and dynamic plant configuration (equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions, etc.) into risk assessment. In fact, PRAs are more integrated into plant management in today’s nuclear power plants than at any other time in the history of nuclear power. However, population-based POF curves are still used to populate fault trees; this approach neglects the time-varying condition of equipment that is relied on during standard and non-standard configurations. Equipment condition monitoring techniques can be used to estimate the component POF. Incorporating this unit-specific estimate of POF in the risk monitor can provide a more accurate estimate of risk in different operating and maintenance configurations. This enhanced risk assessment will be especially important for aSMRs that have advanced component designs, which don’t have an available operating history to draw from, and often use passive design features, which present challenges to PRA. This paper presents the requirements and technical gaps for developing a framework to integrate unit-specific estimates of POF into risk monitors, resulting in enhanced risk monitors that support optimized operation and maintenance of aSMRs.

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings...

  14. Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance Shmuel Oren University of the critical infrastructures in our society. Risk assessment and systematic consideration of risk in the design knowledge for engineers, like physics for instance, consideration of risk has penetrated all engineering

  15. Reducing the Risks. In the aftermath of a terrorist attack, wastewater utilities may have to contend with decontamination water containing chemical, biological, or radiological substances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Linda P.; Hornback, Chris; Strom, Daniel J.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the aftermath of a chemical, biological, or radiological (CBR) attack, decontamination of people and infrastructure will be needed. Decontamination inevitably produces wastewater, and wastewater treatment plants (WTPs) need to know how to handle decontamination wastewater. This article describes CBR substances; planning, coordinating, and communicating responses across agencies; planning within a utility; coordination with local emergency managers and first responders; mitigating effects of decontamination wastewater; and mitigating effects on utility personnel. Planning for Decontamination Wastewater: A Guide for Utilities, the document on which this article is based, was developed under a cooperative agreement from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) and its contractor, CH2MHILL, Inc.

  16. Termination unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  17. Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern? G. Allen Burton Jr; Fracking; Water-quality stressor; Ecological risk assessment Introduction The world's energy marketplace

  18. LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

  19. United States Department of Correlation and Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    United States Department of Correlation and Prediction Agriculture Forest Service of Snow Water L. Azuma #12;McGurk, Bruce J.; Azuma, David L. 1992. Correlation and prediction of snow water" and, by implication, prediction of wilderness snow data by nonwilderness sensors that are typically

  20. Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenner, R. A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Climate Change on Water, Biodiversity and Livelihoods”Dallas 5. The United Nations World Water Development Report3 (2009) “Water in a Changing World” Unesco Publishing (

  1. The UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Office of Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Office of Risk Management 112 Conference Center Building Knoxville, TN to the Office of Risk Management. NOTE: Please share this information within your department/unit with those with University and State requirements. It is imperative that the Office of Risk Management be notified

  2. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  3. Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    influence water quality and restoration potential? How does stream channelization influence water quality of the United States. Human activities have altered stream hydrology that affects water quality. Stream-2010 Iowa Water Center research program is on stream dynamics affecting water quality. We are interested

  4. arboviruses risk assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procedure 448 A 576-YEAR WEBER RIVER STREAMFLOW RECONSTRUCTION FROM TREE RINGS FOR WATER RESOURCE RISK ASSESSMENT IN THE WASATCH FRONT, UTAH1 Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

  5. accident risk assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procedure 499 A 576-YEAR WEBER RIVER STREAMFLOW RECONSTRUCTION FROM TREE RINGS FOR WATER RESOURCE RISK ASSESSMENT IN THE WASATCH FRONT, UTAH1 Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

  6. assessment risk assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procedure 447 A 576-YEAR WEBER RIVER STREAMFLOW RECONSTRUCTION FROM TREE RINGS FOR WATER RESOURCE RISK ASSESSMENT IN THE WASATCH FRONT, UTAH1 Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

  7. Flood Risk Management Every year floods sweep through communities across the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management #12;Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States risk management activities of communities in both urban and rural areas throughout the United States management activities. At the direction of Congress, the Corps studies and implements flood risk management

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With"...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in...

  11. Insuring Long-Term Care in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Amy

    Long-term care expenditures constitute one of the largest uninsured financial risks facing the elderly in the United States and thus play a central role in determining the retirement security of elderly Americans. In this ...

  12. Water Network Design by MINLP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 13, 2008 ... ... on the internet at http://domino.watson.ibm.com/library/CyberDig.nsf/home . .... The hydraulic head is the total energy per unit of weight of the water, and it is ..... used to model the hydraulic and water quality behavior of water ...

  13. 2004 Environmental risk assessment report for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................................12 6.1 Water 12 6.2 Waste 14 6.3 Other impact areas 16 6.4 Buildings ­ Phenomics 17 7 - Current..................... 7 Figure 5.2 ­ Per cent residual environmental risk at the Australian National University ... 7 ..................................................... 8 Figure 5.4 - Per cent residual environmental risk by impact area

  14. Physiological and genetic control of water stress tolerance in zoysiagrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewey, Daniel Wade

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and outdoor conservation measures. The United States uses 340 billion gallons per day of fresh water with 80 percent of the water consumed in the United States being used for agricultural purposes (Schaible, 2004; United States Geological Survey, 1995a..., and Texas are also giving rebates for, or encouraging, the replacement of turfgrass with more water efficient species (Arizona Department of Water Resources, 2004; City of Albuquerque, 2004; City of Austin, 2004; El Paso Water Utilities, 2004; San Diego...

  15. Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

  16. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  17. Risk Without Return

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Lisa R.; Mahmoud, Ola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mitra, I. (2010). Extreme risk analysis. The Journal offrom the fact that the risk parity strategy was diversifiedboth in capital and in risk weights. Further research into

  18. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Is Quantitative Risk Assessment?" Risk Analysis, Aubrey,quantitative methods of how people do science, engineering and risk analysisthe Quantitative Definition of Risk." Risk Analysis, 1(1),

  19. International Water Resources Association Water International, Volume 28, Number 2, Pages 209216, June 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    ­216, June 2003 209 Facing Water Scarcity in Jordan Reuse, Demand Reduction, Energy, and Transboundary, United States Agency for International Development, Cairo, Egypt, and Amal Hijazi, United States Agency, demand management, energy-water linkages, and transboundary water management. While progress in Jordan

  20. You Are At Risk! Water supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    days lead to wildfires, you cannot expect fire engines to park in front of your home to protect your subdivision and destroy your home and your neighborhood. To protect your home, your family and your are trying to drive into your area, you must be able to escape in your car with your family and valuable

  1. Baseline Risk Assessment for the Ground Water Operable Unit (GWOU) at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri, DOE/OR/21548-568

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it !D;rC.

  2. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ...........26 List of Figures Figure 1: The Risk Management Process.......................................................................................................12 #12; 1 Overview The risk management process--of identifying, analyzing, evaluating

  3. Credit Risk Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Credit Risk Analyst in the Transacting and Credit Risk Management department of the Office of Risk Management. The Transacting and Credit Risk...

  4. Incentive Games and Mechanisms for Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpcan, Tansu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incentives play an important role in (security and IT) risk management of a large-scale organization with multiple autonomous divisions. This paper presents an incentive mechanism design framework for risk management based on a game-theoretic approach. The risk manager acts as a mechanism designer providing rules and incentive factors such as assistance or subsidies to divisions or units, which are modeled as selfish players of a strategic (noncooperative) game. Based on this model, incentive mechanisms with various objectives are developed that satisfy efficiency, preference-compatibility, and strategy-proofness criteria. In addition, iterative and distributed algorithms are presented, which can be implemented under information limitations such as the risk manager not knowing the individual units' preferences. An example scenario illustrates the framework and results numerically. The incentive mechanism design approach presented is useful for not only deriving guidelines but also developing computer-assistan...

  5. Risk analysis of highly combustible gas storage, supply, and distribution systems in PWR plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simion, G.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); VanHorn, R.L.; Smith, C.L.; Bickel, J.H.; Sattison, M.B. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bulmahn, K.D. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the evaluation of the potential safety concerns for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) identified in Generic Safety Issue 106, Piping and the Use of Highly Combustible Gases in Vital Areas. A Westinghouse four-loop PWR plant was analyzed for the risk due to the use of combustible gases (predominantly hydrogen) within the plant. The analysis evaluated an actual hydrogen distribution configuration and conducted several sensitivity studies to determine the potential variability among PWRs. The sensitivity studies were based on hydrogen and safety-related equipment configurations observed at other PWRs within the United States. Several options for improving the hydrogen distribution system design were identified and evaluated for their effect on risk and core damage frequency. A cost/benefit analysis was performed to determine whether alternatives considered were justifiable based on the safety improvement and economics of each possible improvement.

  6. Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Natural Resources Commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in...

  7. Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service (Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management) riskmanagement@uoregon.edu Fax: 541-346-7008 As a volunteer Tort Claims Act, ORS 30.260-300, and Oregon Department of Administrative Services Risk Management

  8. CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK? It is often hard to explain why one person develops cancer and another does not. There are risk factors that could increase a person's likelihood of developing cancer, however, some people may have many of these risk factors and never get cancer. When thinking about your

  9. Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K. (Environmental Science Division); (Sandia National Laboratory); (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power from the market, albeit at higher prices. However, sufficient excess generation and transmission must be available for this strategy to work. Although power purchase was the most commonly discussed drought mitigation strategy, a total of 12 response strategies were identified in the literature, falling into four main categories: electricity supply, electricity demand response, alternative water supplies, and water demand response. Three hydrological drought scenarios were developed based on a literature review and historical data analysis. The literature review helped to identify key drought parameters and data on drought frequency and severity. Historical hydrological drought data were analyzed for the western United States to identify potential drought correlations and estimate drought parameters. The first scenario was a West-wide drought occurring in 1977; it represented a severe drought in five of the eight basins in the study area. A second drought scenario was artificially defined by selecting the conditions from the 10th-percentile drought year for each individual basin; this drought was defined in this way to allow more consistent analysis of risk to electricity generation in each basin. The final scenario was based upon the current low-flow hydro modeling scenario defined by WECC, which uses conditions from the year 2001. These scenarios were then used to quantify the risk to electricity generation in each basin. The risk calculations represent a first-order estimate of the maximum amount of electricity generation that might be lost from both hydroelectric and thermoelectric sources under a worst-case scenario. Even with the conservative methodology used, the majority of basins showed a limited amount of risk under most scenarios. The level of risk in these basins is likely to be amenable to mitigation by known strategies, combined with existing reserve generation and transmission capacity. However, the risks to the Pacific Northwest and Texas Basins require further study. The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable because of its heavy reliance on hydroelectri

  10. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 3. Appendix E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains Appendix E: Toxicity Information and Uncertainty Analysis, description of methods, from the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  11. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  12. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Anaconda Company Smelter (ARWW and S) Operable Unit, Anaconda, MT, September 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with the concurrence of the State of Montana Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), presents this Record of Decision (ROD) for the Anaconda Regional Water, Waste, and Soils (ARWW and S) Operable Unit (OU) of the Anaconda Smelter National Priorities List (NPL) Site. The ROD is based on the Administrative Record for the ARWW and S OU, including three Remedial Investigations (RIs) and five Feasibility Study (FS) Deliverables, human health and ecological risk assessments, the Proposed Plan, the public comments received, including those from the potentially responsible party (PRP), and EPA responses. The ROD presents a brief summary of the RIs and FS Deliverables, actual and potential risks to human health and the environment, and the Selected Remedy. EPA followed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and appropriate guidance in preparation of the ROD.

  13. EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

  14. Results of toxicity tests and chemical analyses conducted on sediments collected from the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit, July 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide unit specific toxicity data that will be used to address critical uncertainty in the ecological risk assessment (ERA) for the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit (TNXOD OU), sediments were collected from eight locations in the Inner Swamp portion of the operable unit and two unit specific background locations. These samples were analyzed for total mercury, total uranium, and sediment toxicity.

  15. Nationwide water availability data for energy-water modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Zemlick, Katie M.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this effort is to explore where the availability of water could be a limiting factor in the siting of new electric power generation. To support this analysis, water availability is mapped at the county level for the conterminous United States (3109 counties). Five water sources are individually considered, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water (western U.S. only), municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped is projected growth in non-thermoelectric consumptive water demand to 2035. Finally, the water availability metrics are accompanied by estimated costs associated with utilizing that particular supply of water. Ultimately these data sets are being developed for use in the National Renewable Energy Laboratories' (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, designed to investigate the likely deployment of new energy installations in the U.S., subject to a number of constraints, particularly water.

  16. Risk Management Strategy Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Risk Management Strategy Introduction 1. The risk of adverse consequences is inherent in all activity. Dynamic enterprise will inevitably create new risks. Risk management is about ensuring that all significant relevant risks are understood and prioritised as part of normal management

  17. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  18. dddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    , and is on the verge of a major water shortage. As vineyards consume more rural acre- age, competition for water irrigation. However, California uses the largest volume of water of any state in the nation resources is increasing, which has increased the pres- sure on California vintners to use water more

  19. Economic and Financial Costs of Saving Water and Energy: Preliminary Analysis for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdivant, Allen W.; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    to the project’s construction cost when evaluating the cost of saving water. The historic average diversion-energy usage level of 201,384 BTU {59.02 kwh} per ac-ft of water diverted (by the District) for calendar years 2002-2006 is used to estimate energy... or longer period is possible, but 49 years is considered reasonable and consistent with engineering expectations (Michalewicz). Sensitivity analyses are utilized to examine the effects of this assumption. Initial Construction Costs: Total initial...

  20. Controlling O&M Costs of Advanced SMRs using Prognostics and Enhanced Risk Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Wood, Richard T.

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs) can contribute to safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy production. The economics of small reactors (including AdvSMRs) will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional light water reactors. The most significant controllable element of the day-to-day costs involves operations and maintenance (O&M). Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs through technologies that help control O&M costs will be critical to ensuring their practicality for wider deployment.A significant component of O&M costs is the management and mitigation of degradation of components due to their impact on planning maintenance activities and staffing levels. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk of failure of key components are important in this context. Given the possibility of frequently changing AdvSMR plant configurations, approaches are needed to integrate three elements – advanced plant configuration information, equipment condition information, and risk monitors – to provide a measure of risk that is customized for each AdvSMR unit and support real-time decisions on O&M. This article describes an overview of ongoing research into diagnostics/prognostics and enhanced predictive risk monitors (ERM) for this purpose.

  1. Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation The risk of a major nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation The risk of a major nuclear accident: calculation #12;1/37 The risk of a major nuclear accident: calculation and perception of probabilities François in the United States, reached this level of severity. The explosion of reactor 4 at the Chernobyl plant

  2. Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Following the U.S . Supreme Court's Decision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Following the U.S . Supreme Court's Decision in Rapanos v. United the jurisdiction over waters of the United States under the Clean Water Act. 3 The chart below summarizes the key will assert jurisdiction over the following waters: " Traditional navigable waters " Wetlands adjacent

  3. Hardness of water.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Oza

    This project is helpful to those people who live in the coastal based and they are suffering every year with problem of safe drinking water and not available throughout the year. It has given ideas, technology and economical way of solution for water crisis and it’s also solving problem of scare by use of different methods to development evelopment new water source in water scare area of Saurashtra and Kutch in Gujarat. Saurashtra land is containing of different types of minerals specially bauxite, calcite, fluoride so many mineral based industries are developed here and those who continuous nuous need this as raw materials and they used many mines and processes units. These minerals are creating problem to polluted ground water some are melting and increasing TDS more than 6000 mg/l and

  4. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  5. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3 Through April

  6. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  7. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  8. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the East Bear Creek Unit, San Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addendum to East Bear Creek Design Data Report, Centraltest wells in East Bear Creek Unit ……………. 41 Appendix B :C : East Bear Creek Refuge Water Supply ……………………………………. 64

  9. Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Earle, L.; Booten, C.; Hancock, C. E.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the Mascot home, an abandoned property that was extensively renovated. Several efficiency upgrades were integrated into this home, of particular interest, a unique water heater (a Navien CR240-A). Field monitoring was performed to determine the in-use efficiency of the hybrid condensing water heater. The results were compared to the unit's rated efficiency. This unit is Energy Star qualified and one of the most efficient gas water heaters currently available on the market.

  10. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil: 2005 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friday, G. P.

    2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal components of the environmental remediation program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the assessment of ecological risk. Used to support CERCLA, RCRA, and DOE orders, the ecological risk assessment (ERA) can identify environmental hazards and evaluate remedial action alternatives. Ecological risk assessment is also an essential means for achieving DOE's risk based end state vision for the disposition of nuclear material and waste hazards, the decommissioning of facilities, and the remediation of inactive waste units at SRS. The complexity of an ERA ranges from a screening level ERA (SLERA) to a full baseline ERA. A screening level ecological risk assessments, although abbreviated from a baseline risk assessment, is nonetheless considered a complete risk assessment (EPA, 2001a). One of the initial tasks of any ERA is to identify constituents that potentially or adversely affect the environment. Typically, this is accomplished by comparing a constituent's maximum concentration in surface water, sediment, or soil with an ecological screening value (ESV). The screening process can eliminate many constituents from further consideration in the risk assessment, but it also identifies those that require additional evaluation. This document is an update of a previous compilation (Friday, 1998) and provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil. It describes how the screening values were derived and recommends benchmarks that can be used for ecological risk assessment. The sources of these updated benchmarks include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the State of Florida, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (RIVM), and the scientific literature. It should be noted that ESV's are continuously revised by the various issuing agencies. The references in this report provide the citations of each source and, where applicable, the internet address where they can be accessed. Although radiological screening values are not included herein due to space limitations, these have been recently derived by a technical working committee sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE 2002, 2004). The recommended ecological screening values represent the most conservative concentrations of the cited sources, and are to be used for screening purposes only. They do not represent remedial action cleanup levels. Their use at locations other than SRS should take into account environmental variables such as water quality, soil chemistry, flora and fauna, and other ecological attributes specific to the ecosystem potentially at risk.

  11. Advanced Rooftop Unit Control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced-Rooftop-Unit-Control Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

  19. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., Ashland, OR 97520 and Gwyneth Myer, Consultant, 220 W. Rapp Rd. Unit 3, Talent, OR 97540. #12;2 THE FIRE

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

  4. Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability April 10th /09 2 Outline 1. Project goal and motivation Commercial unit fuel cell 5. Conclusions #12;Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability April 10th /09 3 for Municipal Water Providers #12;Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability April 10th /09 4 Water

  5. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The  United  States'  Biofuel  Policies   and  Compliance  Water  Impacts  of  Biofuel  Extend  Beyond   Irrigation."  for  assessing  sustainable  biofuel  production."  

  6. Essays on econometric modeling of subjective perceptions of risks in environment and human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, To Ngoc

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the estimator asymptotically unbiased and efficient. The third essay addresses the problem of modeling perceived mortality risks from arsenic concentrations in drinking water. I estimated a formal model that allows for ambiguity about risk. The empirical...

  7. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  8. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1972 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 66 Prepared by STATISTICS;ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The data in this edition of "Fishery Statistics of the United States" were collected in co- operation with the various States and tabulated by the staff of the Statistics and Market News Division

  9. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

  10. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Gregory G.

    Assessment Thomas M. Quigley, Editor U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research, and Andy Wilson. Thomas M. Quigley Editor United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service United Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 120 p. (Quigley, Thomas M., ed.; Interior Columbia Basin

  11. United States Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    Protect Your Family From Lead in Your Home United States Environmental Protection Agency United · What you can do to protect your family · Where to go for more information Before renting or buying Family from Lead Hazards If you think your home has lead-based paint: · Don't try to remove lead

  12. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DOMESTIC HOT WATER (DHW)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage water heaters (rated input of greater than 75,000 Btu/hr), list Recovery Efficiency (RE), Thermal; and Pipe insulation for steam hydronic heating systems or hot water systems >15 psi, meets the requirements with Multiple Dwelling Units (required for prescriptive) TO COMPLY - ALL BOXES MUST BE CHECKED All hot water

  13. Quaternary Ammonium Compounds as Water Channel Blockers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Groot, Bert

    /AQP2/AQP4, whereas the water permeability of AQP3 and AQP5, which lack a corresponding TyrQuaternary Ammonium Compounds as Water Channel Blockers SPECIFICITY, POTENCY, AND SITE OF ACTION, West Mains Road, EH9 3JJ Scotland, United Kingdom Excessive water uptake through Aquaporins (AQP) can

  14. Risk assessment as a framework for decisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, Robert Paul; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Borns, David James

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risk assessment approach has been applied to support numerous radioactive waste management activities over the last 30 years. A risk assessment methodology provides a solid and readily adaptable framework for evaluating the risks of CO2 sequestration in geologic formations to prioritize research, data collection, and monitoring schemes. This paper reviews the tasks of a risk assessment, and provides a few examples related to each task. This paper then describes an application of sensitivity analysis to identify important parameters to reduce the uncertainty in the performance of a geologic repository for radioactive waste repository, which because of importance of the geologic barrier, is similar to CO2 sequestration. The paper ends with a simple stochastic analysis of idealized CO2 sequestration site with a leaking abandoned well and a set of monitoring wells in an aquifer above the CO2 sequestration unit in order to evaluate the efficacy of monitoring wells to detect adverse leakage.

  15. anechoic water tank: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    164 University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension EC 98-771-S Nebraskas System for Assessing Water Contamination Risk FACT SHEET 8 Improving Household Wastewater Treatment...

  16. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  17. Invited paper in: Risk-Based Decision Making in Water Resources. (Ed. Y.Y. Haimes and D.A. Moser), American Society of Civil Engineers and presented at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    , California. November 2002. GIS Model for Estimating Dam Failure Life Loss Maged Aboelata, Student Member ASCE of life from natural and dam-failure floods. The model can be used to provide life-loss estimates for use in dam safety risk assessments, including dam failure caused by terrorism. It can be used to explore

  18. Risk assessment of hurricane storm surge for New York City K. A. Emanuel,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    Risk assessment of hurricane storm surge for New York City N. Lin,1 K. A. Emanuel,2 J. A. Smith,1 September 2010. [1] Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States. We apply a modelbased risk assessment methodology to investigate hurricane storm surge risk for New York City (NYC). We

  19. Hypertension . Author manuscript Validating the Framingham Hypertension Risk Score: results from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hypertension . Author manuscript Page /1 9 Validating the Framingham Hypertension Risk Score A promising hypertension risk prediction score using data from the United States Framingham Offspring study performance of the Framingham hypertension risk score in a European population, the Whitehall II study

  20. CONVERT 15 WELLS TO BORS PUMPING UNITS AND TEST/COMPARE TO CONVENTIONAL UNITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter B. North

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of fluid lifting equipment called Balanced Oil Recovery System (trade named BORS Lift{trademark}) was installed on several idle oil wells to demonstrate the operating efficiency of this innovative equipment technology. The BORS Lift system is designed to bring oil to the surface without the accompanying formation water. The BORS Lift system uses an innovative strap mechanism that takes oil from the top of the downhole oilwater column and lifts it to the surface, eliminating production of the formation water. Eliminating salt water production could potentially increase oil production, reduce operational costs, benefit the environment, and cut salt water disposal costs. Although the BORS Lift units did not function as intended, lessons learned during the course of the field demonstration project resulted in improvements in the technology and redesign of subsequent generation BORS Lift units which are reported to have significantly improved their performance characteristics. BORS Lift units were installed on 15 temporarily abandoned wells which had been shut down due to low oil production, high water production, and uneconomic operating conditions. The wells had been producing with artificial lift at a high watercut from a shallow (850-900 feet), pressure depleted oil sand reservoir prior to being shut down. The electrical motor driven BORS Lift units provided a possible approach for economically returning the shallow, low-volume oil wells to production. The BORS Lift units used in this field demonstration were designed to recover up to roughly 22 barrels of fluid per day from depths ranging to 1,700 feet, ideal for many marginal stripper well operations. The BORS units were first-production-model test units, operated under oil field conditions for the first time, and were naturally expected to experience some design problems. From the onset, the operator experienced mechanical, design, and operational problems with the BORS Lift units and was unable to maintain un-interrupted production operations. The inventor provided considerable on-site technical support in an ongoing effort to correct the problems with the units and the inventor worked extensively with the operator to make design and manufacturing changes to the units to try to improve their reliability and performance. The operational problems were mostly related to the durability of the various components under oil field operating conditions such as inadequate mechanical, electrical, and electronic design for rough service, extended operation, and severe weather conditions. During the course of the demonstration project, it further appeared that the producing formation lacked sufficient reservoir energy and/or favorable oil properties to mobilize and displace oil from the formation into the well bore in order to recharge the oil column in the well. The BORS Lift units were then moved to a second lease which appeared to have more favorable WTI quality oil properties. Eight of these units were reported to have been installed and placed in operation on the second lease, however, operational difficulties continued. It was determined that the units were inadequately designed and would need to be replace by improved second generation units. Due to the lack of success with the first generation units and the extra cost to replace them with the redesigned units, the operators decided not to continue with the project and the project was terminated at that point.

  1. Societal and observational problems in earthquake risk assessments and their delivery to those most at risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilham, Roger

    -0399, United States a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 10 October 2011 Received risk are inappropriate in regions where strain rates are low, and where historical data are short these articles note that deaths and costs will continue to rise in the next century, but that extreme events

  2. Risk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    to generate 20% of its electricity from wind. Developers are actively planning offshore wind farms along the URisk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore Wind of Energy has estimated that over 50 GW of offshore wind power will be required for the United States

  3. Review of the independent risk assessment of the proposed Cabrillo liquified natural gas deepwater port project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritzo, Louis Alan; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2005, the United States Coast Guard requested that Sandia National Laboratories provide a technical review and evaluation of the appropriateness and completeness of models, assumptions, analyses, and risk management options presented in the Cabrillo Port LNG Deepwater Port Independent Risk Assessment-Revision 1 (Cabrillo Port IRA). The goal of Sandia's technical evaluation of the Cabrillo Port IRA was to assist the Coast Guard in ensuring that the hazards to the public and property from a potential LNG spill during transfer, storage, and regasification operations were appropriately evaluated and estimated. Sandia was asked to review and evaluate the Cabrillo Port IRA results relative to the risk and safety analysis framework developed in the recent Sandia report, ''Guidance on Risk Analysis and Safety Implications of a Large Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Spill over Water''. That report provides a framework for assessing hazards and identifying approaches to minimize the consequences to people and property from an LNG spill over water. This report summarizes the results of the Sandia review of the Cabrillo Port IRA and supporting analyses. Based on our initial review, additional threat and hazard analyses, consequence modeling, and process safety considerations were suggested. The additional analyses recommended were conducted by the Cabrillo Port IRA authors in cooperation with Sandia and a technical review panel composed of representatives from the Coast Guard and the California State Lands Commission. The results from the additional analyses improved the understanding and confidence in the potential hazards and consequences to people and property from the proposed Cabrillo Port LNG Deepwater Port Project. The results of the Sandia review, the additional analyses and evaluations conducted, and the resolutions of suggested changes for inclusion in a final Cabrillo Port IRA are summarized in this report.

  4. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    : The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

  5. Unit hydrograph application to stormwater collection system design and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spinks, Melvin Gerald

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    review of each model studied and its capabilities follows. Storm Water Management Model. ? The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency for the analysis of urban stormwater runoff... backwater analysis option uses the Direct Step Method to compute the water surface profiles in the storm sewer system. Two case studies with complex stormwater collection systems were modeled to verify and validate the hydrologic and hydraulic methods...

  6. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (631-24G) - March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit is located in the northeast corner of SRS. In the mid 1980`s, sparse vegetation, dead trees, and small mounds of soil were discovered on a portion of the road leading to Gunsite 113. This area became the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (Gunsite 113). The unit appears to have been used as a spoil dirt and / or road construction debris disposal area. There is no documentation or record of any hazardous substance management, disposal, or any type of waste disposal at this unit. Based upon the available evidence, there are no potential contaminants of concern available for evaluation by a CERCLA baseline risk assessment. Therefore, there is no determinable health risk associated with Gunsite 113. In addition, it is also reasonable to conclude that, since contamination is below risk-based levels, the unit presents no significant ecological risk. It is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  7. Automatically clustering similar units for unit selection in speech synthesis. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Alan W; Taylor, Paul A

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new method for synthesizing speech by concatenating sub-word units from a database of labelled speech. A large unit inventory is created by automatically clustering units of the same phone class ...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

  11. Stochastic Unit Commitment in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    the amount of installed pumped storage capacity enables the inclusion of pumped storage plants units. Its total capacity is about 13,000 megawatts (MW), including a hydro capacity of 1,700 MW

  12. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  17. Voltage verification unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Edward J. (Virginia Beach, VA)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

  19. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a typical wind energy production facility, the results warrant further research on the use of acoustic;1 INTRODUCTION Over the past decade, wind energy production capacity in the United States has increased

  20. " Million Housing Units, Preliminary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, By Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Preliminary" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)"...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South"...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than 20,000","20,000 to 39,999","40,000 to 59,999","60,000 to...

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than 20,000","20,000 to 39,999","40,000 to 59,999","60,000 to...

  6. PRTR ion exchange vault water removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ham, J.E.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the removal of radiologically contaminated water from the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. Approximately 57,000 liters (15,000 gallons) of water had accumulated in the vault due to the absence of a rain cover. The water was removed and the vault inspected for signs of leakage. No evidence of leakage was found. The removal and disposal of the radiologically contaminated water decreased the risk of environmental contamination.

  7. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of desalination research. The primary technological method of generating additional water supplies is through desalination and enhanced water reuse and recycling technologies....

  8. Water Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  9. The Institute for Water & Watersheds Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    timber and salmon to solar panels and semiconductors. But water supply and demand in the state of the United States. In the academic community there is growing recognition that the solutions to future water

  10. Getting Our Feet Wet: Water Management at Mt. Laguna in Cleveland National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, William Cade

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    could prove that water shortages exist at Mount Laguna, itto fire, and risk of water shortage. In particular, issues72,73 Rural areas with water shortage problems tend to

  11. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    can accumulate to harmful levels in drinking water. As radionuclides decay, they emit radioactive parti- cles such as alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Each type of particle produces different effects on humans. Alpha particles... penetrating, alpha particles cause more damage per unit volume than do beta particles or gamma rays. Beta particles and gamma rays deposit their ener- gy over longer distances. Beta particles can be stopped by a piece of wood or a thin sheet of metal...

  12. RISK-AVERSE FEASIBLE POLICIES FOR LARGE-SCALE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    side of the constraints, such risk-averse problems are linear programs. We show how .... 2. Motivation. Our initial motivation is the long-term optimal management of water reservoirs in hydro-thermal .... The demand demt at time step t is assumed deterministic for convenience. .... Building risk-averse rolling-horizon policies.

  13. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Types of Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Types of risk associated with range ecosystems include climatic, biological, financial and political risks. These risks are explained so that managers can know how to handle them....

  14. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bookstaber, R. (1999). "Risk Management in ComplexG. E. (2004). "How Useful Is Quantitative Risk Assessment?"Risk Analysis, Aubrey, A. (2010). "Preventing Diabetes:

  15. Best Buys and Unit Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide explains how to determine a unit price--the cost of an item based on a specific unit such as pound or ounce. Unit pricing can be used to identify foods that are the most economical....

  16. Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING Charles S. Tapiero Department Head and Morton and Angela Topfer · Corporate Finance and Financial Markets · Computational Finance · Risk Finance · Technology and Algorithmic Finance A Collective Leadership Students participation #12;RESEARCH STRENGTHS · Black Swans and Fragility

  17. Health and environmental risks of energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives four examples of health risk assessments of energy systems: (1) Comparative risk assessment of the health effects of the coal and nuclear fuel cycles. Estimates differ from previous values chiefly by inclusion of ranges of uncertainty, but some coal-cycle numbers were re-estimated. Upper-boundary public disease risks of air pollution from coal-fired plants dominate. Reactors probably account for most of the potential effect of major nuclear accidents. Accidental death rates in electricity generation are low for reactors and higher for coal. (2) Upper boundary air pollution health risks of existing fossil-based energy technologies in the United States. Preliminary mortality estimates were obtained combining potential impacts of three index pollutants - SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 2/, and CO - as independent measures of risk. Four fuel cycle trajectories leading to three end-uses were analyzed. Example results: domestic wood burning has substantial potential impact, with an upper boundary exceeding that of coal; upper-boundary air pollution impacts of gas can exceed those of oil, because of NO/sub 2/. (3) Health risks of acid deposition and other transported air pollutants, carried out as part of an assessment of the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) Acid Rain and Transported Air Pollutants - Implications for Public Policy. Three scenarios were examined, leading to estimates of 40,000 to 50,000 annual premature deaths, depending on year (1978 vs 2000) and scenario (holding total emissions constant vs 30% reduction). (4) health effects of uranium mill tailings piles. Mortality risk is estimated to be minuscule (8.7 x 10/sup -9/ average individual lifetime cancer risk from a model mill, compared with 9.5 x 10/sup -4/ for background radiation). Methods that sum risks over the indefinite future are shown to be to be unrealistic. 39 references, 7 figures, 15 tables.

  18. Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the amount and type of precipitation that falls across the western United States. Research shows a trend1 Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you Water is a crucial, industry, energy, recreation, and the natural resources we manage and care about. While most citizens

  19. Sandia Energy - Phasor Measurement Units

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phasor Measurement Units Home Stationary Power Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Phasor Measurement Units Phasor Measurement Unitsashoter2015-05-11T21:0...

  20. Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1103) Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguityby author(s). Subjective Risk, Con?dence, and Ambiguity ?567. Ellsberg, D. (1961), ‘Risk, ambiguity and the savage

  1. Essays in time and risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprenger, Charles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.4.1 Risk Attitudes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3.1 Additional Risk Preference Measures . . . . . . . .An Endowment Effect for Risk: Experimental Tests of

  2. Learning and risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyarzun, Carlos

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

  3. Livestock Risk Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    risk insurance with an ending date of coverage that meets their risk management objectives. Feeder cattle producers may want the end date of coverage to match the William Thompson, Blake Bennett and DeDe Jones* Figure 1: Livestock Risk Protection...

  4. Estimated Benefits of IBWC Rio Grande Flood-Control Projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Michelsen, Ari M.; Rister, M. Edward; Assadian, Naomi; Eriksson, Marian; Freeman, Roger; Jacobs, Jennifer H.; Madison, W. Tom; McGuckin, James T.; Morrison, Wendy; Robinson, John R.C.; Staats, Chris; Sheng, Zhuping; Srinivasan, R.; Villalobos, Joshua I.

    TR- 275 2004 Estimated Benefits of IBWC Rio Grande Flood-Control Projects in the United States Allen W. Sturdivant Ronald D. Lacewell Ari M. Michelsen M. Edward Rister Naomi Assadian Marian Eriksson Roger Freeman Jennifer H... Flood-Control Projects in the United States Prepared for: INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES SECTION EL PASO, TEXAS SEPTEMBER 2004 Prepared by: Texas Agriculture Experiment Station, and Texas Water Resources Institute of the Texas...

  5. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the temperature of the residual water encountered by theof hot water and the residual water might occur: (1) thehot water might drive the residual water through the piping

  6. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Water Heaters and Hot Water DistributionLaboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distributionfor instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss

  7. Status of the Surry low power and shutdown PRA (probabilistic risk analysis)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T-L.; Luckas, W.; Musicki, Z.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surry low power and shutdown probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) is an ongoing project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to identify and quantify potential accident scenarios that may occur in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during low power and shutdown. It was initiated as a result of various incidents and accidents that have occurred within the United States and overseas. The project involves review and evaluation of PWR experience at shutdown, identification of accident scenarios, determination of methods to mitigate the accidents, and performance a level 1 PRA. An evaluation of accident progression, source terms, and consequences has also been initiated. The results will be used to address issues related to shutdown conditions. The objective of this paper is to provide a progress report on the project, and to present the approach used as well as preliminary results of the ongoing and completed tasks. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    always been a major concern in these small volcanic islands where rain water harvesting, ground waterVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The United States

  9. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water of Puerto Rico. The Institute is one of 54 water research centers established throughout the United States

  10. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water of Puerto Rico. The Institute is one of 54 water research centers established throughout the United States

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Sustainable Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demand of plastic bottled water, additional unsustainable resources are required to support this demand drinking water solutions. Three methods will be compared; plastic bottled water, WaterFillz units method of delivering drinking water to students showed that plastic bottled water is not a solution

  12. INTEGRATED CO2 HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS FOR SPACE HEATING AND HOT WATER HEATING IN LOW-ENERGY HOUSES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Stene

    designed as stand-alone systems, i.e. a heat pump water heater (HPWH) in combination with separate units

  13. Solving Unit Commitment by a Unit Decommitment Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solving Unit Commitment by a Unit Decommitment Method Chung-Li Tsengy,Chao-an Liz, Shmuel S. Oren x October 14, 1997 Abstract In this paper, we present an e cient and robust method for solving unit commit- ment problem using a unit decommitment method. 1 Introduction A problem that must be frequently solved

  14. Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

  15. Risk & QualityRisk & Quality ManagementManagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    liability."" [Balsaono RR, Brown[Balsaono RR, Brown MK, Risk ManagementMK, Risk Management inin Legal

  16. RADTRAN3. Radioactive Material Transport Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, M.M.; Taylor, J.M.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Reardon, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADTRAN3 is a flexible analytical tool for calculating both the incident-free and accident impacts of transporting radioactive materials. The consequences from incident-free shipments are apportioned among eight population subgroups and can be calculated for several transport modes. The radiological accident risk (probability times consequence summed over all postulated accidents) is calculated in terms of early fatalities, early morbidities, latent cancer fatalities, genetic effects, and economic impacts. Groundshine, ingestion, inhalation, direct exposure, resuspension, and cloudshine dose pathways are modeled to calculate the radiological health risks from accidents. Economic impacts are evaluated based on costs for emergency response, cleanup, evacuation, income loss, and land use. RADTRAN3 can be applied to specific scenario evaluations (individual transport modes or specified combinations), to compare alternative modes or to evaluate generic radioactive material shipments. Unit-risk factors can easily be evaluated to aid in performing generic analyses when several options must be compared with the amount of travel as the only variable.

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family...

  18. MFR PAPER 1170 Water Surface Area Within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in hectares for each subsubarea within each subarea. Conversion factor Central latllude Stallstlcal hectares the Gulf coa t. especiall y tho e concerning im- pact of energy-related development. METHODS Water surface.-Converslon factors (hectares per planimeter unit) used to convert average planimeter units to area

  19. Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive Species andWater Levels, Invasive Species and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ­­ ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive." IPCC Risk management is the framework to discuss adaptation to climate change impacts. Risk The Water Resources Working Group will assess and synthesize climate change impacts to Wisconsin's water

  20. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report RMRS-GTR-127 April 2004 Exploring Information Needs for Wildland Fire and Fuels Management Risk Probability of a negative outcome: ., loss of life or property, degraded ecological condition e of the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Missoula, MT. After a brief career as an electrical engineer, she

  1. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Fiscal Year 2011 Report Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and avian and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2011, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists adapted and applied the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), first developed to examine the effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy devices on aquatic environments, to offshore wind development. PNNL scientists conducted a risk screening analysis on two initial OSW cases: a wind project in Lake Erie and a wind project off the Atlantic coast of the United States near Atlantic City, New Jersey. The screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two OSW cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device, such as alterations in bottom habitats. Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted during FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an assessment of the vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with OSW installations; a probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. As more data become available that document effects of offshore wind farms on specific receptors in U.S. coastal and Great Lakes waters, probability analyses will be performed.

  2. United Nations Development Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technologies To Convert Biomass Into Modern Energy Chapter 5 5.1. Gasification 5.2. Anaerobic Digestion 5 Chapter 7 7.1. Biogas-Based Electricity and Water Supply in Indian Villages 7.2. Sustainable

  3. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General. in the aircraft nuclear propulsion department at the National Reactor Testing Station in Idaho. In 1961 Rothermel.S. Department of Agriculture, Fire Laboratory at Missoula was conceived in the aftermath of the Mann Gulch fire

  4. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are thought to contribute to carbon sequestration, including current debates on this topic. The science regarding forestry and carbon sequestration is more advanced and less controversial than that for range, land management, carbon sequestration, carbon markets, United States. #12;ii Executive Summary

  5. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report NRS-112 Modeling the Effects of Emerald Ash Borer on Forest Composition in the Midwest of human population, energy, consumption, land use, and economic models to project the future condition of forests in the Midwest and Northeast United States. Our results suggest that in most cases EAB

  6. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Alabama, is receiving increasing attention as an economically recoverable natural gas source, and proximity to natural gas markets in the heavily urbanized northeastern United States have prompted increased-10 Reptile, Amphibian, and Small Mammal Species Associated with Natural Gas Development

  7. Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures Preface The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its management together with the means for identifying, analysing and managing risk in order to minimise its frequency and impact. The risks considered significant

  8. Professional Certificate in Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    Professional Certificate in Risk Management 2010 Program 3 Part-time Courses CRM01: Essentials of Risk Management ­ Next Session Fall 2010 CRM02: Risk Control ­ Jan. 12 - April 26, 2010 CRM03: Risk to apply for the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) designation. #12;Professional Certificate in Risk

  9. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline formation waters. Therefore, they are expected to be representative of saline formation waters at actual and potential future CCS sites. We are using a produced waters database (Breit, 2002) covering most of the United States compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In one instance to date, we have used this database to find a composition corresponding to the brine expected at an actual CCS site (Big Sky CSP, Nugget Formation, Sublette County, Wyoming). We have located other produced waters databases, which are usually of regional scope (e.g., NETL, 2005, Rocky Mountains basins).

  10. Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript RESOURCES: HYDRAULICS AND HYDROLOGY #12;Approved for public release distribution IS unlimited. #12;Preface The United States Army Corps of Engineers significantly contributed to hydraulic and hydrologic engineering

  11. Marketing water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many... ] Many cities are promoting landscape management and water conservation practices with their citizens. This garden demonstrates the EARTH- KIND principles of environmentally tolerant, low water use ornamentals. tx H2O | pg. 18 and no adverse runoff...

  12. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T. [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  13. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T. (Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland)); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  14. El Paso landscape perspective: Researchers study water conservation, plant-tolerance, and water reuse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -largest city in Texas and the #26;#19;th-largest in the United States,? Michelsen said. El Paso landscape perspective Researchers study water conservation, plant-tolerance, and water reuse 16 tx H2O Summer 2011 El Paso landscape perspective Continued... ?Landscape irrigation typically accounts for half of annual residential water use,? he said. ?Finding and developing low water use, drought- and salt-tolerant plants are critical to conserving and protecting our limited freshwater supplies to ensure...

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [INL; Busby, Jeremy [ORNL; Hallbert, Bruce [INL; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [INL; Smith, Curtis [INL; Barnard, Cathy [INL

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  18. Conditional Risk Mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megiddo

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Key words: Risk; Conjugate Duality; Stochastic Optimization; Dynamic ... MSC2000 Subject Classification: Primary: 90C15,90C48; Secondary: 91B30,

  19. Grundfos HVAC OEM Efficient water hydraulics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    complexity ·20 years of experience in hydraulics for the Boiler System industry. ·Key success factor is our Benefits with an integrated solution #12;Heat pump unit with storage tank 1 2 Efficient water hydraulics 3 return Heatin g supply Cold wate r Hot water PRV Drain 3 way valve 1 2 3 air ventPT Grundfos flow sensor

  20. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  1. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  2. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  3. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  4. Water quality analysis of the piped water supply in Tamale, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Allison Jean

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United Nation's Millennium Development Goal Target 7.C is to "halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water". While the UN claimed to have met this goal, studies ...

  5. Environmental effects of dredging. Risk-based testing of dredged material for aquatic disposal evaluations. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, T.M.; Engler, R.M.; Patin, T.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes a risk-based framework for testing and evaluating dredged material scheduled for open-water disposal.

  6. UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ................ Sidney Area Deals with Drought 6................ Water and Electricity Are Inseparable 10's East Campus. "Consolidating administration,faculty and staff and facilities is costeffectiveandper or commercial products constitute endorsement by the U.S. Government. WATER CURRENT Water Center University

  7. Water Conservation and Water Use Efficiency (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin has several statutes that promote water conservation and controlled water use, and this legislation establishes mandatory and voluntary programs in water conservation and water use...

  8. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: Lutz J.D. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution

  9. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Energy Use Unaccounted-for Water Demand Managementdetermine whether its unaccounted-for losses exceed typicalof distribution zones Unaccounted-for treated water Units

  10. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  11. United Nations geothermal activities in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beredjick, N.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United Nations implements technical cooperation projects in developing countries through its Department of Technical Cooperation for Development (DTCD). The DTCD is mandated to explore for and develop natural resources (water, minerals, and relevant infrastructure) and energy - both conventional and new and renewable energy sources. To date, the United Nations has been involved in over 30 geothermal exploration projects (completed or underway) in 20 developing countries: 8 in Africa (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar); 8 in Asia (China, India, Jordan, Philippines, Thailand); 9 in Latin America (Bolivia, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama) and 6 in Europe (Greece, Romania, Turkey, Yugoslavia). Today, the DTCD has seven UNDP geothermal projects in 6 developing countries. Four of these (Bolivia, China, Honduras, and Kenya) are major exploration projects whose formulation and execution has been possible thanks to the generous contributions under cost-sharing arrangements from the government of Italy. These four projects are summarized.

  12. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishery products, free zings and cold storage holdings, and for- eign trade in fishery commodities and caught in international waters ... 0 U, S. landings for human food and industrial use Relative volume., by countries Processed fisher y produc ts. Canned fishery products . . . . . · . Industrial fishery products

  13. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information and public property. Nationally, a successful program was characterized as one with sufficient resources to the principle of multiple use management of the Nation's forest resources for sustained yields of wood, water

  14. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons property. Nationally, a successful program was characterized as one with sufficient resources of multiple use management of the Nation's forest resources for sustained yields of wood, water, forage

  15. Essays on risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jindapon, Paan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the preferred distribution by a simple mean-preserving spread and the cost is a utility cost. Higher-order increases in risk lead to higher-order generalizations, and the com- parative statics method yields a unified approach to the problem of comparative risk...

  16. Information content and reliability of TOVS estimates of precipitable water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Min

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of water vapor in the atmosphere has been accomplished by satellite sensors in both the infrared (IR) and microwave spectral regions. The radiance will be high if either the atmospheric temperature is high or the water vapor content is low. Among... hours apart. On board each satellite are channels of High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS2), Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU). Two infrared channels are essentially sensitive to water vapor. PW derived...

  17. Energy Management in Olefins Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, T. A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit...

  18. Energy Audits in Process Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corwin, J. D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emphasis is placed on practical considerations in the effective organization and execution of a successful in-house energy audit of a process unit, based upon experience gained in several such audits of Gulf Coast petrochemical units. Staffing...

  19. Energy Management in Olefins Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, T. A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit...

  20. Value creation in water allocation negotiations : lessons from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River and Lower Colorado River Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solis, Miriam

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense water disputes in the United States are being caused by new and conflicting demands from many quarters and changes in water availability that appear to be caused by climate change. Projections of heightened water ...

  1. Blowout risks still growing concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into blowout prevention and control is one of the most active areas in the offshore oil industry. Drilling relief wells is the most common method for killing underwater blowouts. Platform blowouts offshore the US are most commonly controlled by mud circulation (55%), capping (35%), and relief wells (10%). Some control methods mentioned were: annulus killing, production casing shear ram, mechanized drill pipe handling, drill-stem telemetry, mud monitors and the best available blowout preventer stacks. Three methods for reducing the fire risk were: down-hole water injection, improved deluge systems for the wellhead deck, and elimination of ignition sources. Containment concepts included: surface containment device, devices positioned in the oil plume, and those which provide containment at the spill sources. (DP)

  2. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

  3. FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SH 11 .A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES ^ 1951 &ch 3. \\§^ ^/'· m:^ STATISTICAL DIGEST. Farley, Director Statistical Digest 30 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1951 BY A. W. ANDERSON;Fishery Statistics of the United States and Alaska are compiled and published annually to make available

  4. Entanglement Storage Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Caneva; T. Calarco; S. Montangero

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a protocol based on optimal control to drive many body quantum systems into long-lived entangled states, protected from decoherence by big energy gaps, without requiring any apriori knowledge of the system. With this approach it is possible to implement scalable entanglement-storage units. We test the protocol in the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model, a prototype many-body quantum system that describes different experimental setups, and in the ordered Ising chain, a model representing a possible implementation of a quantum bus.

  5. l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj:'I,\ W CTheuse of_-_ ._UNITED

  6. Rooftop Unit Campaign

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofittingFundA l i c eRooftop Unit Campaign

  7. Rooftop Unit Network Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofittingFundA l i c eRooftop Unit

  8. Computerized Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ing 2002?2005 and documented in TWRI?s Technical Report 284 released in January 2006, include: ? Capabilities for short-term reliability analyses based on current storage conditions (Or what is the likelihood of meeting water needs in the near... System Reference Manual. TWRI Technical Report 255, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Water Rights Analysis Package Modeling System Users Manual. TWRI Technical Report 256, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Fundamentals of Water Availability Modeling...

  9. INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES FY 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ), and is recognized as a national center of expertise in water resources planning methods, risk analysis, hydrologic, and analytical tools used for water resources and water systems planning, investment decision support, conflict-looking analysis and state-of-the-art methodologies. IWR fulfills this mission by supporting the Civil Works

  10. PERISHSaving an Oil Industry at Risk FEBRUARY 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    01 Global Demand Outlook for Crude Oil OVERVIEW 04 DEMAND BY COUNTRY 06 United States 06 China 06 supplies. On top of all that, demand for oil products in North America is falling. The continent's oilPIPEOR PERISHSaving an Oil Industry at Risk FEBRUARY 2013 MICHAEL HOLDEN, SENIOR ECONOMIST #12;The

  11. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

  12. Econometric Analyses of Public Water Demand in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, David

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    -run demand response is not shown to be statistically significant. The quasidifference price representation used in Chapters II and III is the difference between two weighted rate indices. The weighting function is essentially one of convenience...

  13. An Overview of Marine Biodiversity in United States Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; Dalton, Penelope; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Pautzke, Clarence; Rosenberg, Andrew; Sandifer, Paul A.; Sedberry, George R.; Tunnell, John W. Jr.; Abbott, Isabella; Brainard, Russell E.; Broduer, Melissa; Eldredge, Lucius G.; Feldman, Michael; Moretzsohn, Fabio; Vroom, Peter S.; Wainstein, Michelle; Wolf, Nicholas

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    in this region is extremely steep, and thus is of particular interest for monitoring biodiversity changes in a warming climate. The Gulf of Maine is topographically and geologically complex, containing three major basins up to 300 m deep, and numerous smaller...

  14. AUSTRALIA BELGIUM CHINA FRANCE GERMANY HONG KONG SAR INDONESIA (ASSOCIATED OFFICE) ITALY JAPAN PAPUA NEW GUINEA SINGAPORE SPAIN SWEDEN UNITED ARAB EMIRATES UNITED KINGDOM UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, David

    PAPUA NEW GUINEA SINGAPORE SPAIN SWEDEN UNITED ARAB EMIRATES UNITED KINGDOM UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

  15. The Non-alcoholic Beverage Market in the United States: Demand Interrelationships, Dynamics, Nutrition Issues and Probability Forecast Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharmasena, Kalu Arachchillage Senarath

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    marketplace trends ................................................................ 3 1.2 Trend in per capita bottled water consumption in the United States: 1976-2007 ...................................................................... 4 1.3 Trend... in per capita consumption of milk in the United States: 1970-2007 ...................................................................... 5 1.4 Trend in per capita consumption of soft drinks in the United States: 1984...

  16. Development of agro-environmental scenarios to support pesticide risk assessment in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    Development of agro-environmental scenarios to support pesticide risk assessment in Europe T reserved. Keywords: Pesticides Risk assessment Agro-environmental scenarios FOOTPRINT Agricultural Kingdom b Pesticide Environmental Fate, 58, St. Annes Rd., London Colney, St. Albans AL2 1LJ, United

  17. Brain and Heart 1. Reducing your risk of stroke and heart attack. . . . 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    #12;Contents Brain and Heart 1. Reducing your risk of stroke and heart attack. . . . 3 2. Exercising for a healthy heart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3. Choosing a home blood pressure unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 #12;BRAIN AND HEART Reducing your risk of stroke and heart attack One of the best ways to protect

  18. Model Selection for the Competing-Risks Model With and Without Masking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chun Man "Thomas"

    Department of Statistics Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523-1877 (tlee@stat.colostate.edu) The competing-risks model is useful in settings in which individuals (or units) may die (or fail) because for competing-risks data with and without masking involves the specification of cause-specific hazard rates

  19. Risk Management in Biopharmaceutical Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply Chain Risk Managementof Recent Work on Supply Chain Risk Management . . . . .M. , Supply chain risk management: Outlining an agenda for

  20. Systemic risk in consumer finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Martha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceSystemic risk in consumer finance Martha Poon, NYU At the

  1. (Energy Risk Professional, ERP), (GARP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    · ­ Dragana Pilipovic. Energy Risk: Valuing and Managing Energy Derivatives,2nd Edition (New York: Mc). 9: Risk Management of Energy Derivatives · ­ Alexander Triantis. Handbook of Modern Finance (New 1 ( ) : . (Energy Risk Professional, ERP

  2. Risk in the Weapons Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

  3. Seismic risk assessment of a BWR: status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, T.Y.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Wells, J.E.; Johnson, J.J.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The seismic risk methodology developed in the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models was developed and analyzed. The SSMRP methodology can equally be applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR). To demonstrate its applicability, to identify fundamental differences in seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR, and to provide a basis of comparison of seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR when analyzed with comparable methodology and assumptions, a seismic risk analysis is being performed on the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant.

  4. Risk information in support of cost estimates for the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Section 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelston, G.M.; Jarvis, M.F.; Warren, B.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Von Berg, R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(1) effort on the overall Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR) project consists of four installation-specific work components performed in succession. These components include (1) development of source terms, 92) collection of data and preparation of environmental settings reports, (3) calculation of unit risk factors, and (4) utilization of the unit risk factors in Automated Remedial Action Methodology (ARAM) for computation of target concentrations and cost estimates. This report documents work completed for the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for components 2 and 3. The product of this phase of the BEMR project is the development of unit factors (i.e., unit transport factors, unit exposure factors, and unit risk factors). Thousands of these unit factors are gene rated and fill approximately one megabyte of computer information per installation. The final unit risk factors (URF) are transmitted electronically to BEMR-Cost task personnel as input to a computer program (ARAM). Abstracted files and exhibits of the URF information are included in this report. These visual formats are intended to provide a sample of the final task deliverable (the URF files) which can be easily read without a computer.

  5. Cancer risks attributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: Assessing what we really know

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Triangle Park, NC 27711; jOffice of Radiation and Indoor Air, Environmental Protection Agency, WashingtonCancer risks attributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: Assessing what we really know David J Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6ME, United Kingdom; dRadiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council

  6. Arsenic Methylation and Bladder Cancer Risk in CaseControl Studies in Argentina and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Arsenic Methylation and Bladder Cancer Risk in Case­Control Studies in Argentina and the United's susceptibility to bladder cancer. Methods: Urinary methylation products were measured in subjects from Argentina (114 cases and 114 controls) and the United States (23 cases and 49 controls). Results: In Argentina

  7. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the biological contamination of waters that have been used for the last 100 years have been shown to lack certainVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) is a unit of the University of the Virgin

  8. Water, law, science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In a world with water resources severely impacted bytechnology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end,this paper is an earth scientist s attempt to comprehend essentialelements of water law, and to examine their connections to science.Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with apriori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science,observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while inlaw, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law inEurope and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago byRoman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason.Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the seawere governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that theseelements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as privateproperty. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jusgentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast,jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jusgentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in whichscience plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all.This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, followstheir evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit ofscience inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving waterand environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In atechnological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of waterlaw. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophicalunderstanding of the relationships between science and law willcontribute to their constructively coming together in the service ofsociety.

  9. Getting Our Feet Wet: Water Management at Mt. Laguna in Cleveland National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, William Cade

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water quality risk of power loss (see Cost of Infrastructurestorage in case of power loss or having back-up generators.

  10. Effects of breach formation parameter uncertainty on inundation risk area and consequence analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skousen, Benjamin Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory; David, Judi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Pherson, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burian, Steve [UNIV OF UTAH

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the national inventory of dams (NID), there are approximately 79,500 dams in the United States, with 11,800 of these dams being classified as high-hazard. It has been recommended that each high-hazard dam in the United States have an emergency action plan (EAP), but it has been found that only about 60% of the high-hazard dams have a complete EAP. A major aspect of these plans is inundation risk area identification and associated impacts in the event of dam failure. In order to determine the inundation risk area an estimation of breach discharge must be completed. Most methods used to determine breach discharge, including the NWS-DAMBRK model, require modelers to select size, shape, and time of breach formation. Federal agencies (e.g. Bureau of Reclamation, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) with oversight of U.S. dams have recommended ranges of values for each of these parameters based on dam type. However, variations in these parameters even within the recommended range have the potential to impose significant transformation on the discharge hydrograph relative to both timing and magnitude of the peak discharge. Therefore, it has also been recommended that sensitivity of these parameters be investigated when performing breach inundation analyses. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis of three breach parameters (average breach width, side slope, and time to failure) on a case study dam located in the United States. The sensitivity analysis employed was based on the 3{sup 3} factorial design, in which three levels (e.g. low, medium, and high) were selected for each of the three parameters, resulting in twenty-seven combinations. The three levels remained within the recommended range of values for each parameter type. With each combination of input parameters, a discharge hydrograph was generated and used as a source condition for inundation analysis using a two-dimensional shallow water equation model. The resulting simulations were compared to determine the sensitivity of flood inundation area, flood arrival time, peak flood depths, and socio-economic impacts (e.g. population at risk, direct and indirect economic loss) to changes in individual parameters and parameter interactions. Results and discussion from this sensitivity analysis will be presented in detail in the paper.

  11. ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crisis and Risk Communication Crisis and Risk Communication Because a natural disaster, act of terrorism or other public emergency can happen without notice, having a planned,...

  12. 2013 Reporting Unit Codes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2013 Reporting Unit Codes 2013 Reporting Unit Codes CFC Reporting Unit Codes 2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-0372: Final Environmental Assessment Alignment: Achieving...

  13. Accelerating CHP Deployment, United States Energy Association...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerating CHP Deployment, United States Energy Association (USEA), August 2011 Accelerating CHP Deployment, United States Energy Association (USEA), August 2011 The United...

  14. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Cancels DOE G 413.3-7.

  15. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS application hosted in the cloud · Alaska DHHS fined $1.7M ­ Portable device stolen from vehicle · Mass Eye

  16. Power systems simulations of the western United States region.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Poch, L.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a part of a broad assessment of energy-water-related issues in the western United States. The full analysis involved three Department of Energy national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. Argonne's objective in the overall project was to develop a regional power sector expansion forecast and a detailed unit-level operational (dispatch) analysis. With these two major analysis components, Argonne estimated current and future freshwater withdrawals and consumption related to the operation of U.S. thermal-electric power plants in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region for the period 2005-2025. Water is withdrawn and used primarily for cooling but also for environmental control, such as sulfur scrubbers. The current scope of the analysis included three scenarios: (1) Baseline scenario as a benchmark for assessing the adequacy and cost-effectiveness of water conservation options and strategies, (2) High nuclear scenario, and (3) High renewables scenario. Baseline projections are consistent with forecasts made by the WECC and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in its Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (EIA 2006a). Water conservation scenarios are currently limited to two development alternatives that focus heavily on constructing new generating facilities with zero water consumption. These technologies include wind farms and nuclear power plants with dry cooling. Additional water conservation scenarios and estimates of water use associated with fuel or resource extraction and processing will be developed in follow-on analyses.

  17. SCOPING SUMMARY FOR THE P-AREA OPERABLE UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupar, J; Sadika Baladi, S; Mark Amidon, M

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping summary supports development of the combined Remedial Investigation (RI)/Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA)/Feasibility Study (FS) for the P-Area Operable Unit (PAOU), or Combined document, which will be submitted on or before 09/28/2007. The objective of this Feasibility Study scoping summary meeting is to agree on the likely response actions to be evaluated and developed as alternatives in the combined document and agree on the uncertainties identified and whether they have been adequately managed.

  18. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    .............. 33 5.6.1 Hot water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 5.6.2 Electrical consumption and people Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees

  19. Disparities in nuclear power plant performance in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Kent F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data comparing the performance of light water reactors in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The comparisons are made for the years 1980-1983 and include 21 Westinghouse ...

  20. Latinos and the Natural Environment Along the United States-Mexico Border

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Angelica

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The vitality of international transborder natural resources is important for the preservation of wildlife corridors, clean water, clean air, and working lands. In particular, not only does the Texas Rio Grande Valley Region in the United States (U...

  1. UNIT NUMBER SWMU 175 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside Security Fence, East of C-360 Building in KPDES Outfall Ditch 002. APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 400 ft...

  2. Importance and sensitivity of parameters affecting the Zion Seismic Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, L.L.; O'Connell, W.J.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study on the importance and sensitivity of structures, systems, equipment, components and design parameters used in the Zion Seismic Risk Calculations. This study is part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) supported by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objective of this study is to provide the NRC with results on the importance and sensitivity of parameters used to evaluate seismic risk. These results can assist the NRC in making decisions dealing with the allocation of research resources on seismic issues. This study uses marginal analysis in addition to importance and sensitivity analysis to identify subject areas (input parameter areas) for improvements that reduce risk, estimate how much the improvement dfforts reduce risk, and rank the subject areas for improvements. Importance analysis identifies the systems, components, and parameters that are important to risk. Sensitivity analysis estimates the change in risk per unit improvement. Marginal analysis indicates the reduction in risk or uncertainty for improvement effort made in each subject area. The results described in this study were generated using the SEISIM (Systematic Evaluation of Important Safety Improvement Measures) and CHAIN computer codes. Part 1 of the SEISIM computer code generated the failure probabilities and risk values. Part 2 of SEISIM, along with the CHAIN computer code, generated the importance and sensitivity measures.

  3. Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique le Bihan Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique Le Bihan, Sophie Pardo, Patrice and their businesses contribute to defining their degree of risk perception and reliance on management tools. Beyond

  4. THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uryasev, Stanislav

    THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION AND STATISTICAL ESTIMATION1 R be confronted in numerous situations. Dealing with them systematically for purposes in risk management Statistical estimation is inevitably a partner with risk management in handling hazards, which may be known

  5. Ozone (o3) efficacy on reduction of phytophthora capsici in recirculated horticultural irrigation water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Garry Vernon

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microorganisms that cause plant disease have been isolated in recirculated irrigation water and increase the risks of disease incidence in horticultural operations. Ozone is an effective oxidizer used to disinfect drinking water supplies and treat...

  6. Phase II Documentation Overview of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject to assess and evaluate radiologic groundwater contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. These activities are overseen by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended March 2010). For Frenchman Flat, the UGTA Subproject addresses media contaminated by the underground nuclear tests, which is limited to geologic formations within the saturated zone or 100 meters (m) or less above the water table. Transport in groundwater is judged to be the primary mechanism of migration for the subsurface contamination away from the Frenchman Flat underground nuclear tests. The intent of the UGTA Subproject is to assess the risk to the public from the groundwater contamination produced as a result of nuclear testing. The primary method used to assess this risk is the development of models of flow and contaminant transport to forecast the extent of potentially contaminated groundwater for the next 1,000 years, establish restrictions to groundwater usage, and implement a monitoring program to verify protectiveness. For the UGTA Subproject, contaminated groundwater is that which exceeds the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) the State of Nevada’s groundwater quality standard to protect human health and the environment. Contaminant forecasts are expected to be uncertain, and groundwater monitoring will be used in combination with land-use control to build confidence in model results and reduce risk to the public. Modeling forecasts of contaminant transport will provide the basis for negotiating a compliance boundary for the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This compliance boundary represents a regulatory-based distinction between groundwater contaminated or not contaminated by underground testing. Transport modeling simulations are used to compute radionuclide concentrations in time and space within the CAU for the 1,000-year contaminant boundary. These three-dimensional (3-D) concentration simulations are integrated into probabilistic forecasts of the likelihood of groundwater exceeding or remaining below the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) defined as the contaminant boundary. Contaminant boundaries are not discrete predictions of the location or concentration of contaminants, but instead are spatial representations of the probability of exceeding Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards. The forecasts provide planning tools to facilitate regulatory decisions designed to protect the health and safety of the public.

  7. Air bubbles clean produced water for reinjection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michnick, M.J. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The reuse of produced water in a waterflood may be hazardous to the health and wealth of the reservoir. Disposal of produced water and finding a new source of water for a waterflood can double your costs. Air flotation is being tested to rehabilitate produced water on a lease in eastern Kansas. The use of air flotation in the oil field is at least forty years old. However, many operators are reluctant to spend the capital for surface equipment to assure a supply of good quality water for their waterflood operation. Before the installation of the air flotation unit only the produced water was filtered through a 75-micron bag and the filter water was then added to the make-up water. Seventy-five micron cartridge filters were used at the wellhead. Both the plant and wellhead filters required frequent replacement. Injection wells averaged more than one cleaning and acidization per year. Since installation of the air flotation unit, the combined produced and makeup water is passed through either a 25-or 10-micron bag filter in the plant and a 10-micron cartridge at the wellhead. The results of the test being conducted by an independent oil operator show a reduction in the cost for the water injection system. This study is part of the Department of Energy Class I PONS with independent oil operators.

  8. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts on California’s Water Supply Source Medellin-AzuaraClimate Change on Yields and Water use of Major Californiawith Less: Agricultural Water Conservation and Efficiency in

  9. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Suh, S. Water Embodied in Bioethanol in the United States.Use in the Production of Bioethanol and Petroleum Gasoline.for Producing Biofuels: Bioethanol and Biodiesel. Biomass

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY12 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY12.

  11. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY13 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY13.

  12. Rethinking Risk: Aspiration as Pure Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Greg B

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of an environmental decision problem where di¤erent investment packages (acts) lead to di¤erent possible levels of global wealth and overall levels of global warming. Avoiding the all too easy economic assumption that the global wealth levels can simply be adjusted... by some amount to re‡ect the e¤ect of the global temperature levels, we are now left with two numerical components in this problem. There are thus separate measures of risk aversion that deal with wealth and temperature, and therefore two di¤erent concepts...

  13. Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water Heaters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. A more-realistic ratings draw is proposed that eliminates most bias by improving mains inlet temperature and by specifying realistic hot water use. This paper outlines the current and the proposed draws and estimates typical ratings changes from draw specification changes for typical systems in four cities.

  14. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  15. Technical Needs for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Equipment Condition Assessment for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Berglin, Eric J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can provide the United States with a safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The controllable day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operation and maintenance costs. Health and condition assessment coupled with online risk monitors can potentially enhance affordability of aSMRs through optimized operational planning and maintenance scheduling. Currently deployed risk monitors are an extension of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). For complex engineered systems like nuclear power plants, PRA systematically combines event likelihoods and the probability of failure (POF) of key components, so that when combined with the magnitude of possible adverse consequences to determine risk. Traditional PRA uses population-based POF information to estimate the average plant risk over time. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a PRA that reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant; this model is updated periodically, typically once a year. Risk monitors expand on living PRA by incorporating changes in the day-by-day plant operation and configuration (e.g., changes in equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions). However, population-based POF (or population- and time-based POF) is still used to populate fault trees. Health monitoring techniques can be used to establish condition indicators and monitoring capabilities that indicate the component-specific POF at a desired point in time (or over a desired period), which can then be incorporated in the risk monitor to provide a more accurate estimate of the plant risk in different configurations. This is particularly important for active systems, structures, and components (SSCs) proposed for use in aSMR designs. These SSCs may differ significantly from those used in the operating fleet of light-water reactors (or even in LWR-based SMR designs). Additionally, the operating characteristics of aSMRs can present significantly different requirements, including the need to operate in different coolant environments, higher operating temperatures, and longer operating cycles between planned refueling and maintenance outages. These features, along with the relative lack of operating experience for some of the proposed advanced designs, may limit the ability to estimate event probability and component POF with a high degree of certainty. Incorporating real-time estimates of component POF may compensate for a relative lack of established knowledge about the long-term component behavior and improve operational and maintenance planning and optimization. The particular eccentricities of advanced reactors and small modular reactors provide unique challenges and needs for advanced instrumentation, control, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) techniques such as enhanced risk monitors (ERM) in aSMRs. Several features of aSMR designs increase the need for accurate characterization of the real-time risk during operation and maintenance activities. A number of technical gaps in realizing ERM exist, and these gaps are largely independent of the specific reactor technology. As a result, the development of a framework for ERM would enable greater situational awareness regardless of the specific class of reactor technology. A set of research tasks are identified in a preliminary research plan to enable the development, testing, and demonstration of such a framework. Although some aspects of aSMRs, such as specific operational characteristics, will vary and are not now completely defined, the proposed framework is expected to be relevant regardless of such uncertainty. The development of an ERM framework will provide one of the key technical developments necessary to ensure the economic viability of aSMRs.

  16. Water Privatisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zölls, Elisa

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  17. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

  18. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  19. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT January 2008 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT CP-320 714-278-7346 #12;2006 ­ 2007 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Executive Summary A. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management

  20. Eighth Annual Risk Management Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Eighth Annual Risk Management Conference Risk Management Amidst Global Rebalancing 10 ­ 11 July 2014, Singapore The Risk Management Institute (RMI) at the National University of Singapore invites submissions for its 8th annual conference on risk management in Singapore on 10 and 11 July 2014. We