National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for water unit risk

  1. Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    risk Quality of life Health Noncancer risk Costs Cost Technology availability Health risk Testing Management factors Environmental quality Treatment Chemical performance Fairness Cost of technology & Management 48:6, 2005 · Evaluation of drinking water treatment technology: An entropy-based fuzzy application

  2. Unit 15: Risk Management To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    1 Unit 15: Risk Management Objectives Đ To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role within the software development process Đ To introduce the use of risk management as a means of identifying Ą Techniques & heuristics for the identification, analysis, treatment & monitoring of risk Ą Risk management

  3. COASTAL BATHING WATER HEALTH RISKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    compliance of all UK beaches with the 1976 Directive. In 1991 the EC introduced the Urban Waste Water

  4. Occurrence of Low-Temperature Geothermal Waters in the United...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occurrence of Low-Temperature Geothermal Waters in the United States, in Assessment of Geothermal Resources of the United States -- 1978 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  5. BUILDING A UNITED STATES DATA BASE: POPULATIONS AT RISK TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    BUILDING A UNITED STATES DATA BASE: POPULATIONS AT RISK TOBUILDING A UNITED STATES DATA BASE: POPULATIONS AT RISK TOof an demographic integrated data base characteristics, air

  6. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. A. Owca

    2007-06-21

    This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

  7. Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, Liam D.; Kohn, Nancy P.

    2000-09-05

    Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in January 1998 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for the first post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and DDT were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared to pre-remediation data available from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissues) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Biomonitoring results indicated that pesticides were still bioavailable in the water column, and have not been reduced from pre-remediation levels. Annual biomonitoring will continue to assess the effectiveness of remedial actions at the United Heckathorn Site.

  8. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility...

  9. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Hydroelectric Webinar...

  10. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    scale. Thus, analysis of flood risk, sub-monthly instream-on water supply risk, and does not address flood risk.water resources modeling, flood risk and water supply risk

  11. Eielson Air Force Base Operable Unit 2 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, R.E.; Jarvis, T.T.; Jarvis, M.R.; Whelan, G.

    1994-10-01

    Operable Unit 2 at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, is one of several operable units characterized by petroleum, oil, and lubricant contamination, and by the presence of organic products floating at the water table, as a result of Air Force operations since the 1940s. The base is approximately 19,270 acres in size, and comprises the areas for military operations and a residential neighborhood for military dependents. Within Operable Unit 2, there are seven source areas. These source areas were grouped together primarily because of the contaminants released and hence are not necessarily in geographical proximity. Source area ST10 includes a surface water body (Hardfill Lake) next to a fuel spill area. The primary constituents of concern for human health include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Monitored data showed these volatile constituents to be present in groundwater wells. The data also showed an elevated level of trace metals in groundwater.

  12. Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    climate- related physical or regulatory water shortage risks for power generation · Technology development : ­ Improved and Advanced Cooling Technologies project Our focus here EDF-EPRI "Water-Climate" partnership #12Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water and Energy Sustainability Denis AELBRECHT

  13. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ID-11263 January 2006 Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants U.S. Department of...

  14. Flood Risk Management As Being Practiced in Japan, Netherlands, United Kingdom,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;Flood Risk Management Approaches As Being Practiced in Japan, Netherlands, United Kingdom.........................................................................................................2 1.3 Flood Risk Management, A Conceptual Framework) ............................................................6 2.1.2 Flood Risk Assessment and the UK Flooding Foresight Study (United Kingdom).10 2

  15. STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1) for BUILDING 90 USER TEST BED FACILITY.G., GEOLOGIST/QSD (530) 222-4339 SWPPP Preparation Date: JUNE 10, 2012 #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan) 222-4339 Name and Title Telephone Number #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Building 90 User

  16. Produced water volumes and management practices in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C. E.; Veil, J. A.

    2009-09-01

    Produced water volume generation and management in the United States are not well characterized at a national level. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked Argonne National Laboratory to compile data on produced water associated with oil and gas production to better understand the production volumes and management of this water. The purpose of this report is to improve understanding of produced water by providing detailed information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the ways in which produced water is disposed or reused. As the demand for fresh water resources increases, with no concomitant increase in surface or ground water supplies, alternate water sources, like produced water, may play an important role. Produced water is water from underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil or gas production. Because the water has been in contact with hydrocarbon-bearing formations, it contains some of the chemical characteristics of the formations and the hydrocarbons. It may include water from the reservoir, water previously injected into the formation, and any chemicals added during the production processes. The physical and chemical properties of produced water vary considerably depending on the geographic location of the field, the geologic formation, and the type of hydrocarbon product being produced. Produced water properties and volume also vary throughout the lifetime of a reservoir. Produced water is the largest volume by-product or waste stream associated with oil and gas exploration and production. Previous national produced water volume estimates are in the range of 15 to 20 billion barrels (bbl; 1 bbl = 42 U.S. gallons) generated each year in the United States (API 1988, 2000; Veil et al. 2004). However, the details on generation and management of produced water are not well understood on a national scale. Argonne National Laboratory developed detailed national-level information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the manner in which produced water is managed. This report presents an overview of produced water, summarizes the study, and presents results from the study at both the national level and the state level. Chapter 2 presents background information on produced water, describing its chemical and physical characteristics, where it is produced, and the potential impacts of produced water to the environment and to oil and gas operations. A review of relevant literature is also included. Chapter 3 describes the methods used to collect information, including outreach efforts to state oil and gas agencies and related federal programs. Because of the inconsistency in the level of detail provided by various state agencies, the approaches and assumptions used to extrapolate data values are also discussed. In Chapter 4, the data are presented, and national trends and observations are discussed. Chapter 5 presents detailed results for each state, while Chapter 6 presents results from federal sources for oil and gas production (i.e., offshore, onshore, and tribal lands). Chapter 7 summarizes the study and presents conclusions.

  17. Risk Management Analysis of Our Water Infrastructure's Soft, Chewy Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolff, Mark

    2005-05-20

    National security has become a growing concern since the terrorist attacks on the United States in September of 2001. A safe public drinking water supply has undoubtedly always been considered a priority nationwide. Now, ...

  18. 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M extend from the northern margins of the Amazon rain for- ests to outliers on the southern borders metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

  19. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana Open Bays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1995-06-23

    Data were collected prior to termination of discharge at three sites (including two open bay sites at Delacroix Island and Bay De Chene) for the risk assessments. The Delacroix Island Oil and Gas Field has been in production since the first well drilling in 1940; the Bay De Chene Field, since 1942. Concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Po, and 228Th were measured in discharges. Radium conc. were measured in fish and shellfish tissues. Sediment PAH and metal conc. were also available. Benthos sampling was conducted. A survey of fishermen was conducted. The tiered risk assessment showed that human health risks from radium in produced water appear to be small; ecological risk from radium and other radionuclides in produced water also appear small. Many of the chemical contaminants discharged to open Louisiana bays appear to present little human health or ecological risk. A conservative screening analysis suggested potential risks to human health from Hg and Pb and a potential risk to ecological receptors from total effluent, Sb, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Ag, Zn, and phenol in the water column and PAHs in sediment; quantitiative risk assessments are being done for these contaminants.

  20. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  1. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  3. Water administration and the risk of syncope and presyncope during blood donation: A randomized clinical trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Berg, K; Lam, J; Bruhn, R; Custer, B; Murphy, EL

    2012-01-01

    COLLECTION Water administration and the risk of syncope andStudies have suggested administration of water beforeof pre- donation water administration in preventing syncope

  4. Prioritizing Water Pipe Replacement and Rehabilitation by Evaluating Failure Risk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Hyun

    2012-02-14

    .1 Problem Statement Damage to water pipes is influenced by various factors, including design, construction, and management. Grey cast iron pipes without any coating or lining in or outside and unlined ductile iron pipes (DIPs) are under the direct... ......................................................................................... 5 2.2 Methods to Access Failure Risk of Water Pipes................................. 6 2.2.1 Deterioration Point Assignment (DPA) Method ....................... 6 2.2.2 Break-even Analysis...

  5. Energy, Water and Fish: Biodiversity Impacts of Energy-Sector Water Demand in the United States Depend on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    Energy, Water and Fish: Biodiversity Impacts of Energy- Sector Water Demand in the United States to increase the impact of energy sector water use on freshwater biodiversity. We forecast changes in future: Biodiversity Impacts of Energy-Sector Water Demand in the United States Depend on Efficiency and Policy

  6. USDOE study: Human health and ecological risk assessment for produced water discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.; Hamilton, L.D.

    1994-12-31

    Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain high concentrations of radionuclides, organics and heavy metals. There are concerns about potential human health and ecological impacts from the discharge of these contaminants to the Gulf of Mexico. Data collected in the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) field study are being used in a series of human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will support scientifically-based regulation and risk management. This presentation: summarizes risk assessments performed for produced water discharges; describes how uncertainties in these assessments are guiding data collection efforts in the USDOE field study; and outlines ongoing risk assessment studies. In these studies, risk assessment is treated as an iterative process. An initial screening-level assessment is performed to identify important contaminants, transport and exposure pathways, and parameters. These intermediate results are used to guide data collection efforts and refinements to the analysis. At this stage in the analysis, risk is described in terms of probabilities; the uncertainties in each measured or modeled parameter are considered explicitly.

  7. United States and UAE Work Together on Energy and Water Nexus...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    United States and UAE Work Together on Energy and Water Nexus United States and UAE Work Together on Energy and Water Nexus December 15, 2014 - 9:00am Addthis Signing ceremony for...

  8. United States Environmental Protection Agency: Use of risk assessment and risk management methodologies. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamuro, R.J.

    1992-09-30

    Make a full investigation of the policy implications and appropriate uses of risk assessment and risk management in regulatory programs under various Federal laws to prevent cancer and other chronic health effects which may result from exposure to hazardous substances. This is the primary mission of the Risk Assessment and Management Commission (Risk Commission). The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), created the Risk Commission reflecting Congress' concern over agency use of risk assessment and risk management techniques and methodologies to implement federal laws protective of human health. The Risk Commission is to consider: methods for measuring and describing risks of chronic health effects from hazardous substances; methods to reflect uncertainties associated with estimation techniques, and whether it is possible or desirable to develop a consistent risk assessment methodology or a consistent standard of acceptable risk for various federal programs.

  9. Tropical cyclone precipitation risk in the Southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shedd, Sandra Michael

    2015-01-01

    This thesis works to evaluate the new rainfall algorithm that is used to simulate longterm tropical cyclone precipitation (TCP) climatology throughout the southeastern United States. The TCP climatology is based on a fleet ...

  10. Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LD Antrim; NP Kohn

    2000-09-05

    This report, PNNL-11911 Rev. 1, was published in July 2000 and replaces PNNL-11911, which was published in September 1998. The revision corrects tissue concentration units that were reported as dry weight but were actually wet weight, and updates conclusions based on the correct reporting units. Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in January 1998 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for the first post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and DDT were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared to pre-remediation data available from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissues) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Chlorinated pesticide concentrations in water samples were similar to pre-remediation levels and did not meet remediation goals. Mean dieldrin concentrations in water ranged from 0.65 ng/L to 18.1 ng/L and were higher than the remediation goal (0.14 ng/L) at all stations. Mean total DDT concentrations in water ranged from 0.65 ng/L to 103 ng/L and exceeded the remediation goal of 0.59 ng/L. The highest concentrations of both pesticides were found in Lauritzen Canal, and the lowest levels were from the Richmond Inner Harbor Channel water. Unusual amounts of detritus in the water column at the time of sampling, particularly in Lauritzen Canal, could have contributed to the elevated pesticide concentrations and poor analytical precision.

  11. Shallow ground-water flow, water levels, and quality of water, 1980-84, Cowles Unit, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, D.A.; Shedlock, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Cowles Unit of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in Porter County, northwest Indiana, contains a broad dune-beach complex along the southern shoreline of Lake Michigan and a large wetland, called the Great Marsh, that occupies the lowland between the shoreline dunes and an older dune-beach complex farther inland. Water levels and water quality in the surficial aquifer were monitored from 1977 to 1984 near settling ponds on adjacent industrial property at the western end of the Cowles Unit. Since 1980, when the settling pond bottoms were sealed, these intradunal lowlands contained standing water only during periods of high snowmelt or rainfall. Water level declines following the cessation of seepage ranged from 6 feet at the eastern-most settling pond to nearly 14 feet at the western-most pond. No general pattern of water table decline was observed in the Great Marsh or in the shoreline dune complex at distances > 3,000 ft east or north of the settling ponds. Since the settling ponds were sealed, the concentration of boron has decreased while concentrations of cadmium, arsenic, zinc, and molybdenum in shallow ground-water downgradient of the ponds show no definite trends in time. Arsenic, boron and molybdenum have remained at concentrations above those of shallow groundwater in areas unaffected by settling pond seepage. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, Kenneth M.

    2012-06-15

    Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

  13. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; Johnson, D.; Monier, Erwan; Strzepek, J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richness in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.

  14. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; et al

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richnessmore »in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.« less

  15. Water Management, Risk, and Uncertainty: Things We Wish We Knew in the 21st

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, W. Douglass

    Water Management, Risk, and Uncertainty: Things We Wish We Knew in the 21st Century [Forthcoming;1 Introduction A survey is offered of the most difficult and challenging issues to water managers in the 21st Century, focusing on the economics of risks and more so, uncertainty. Risk and uncertainty is addressed

  16. An Overview of Marine Biodiversity in United States Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; Dalton, Penelope; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Pautzke, Clarence; Rosenberg, Andrew; Sandifer, Paul A.; Sedberry, George R.; Tunnell, John W. Jr.; Abbott, Isabella; Brainard, Russell E.; Broduer, Melissa; Eldredge, Lucius G.; Feldman, Michael; Moretzsohn, Fabio; Vroom, Peter S.; Wainstein, Michelle; Wolf, Nicholas

    2010-08-02

    Marine biodiversity of the United States (U.S.) is extensively documented, but data assembled by the United States National Committee for the Census of Marine Life demonstrate that even the most complete taxonomic inventories are based on records...

  17. Econometric Analyses of Public Water Demand in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, David

    2012-02-14

    Two broad surveys of community- level water consumption and pricing behavior are used to answer questions about water demand in a more flexible and dynamic context than is provided in the literature. Central themes of price representation...

  18. Risk-Based Ranking Experiences for Cold War Legacy Facilities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past two decades, a number of government agencies in the United States have faced increasing public scrutiny for their efforts to address the wide range of potential environmental issues related to Cold War legacies. Risk-based ranking was selected as a means of defining the relative importance of issues. Ambitious facility-wide risk-based ranking applications were undertaken. However, although facility-wide risk-based ranking efforts can build invaluable understanding of the potential issues related to Cold War legacies, conducting such efforts is difficult because of the potentially enormous scope and the potentially strong institutional barriers. The U.S. experience is that such efforts are worth undertaking to start building a knowledge base and infrastructure that are based on a thorough understanding of risk. In both the East and the West, the legacy of the Cold War includes a wide range of potential environmental issues associated with large industrial complexes of weapon production facilities. The responsible agencies or ministries are required to make decisions that could benefit greatly from information on the relative importance of these potential issues. Facility-wide risk-based ranking of potential health and environmental issues is one means to help these decision makers. The initial U.S. risk-based ranking applications described in this chapter were “ground-breaking” in that they defined new methodologies and approaches to meet the challenges. Many of these approaches fit the designation of a population-centred risk assessment. These U.S. activities parallel efforts that are just beginning for similar facilities in the countries of the former Soviet Union. As described below, conducting a facility-wide risk-based ranking has special challenges and potential pitfalls. Little guidance exists to conduct major risk-based rankings. For those considering undertaking such efforts, the material contained in this chapter should be useful background information.

  19. Baseline risk assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. Cleanup of the site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU), consisting of the Weldon Spring quarry and its surrounding area, is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE is conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the proper response to address various contaminated media that constitute the QROU. Specifically, the operable unit consists of the following areas and media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and the bulk waste; groundwater underlying the quarry and surrounding area; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including surface water and sediment at Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek. An initial evaluation of conditions at the quarry area identified remaining data requirements needed to support the conceptual site exposure and hydrogeological models. These data requirements are discussed in the RI/FS work plan issued in January 1994. Soil contamination located at a property adjacent to the quarry, referred to as Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), was originally part of the scope of the QROU, as discussed in the work plan. However, a decision was subsequently made to remediate this vicinity property as part of cleanup activities for the chemical plant operable unit, as provided for in the Record of Decision (ROD). Remediation of VP9 was completed in early 1996. Hence, this baseline risk assessment (BRA) does not address VP9.

  20. PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1 , Andrew M. Parsons2 , Loren R. Anderson3 and Terry F. Glover4 ABSTRACT This paper summarises the Portfolio Risk Assessment (PRA a reconnaissance-level engineering assessment and risk assessment. These assessments were performed for floods

  1. United States 2015 Stockholm Junior Water Prize State Winners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    from Storm Water using Improved HDTMA Nano-Particle Enhanced Reactive Porous Concrete Auburn High-Exchanging, Biosorptive Permeable Barriers Collins Hill High School Science Teacher ­ Laura Herbid Sponsored

  2. Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States Kenneth://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation of Withdrawal and Consumption for Thermo-electric Systems (WiCTS) is formalized. This empirically

  3. Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern Evan Torline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern of its residents are living without access to clean drinking water. This simple issue causes terrible community of Mol, Haiti before the implementation of a chlorine water filtration system in it. A handful

  4. Energy Savings and Breakeven Costs for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, Jeff; Burch, Jay; Merrigan, Tim; Ong, Sean

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently re-emerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, NREL performed simulations of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern United States. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern United States, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  5. Risk Perception and Willingness to Pay for Removing Arsenic in Drinking Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sihong

    2012-10-19

    relating to arsenic in drinking water employing contingent valuation in U.S. arsenic hot spots. Re-cent studies have shown that perceived risk is a more reliable variable than scientific assessments of risk when applied to interpret and predict individual...

  6. Comparison of Advanced Residential Water Heating Technologies in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, Jeff; Fang, Xia; Wilson, Eric

    2013-05-01

    In this study, gas storage, gas tankless, condensing, electric storage, heat pump, and solar water heaters were simulated in several different climates across the United States, installed in both conditioned and unconditioned space and subjected to several different draw profiles. While many pre-existing models were used, new models of condensing and heat pump water heaters were created specifically for this work. In each case modeled, the whole house was simulated along with the water heater to capture any interactions between the water heater and the space conditioning equipment.

  7. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    The condition of a water well and its proximity to contamination sources determine the risk it poses to ground water. Topics covered include well location, well construction, well age and type, well depth, well maintenance, water testing...

  8. Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.

    2011-05-09

    Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

  9. Incorporation of Agricultural Risk into Water Resource Planning Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    , domestic, municipal, agricultural and industrial uses of water, ... and all relevant means (including nonstructural as well as structural measures) singly, in combination, or in alternative combinations reflecting different choice patterns for providing...

  10. The role of the United States Water Resources Engineering Community in responding to the water related needs of the developing world 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ormond, Timothy Paul

    1993-01-01

    THK ROLE OF THK UNITED STATES WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING COMMUNITY IN RESPONDING TO THE WATER- RELATED NEEDS OF THK DEVELOPING WORLD A Thesis by TIMOTHY PAUL ORMOND Submitted to thc Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM Vnivcrsdy... in partial fulfdlmcnt of the requirements for thc dcgrcc of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THF. ROLE OF THE UNITED STATES WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING COMMUNITY IN RESPONDING TO THE WATER-RELATED NEEDS OF THE DEVELOPING...

  11. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-07-11

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

  12. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-05-16

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

  13. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

  14. Feasibility Study of Developing a Virtual Chilled Water Flow Meter at Air Handling Unit Level 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, L.; Swamy, A.; Shim, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a virtual Air handling unit (AHU) level water flow meter is explored by using a control valve as a measurement device. The flow through the valve is indirectly calculated using differential pressure over both the valve and its...

  15. 22 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. LIST O F WATER PLANTS POR CARP PONDS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .-Narrow-leaved Oat-tail. Very common. Less common,but found in this District and notably in a pond near the foot22 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. LIST O F WATER PLANTS POR CARP PONDS. B y LESTER. Rudolph Hessel, Superintendent of the Carp Ponds. The names given in that list where obsolete are placed

  16. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  17. Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  19. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-22

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has a program of research in the environmental aspects of oil and gas extraction. This sampling project will characterize the environmental impacts associated with the discharge of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), metals and organics in produced water. This report is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico, supported by the USDOE. These assessments are being coordinated with the field study, using the collected data to perform human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the development and use of appropriate discharge practices. The initial human health and ecological risk assessments consist of conservative screening analyses meant to identify potentially important contaminants, and to eliminate others from further consideration. More quantitative assessments were done for contaminants identified, in the screening analysis, as being of potential concern. Section 2 gives an overview of human health and ecological risk assessment to help put the analyses presented here in perspective. Section 3 provides the hazard assessment portion of the risk assessment, and identifies the important receptors and pathways of concern. Section 3 also outlines the approach taken to the risk assessments presented in the rest of the report. The remaining sections (4 through 9) present the human health and ecological risk assessments for discharges of produced water to open bays in Louisiana.

  20. Statistical estimation of water distribution system pipe break risk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamijala, Shridhar

    2009-05-15

    of support or bedding. 5) Soil movement: Subsidence due to mining, filled land etc. Differential consolidation or geological changes. Changes in water table or soil moisture content. Extremes of climate such as frost heave or clay shrinkage. Loss....021 and 0.014 for pit cast iron and sandspun cast iron pipes respectively, when they employed a similar modeling approach on other datasets. 16 The Shamir and Howard models are one of the first attempts to statistically analyze break records...

  1. Radioactive Water Treatment at a United States Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Site - 12322

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, John C.

    2012-07-01

    A water treatment system at a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Superfund site impacted by radiological contaminants is used to treat water entering the site. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is actively managing the remedial action for the USEPA using contracts to support the multiple activities on site. The site is where former gas mantle production facilities operated around the turn of the century. The manufacturing facilities used thorium ores to develop the mantles and disposed of off-specification mantles and ore residuals in the surrounding areas. During Site remedial actions, both groundwater and surface water comes into contact with contaminated soils and must be collected and treated at an on-site treatment facility. The radionuclides thorium and radium with associated progeny are the main concern for treatment. Suspended solids, volatile organic compounds, and select metals are also monitored during water treatment. The water treatment process begins were water is pumped to a collection tank where debris and grit settle out. Stored water is pumped to a coagulant tank containing poly-aluminum chloride to collect dissolved solids. The water passes into a reaction tube where aspirated air is added or reagent added to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC'S) by mass transfer and convert dissolved iron to a solid. The water enters the flocculent polymer tank to drop solids out. The flocculated water overflows to a fluidized bed contact chamber to increase precipitation. Flocculation is where colloids of material drop out of suspension and settle. The settled solids are periodically removed and disposed of as radioactive waste. The water is passed through filters and an ion exchange process to extract the radionuclides. Several million liters of water are processed each year from two water treatment plants servicing different areas of the remediation site. Ion exchange resin and filter material are periodically replaced and disposed of as radioactive waste. A total of 0.85 m{sup 3} of waste sludge per year requires disposal on average, in addition to another 6.6 m{sup 3} of waste cartridge filters. All water discharges are regulated by a state of New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit implemented by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Clean Water Act). Laboratory analyses are required to satisfy requirements of the state NPDES permit. Specific monitoring parameters and discharge rates will be provided. Use of the water treatment systems drastically reduces the amount of contaminated water requiring solidification and water disposal to near zero. Millions of liters of potentially contaminated water from excavation activities is treated and released within permit limits. A small volume of solid radioactive waste (21 cubic meters) is generated annually from water treatment process operations. Management of ground and surface water is effectively controlled in remediation areas by the use of sumps, erosion control measures and pumping of water to storage vessels. Continued excavations can be made as water impacting the site is effectively controlled. (authors)

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

  3. Design and Operation of Fan-Coil Units in Using River Water as Chilled Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, A.; Chen, H.; Ma, W.; Zhu, H.

    2006-01-01

    and the properties of indoor-air, and so on. Especially, the temperature of inlet-water can not only make a strong impact on the capacity of the energy afforded by FCUs, but also affect the economic capability of the whole air-conditioning system directly.... As a rule, the designers of A/C systems pay more attention to the design of the inlet-water temperature of FCUs, and many correlative criteria have been established. Generally, considering the economic benefit of an air-conditioning system wholly...

  4. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1996-06-01

    This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

  5. Water Resources Development, Vol. 14, No. 3, 315 325, 1998 Hydrologic Modelling of the United States with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , water demands, point- sources of pollution, and land management affecting non-point pollution planning related to water and land management issues. Models are often required to assess the impacts and risks of management alternatives on the availability and quality of water in large and complex river

  6. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J.

    2011-02-24

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  7. Arsenic in your water?: Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    in rocks, soils, and the waters in contact with them, and its contamination of groundwater is largely the result of minerals dissolv- ing from weathered rocks and soils. Groundwater arsenic contamination is widespread in Texas, especially in South... stream_source_info Arsenic in your water.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5400 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Arsenic in your water.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Arsenic...

  8. Option Markets for Water in California: Effective Management of Water Supply Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Price Agricultural Node Option Price Table 2. Comparison ofStrike Price (Percentage Above Average Water Value). Tableprice, option value at the higher-value C5 is higher than at C3. Table

  9. Analyzing risk and uncertainty for improving water distribution system security from malevolent water supply contamination events 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Jacob Manuel

    2009-05-15

    subject to an intentional water contamination event. A Monte Carlo simulation is conducted including uncertain stochastic diurnal demand patterns, seasonal demand, initial storage tank levels, time of day of contamination initiation, duration...

  10. Demand-Supply Optimization with Risk Management for a Multi-Connection Water Reservoir Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatpatanasiri, Ratthachat

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework to solve a demand-supply optimization problem of long-term water resource allocation on a multi-connection reservoir network which, in two aspects, is different to the problem considered in previous works. First, while all previous works consider a problem where each reservoir can transfer water to only one fixed reservoir, we consider a multi-connection network being constructed in Thailand in which each reservoir can transfer water to many reservoirs in one period of time. Second, a demand-supply plan considered here is static, in contrast to a dynamic policy considered in previous works. Moreover, in order to efficiently develop a long-term static plan, a severe loss (a risk) is taken into account, i.e. a risk occurs if the real amount of water stored in each reservoir in each time period is less than what planned by the optimizer. The multi-connection function and the risk make the problem rather complex such that traditional stochastic dynamic programming and determi...

  11. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01

    market research on solar water heaters. National Renewabletankless combined space/water heaterds, solar water heaters,combined solar space/water heater, electric water heaters

  12. Risk-informed applications and online maintenance in France and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdier, Edouard (Edouard Pierre Emmanuel)

    2012-01-01

    During the past twenty-five years, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been progressing toward a more risk-informed, performance-based regulation. This regulatory framework has effectively supported the development ...

  13. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01

    fact, not new to utility planning, and a variety of authorson other aspects of the utility planning environment (e.g. ,regulatory risk for utility policy, planning, and investment

  14. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01

    fact, not new to utility planning, and a variety of authorson other aspects of the utility planning environment (e.g. ,regulatory risk for utility policy, planning, and investment

  15. Integrated Risk Assessment for the LaSalle Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant, Phenomenology and Risk Uncertainty Evaluation Program (PRUEP), MELCOR code calculations. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaffer, C.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, L.A.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1992-10-01

    A Level III Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has been performed for LaSalle Unit 2 under the Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP) and the Phenomenology and Risk Uncertainty Evaluation Program (PRUEP). This report documents the phenomenological calculations and sources of. uncertainty in the calculations performed with HELCOR in support of the Level II portion of the PRA. These calculations are an integral part of the Level II analysis since they provide quantitative input to the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) and Source Term Model (LASSOR). However, the uncertainty associated with the code results must be considered in the use of the results. The MELCOR calculations performed include four integrated calculations: (1) a high-pressure short-term station blackout, (2) a low-pressure short-term station blackout, (3) an intermediate-term station blackout, and (4) a long-term station blackout. Several sensitivity studies investigating the effect of variations in containment failure size and location, as well as hydrogen ignition concentration are also documented.

  16. Integrated Risk Assessment for the LaSalle Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant, Phenomenology and Risk Uncertainty Evaluation Program (PRUEP), MELCOR code calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaffer, C.J. (Science and Engineering Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Miller, L.A.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1992-10-01

    A Level III Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has been performed for LaSalle Unit 2 under the Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP) and the Phenomenology and Risk Uncertainty Evaluation Program (PRUEP). This report documents the phenomenological calculations and sources of. uncertainty in the calculations performed with HELCOR in support of the Level II portion of the PRA. These calculations are an integral part of the Level II analysis since they provide quantitative input to the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) and Source Term Model (LASSOR). However, the uncertainty associated with the code results must be considered in the use of the results. The MELCOR calculations performed include four integrated calculations: (1) a high-pressure short-term station blackout, (2) a low-pressure short-term station blackout, (3) an intermediate-term station blackout, and (4) a long-term station blackout. Several sensitivity studies investigating the effect of variations in containment failure size and location, as well as hydrogen ignition concentration are also documented.

  17. Agility and Risk Management at Pacific Life: Optimizing Business Unit Autonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Jeanne W.

    2007-12-01

    Pacific Life is a diversified financial services company with a history of autonomous business units. Pacific Life had five independent divisions, including Life Insurance, Annuities and Mutual Funds, and Investments. These ...

  18. Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-04-28

    A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

  19. 320 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2000 SEASONAL RISK ANALYSIS FOR FLOODPLAINS IN THE DELAWARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    320 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2000 SEASONAL RISK ANALYSIS FOR FLOODPLAINS IN THE DELAWARE RIVER BASIN By Kirk Weiler,1 M. Todd Walter,2 Michael F. Walter,3

  20. A Risk-based Optimization Modeling Framework for Mitigating Fire Events for Water and Fire Response Infrastructures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanta, Lufthansa Rahman

    2011-02-22

    ) minimizing the cost of mitigation. Third, a stochastic modeling approach is developed to assess urban fire risk for the coupled water distribution and fire response systems that includes probabilistic expressions for building ignition, WDS failure, and wind...

  1. Impact of a retrofitted heat-recovery unit on an existing residential heat pump and water heater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, K.M.; Fischler, S.

    1980-01-01

    Two heat-recovery units were retrofitted, one at a time, with one heat pump and one storage-type water heater to produce two integrated heat pump - heat recovery unit - water heater systems. Each system was operated with appropriate measuring devices to determine the effect(s) of using the retrofit heat recovery unit on the performance of the heat pump and water heater. The system was operated with the outdoor unit of the heat pump in an environmental chamber with outdoor temperatures of 75, 85, 95, and 20F. The indoor unit of the heat pump was in an environmental chamber whose indoor temperature was set at 80F when the outdoor temperature was 75, 85, 95F, and 70F when the outdoor temperature was set at 20F. The indoor relative humidity was maintained at approximately 50%. The heat recovery unit and water heater were in an environmental chamber set at the basement temperature of 65F with 50% relative humidity.

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

  3. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01

    heaterds, solar water heaters, combined solar space/watermarket research on solar water heaters. National Renewableheaters, combined space heating and water heating appliances 3 , solar

  4. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01

    change and global water resources. Global Environmentalin Managing International Water Resources (No. WPS 1303):Darcy Lecture Tour. Ground Water, 45(4), 390-391. Sadoff,

  5. Correlation between water-vapor transport from the Gulf of Mexico and precipitation in the eastern United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, John Vinson

    1973-01-01

    CORRELATION BETWEEN WATER-V'POR TRANSPORT FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO AND PR CIPITATION IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES A Thesis John Vinson Wright, Jr. Subiaitted to the Gw. . duate College ot Texas A&M University in parti ' fulfillment... of the reourres, ent for the degre oi MASTER OF SCIENCE May 197B Ma]or Sub]ect: Meteorology CORRELATION BETWEEN WATER-VAPOR TRANSPORT FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO AND PRECIPITATION IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATFS A Thesis by John Vinson Wright, Jr. Approved ac...

  6. Sampling and analysis plan for treatment water and creek water for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the methodology, organizational structure, quality assurance and health and safety practices to be employed during the water sampling and analysis activities associated with the remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit during remediation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Bruner sites.

  7. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01

    primary water management activities being considered relate to treatment of wastewater andprimary water concerns of the region: treatment of wastewater,

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  9. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    to use forecasts." Risk Analysis 25(5): 1265- Oreskes, N. (P. C. (1977). "Mean-Risk Analysis with Risk Associated withChavas, J. -P. (2004). Risk Analysis in Theory and Practice.

  10. Searching for Comparative International Water Research: Urban and Rural Water Conservation Research in India and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wescoat, James

    Comparison is common in water management research: every table, map, and graph invites comparisons of different places and variables. Detailed international comparisons, however, seem infrequent in water resources research. ...

  11. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01

    in United States New Construction Market Alex B. Lekov,in United States New Construction Market Alex B. Lekov,New single-family home construction represents a significant

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  13. United: How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    . A?er a major drought in the ????s, the Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill ? in ????, which called for a comprehensive water management planning process and a water availability modeling system to make e?ective management of the surface water... as any possible impacts it might have on existing water rights in the basin. ?If someone applies for a new water right, we have many requirements, one of which is that we have to ?nd that the water is available, a?er we look at all existing water...

  14. Final Report: Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-01

    Potential human health and environmental impacts from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico are of concern to regulators at the State and Federal levels, the public, environmental interest groups and industry. Current and proposed regulations require a zero discharge limit for coastal facilities, based primarily on studies in low energy, poorly flushed environments. However, produced water discharges in coastal Louisiana include a number of open bay sites, where potential human health and environmental impacts are likely to be smaller than those demonstrated for low energy canal environments, but greater than the minimal impacts associated with offshore discharges. Additional data and assessments are needed to support risk managers at the State and Federal levels in the development of regulations that protect human health and the environment without unnecessary cost to the economic welfare of the region and the nation. This project supports the Natural Gas and Oil Initiative objectives to: (1) improve coordination on environmental research; (2) streamline State and Federal regulation; (3) enhance State, and Federal regulatory decision making capability; (4) enhance dialogue through industry/government/public partnerships; and (5) work with States and Native American Tribes.

  15. Mapping water availability, projected use and cost in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent C. Tidwell; Barbara D. Moreland; Katie M. Zemlick; Barry L. Roberts; Howard D. Passell; Daniel Jensen; Christopher Forsgren; Gerald Sehlke; Margaret A. Cook; Carey W. King

    2014-06-01

    New demands for water can be satisfied through a variety of source options. In some basins surface and/or groundwater may be available through permitting with the state water management agency (termed unappropriated water), alternatively water might be purchased and transferred out of its current use to another (termed appropriated water), or non-traditional water sources can be captured and treated (e.g., wastewater). The relative availability and cost of each source are key factors in the development decision. Unfortunately, these measures are location dependent with no consistent or comparable set of data available for evaluating competing water sources. With the help of western water managers, water availability was mapped for over 1200 watersheds throughout the western US. Five water sources were individually examined, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water, municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped was projected change in consumptive water use from 2010 to 2030. Associated costs to acquire, convey and treat the water, as necessary, for each of the five sources were estimated. These metrics were developed to support regional water planning and policy analysis with initial application to electric transmission planning in the western US.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  17. Dresden Unit 2 hydrogen water chemistry: Chemical surveillance, oxide-film characterization, and recontamination during Cycle 10: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, C.P.; Peterson, J.P.; Robinson, R.N.; Sundberg, L.L.

    1989-03-01

    This document provides an Executive Summary of work performed under Project RP1930-7, BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry - Chemical Surveillance. It describes the work performed to monitor chemical and radiological performance at Commonwealth Edison's Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 2 during Cycle 10, its second full fuel cycle on Hydrogen Water Chemistry. It includes the results of water chemistry measurements, shutdown gamma scan/dose rate measurements, and the results of stainless steel oxide film characterization. This experience at Dresden-2 continues to demonstrate that a plant can operate on Hydrogen Water Chemistry with only minor impact on plant parameters, compared with the beneficial effect on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of sensitized stainless steel components. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Chapter 16: Log-linear regression for Poisson counts Exposure to ionizing radiation is recognized as a cancer risk. In the United States, EPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    as a cancer risk. In the United States, EPA sets guidelines specifying upper limits on the amount of exposure groups than low exposure. The objective of regression analysis is to estimate the rate of cancer deaths cases or deaths attributable to cancer) using a number of explanatory variables believed to be related

  19. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    R. B. Lammers (2000). "Global water resources: Vulnerabilityin two small watersheds." Water Resources Research 18(3).of a warming climate on water availability in snow-dominated

  20. International cooperation between the United States and Mexico: addressing water quality of the Lower Rio Grande 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouch, Kellie Gene

    1997-01-01

    Water quantities of the Lower Rio Grande were apportioned between Mexico and Texas through a treaty in 1944. The treaty defines the mandate of the International Boundary and Water Commission, an international institution ...

  1. Public Attitudes toward Water Management and Drought in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoutenborough, James W.; Vedlitz, Arnold

    2013-12-19

    Water management is becoming increasingly salient as climate change continues to alter the environment, resulting in more severe and frequent droughts. To address water management issues, large-scale projects may be needed. ...

  2. The Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH,

  3. A Critical Review of the Risks to Water Resources from Unconventional Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    A Critical Review of the Risks to Water Resources from Unconventional Shale Gas Development: The rapid rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has expanded the extraction of hydrocarbon resources in the U.S. The rise of shale gas development has

  4. Sunlight inactivation of fecal indicator bacteria in open-water unit process wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Mi T.

    2015-01-01

    water wetlands, utilizes geotextile fabrics on the wetlandwas lined with concrete and geotextile fabric to prevent the

  5. Risk Management Policy 1 Risk Management Policy (December, 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Risk Management Policy 1 Risk Management Policy (December, 2014) Risk Management Policy Responsible Governance Level Principle No. 2 - Risk Management Responsible Organisational Unit Audit & Risk CONTENTS 1 ........................................................................................................2 3.1 Effective Risk Management

  6. Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie M.; Macknick, Jordan

    2013-07-01

    As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

  7. The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in water and energy efficient technologies and policies between water and energy and to use and allocate both more efficiently. Collaborating with partners

  8. Sandia Energy - Security Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Risk Assessment Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Security Risk Assessment Security Risk Assessmentcwdd2015-05-04T21:...

  9. Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.

    2007-03-01

    Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

  10. Drinking fountains : the past and future of free public water in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Josselyn

    2015-01-01

    Drinking fountains have a rich history as pieces of urban infrastructure in the United States. Installed in prominent public squares to reduce disease, help the poor, and promote a temperance agenda, early American drinking ...

  11. A SCOPING STUDY: Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Reactivity Insertion Accidents During Shutdown In U.S. Commercial Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Khericha

    2011-06-01

    This report documents the scoping study of developing generic simplified fuel damage risk models for quantitative analysis from inadvertent reactivity insertion events during shutdown (SD) in light water pressurized and boiling water reactors. In the past, nuclear fuel reactivity accidents have been analyzed both mainly deterministically and probabilistically for at-power and SD operations of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since then, many NPPs had power up-rates and longer refueling intervals, which resulted in fuel configurations that may potentially respond differently (in an undesirable way) to reactivity accidents. Also, as shown in a recent event, several inadvertent operator actions caused potential nuclear fuel reactivity insertion accident during SD operations. The set inadvertent operator actions are likely to be plant- and operation-state specific and could lead to accident sequences. This study is an outcome of the concern which arose after the inadvertent withdrawal of control rods at Dresden Unit 3 in 2008 due to operator actions in the plant inadvertently three control rods were withdrawn from the reactor without knowledge of the main control room operator. The purpose of this Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Model development project is to develop simplified SPAR Models that can be used by staff analysts to perform risk analyses of operating events and/or conditions occurring during SD operation. These types of accident scenarios are dominated by the operator actions, (e.g., misalignment of valves, failure to follow procedures and errors of commissions). Human error probabilities specific to this model were assessed using the methodology developed for SPAR model human error evaluations. The event trees, fault trees, basic event data and data sources for the model are provided in the report. The end state is defined as the reactor becomes critical. The scoping study includes a brief literature search/review of historical events, developments of a small set of comprehensive event trees and fault trees and recommendation for future work.

  12. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2009-05-06

    New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

  13. National radiation exposures and risks caused by implementing EPA`s proposed revised national primary drinking water regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1993-05-01

    This report estimates risks to workers and the public associated with treatment processes and their associated waste products that would be mandated under proposed regulations of radium, radon, and uranium in drinking water. Three scenarios were examined: (1) all wastes flushed to the sanitary sewer; (2) all wastes disposed on land; (3) similar to (2) but radon removal by granulated activated carbon rather than packed tower aeration. Risks considered included accidental injury and cancer. Worker risks for both scenarios I and II were estimated to be 0.025 and 0.01 deaths per year of operation for radium-226 and radium-228, respectively. Worker risks for uranium were estimated to be 0.13 deaths/year of operation for scenario I and 0.5 deaths/year of operation for scenario II. Worker risks for radon removal were estimated to be 1.7 deaths/year of operation for scenario I and 2.2 deaths/year of operation for scenario II. Risks to the public for scenarios I and II for radium-226 were 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and for radium-228 were 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} deaths/year of operation. Risks to the public for scenarios I and II for uranium were 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} and 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. Risks to the public for scenario I and II for radon were 24 deaths/year of operation and for scenario III were nil. Public risks were quantified only for people exposed during a year of operation. For example, effects of public exposures in future years via groundwater contamination associated with landfill of treatment waste were not considered.

  14. Comparison of Advanced Residential Water Heating Technologies in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Fang, X.; Wilson, E.

    2013-05-01

    Gas storage, gas tankless, condensing, electric storage, heat pump, and solar water heaters were simulated in several different climates across the US installed in both conditioned and unconditioned space and subjected to several different draw profiles. While many preexisting models were used, new models of condensing and heat pump water heaters were created specifically for this work.

  15. Water administration and the risk of syncope and presyncope during blood donation: A randomized clinical trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Berg, K; Lam, J; Bruhn, R; Custer, B; Murphy, EL

    2012-01-01

    Syncope or presyn- Water arm Control arm cope occurred in 23events between the water and control arms of our cope eventsby volume of water regression modeling to control for drunk*

  16. Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA of drinking water from domestic wells Future direction and challenges List of references Tables Figure Legends

  17. The Economic Value of Irrigation Water in the Western United States: An Application to Ridge Regression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, M. D.; Beattie, B. R.

    1979-01-01

    the form of a multiplicative function with nine domain variables, i.e., irrigation water applied, value of land and buildings, hired labor expenditures, fuel and lubricant expenditures, fertilizer and lime expenditures, feed expenditures, value of machinery...

  18. A review of water and greenhouse gas impacts of unconventional natural gas development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, Doug; Logan, Jeff; Macknick, Jordan; Boyd, William; Medlock , Kenneth; O'Sullivan, Francis; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Huntington, Hill; Heath, Garvin; Statwick, Patricia M.; Bazilian, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in the production and use of unconventional natural gas in the United States with a focus on water and greenhouse gas emission implications. If unconventional natural gas in the U.S. is produced responsibly, transported and distributed with little leakage, and incorporated into integrated energy systems that are designed for future resiliency, it could play a significant role in realizing a more sustainable energy future; however, the increased use of natural gas as a substitute for more carbon intensive fuels will alone not substantially alter world carbon dioxide concentration projections.

  19. Recommendations for at-risk water supplies in Capiz Province, Philippines : using water source and community assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, Jessica Molly

    2010-01-01

    The following thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Provincial Health Office (PHO) in Capiz Province, Philippines for expert advice to support its drinking water quality testing ...

  20. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

  1. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Supporting MELCOR calculations, Volume 6, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Brown, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of the risk significance of low power and shutdown modes of operation, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research at the NRC established programs to investigate the likelihood and severity of postulated accidents that could occur during low power and shutdown (LP&S) modes of operation at commercial nuclear power plants. To investigate the likelihood of severe core damage accidents during off power conditions, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) were performed for two nuclear plants: Unit 1 of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, which is a BWR-6 Mark III boiling water reactor (BWR), and Unit 1 of the Surry Power Station, which is a three-loop, subatmospheric, pressurized water reactor (PWR). The analysis of the BWR was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories while the analysis of the PWR was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This multi-volume report presents and discusses the results of the BWR analysis. The subject of this part presents the deterministic code calculations, performed with the MELCOR code, that were used to support the development and quantification of the PRA models. The background for the work documented in this report is summarized, including how deterministic codes are used in PRAS, why the MELCOR code is used, what the capabilities and features of MELCOR are, and how the code has been used by others in the past. Brief descriptions of the Grand Gulf plant and its configuration during LP&S operation and of the MELCOR input model developed for the Grand Gulf plant in its LP&S configuration are given.

  2. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

  3. Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yong B.

    2006-08-16

    Factors related to operations of a well that impact drilling uncertainties in the shallow water region of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) can be directly linked to the site specific issues; such as water depth and local geological ...

  4. Impacts of Water Loop Management on Simultaneous Heating and Cooling in Coupled Control Air Handling Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guan, W.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.

    1998-01-01

    The impacts of the water loop management on the heating and cooling energy consumption are investigated by using model simulation. The simulation results show that the total thermal energy consumption can be increased by 24% for a typical AHU in San...

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER Managing climate change risks in New York City's water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the effects of climate change must become a regular part of planning for water supply, sewer, wastewater Protection (NYCDEP), the agency responsible for managing New York City's (NYC) water supply, sewer focuses on the water supply, sewer, and wastewater treatment systems of NYC, but has wide application

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  7. Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasekh, Amin

    2012-10-19

    of terrorism, several aspects of emergency management for WDSs remain at an undeveloped stage. A set of methods is developed to analyze the risk and consequences of WDS contamination events and develop emergency response support tools. Monte Carlo...

  8. Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

    2008-01-01

    2481 0.5 2.8 Average 0.082 + 0.053 518 2431 0.6 2.7 Note: Data from Test #4 was not used as it was inconsistent, indicating measurement problems/errors. 2 C R 3 1 5 0 ( I N S P I R A T I O N R D ) CR 1 7300 (MIL E 8 N ) C R 3 3 0 0 N... ( T R O S P E R R D ) F M 6 8 1 ( M O O R E F I E L D R D ) C R 3 2 0 0 N ( L O S E B A N O S R D ) FM 68 1 (F M 2 221 ) CR 1 7400 (MIL E 8 1/2 N ) United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County ? Mission, Texas ission, Texas Legend...

  9. Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RECHARD,ROBERT P.

    2000-07-14

    This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

  10. Estimation of the urban household demand for water in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Henry Sessam

    1977-01-01

    Htctec FIi3iiary Academy Chai:man of Advisory Commi. t Lee: Br. iiruce R. B' aItie This research was rnndertai~en to specify;. nd estimat? model rc- 1- ting household demand lor urban water i. o its principal dcLcrImLnun Ls. Feud specif ic objectives... were ustabldshed to guide the analysis: To postulaLo; n srpropriaLc:-c nomic demand mcdcl for house- ho]ds uh To estimate. pam motors of *hc model based. on pcoi cd data re?resent' ng uli. of the U. H, '3. To csc-blish cL ULor:a for a. breawdcwn...

  11. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Potential Evapotranspiration .. 39 2.9.2 Applied water demands 39 2.10 Urban demands and supplies.. 40 2.11 In-stream flows and hydropower .

  12. Foreign offshore worker injuries in foreign waters: why a United States forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutterfield, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    When foreigners are injured or killed in offshore oil operations in foreign jurisdictional waters, US laws do not always apply as they would if the plaintiffs are American or resident aliens. The courts must first consider whether the Jones Act, Death on the High Seas Act, general maritime law, or a combination of laws applies and whether the court should assume jurisdiction or use the doctrine of forum non conveniens. Cases involving foreign offshore workers are used to illustrate the factors involved in each application and to consider the foreign-policy implication when foreign nationals assume that American laws and morality accompany multinational business. Congress has yet to resolve the issues, although a bill was proposed in 1980. 75 references. (DCK)

  13. Guidance on risk analysis and safety implications of a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Gerald William; Melof, Brian Matthew; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Irwin, Michael James; Kaneshige, Michael Jiro; Morrow, Charles W.

    2004-12-01

    While recognized standards exist for the systematic safety analysis of potential spills or releases from LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) storage terminals and facilities on land, no equivalent set of standards or guidance exists for the evaluation of the safety or consequences from LNG spills over water. Heightened security awareness and energy surety issues have increased industry's and the public's attention to these activities. The report reviews several existing studies of LNG spills with respect to their assumptions, inputs, models, and experimental data. Based on this review and further analysis, the report provides guidance on the appropriateness of models, assumptions, and risk management to address public safety and property relative to a potential LNG spill over water.

  14. Commercial HVAC and Water-Heating Equipment Minimum Efficiency Standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasseri, Cyrus H.; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2001-08-01

    ABSTRACT In 1992, Federal legislation mandated that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) set the efficiency levels in the then-current ASHRAE Standard 90.1 as mandatory minimums for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and service water-heating (SWH) equipment sold in the U.S. market, as well as a process for revising the minimum equipment efficiency standards to comply with requirements in an updated Standard 90.1. Because Standard 90.1 was updated in October 1999 (Standard 90.1-1999), DOE is now undertaking a rulemaking process for these equipment categories. In January 2001, DOE published a final rule adopting Standard 90.1-1999 levels as uniform national standards for 18 product categories of commercial HVAC and SWH equipment. For 11 other categories of commercial products, DOE has signaled its intention to consider more stringent standards than those adopted by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE). DOE has now initiated a formal rulemaking process to further analyze these equipment categories.

  15. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Household wastewater treatment systems (septic systems) can contaminate ground water unless they are properly designed, constructed and maintained. This publication describes various kinds of systems and guides the homeowner in assessing...

  16. Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

    2007-01-01

    In general, preventing water pollution from motor vehiclestransportation on water pollution (Litman 2002), and acosts of controlling water pollution from motor vehicles. It

  17. Ann Williamson, Deputy Director, Office of Environmental Assessment Mike Cox, Manager, Risk Assessment Unit, Office of Environmental Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment Unit, Office of Environmental Assessment U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ­ Region 10 Greg to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council on June 11, 2008, to provide an update on EPA's national commitment Report for review. This letter will provide some compelling information from that working draft which we

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With"...

  19. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 3: Appendixes E and F -- Risk assessment information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  20. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 3. Risk assessment information. Appendixes E, F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 3 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  1. Water, water everywhere,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    1 Water, water everywhere, but is it safe to drink? An Inquiry-based unit investigating the journey of your drinking water from source to tap of drinking water will contain different contaminants, based on surrounding land uses (guided inquiry activity

  2. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  3. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Main Report and Appendix A: Evaluates water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects.

  4. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimated UseofWaterintheUnitedStatesin2005 Trends in estimated water use in the United States.L., Hutson, S.S., Linsey, K.S., Lovelace, J.K., and Maupin, M.A., 2009, Estimated use of water in the United

  5. UNITED STATES PARTMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES PARTMENT OF lMMERCE J8l1CATION SEATTLE, WA IOVEMBER 1973 FISHERY FACTS-6 U. S of foreign fishing off United States coastal waters, and the aevelopment and enforce- ment of international;ABSTRACT Dungeness crabs, Cancer magister, occur in the inshore waters of t he west coast of the United

  6. EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

  7. Timber Harvest Impacts on Water Yield in the Continental/Maritime Hydroclimatic Region of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timber Harvest Impacts on Water Yield in the Continental/Maritime Hydroclimatic Region and two different harvest practices (50% clearcut, 50% partial cut). The change in water yield harvesting. Monthly and seasonal analyses revealed the largest impacts of harvest practices on water yield

  8. United Sates Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    United Sates Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water (4305) EPA/823/B/95/003 August 1995 QUAL2E Windows Interface User's Guide #12;QUAL2E Windows Interface User's Guide United States

  9. Charting new territories together : laying the foundations for mutual gains in United States - Mexico water and energy negotiations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdini Trejo, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    This research examines two landmark negotiations between the United States and Mexico. The first involves the conflict over the shared hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico. The second analyzes the dispute over the ...

  10. Polymer treatments for D Sand water injection wells: Sooner D Sand Unit Weld County, Colorado. Final report, April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, T.J.

    1998-10-01

    Polymer-gel treatments in injection wells were evaluated for improving sweep efficiency in the D Sandstone reservoir at the Sooner Unit, Weld County, Colorado. Polymer treatments of injection wells at the Sooner Unit were expected to improve ultimate recovery by 1.0 percent of original-oil-in-place of 70,000 bbl of oil. The Sooner D Sand Unit was a demonstration project under the US Department of Energy Class I Oil Program from which extensive reservoir data and characterization were obtained. Thus, successful application of polymer-gel treatments at the Sooner Unit would be a good case-history example for other operators of waterfloods in Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs in the Denver Basin.

  11. Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

    2007-01-01

    groundwater pollution; motor-vehicle transportation;Non-point Source Water Pollution Motor vehicles are a majorSecond, as motor vehicle pollution is often released in tiny

  12. Runoff Variability and Transboundary Water Management: An Assessment of Risk to Regional Agreements From Likely Climatic Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHATTERJEE, INDRANI

    2014-01-01

    change and the stability of water allocation agreements.change and the stability of water allocation agreements.Do nations go to war over water? Nature 458:282-283 Barret,

  13. Study of an integrated appliance, the air conditioner/heat pump-heat recovery unit-water heater. Final report, November 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, K.M.; Davies, A.; Fischler, S.

    1981-02-01

    Three integrated heat-pump - heat-recovery-unit - water-heater appliances were tested under various environmental conditions to measure the functional parameters and study the operating characteristics of these systems. It was found that the heat recovery, heat-recovery rate, and heat-recovery efficiency were dependent on the heat-recovery-unit's characteristics. The use of the heat-recovery unit in the system resulted in a reduced work load for the heat pump's compressor and slightly improved the heat-pump's performance. A computer simulation model of the integrated system was developed to study the interactions between several of the pertinent system variables on an hourly basis for selected situations and to estimate energy savings. Two alternative estimation methods that utilize five-degree temperature bin data were also developed. The estimate savings determined by using the alternative methods were about the same as those estimated using the hourly data. Conclusions were also reached concerning the use of water heaters with different tank capacities and on methods of increasing potential energy savings.

  14. Application of the bioecological model and health belief model to self-reported health risk behaviors of adolescents in the united states 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleary, Sasha A.

    2009-05-15

    . Adolescents from a suburban Indiana area were asked to complete the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey which assessed egocentrism, self-esteem, social norms, risk perceptions, and the incidence and prevalence of health endangering behaviors. Hierarchical...

  15. A Cross-Sectional Investigation of the Determinants of Urban Residential Water Demand in the United States, 1960 and 1970 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, H.S., Jr.; Beattie, B. R.

    1978-01-01

    This research was undertaken to specify and estimate a model relating household demand for urban water to its principal determinants. Four specific tasks were accomplished: 1. An appropriate economic demand model for ...

  16. From Emergency to Fix: Point-of-Use Water Filtration Technology in Colonias Along the United States-Mexico Border 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandewalle, Emily Lauren

    2014-04-30

    Small-scale decentralized facilities and technologies are rapidly becoming a dominant technological fix to deliver water to underserved populations in developing nations. This project examines the case of a university partnership with government...

  17. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Holding Pen Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Open lots or holding pens for feeding or holding livestock can be sources of ground water contamination. The safety of such operations depends on their separation from water wells, characteristics of the site, and proper management. This publication...

  18. Runoff Variability and Transboundary Water Management: An Assessment of Risk to Regional Agreements From Likely Climatic Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHATTERJEE, INDRANI

    2014-01-01

    the water sectors such as hydro power, water storage, multiwater supply, agriculture and hydro-power are the three mostper year, followed by hydro-power, which has a yearly demand

  19. Sulfur isotope evidence for regional recharge of saline water during continental glaciation, north-central United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, D.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Sulfate concentrations in ground water from the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of south-eastern Wisconsin and northern Illinois increase up to hundreds of times where the aquifer is confined beneath the Maquoketa Shale. There is no sulfate source in the aquifer or overlying rocks except for minor amounts of finely disseminated pyrite. Coinciding with increasing sulfate concentrations, {delta}{sup 34}S of the dissolved sulfate increases from less than {minus}5{per thousand} in the unconfined part of the aquifer to a nearly constant value of +20{per thousand} where the aquifer is confined and where sulfate reduction is minimal. The most likely source for this isotopically heavy sulfate is ground water associated with Silurian evaporites under Lake Michigan. It is uncertain if the sulfate-rich water was emplaced in pulses or mostly during the last glaciation.

  20. Studentnumber:Name:Degree: Unit:Unit:Unit:Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Studentnumber:Name:Degree: Semester: Semester: Unit:Unit:Unit:Unit: Unit:Unit:Unit:Unit: Year the Undergraduate Degree Course Rules. Have you included units that will lead to at least one degree-specific major that the units you choose in first year will lead to at least one degree-specific major. It is a requirement

  1. Analysis of steam-generator tube-rupture events combined with auxiliary-feedwater control-system failure for Three Mile Island-Unit 1 and Zion-Unit 1 pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassersharif, B.

    1986-01-01

    A steam-generator tube-rupture (SGTR) event combined with loss of all offsite alternating-current power and failure of the auxiliary-feedwater (AFW) control system has been investigated for the Three Mile Island-Unit 1 (TMI-1) and Zion-Unit 1 (Zion-1) pressurized water reactors. The Transient Reactor Analysis Code was used to simulate the accident sequence for each plant. The objectives of the study were to predict the plant transient response with respect to tube-rupture flow termination, extent of steam generator overfill, and thermal-hydraulic conditions in the steam lines. Two transient cases were calculated: (1) a TMI-1 SGTR and runaway-AFW transient, and (2) a Zion-1 SGTR and runaway-AFW transient. Operator actions terminated the tube-rupture flow by 1342 s (22.4 min) and 1440 s (24.0 min) for TMI-1 and Zion-1, respectively, but AFW injection was continued. The damaged steam generator (DSG) overfilled by 1273 s (21.2 min) for the TMI-1 calculation and by 1604 s (26.7 min) for the Zion-1 calculation. The DSG steam lines were completely filled by 1500 s (25 min) and 2000 s (33.3 min) for TMI-1 and Zion-1, respectively. The maximum subcooling in the steam lines was approx.63 K (approx.113/sup 0/F) for TMI-1 and approx.44 K (approx.80/sup 0/F) for Zion-1.

  2. Invited paper in: Risk-Based Decision Making in Water Resources. (Ed. Y.Y. Haimes and D.A. Moser), American Society of Civil Engineers and presented at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    ), American Society of Civil Engineers and presented at the Tenth Engineering Foundation Conference on Risk Engineers & Economists; 435-797-4010; David.Bowles@usu.edu. 3 Water Resources Engineer, GEI Consultants, Inc

  3. Economic and Financial Costs of Saving Water and Energy: Preliminary Analysis for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdivant, Allen W.; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    Intermediate Calculation Values ........................................12 Construction Cost per ac-ft of Water Saved ...............................12 Construction Cost per Unit of Energy Saved ...............................12 Construction Cost per Dollar.... Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 485 ac-ft of water per year and 179,486,553 BTUs {52,604 kwh} of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost...

  4. "Table HC4.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1 HomeRegional37 Housing84348 Water

  5. The impact of sexual experiences of young minority group members in the United States, and the associated risks of sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission among adults in the United States and China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ginny Elizabeth

    2006-08-16

    This thesis explores incidence rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among minority group teenagers in the United States and among adults aged 20-34 in the U.S. and in China. The focus is on trends and patterns ...

  6. Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A, and I-22 Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fipps, G.; Leigh, E.

    2008-01-01

    -19/I-18 3.6 11.6 1157 57,900 64.9 SJ17 I-7A 1.5 6.8 466 55,800 62.5 SJ18 I-22 2.7 5.0 605 40,500 45.4 * Water loss rates given are based on an in-service use of 24 hours/day and 365 days/year. Test SJ16 included a 1 mile segment... of structures and diameter sizes used for test calculations. Test SJ16 Table 3. Test SJ16: Unit I-19/I-18 Test Measurements 2/15/2007 Standpipe #1 Standpipe #2 Time WL-Reading (ft) Reading (ft) 11:50 6.6 3.6 12:00 11...

  7. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Pesticide Storage and Handling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Proper pesticide management is important to preventing ground water contamination. This publication contains helpful information about pesticide storage facilities, mixing and loading practices, and spill cleanup. A chart lists pesticides according...

  8. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Improperly managed manure can contaminate both ground and surface water. Storing manure allows producers to spread it when crops can best use the nutrients. This publication explains safe methods of manure storage, as well as specifics about safe...

  9. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Milking Center Wastewater Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Storing wastewater from the milking center and applying it to crops is the best method of preventing ground water contamination. This publication discusses proper methods of storing and applying such waste, with illustrations of a detention pond...

  10. Risk assessment of surface vs subsea blowout preventers (bops) on mobile offshore drilling units focusing on riser failure and the use of subsea shear rams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melendez, Jorge Luis

    2006-08-16

    The use of a slim, high-pressure drilling riser for surface blowout preventer operations in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico was assessed as an alternative to conventional drilling procedures from floating units. Comparison ...

  11. Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Hall

    2006-01-01

    Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MW) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MW) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

  12. Feasibility assessment of the water energy resources of the United States for new low power and small hydro classes of hydroelectric plants: Main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas G.; Reeves, Kelly S.; Brizzee, Julie; Lee, Randy D.; Carroll, Gregory R.; Sommers, Garold L.

    2006-01-01

    Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

    2013-08-01

    The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

  14. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Fertilizer Storage and Handling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29

    . Locate the pad adjacent to the storage area. Make sure that water moves away from the well. At sites where runoff could reach the well, construct a diversion to direct runoff to another area. The size of the pad depends on the equip- ment you use. Provide... into the water. Other potential sources of nitrate are septic systems, livestock yards, livestock waste stor- age facilities, and silage storage. This bulletin covers the following topics: 1) Building a new storage facility 2) Modifying an existing facility 3...

  15. Epidemiol. Infect. (1998), 121, 227236. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press At-risk individuals in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    1998-01-01

    approach in a natural population of domestic cats (Felis catus) F. COURCHAMP"*, N. G. YOCCOZ", M. ARTOIS 50 Florida panthers, Felis concolor coryi, is infected [9]. Further risk is that some threatened populations of wild felids are in close contact with infected domestic cats (e.g. Felis silvestris in Europe

  16. Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources: Appendix A - Assessment Results by Hydrologic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for each of the 20 hydrologic regions are presented in Appendix A

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  18. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-02-21

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  20. ?Framework for a Risk-Informed Groundwater Compliance Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sam Marutzky

    2010-09-01

    Note: This document was prepared before the NTS was renamed the Nevada National Security Site (August 23, 2010); thus, all references to the site herein remain NTS. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98, Frenchman Flat, at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was the location of ten underground nuclear tests between 1965 and 1971. As a result, radionuclides were released in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Corrective Action Unit 98 and other CAUs at the NTS and offsite locations are being investigated. The Frenchman Flat CAU is one of five Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs at the NTS that are being evaluated as potential sources of local or regional impact to groundwater resources. For UGTA sites, including Frenchman Flat, contamination in and around the test cavities will not be remediated because it is technologically infeasible due to the depth of the test cavities (150 to 2,000 feet [ft] below ground surface) and the volume of contaminated groundwater at widely dispersed locations on the NTS. Instead, the compliance strategy for these sites is to model contaminant flow and transport, estimate the maximum spatial extent and volume of contaminated groundwater (over a period of 1,000 years), maintain institutional controls, and restrict access to potentially contaminated groundwater at areas where contaminants could migrate beyond the NTS boundaries.

  1. Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development Mitchell J. Small,*, Paul C, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada 89512, United States 1. INTRODUCTION The recent U.S. shale gas Issue: Understanding the Risks of Unconventional Shale Gas Development Published: July 1, 2014 A broad

  2. Earthquake risk reduction in the United States: An assessment of selected user needs and recommendations for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This Assessment was conducted to improve the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) by providing NEHRP agencies with information that supports their user-oriented setting of crosscutting priorities in the NEHRP strategic planning process. The primary objective of this Assessment was to take a ``snapshot`` evaluation of the needs of selected users throughout the major program elements of NEHRP. Secondary objectives were to conduct an assessment of the knowledge that exists (or is being developed by NEHRP) to support earthquake risk reduction, and to begin a process of evaluating how NEHRP is meeting user needs. An identification of NEHRP`s strengths also resulted from the effort, since those strengths demonstrate successful methods that may be useful to NEHRP in the future. These strengths are identified in the text, and many of them represent important achievements since the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act was passed in 1977.

  3. Application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in Establishing Perchlorate and Goitrogen Risk Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford-Brown, Douglas

    2015-08-26

    This paper applies probabilistic risk assessment in quantifying risks from cumulative and aggregate risk pathways for selected goitrogens in water and food. Results show that the percentages of individuals with a Hazard Index (HI) value above 1...

  4. 280 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSIOX. over the edge of the barrel, wliile the other is left hanging in the water.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is left hanging in the water. After stopping the pressurc of tbe fingers the water flows from the free . end of the rubber tube and is allowed to flow through a filter (a piece of coarse ljnen,a p6ckt.t-l1nndlrei.chief,&e.). The larv83 :we carried by the current of' the water iiito and through the rubber tube

  5. Managing California’s Water: Insights from Interviews with Water Policy Experts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Null, Sarah E.; Bartolomeo, Eleanor; Lund, Jay R.; Hanak, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Sporadic funding sources Flood risk Water transfer problemsFunding Sources O (E) Flood Risk O (E) Water TransferClimate Change and Flood Risk “The technologies of the 1940s

  6. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States...

  7. The challenges of a water system management handover in eastern Ethiopia : from the United Nations Refugee Agency to a local community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Christophe (Christopher J.)

    2011-01-01

    During the height of a political crisis in the late 1980s, hundreds of thousands of Somali refugees crossed into eastern Ethiopia. A humanitarian crisis soon unfolded as water was in short supply in the arid region. In ...

  8. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S.

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  9. Water Resources People cand Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources People cand Issues Interview With Professor Arthur Maass US Army Corps of Engineers Maass. (Water resources people and issues) 1. Water resources development--United States-- Planning--History. 2. Water resources development-- United States--Planning--History--Sources. I. Maass, Arthur. II

  10. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 7: Regional Groundwater than the unit situations that we saw. Surface water/Groundwater interactions. lakes and streams springs (seepage) Ambient water-table movements Seasonal changes Inteference with other water end-users. Inherent

  11. A detection-level hazardous waste ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 200 areas low-level burial grounds and retrievable storage units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    This plan defines the actions needed to achieve detection-level monitoring compliance at the Hanford Site 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Compliance will be achieved through characterization of the hydrogeology and monitoring of the ground water beneath the LLBG located in the Hanford Site 200 Areas. 13 refs., 20 figs.

  12. Measure Guideline: Transitioning to a Tankless Water Heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brozyna, K.; Rapport, A.

    2012-09-01

    This Measure Guideline provides information to help residential builders and retrofitters with the design, specification, selection, implementation, installation, and maintenance issues of transitioning from tank-type water heaters to tankless water heaters. The report compares the differences between tankless and tank-type water heaters, highlighting the energy savings that can be realized by adopting tankless water heaters over tank-type water heaters. Selection criteria and risks discussed include unit sizing and location, water distribution system, plumbing line length and diameter, water quality, electrical backup, and code issues. Cost and performance data are provided for various types of tankless and tank-type water heaters, both natural gas fired and electric. Also considered are interactions between the tankless water heater and other functional elements of a house, such as cold water supply and low-flow devices. Operating costs and energy use of water distribution systems for single- and two-story houses are provided, along with discussion of the various types of distribution systems that can be used with tankless water heaters. Finally, details to prepare for proper installation of a tankless water heater are described.

  13. 9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 26-30 October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . INTRODUCTION Problem The landfilling is an attractive method for the municipal solid waste management due9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters problems of the urban water management in developing countries C. Madera* and Viviana Valencia

  14. Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal Energy- and Water-Saving Projects Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal Energy- and Water-Saving...

  15. Eielson Air Force Base OU-1 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, M.T.; Jarvis, T.T.; Van Houten, N.C.; Lewis, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment report is the second volume in a set of three volumes for operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The companion documents contain the Remedial Investigation and the Feasibility Study. Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) is one of several groups of hazardous waste sites located at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, Alaska. The operable units at Eielson are typically characterized by petroleum, oil, lubricant/solvent contamination, and by the presence of organics floating at the water table. In 1989 and 1990, firms under contract to the Air Force conducted field studies to gather information about the extent of chemical contamination in soil, groundwater, and soil air pore space (soil gas) at the site. This report documents the results of a baseline risk assessment, which uses the 1989 and 1991 site characterization database to quantify the potential human health risk associated with past Base industrial activities in the vicinity of OU-1. Background data collected in 1992 were also used in the preparation of this report.

  16. Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

    2009-01-01

    have nearly run the River dry during the irrigation season. 36 In 2002 the Yellow River Conservancy Commission (YRCC), for the first time, suspended the issuance of new water permits in the region, to force these regions to improve irrigation... 3 /s of streamflow in the downstream Inner Mongolia Reach. Sometimes that flow can fall below the minimum flow alarm threshold of 50 m 3 /s, nearly running the river dry over the 200 km stretch between the Upper Reach and the Middle Reach...

  17. Decentralization and Environmental Quality: An International Analysis of Water Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Hilary

    2009-01-01

    United Nations, Global Environment Monitoring System Waterthe UN’s Global Environment Monitoring System Water Quality

  18. Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration...

  19. A Framework for Analysis of the Uncertainty of Socioeconomic Growth and Climate Change on the Risk of Water Stress: a Case Study in Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.

    The sustainability of future water resources is of paramount importance and is affected by many factors, including population, wealth and climate. Inherent in how these factors change in the future is the uncertainty of ...

  20. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

  1. Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-09-20

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

  2. 9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 26-30 October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    supply, sanitation and waste management facilities. Urban context of the Mingoa River watershed9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters on the Municipal Lake of Yaoundé, Cameroon Marielle Naah* *Laboratoire Eau Environnement et Systčmes Urbains (LEESU

  3. 8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES 2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 2-5 June 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to salt under intensive use context Nizar Omrani* *Institute of Arid Regions Medenine (IRA), Tunisia management. These oases observed a lightening development. The improvement in drilling techniques reinforced in the oases, drillings had been multiplied and spread across the oases. The development of the water

  4. Unit and student details Unit code Unit title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    Unit and student details Unit code Unit title If this is a group assignment, each student must submitted Has any part of this assessment been previously submitted as part of another unit/course? Yes not be copied. No part of this assignment has been previously submitted as part of another unit/course. I

  5. Risk assessment of hurricane storm surge for New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, N,

    Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States. We apply a model-based risk assessment methodology to investigate hurricane storm surge risk for New York City (NYC). We couple a statistical/deterministic ...

  6. Individual Permit for Storm Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL from specified solid waste management units and areas of concern, collectively referred to as Sites. Canada del...

  7. Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program Desc OLD ACCOUNT FORMAT NEW ACCOUNT FORMAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program Desc OLD ACCOUNT FORMAT NEW ACCOUNT FORMAT 001113 AP Old O/S A/P NonResCk 0000 General 000000 General #12;Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program

  8. EWO Meeting, Sep. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    EWO Meeting, Sep. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management Balancing Risk and Economics for Chemical. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management Chemical Supply chain: an integrated network of business units;Page 3EWO Meeting, Sep. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management Motivation Introduction ­ Research Goal

  9. EWO Meeting, Mar. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    EWO Meeting, Mar. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management Risk Management for Chemical Supply Chain, PA Risk Management Chemical Supply chain: an integrated network of business units for the supply #12;Page 3EWO Meeting, Mar. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management Motivation Introduction · Objective

  10. The horizontal desalination unit described herein utilizes the humidification-dehumidification process to purify water using air as a carrier gas. The temperature required to drive the process is low enough that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The horizontal desalination unit described herein utilizes the humidification enough that waste heat from a fuel combustion or solar collectors can be used. A unit in which air horizontal units, determine the efficiency of operation, and isolate ways of improving future units

  11. User's Manual for BEST-Dairy: Benchmarking and Energy/water-Saving Tool (BEST) for the Dairy Processing Industry (Version 1.2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01

    use of energy and water unit conversion. The BEST-Dairy toolwe have developed a "Unit Conversion Calculator" for yourmetric units. The "Unit Conversion Calculator" is available

  12. Optimization of Cooling Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    1985-01-01

    A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems....

  13. Risk Prioritization

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Quality Managers Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee Reference Document SQAS21.01.00 - 1999 Software Risk Management A Practical Guide February, 2000 Abstract This document is...

  14. UNITED STEELWORKERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE:Administrationfollowing tableUNITED FERC

  15. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States

  16. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States7

  17. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States78

  18. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United

  19. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 UnitedDuke-4-E

  20. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

  1. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    Turbid water Clear water pixel position cameraresponsecameraresponse pixel position ABSTRACT: A new underwater laser scanning system, providing microbathymetric information in coastal waters is described the backscatter component resulting in enhanced performance in turbid waters. The system is expected to provide

  2. Determination of radon concentration in water using RAD7 with RAD H{sub 2}O accessories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, M. F. I.; Rabaiee, N. A.; Jaafar, M. S.

    2015-04-24

    In the last decade, the radon issue has become one of the major problems of radiation protection. Radon exposure occurs when using water for showering, washing dishes, cooking and drinking water. RAD7 and Rad H20 accessories were used in order to measure radon concentration in water sample. In this study, four types of water were concerns which are reverse osmosis (drinking water), mineral water, tap water and well water. Reverse osmosis (drinking water) and mineral water were bought from the nearest supermarket while tap water and well water were taken from selected areas of Pulau Pinang and Kedah. Total 20 samples were taken with 5 samples for each type of water. The measured radon concentration ranged from 2.9±2.9 to 79.5±17 pCi/L, 2.9±2.9 to 67.8±16 pCi/L, 15.97±7 to 144.25±24 pCi/L and 374.89±37 to 6409.03±130 pCi/L in reverse osmosis (drinking water), mineral water, tap water and well water. Well water has the highest radon compared to others. It was due to their geological element such as granite. Results for all types of water are presented and compared with maximum contamination limit (MCL) recommended by United State Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) which is 300pCi/L. Reverse osmosis water, mineral water and tap water were fall below MCL. However, well water was exceeded maximum level that was recommended. Thus, these findings were suggested that an action should be taken to reduce radon concentration level in well water as well as reduce a health risk towards the public.

  3. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " 1Total U.S. includes all primary occupied housing units in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military...

  5. United States Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Protect Your Family From Lead in Your Home United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Consumer Product Safety Commission United States Department of Housing and Urban Development

  6. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  7. United Power- Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    United Power is providing rebates to their customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV), wind, and solar water heating systems. These incentives are separate from the rebates provided by the...

  8. Risk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brigo, Damiano

    Risk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures GARP Seminar, London, Nov://www.capco.com/capco-insights -- Joint work with Claudio Nordio Prof. D. Brigo (Imperial College and Capco) Risk Management under Management under Liquidity Risk GARP Seminar London 2 / 60 #12;Introduction Liquidity in Risk Measurement

  9. Incorporating Equipment Condition Assessment in Risk Monitors for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2013-10-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can complement the current fleet of large light-water reactors in the USA for baseload and peak demand power production and process heat applications (e.g., water desalination, shale oil extraction, hydrogen production). The day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance (O&M); however, the effect of diverse operating missions and unit modularity on O&M is not fully understood. These costs could potentially be reduced by optimized scheduling, with risk-informed scheduling of maintenance, repair, and replacement of equipment. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a “living” probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant and combine event probabilities with population-based probability of failure (POF) for key components. “Risk monitors” extend the PRA by incorporating the actual and dynamic plant configuration (equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions, etc.) into risk assessment. In fact, PRAs are more integrated into plant management in today’s nuclear power plants than at any other time in the history of nuclear power. However, population-based POF curves are still used to populate fault trees; this approach neglects the time-varying condition of equipment that is relied on during standard and non-standard configurations. Equipment condition monitoring techniques can be used to estimate the component POF. Incorporating this unit-specific estimate of POF in the risk monitor can provide a more accurate estimate of risk in different operating and maintenance configurations. This enhanced risk assessment will be especially important for aSMRs that have advanced component designs, which don’t have an available operating history to draw from, and often use passive design features, which present challenges to PRA. This paper presents the requirements and technical gaps for developing a framework to integrate unit-specific estimates of POF into risk monitors, resulting in enhanced risk monitors that support optimized operation and maintenance of aSMRs.

  10. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"...

  11. National Lab., TN (United States)] 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    G.M. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States) 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GROUND WATER; REMEDIAL ACTION; TECHNETIUM 99; SORPTION; PERTECHNETATES Groundwater used for...

  12. Termination unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  13. Small Units inside Large Units 8.1 Experimental units bigger than observational units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R. A.

    Chapter 8 Small Units inside Large Units 8.1 Experimental units bigger than observational units 8, but it is individual people that are measured. In general, suppose that there are m experimental units, each of which consists of k observational units, and that there are t treatments, each of which is applied

  14. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  15. Probabilistic Risk Assessment for dairy waste management systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, Edward Marshall

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques were used to evaluate the risk of contamination of surface and ground water with wastewater from an open lot dairy in Erath County, Texas. The dairy supported a complex waste management system...

  16. National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project Mapping Onsite Treatment Needs Onsite Treatment Needs, Pollution Risks, and Management Options Using GIS Submitted by the University. Wastewater Planning Handbook: Mapping Onsite Treatment Needs, Pollution Risks, and Management Options Using

  17. Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenner, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    of Climate Change on Water, Biodiversity and Livelihoods”Dallas 5. The United Nations World Water Development Report3 (2009) “Water in a Changing World” Unesco Publishing (

  18. Managing Grazing for Water Quality Integrating research and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    tool box ­ not silver bullet. Factors that increase risk of water pollution with pathogens Distribution areas Distribution spaceDistribution space Factors that reduce risk of water pollution with pathogens that increase risk of water pollution with pathogens Distribution timeDistribution time cattle defecate near

  19. Water Clean Water Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Keep Our Water Clean Keep Our Water Clean Home and garden pesticides and fertilizers are polluting residues wash into gutters, storm drains, and streams by rain,garden watering,or cleaning up drinking water. Follow these tips to keep our rivers, creeks, and oceans clean. What can you do to protect

  20. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  1. Kansas Citys, Missouri and Kansas Flood Risk Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Kansas Citys, Missouri and Kansas Flood Risk Management Project 22 April 2014 ABSTRACT: The existing Kansas Citys, Missouri and Kansas, Flood Risk Management Project consists of seven levee units. This study evaluated whether one or more plans for reducing flood risk and increasing levee reliability

  2. IMPROVING PUBLIC SAFETY FROM FEDERAL PROTECTION TO SHARED RISK REDUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Don Riley US Army Corps of Engineers Responsibility for flood risk management in the United States and promoting sound flood risk management. The authority to determine how land is used in floodplains to mitigate flood risk and the performance of federal flood damage reduction infrastructure. One key challenge

  3. The UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Office of Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Office of Risk Management 112 Conference Center Building Knoxville, TN to the Office of Risk Management. NOTE: Please share this information within your department/unit with those with University and State requirements. It is imperative that the Office of Risk Management be notified

  4. United Nations Programme on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    United Nations Programme on Space Applications UNITED NATIONS UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR OUTER SPACE, Sputnik 1. Soon after that event, the Member States of the United Nations declared that space should and natural resources management. At the first United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses

  5. Sandia Energy - Sandia Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum: Bridging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum: Bridging Climate Science and Actuarial Practice" Home Climate Water Security Facilities News Global Climate & Energy NISAC News & Events Analysis...

  6. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range symposium dealing with this subject in the western United States, the papers presented address current ........................................................................................................................................ 1 Annosus Root Disease in Europe and the Southeastern United States: Occurrence, Research

  7. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Forest Experiment Station research unit in New Hampshirein 1957, where he studied problemsof regenerationandthinning research unit at Warren, Pennsylvania, where he headed a program of research on problems related

  8. Unit 35 - Raster Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 35, CC in GIS; Peuquet, Donna

    1990-01-01

    in GIS - 1990 Page 8 Unit 35 - Raster Storage GIS to whichNCGIA Core Curriculum in GIS - 1990 Page 9 Unit 35 - RasterStorage UNIT 35 IMAGES NCGIA Core Curriculum in GIS - 1990

  9. Power Blackout Risks Risk Management Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Power Blackout Risks Risk Management Options Emerging Risk Initiative ­ Position Paper November 2011 #12;2 Content 1. Summary 3 2. Power blackouts challenge society and economy 4 3. Blackout risks on the increase 5 3.1. How power market trends influence blackout risks 5 3.1.1. Liberalisation and privatisation

  10. Insuring Long-Term Care in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Amy

    Long-term care expenditures constitute one of the largest uninsured financial risks facing the elderly in the United States and thus play a central role in determining the retirement security of elderly Americans. In this ...

  11. Promising Technology: Tankless Gas Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A tankless gas water heater does not have a storage tank, as a conventional water heater does. Instead, a tankless water heater instantaneously heats water flowing over the heat exchanger coils when there is hot water demand. Because there is no tank, tankless water heaters have no standby energy losses that are associated with storage units. Another non-energy saving benefit is that a tankless water heater is much more compact.

  12. Omnibus water resources legislation. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Water Resources of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on Pending Water Resources Legislation, April 22; May 17, 18; and June 15, 1983. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Part 1 of the hearing record covers four days of testimony by 21 witnesses and additional material submitted for the record on water projects in several states and 22 bills proposing 101 projects related to flood damage control, port and harbor improvements, and hydroelectric power generation. Some of the witnesses, who represented citizen and environmental groups, water project agencies, local and state governments, the Corps of Engineers, the Congressional Budget Office, and others, supported while others opposed specific bills. The record includes a reprint of each bill. (DCK)

  13. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General assigned to the Station's research unit studying the regeneration of California forests

  14. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture MIX: A Computer Program to Evaluate Forest Service, a research entomologist, is in charge of the unit developing improved technology for integrated management

  15. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Programs: A Review of Cognitive and Behavioral Studies Introduction Recent wildfires in the Western United

  16. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range to the Chaparral Prescribed Fire Research Unit, headquartered at Riverside, California. Publisher: Pacific

  17. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General is a Research Ecologist at the Station's Timber Management/Wildlife Habitat Interactions Unit, Redwood Sciences

  18. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General scientist with the Station's Wildland Recreation and Urban Cultures Research Unit, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive

  19. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    A United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station General, land management, carbon sequestration, carbon markets, United States. #12;ii Executive Summary

  20. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General acrossthe United States provide estimates of the amount of erosion reductionon forest roadsfrom

  1. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94701 United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range of California, Berkeley, and a cooperator with the Research Unit. #12;Acknowledgments We especially acknowledge

  2. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range to the Station's chaparral and related ecosystems research unit, with headquarters at Riverside, California. He

  3. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of California Oaks: A Bibliography Agriculture Forest Service Pacific forester in the Station's Forest Regeneration Research Unit, at Redding, California. He holds bachelor

  4. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    United States Department of Agriculture Rural Business- Cooperative Service Research Report 157, concentration, globalization, agency theory Cooperatives in a Changing Global Food System United States

  5. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General is a supervisory research entomologist in the Station's Regeneration Insect Research Unit in Berkeley. W. WAYNE

  6. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the hydrologic cycle over a range of time and areal scales Risk assessment and management of water quality and quantity Water quality standards and regulation for Hawaii Pipeline forensics and asset replacement

  7. Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2005-04-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

  8. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  9. Baseline Risk Assessment for the Ground Water Operable Unit (GWOU) at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri, DOE/OR/21548-568

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval ,, *' ; . Final lo B $2G:L

  10. International Water Resources Association Water International, Volume 25, Number 3, Pages 437445, September 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Raja

    of the United States. Nationally, the U.S. Congress passed the 1985 Food Security Act (United States HouseInternational Water Resources Association Water International, Volume 25, Number 3, Pages 437445 policy scenarios in the Big Creek water- shed. The models and methodologies described here, however

  11. PUBLIC NOTICE CLEAN WATER ACT PROPOSED RULE FOR DEFINITION OF WATERS OF THE U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PUBLIC NOTICE CLEAN WATER ACT PROPOSED RULE FOR DEFINITION OF WATERS OF THE U.S. On 21 April 2014 the scope of waters protected under the Clean Water Act (CWA), in light of the U.S. Supreme Court cases in U by increasing clarity as to the scope of "waters of the United States" protected under the Act. Developing

  12. Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2013-01-01

    a calculator developed for unit conversions that are desireduse of energy and water unit conversion. The BEST-Dairy toolwe have developed a "Unit Conversion Calculator" for your

  13. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2013-01-01

    a calculator developed for unit conversions that are desireduse of energy and water unit conversion. The BEST-Dairy toolwe have developed a "Unit Conversion Calculator" for your

  14. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ...........26 List of Figures Figure 1: The Risk Management Process.......................................................................................................12 #12; 1 Overview The risk management process--of identifying, analyzing, evaluating

  15. Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vaporRisks: ď‚· Radiation - alpha,

  16. Incentive Games and Mechanisms for Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpcan, Tansu

    2010-01-01

    Incentives play an important role in (security and IT) risk management of a large-scale organization with multiple autonomous divisions. This paper presents an incentive mechanism design framework for risk management based on a game-theoretic approach. The risk manager acts as a mechanism designer providing rules and incentive factors such as assistance or subsidies to divisions or units, which are modeled as selfish players of a strategic (noncooperative) game. Based on this model, incentive mechanisms with various objectives are developed that satisfy efficiency, preference-compatibility, and strategy-proofness criteria. In addition, iterative and distributed algorithms are presented, which can be implemented under information limitations such as the risk manager not knowing the individual units' preferences. An example scenario illustrates the framework and results numerically. The incentive mechanism design approach presented is useful for not only deriving guidelines but also developing computer-assistan...

  17. Alternative Water Sources Map Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program created the Alternative Water Map Tool to provide information about rainwater harvesting regulations throughout the United States. FEMP designed the map to help agencies decide where to implement rainwater harvesting projects.

  18. Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service (Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management) riskmanagement@uoregon.edu Fax: 541-346-7008 As a volunteer Tort Claims Act, ORS 30.260-300, and Oregon Department of Administrative Services Risk Management

  19. ORESTIMBA CREEK, WEST STANISLAUS COUNTY, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ORESTIMBA CREEK, WEST STANISLAUS COUNTY, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT 29 May 2013 ABSTRACT flood risk management for the City of Newman, Stanislaus County, California and the surrounding area public health risks caused by area flooding included contamination of domestic water wells and inundation

  20. OPTIMAL LOCATION OF ISOLATION VALVES IN WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 7 OPTIMAL LOCATION OF ISOLATION VALVES IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: A RELIABILITY The cornerstone of any healthy population is access to safe drinking water. The goal of the United Nations International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade from 1981 to 1990 was safe drinking water for all

  1. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AMAgriLife, and member of the National Institutes for Water Resources, provides leadership

  2. The effects of an intermittent piped water network and storage practices on household water quality in Tamale, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vacs Renwick, Deborah Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include a target to halve the number of people without access to "improved" water sources, which include piped water supply. However, an "improved" source of water does not ...

  3. Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K.

    2012-02-09

    Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power from the market, albeit at higher prices. However, sufficient excess generation and transmission must be available for this strategy to work. Although power purchase was the most commonly discussed drought mitigation strategy, a total of 12 response strategies were identified in the literature, falling into four main categories: electricity supply, electricity demand response, alternative water supplies, and water demand response. Three hydrological drought scenarios were developed based on a literature review and historical data analysis. The literature review helped to identify key drought parameters and data on drought frequency and severity. Historical hydrological drought data were analyzed for the western United States to identify potential drought correlations and estimate drought parameters. The first scenario was a West-wide drought occurring in 1977; it represented a severe drought in five of the eight basins in the study area. A second drought scenario was artificially defined by selecting the conditions from the 10th-percentile drought year for each individual basin; this drought was defined in this way to allow more consistent analysis of risk to electricity generation in each basin. The final scenario was based upon the current low-flow hydro modeling scenario defined by WECC, which uses conditions from the year 2001. These scenarios were then used to quantify the risk to electricity generation in each basin. The risk calculations represent a first-order estimate of the maximum amount of electricity generation that might be lost from both hydroelectric and thermoelectric sources under a worst-case scenario. Even with the conservative methodology used, the majority of basins showed a limited amount of risk under most scenarios. The level of risk in these basins is likely to be amenable to mitigation by known strategies, combined with existing reserve generation and transmission capacity. However, the risks to the Pacific Northwest and Texas Basins require further study. The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable because of its heavy reliance on hydroelectri

  4. EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

  5. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture DESIGN: A Program to Create Data Forest Service Entry Research Work Unit at the Station's Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507

  6. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Observatory in Stinson Beach, Calif. Thomas E. Martin is Assistant Unit Leader--Wildlife at the U.S. Fish

  7. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range, objectives, and targets and specific work plans for the field units--the National Forests and their Ranger

  8. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station Research, and export from 1997 to 2010, for main world regions and the United States. Detailed tables by country

  9. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Peelflc Southwest Forest and Range that are expressed in tems familim to the user. Theboard footand cubic footare mdiriond units of measure, altlnough

  10. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper-Central United States (Monserud and Ek 1977; Monserud 1987). This model was used within the framework of FOREST

  11. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station for the Station's Wildland Recreation and the Urban Culture Research Work Unit, located at the Forest Fire

  12. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Usual Planting and Harvesting Dates for U.S. Field Crops million acres of barley were harvested in the United States (U.S.) during 1996. After reaching a peak

  13. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station Research, import, and export from 1997 to 2010, for main world regions and the United States. Detailed tables

  14. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  15. Secretary Bodman Announces Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rule that establishes the process for utility companies building the next six new nuclear power plants in the United States to qualify for a portion of 2 billion in federal risk...

  16. Wind/Water Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    Nobel laureate Richard Smalley cited energy and water as among humanity's top problems for the next 50 years as the world's population increases from 6.3 billion to 9 billion. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Program has initiated an effort to explore wind energy's role as a technical solution to this critically important issue in the United States and the world. This four-page fact sheet outlines five areas in which wind energy can contribute: thermoelectric power plant/water processes, irrigation, municipal water supply, desalination, and wind/hydropower integration.

  17. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  18. Nationwide water availability data for energy-water modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Zemlick, Katie M.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this effort is to explore where the availability of water could be a limiting factor in the siting of new electric power generation. To support this analysis, water availability is mapped at the county level for the conterminous United States (3109 counties). Five water sources are individually considered, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water (western U.S. only), municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped is projected growth in non-thermoelectric consumptive water demand to 2035. Finally, the water availability metrics are accompanied by estimated costs associated with utilizing that particular supply of water. Ultimately these data sets are being developed for use in the National Renewable Energy Laboratories' (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, designed to investigate the likely deployment of new energy installations in the U.S., subject to a number of constraints, particularly water.

  19. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range unit investigating measurement and analysis techniques for management planning, with headquarters in Berkeley, Calif. ELLIOT L. AMIDON is now assigned to the Station's unit at Arcata, Calif., that is studying

  20. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Management Research Work Unit at Boise, ID. He re- ceived with the Intermountain Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Man- agement Research Work Unit at the Forestry

  1. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General Estimates for Forest Types of the United States James E. Smith Linda S. Heath Kenneth E. Skog Richard A forest types within 10 regions of the United States. Separate tables were developed for afforestation

  2. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service General Technical #12;- TH ,a geneticist, is assigned to the Station's research unit dyin etics of western forest trees, with headquarters in Berkeley, Berkeley. PAUL D. cal technician with the genetics research unit, isa forestry gra California, Berkeley

  3. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Ogden, UT. He was project leader of the fire fundamentals research work unit from 1966 until 1979 and is currently project leader of the fire behavior research work unit at the fire sciences laboratory. RALPH A

  4. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebhold, Andrew

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper of the Eastern United States have been devastated by invasive pests. We used existing data to predict-quarter in total host density. Gypsy moth occupies only 23 percent of its potential range in the Eastern United

  5. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Thomas J. Mills Frederick W. Bratten #12;The Authors: are with the Station's research unit studying fire J. MILLS, a forest economist, is in charge of the unit. He earned degrees at Michigan State

  6. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) species and hybrids--largely from the western United States locations in the eastern and southern United States. Cover Image: Chapter 6, Figure 6-2. #12;Xylem

  7. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range ecosystemsresearch unit located in Riverside. California. PAUL H. DUNN was project leader at that time and is now project leader of the atmospheric deposition research unit in Riverside. Calif. SUSAN C. BARRO

  8. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Proceedings of the Agriculture Pacific Southwest Symposium on Social of Agriculture; 96 p. The growing demand for recreation at the wildland-urban interface throughout the United and the Urban Culture Research Unit headquartered at the Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Dr

  9. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station http. Arbaugh is a statistician with the Station's Atmospheric Deposition Effects Research Unit at Riverside and associate professor with the National Park Service Cooperative Park Studies Unit, College of Forest

  10. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holberton, Rebecca L.

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General Technical Report NE-318 Atlas of Climate Change Effects in 150 Bird Species of the Eastern United States Service 359 Main Road Delaware, OH 43015 USA #12;United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

  11. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper NE-722 James E. Smith Linda S. Heath A Model of Forest Floor Carbon Mass for United States Forest contiguous United States. Manuscript received for publication 22 April 2002 #12;A Model of Forest Floor

  12. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Southern Research Station General Technical United States. In: Rauscher, H. Michael, and Kurt Johnsen, eds. Southern forest science: past, present Trends in the Southern United States Robert A. Mickler, James E. Smith, and Linda S. Heath1 Abstract

  13. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General reported in USDA Forest Service surveys for forests of the conterminous United States. Developed for use estimates are provided for regional tree-mass totals using summary forest statistics for the United States

  14. United States Nuclear Regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission United States Department of Energy United States.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 E-mail: DISTRIBUTION@nrc.gov Facsimile: 301; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10

  15. Unit Testing Discussion C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Unit Testing Discussion C #12;Unit Test public Method is smallest unit of code Input/output transformation Test if the method does what it claims Not exactly black box testing #12;Test if (actual result Expected Computed Input #12;Functionality Computation ­ Easy to test Time based Asynchronous interaction

  16. The Macroscopic Cortical Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    The Macroscopic Brain Will Penny Cortical Unit Neural Mass Model Cell Populations Differential Will Penny 21st April 2011 #12;The Macroscopic Brain Will Penny Cortical Unit Neural Mass Model Cell as formulated in David et al. (2006). #12;The Macroscopic Brain Will Penny Cortical Unit Neural Mass Model Cell

  17. Risk Management Strategy Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Risk Management Strategy Introduction 1. The risk of adverse consequences is inherent in all activity. Dynamic enterprise will inevitably create new risks. Risk management is about ensuring that all significant relevant risks are understood and prioritised as part of normal management

  18. Investigating Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02

    This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity...

  19. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01

    Risk Assessment?" Risk Analysis, Aubrey, A. (2010). "T. (2003). Foundations of Risk Analysis : A Knowledge andNJ. Ayyub, B. M. (2003). Risk Analysis in Engineering and

  20. Results of toxicity tests and chemical analyses conducted on sediments collected from the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit, July 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-02-11

    In order to provide unit specific toxicity data that will be used to address critical uncertainty in the ecological risk assessment (ERA) for the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit (TNXOD OU), sediments were collected from eight locations in the Inner Swamp portion of the operable unit and two unit specific background locations. These samples were analyzed for total mercury, total uranium, and sediment toxicity.

  1. Risk and robust optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David Benjamin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    This thesis develops and explores the connections between risk theory and robust optimization. Specifically, we show that there is a one-to-one correspondence between a class of risk measures known as coherent risk measures ...

  2. Why Risk Assessment? Because ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Střlen, Ketil

    Why Risk Assessment? Because ... CORAS is committed to supporting international industry can take advantage of the CORAS technology in order to give their mission critical risk assessment assessment methodology integrating techniques and features from partly complementary risk assessment methods

  3. Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 51, CC in GIS; Cowen, David; Ferguson, Warren

    1990-01-01

    51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS1990 Page 1 Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas Computers inyour students. UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS Compiled with

  4. Object-oriented image analysis methods in disaster risk management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Object-oriented image analysis methods in disaster risk management Dr. Norman Kerle #12;2 Lecture-grouphttp://www.itc.nl/about_itc/resumes/kerle.aspx #12;6 Object-oriented analysis for disaster risk management DRM OOA Univ Innsbruck - 17 June 2013 @ ITC #12;4 ITC/University Twente Houses the United Nations University- ITC Centre for Spatial Analysis

  5. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  6. Controlling O&M Costs of Advanced SMRs using Prognostics and Enhanced Risk Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Wood, Richard T.

    2014-02-25

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs) can contribute to safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy production. The economics of small reactors (including AdvSMRs) will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional light water reactors. The most significant controllable element of the day-to-day costs involves operations and maintenance (O&M). Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs through technologies that help control O&M costs will be critical to ensuring their practicality for wider deployment.A significant component of O&M costs is the management and mitigation of degradation of components due to their impact on planning maintenance activities and staffing levels. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk of failure of key components are important in this context. Given the possibility of frequently changing AdvSMR plant configurations, approaches are needed to integrate three elements – advanced plant configuration information, equipment condition information, and risk monitors – to provide a measure of risk that is customized for each AdvSMR unit and support real-time decisions on O&M. This article describes an overview of ongoing research into diagnostics/prognostics and enhanced predictive risk monitors (ERM) for this purpose.

  7. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  8. Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Following the U.S . Supreme Court's Decision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Following the U.S . Supreme Court's Decision in Rapanos v. United the jurisdiction over waters of the United States under the Clean Water Act. 3 The chart below summarizes the key will assert jurisdiction over the following waters: " Traditional navigable waters " Wetlands adjacent

  9. United States General Accounting Office GAO High-Risk Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    Financial Management 62 GAO/HR-97-2 Quick Reference GuidePage 4 #12;Contents Asset Forfeiture Programs 67 of the Office of Management and Budget, and the heads of major departments and agencies. James F. Hinchman-2 Quick Reference GuidePage 3 #12;Contents Defense Financial Management 8 Defense Contract Management 12

  10. Elemental Conservation Units: Communicating Extinction Risk without Dictating Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Mart

    identificar y proteger la biodiversidad por debajo del nivel de especies pero aun no han resuelto cu´al es el abstracta de preservar la m´axima cantidad de biodiversidad ´unica y la meta pragm´atica de minimizar la p´erdida de bienes y servicios ecol´ogicos considerando que la p´erdida de biodiversidad parece inevitable

  11. REDUCING THE RISK FROM VOLCANO HAZARDS UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems, and cause jet engines to fail. USGS and other scientists with the Alaska Volcano Observatory eruptions. As the crew of KLM Flight 867 struggled to restart the plane's engines, "smoke" and a strong odor Mountains(7,000to11,000feethigh).Allfour engines had flamed out when the aircraft in- advertently entered

  12. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring, Missouri,MSEReportyGWSHP 1.83

  13. Mining withdrawals by water quality and State, 2005. EXPLANATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mining withdrawals by water quality and State, 2005. 0 to 10 10 to 50 50 to 100 100 to 200 200 mining withdrawals Freshwater mining withdrawals Saline-water mining withdrawals Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 2005 - Mining USGS Water-Science School -- http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/wumi.html Source

  14. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..............................................................................2 Solid Waste Management .........................................................................3 ....................................................................................4 Solid Waste ManagementUnited States Department of Returns on InvestmentsAgriculture Forest Service in Management Sciences

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)"...

  16. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    LBNL collected water and waste water tariffs in Californiastate. Current water and waste water tariffs for these areaswas based on water and waste water tariffs in California

  17. Sandia Energy - Phasor Measurement Units

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Units Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Phasor Measurement Units...

  18. RISK JOURNALS CATALOGUE 2015 www.risk.net/journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK JOURNALS CATALOGUE 2015 www.risk.net/journal #12;Risk Journals deliver academically rigorous accurately. DISCOVER RISK JOURNALS HOW CAN RISK JOURNALS HELP YOU? www.risk.net/journal Risk Journals deliver strategies, commodities, infrastructures, derivatives, regulation and more. Each quarter Risk Journals

  19. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    2012-01-01

    The  United  States'  Biofuel  Policies   and  Compliance  Water  Impacts  of  Biofuel  Extend  Beyond   Irrigation."  for  assessing  sustainable  biofuel  production."  

  20. Risk Assessment Sally Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    or publicly owned treatment works) whose regulations and rule enforcement work to make sure that the risksRisk Assessment Sally Brown University of Washington Risk in our day to day routines One could argue that every thing that we do, every day is fraught with risks and that the safest approach is just

  1. Risk Assessment Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Risk Assessment ® Fact Sheet U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Building Strong ® Buffalo District June 2012 Risk Assessment A risk assessment is performed for hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste sites and chemicals in the environment. Information from the risk assessment is used to determine whether action

  2. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture

  3. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

  4. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

  5. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture

  6. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

  7. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

  8. Risk communications & emergency planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranski, S.C. [EQUINOX Environmental, Inc., Shushan, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This talk outlines the interface between good risk communication and emergency planning. The major topics include the following: What is risk communication and how is it applied to emergency planning; crisis communication and the need to know and how to integrate crisis communication and risk communication; the face of the emergency: spokespersons, public information; The Media`s role in emergency Public information and risk communication; Developing the risk communication message; How to respond to continuing need for 24 hours communications; the EAS and Risk communication and Crisis communication; and finally where is risk communication heading and how it can help.

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 3Tankless water heaters, also known as instantaneous or on-demand water...

  10. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Sustainable Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into Sustainable Water Consumption (Bottled Water versus WaterFillz Units) Jenson Chang, Keqin Chen, Maryam Fallahi of a project/report". #12;An Investigation into Sustainable Water Consumption (Bottled Water versus Water on the environmental, economical, and social impacts of selling over-the-counter bottled waters versus implementing

  11. Risk assessment as a framework for decisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, Robert Paul; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Borns, David James

    2010-12-01

    The risk assessment approach has been applied to support numerous radioactive waste management activities over the last 30 years. A risk assessment methodology provides a solid and readily adaptable framework for evaluating the risks of CO2 sequestration in geologic formations to prioritize research, data collection, and monitoring schemes. This paper reviews the tasks of a risk assessment, and provides a few examples related to each task. This paper then describes an application of sensitivity analysis to identify important parameters to reduce the uncertainty in the performance of a geologic repository for radioactive waste repository, which because of importance of the geologic barrier, is similar to CO2 sequestration. The paper ends with a simple stochastic analysis of idealized CO2 sequestration site with a leaking abandoned well and a set of monitoring wells in an aquifer above the CO2 sequestration unit in order to evaluate the efficacy of monitoring wells to detect adverse leakage.

  12. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

    2013-01-29

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

  13. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1972 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 66 Prepared by STATISTICS;ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The data in this edition of "Fishery Statistics of the United States" were collected in co- operation with the various States and tabulated by the staff of the Statistics and Market News Division

  14. Water Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  15. Mechanism Design with Risk Aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhalgat, Anand; Khanna, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    We design efficient algorithms to compute truthful mechanisms for risk-averse sellers, in Bayesian single-parameter and multi-parameter settings. We model risk aversion by a concave utility function, where the the seller maximizes its expected utility. Much earlier work on Bayesian mechanism design has focused on maximizing expected revenue, and no succinct characterization of expected utility maximizing mechanism is known even for multi-unit auctions. We design a poly-time algorithm for multi-unit auctions, to compute a sequential posted pricing mechanism (SPM) that for any $\\eps > 0$, yields a $(1-1/e-\\eps)$-approximation to the expected utility of an optimal mechanism. In comparison, the best known approximation factor using SPM is $(1-1/e)$ even for the expected revenue objective (linear utility). Our result uses a correlation gap bound and then applies concentration bounds to show the existence of an order-independent SPM for large inventory, and an approximation scheme for optimal adaptive SPM for small...

  16. Risk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    to generate 20% of its electricity from wind. Developers are actively planning offshore wind farms along the URisk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore Wind of Energy has estimated that over 50 GW of offshore wind power will be required for the United States

  17. Societal and observational problems in earthquake risk assessments and their delivery to those most at risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilham, Roger

    -0399, United States a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 10 October 2011 Received risk are inappropriate in regions where strain rates are low, and where historical data are short these articles note that deaths and costs will continue to rise in the next century, but that extreme events

  18. Forest Inventory and Harvest Unit Layout By Grant Becker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    is accounted for. This step sets up the entire harvest, from boundary placement and property marking to water depending on the severity of slope, landscape, water bodies, and more. These factors can bring a harvestForest Inventory and Harvest Unit Layout By Grant Becker Introduction Forest inventory is of most

  19. Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION COMBINED SPACE AND WATER HEATING SYSTEMS; COMBO SYSTEMS;...

  20. Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Brady, Patrick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Brady, Patrick V. Abstract Not Provided Sandia National Laboratories USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) United...

  1. The Unit Coordinator Handbook About the Unit Coordinator Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    1 The Unit Coordinator Handbook About the Unit Coordinator Handbook This Handbook will assist you in fulfilling your responsibilities as a Unit Coordinator and has been developed with input from Unit staff, however, more resources are available at the Unit Coordinator website: http

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Analysis and Concept Design for grey water heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design for grey water heat recovery to preheat domestic water supply for multi-unit residential high rise of a project/report". #12;2 Analysis and Concept Design for grey water heat recovery to preheat domestic water

  3. PRTR ion exchange vault water removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ham, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents the removal of radiologically contaminated water from the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. Approximately 57,000 liters (15,000 gallons) of water had accumulated in the vault due to the absence of a rain cover. The water was removed and the vault inspected for signs of leakage. No evidence of leakage was found. The removal and disposal of the radiologically contaminated water decreased the risk of environmental contamination.

  4. Review of the independent risk assessment of the proposed Cabrillo liquified natural gas deepwater port project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritzo, Louis Alan; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2006-01-01

    In March 2005, the United States Coast Guard requested that Sandia National Laboratories provide a technical review and evaluation of the appropriateness and completeness of models, assumptions, analyses, and risk management options presented in the Cabrillo Port LNG Deepwater Port Independent Risk Assessment-Revision 1 (Cabrillo Port IRA). The goal of Sandia's technical evaluation of the Cabrillo Port IRA was to assist the Coast Guard in ensuring that the hazards to the public and property from a potential LNG spill during transfer, storage, and regasification operations were appropriately evaluated and estimated. Sandia was asked to review and evaluate the Cabrillo Port IRA results relative to the risk and safety analysis framework developed in the recent Sandia report, ''Guidance on Risk Analysis and Safety Implications of a Large Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Spill over Water''. That report provides a framework for assessing hazards and identifying approaches to minimize the consequences to people and property from an LNG spill over water. This report summarizes the results of the Sandia review of the Cabrillo Port IRA and supporting analyses. Based on our initial review, additional threat and hazard analyses, consequence modeling, and process safety considerations were suggested. The additional analyses recommended were conducted by the Cabrillo Port IRA authors in cooperation with Sandia and a technical review panel composed of representatives from the Coast Guard and the California State Lands Commission. The results from the additional analyses improved the understanding and confidence in the potential hazards and consequences to people and property from the proposed Cabrillo Port LNG Deepwater Port Project. The results of the Sandia review, the additional analyses and evaluations conducted, and the resolutions of suggested changes for inclusion in a final Cabrillo Port IRA are summarized in this report.

  5. United States Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    United States Shorebird Conservation Plan M A N O M E T C E N T E R F O R C O N S E R V A T I O N T I O N #12;United States Shorebird Conservation Plan Council Organizations #12;1 U n i t e d S t a t e s S h o r e b i r d C o n s e r v a t i o n P l a n 2 0 0 1 The United States Shorebird

  6. Decentralized Wastewater Treatment for Distributed Water Reclamation and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , United States *E-mail: jdrewes@mines.edu Cities worldwide are facing a growing water crisis,2013|doi:10.1021/bk-2013-1123.ch015 In Novel Solutions to Water Pollution; Ahuja, S., et al.; ACS Symposium

  7. Unit Clause: Summary Benny Applebaum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, Benny

    Unit Clause: Summary Benny Applebaum Tel-Aviv University Spring Semester, 2012 #12;Unit Clause: Reminder Unit Clause Input: chosen uniformly from F3(n, rn). 1 If there exists unit clause (Forced step) pick at random unit clause { i} and satisfy it 2 Otherwise, (Free step) pick a random literal i

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  13. Voltage verification unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Edward J. (Virginia Beach, VA)

    2008-01-15

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  14. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

    2014-04-01

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 3Use of heating equipment for another housing unit also includes the use of...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 3Housing units are classified as urban or rural using definitions created by...

  17. Automatically clustering similar units for unit selection in speech synthesis. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Alan W; Taylor, Paul A

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for synthesizing speech by concatenating sub-word units from a database of labelled speech. A large unit inventory is created by automatically clustering units of the same phone class ...

  18. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Types of Risk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-11-01

    Types of risk associated with range ecosystems include climatic, biological, financial and political risks. These risks are explained so that managers can know how to handle them....

  19. State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mission Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State Energy Risk Profiles State Energy Risk Assessment Initiative - State...

  20. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (631-24G) - March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit is located in the northeast corner of SRS. In the mid 1980`s, sparse vegetation, dead trees, and small mounds of soil were discovered on a portion of the road leading to Gunsite 113. This area became the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (Gunsite 113). The unit appears to have been used as a spoil dirt and / or road construction debris disposal area. There is no documentation or record of any hazardous substance management, disposal, or any type of waste disposal at this unit. Based upon the available evidence, there are no potential contaminants of concern available for evaluation by a CERCLA baseline risk assessment. Therefore, there is no determinable health risk associated with Gunsite 113. In addition, it is also reasonable to conclude that, since contamination is below risk-based levels, the unit presents no significant ecological risk. It is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  1. risk management annual report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    ____________________________________________________________________ 2 The ERM Process______________________________________________________________________ 28 The ERM Process in 2014 and Beyond and mitigating the risks that threaten its mission, the Office of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) was tasked

  2. Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING Charles S. Tapiero Department Head and Morton and Angela Topfer · Corporate Finance and Financial Markets · Computational Finance · Risk Finance · Technology and Algorithmic Finance A Collective Leadership Students participation #12;RESEARCH STRENGTHS · Black Swans and Fragility

  3. James Madison University Flood Water Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    James Madison University Flood Water Plan JMU Office of Risk Management: 9/30/2010 JAMES MADISON of Risk Management: 9/30/2010 Flooding - Dealing with flooding on JMU's Campus The University Police UNIVERSITY FLOOD EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN http://www.jmu.edu/safetyplan/flood/ Should faculty, staff, students

  4. A Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, Jordan; Newmark, Robin; Heath, Garvin; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The presented water factors may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

  5. A Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.

    2012-06-01

    In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. This paper proposes a more realistic ratings draw that eliminates most bias by improving mains inlet temperature and by specifying realistic hot water use. Presented at the 2012 World Renewable Energy Forum; Denver, Colorado; May 13-17, 2012.

  6. Learning and risk aversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyarzun, Carlos

    2009-06-02

    This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

  7. February 2002 RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 RISK MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS By Joan S. Hash, Computer is the ability to iden tify and protect critical information assets. A sound risk management pro gram-30, Risk Management Guide For Information Technology Systems, by Gary Stoneburner, Alice Goguen, and Alexis

  8. NISTIR 8023 Risk Management for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with replication devices. Keywords 3D printers; 3D scanners; copiers; countermeasures; exploits; mitigation; multifunction devices; printers; replication devices; risk; risk assessment; risk management; scanners; security

  9. Sandia Energy - Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Probabilistic Risk Assessment Probabilistic...

  10. UNIT SELECTION ALGORITHM FOR JAPANESE SPEECH SYNTHESIS BASED ON BOTH PHONEME UNIT AND DIPHONE UNIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duh, Kevin

    UNIT SELECTION ALGORITHM FOR JAPANESE SPEECH SYNTHESIS BASED ON BOTH PHONEME UNIT AND DIPHONE UNIT ABSTRACT This paper proposes a novel unit selection algorithm for Japanese Text-To-Speech (TTS) systems, CV units are basic to con- catenative TTS systems for Japanese. However, speech syn- thesized with CV

  11. Conventional regression models Unlabelled units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Unlabelled units Consequences Sampling bias in logistic models Peter effects #12;Conventional regression models Unlabelled units Consequences Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Properties of conventional models 2 Unlabelled units Point

  12. Unit 9: Spatial Data Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9, CCTP; Dodson, Rustin

    1998-01-01

    UNIT 9: SPATIAL DATA CONVERSION Written by Rustin Dodson,Programs Page 1 Unit 9: Spatial Data Conversion freezingPrograms Page 2 Unit 9: Spatial Data Conversion Export USGS

  13. Best Buys and Unit Pricing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-02-02

    This guide explains how to determine a unit price--the cost of an item based on a specific unit such as pound or ounce. Unit pricing can be used to identify foods that are the most economical....

  14. Health and environmental risks of energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper gives four examples of health risk assessments of energy systems: (1) Comparative risk assessment of the health effects of the coal and nuclear fuel cycles. Estimates differ from previous values chiefly by inclusion of ranges of uncertainty, but some coal-cycle numbers were re-estimated. Upper-boundary public disease risks of air pollution from coal-fired plants dominate. Reactors probably account for most of the potential effect of major nuclear accidents. Accidental death rates in electricity generation are low for reactors and higher for coal. (2) Upper boundary air pollution health risks of existing fossil-based energy technologies in the United States. Preliminary mortality estimates were obtained combining potential impacts of three index pollutants - SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 2/, and CO - as independent measures of risk. Four fuel cycle trajectories leading to three end-uses were analyzed. Example results: domestic wood burning has substantial potential impact, with an upper boundary exceeding that of coal; upper-boundary air pollution impacts of gas can exceed those of oil, because of NO/sub 2/. (3) Health risks of acid deposition and other transported air pollutants, carried out as part of an assessment of the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) Acid Rain and Transported Air Pollutants - Implications for Public Policy. Three scenarios were examined, leading to estimates of 40,000 to 50,000 annual premature deaths, depending on year (1978 vs 2000) and scenario (holding total emissions constant vs 30% reduction). (4) health effects of uranium mill tailings piles. Mortality risk is estimated to be minuscule (8.7 x 10/sup -9/ average individual lifetime cancer risk from a model mill, compared with 9.5 x 10/sup -4/ for background radiation). Methods that sum risks over the indefinite future are shown to be to be unrealistic. 39 references, 7 figures, 15 tables.

  15. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01

    Williams, E. Life Cycle Water Use of Low-Carbon TransportSuh, S. ; Hellweg, S. In Water Use Impacts from Corn- BasedMaupin, M. A. Estimated Use of Water in the United States in

  16. Quenching China's Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China's Renewable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2014-01-01

    M.A. , 2009, Estimated use of water in the United States ins Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China’ss Thirst For Renewable Power: Water Implications of China’s

  17. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) during this fiscal year to work with the State of Utah DEQ Air Quality Board in the evaluation, and reevaluation with regard to risks of contamination of source water from near and far sources. Both point sources and non-point sources (NPS) need to be identified. Risks to Utah's source water include both point

  18. Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern? G. Allen Burton Jr; Fracking; Water-quality stressor; Ecological risk assessment Introduction The world's energy marketplace industrial processes, the higher the risk of that ecosystem being impacted by the operation. The associated

  19. Drug-free Workplace Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drug-free Workplace Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Human Resources Policy Contact, students, and other individuals in our workplace and campus community. Alcohol abuse and drug use can pose.1 There are many risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol, including physical

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Sustainable Water Consumption -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Into Sustainable Water Consumption - Water Bottles versus WaterFillz Units Alireza Tavassoli, Yee Chung Wong, Sina of a project/report". #12;An Investigation Into Sustainable Water Consumption - Water Bottles versus Water, 2010 TA: Craig Hennessey #12;ii Table of Contents Abstract

  1. In Press Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management -2009 INTEGRATED OPTIMIZATION OF A DUAL QUALITY WATER AND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    OF A DUAL QUALITY WATER AND1 WASTEWATER SYSTEM: A CASE STUDY OF GREATER BEIRUT, LEBANON2 3 Patrick A. Ray1 Greater Beirut25 2. Total unit costs to supply, reuse, and dispose of water in Greater Beirut, year 200026, disposal and reuse.39 Innovative water management strategies in general, and opportunities for water reuse

  2. Solving Unit Commitment by a Unit Decommitment Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solving Unit Commitment by a Unit Decommitment Method Chung-Li Tsengy,Chao-an Liz, Shmuel S. Oren x October 14, 1997 Abstract In this paper, we present an e cient and robust method for solving unit commit- ment problem using a unit decommitment method. 1 Introduction A problem that must be frequently solved

  3. UCL Migration Research Unit 2013 Migration Research Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    UCL Migration Research Unit ANNUAL REPORT 2013 Migration Research Unit UCL DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY in the Migration Research Unit. Two key members of the research unit are on the move. JoAnn McGregor moves highly successful MSc in Global Migration and her involvement in the degree will be missed as well as her

  4. Risk Assessment Coherent Risks: An Axiomatic Approach Relation with Cooperative Game Concluding Remarks Risk, Coherency and Cooperative Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    Risk Assessment Coherent Risks: An Axiomatic Approach Relation with Cooperative Game Concluding 2011 1 / 30 #12;Risk Assessment Coherent Risks: An Axiomatic Approach Relation with Cooperative Game Concluding Remarks Outline 1 Risk Assessment Risk = Volatility? Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT) Risk

  5. United States Deparirnenl of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    differencebe- tween predicted and measured loadings signifi- cantly different from zero. For the forest types do not pro- duce as much residue as older stands, but amounts generated and values at risk usually. But stands left untreated or inade- quately treated could be lost to wild- fire or pests. The forest manager

  6. Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures Preface The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its management together with the means for identifying, analysing and managing risk in order to minimise its frequency and impact. The risks considered significant

  7. Professional Certificate in Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    Professional Certificate in Risk Management 2010 Program 3 Part-time Courses CRM01: Essentials of Risk Management ­ Next Session Fall 2010 CRM02: Risk Control ­ Jan. 12 - April 26, 2010 CRM03: Risk to apply for the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) designation. #12;Professional Certificate in Risk

  8. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Fiscal Year 2011 Report Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-11-01

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and avian and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2011, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists adapted and applied the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), first developed to examine the effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy devices on aquatic environments, to offshore wind development. PNNL scientists conducted a risk screening analysis on two initial OSW cases: a wind project in Lake Erie and a wind project off the Atlantic coast of the United States near Atlantic City, New Jersey. The screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two OSW cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device, such as alterations in bottom habitats. Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted during FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an assessment of the vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with OSW installations; a probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. As more data become available that document effects of offshore wind farms on specific receptors in U.S. coastal and Great Lakes waters, probability analyses will be performed.

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Unit Buildings",19.1,4.4,3.7,6.2,4.7 "Mobile Homes",6.9,0.5,1.1,3.9,1.4 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.4,5.6,4.6,2.4,1.9 "1940 to 1949",5.2,1.3,1.4,1.6,0.9 "1950 to...

  10. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are thought to contribute to carbon sequestration, including current debates on this topic. The science regarding forestry and carbon sequestration is more advanced and less controversial than that for range, land management, carbon sequestration, carbon markets, United States. #12;ii Executive Summary

  11. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to moisture availability and solar radiation. We describe research results pertaining to global climate change Technical Report PSW-GTR-235 June 2011 A Review of the Potential Effects of Climate Change on Quaking Aspen of the potential effects of climate change on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Western United States

  12. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies are used for agriculture, natural resources, salt water intrusion protection, drinking water, industry

  13. Sociocultural definitions of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1990-10-01

    Public constituencies frequently are criticized by technical experts as being irrational in response to low-probability risks. This presentation argued that most people are concerned with a variety of risk attributes other than probability and that is rather irrational to exclude these from the definition and analysis of technological risk. Risk communication, which is at the heart of the right-to-know concept, is described as the creation of shared meaning rather than the mere transmission of information. A case study of utilities, public utility commissions, and public interest groups illustrates how the diversity of institutional cultures in modern society leads to problems for the creation of shared meanings in establishing trust, distributing liability, and obtaining consent to risk. This holistic approach to risk analysis is most appropriate under conditions of high uncertainty and/or decision stakes. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  14. Emergy Analysis of Sugarcane (energy crop) Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    diagrams Energy & Material Flow Data Emergy computations Analysis 5. Case Study #12;12Annual Southwest and Material Flow data #12;EmergyEvaluationTable 15 Unit Solar Solar Data EMERGY* EMERGY Note Item Unit (unitsEmergy Analysis of Sugarcane (energy crop) Water Management HENDRY COUNTY SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS

  15. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline formation waters. Therefore, they are expected to be representative of saline formation waters at actual and potential future CCS sites. We are using a produced waters database (Breit, 2002) covering most of the United States compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In one instance to date, we have used this database to find a composition corresponding to the brine expected at an actual CCS site (Big Sky CSP, Nugget Formation, Sublette County, Wyoming). We have located other produced waters databases, which are usually of regional scope (e.g., NETL, 2005, Rocky Mountains basins).

  16. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T.; Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.

    1992-12-31

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  17. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T. ); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. )

    1992-01-01

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  18. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A.; Busby, Jeremy; Hallbert, Bruce; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Smith, Curtis; Barnard, Cathy

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  1. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  2. forreading. Sustainability Index for Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    -made sustainability indexes are defined for water users in Mexico, the United States, the environment, and for meeting their ecological, environmental and hydrological integrity." Although this concept is still valid, water management impact on a system. Thus, the objective is to look for policies that reduce the adverse impacts of actual

  3. Climate Change and Water Resources in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    Climate Change and Water Resources in the Tropical Andes Mathias Vuille Inter-American Development Bank Environmental Safeguards Unit TECHNICAL NOTE No. IDB-TN-515 March 2013 #12;Climate Change-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Vuille, Mathias. Climate change and water resources in the tropical

  4. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Texas Cooperative. The institute maintains joint or collaborative projects with 15 Texas universities and 3 in other states; 11

  5. Water quality analysis of the piped water supply in Tamale, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Allison Jean

    2014-01-01

    The United Nation's Millennium Development Goal Target 7.C is to "halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water". While the UN claimed to have met this goal, studies ...

  6. Mathematical structure of unit systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Kitano

    2013-05-04

    We investigate the mathematical structure of unit systems and the relations between them. Looking over the entire set of unit systems, we can find a mathematical structure that is called preorder (or quasi-order). For some pair of unit systems, there exists a relation of preorder such that one unit system is transferable to the other unit system. The transfer (or conversion) is possible only when all of the quantities distinguishable in the latter system are always distinguishable in the former system. By utilizing this structure, we can systematically compare the representations in different unit systems. Especially, the equivalence class of unit systems (EUS) plays an important role because the representations of physical quantities and equations are of the same form in unit systems belonging to an EUS. The dimension of quantities is uniquely defined in each EUS. The EUS's form a partially ordered set. Using these mathematical structures, unit systems and EUS's are systematically classified and organized as a hierarchical tree.

  7. Computerized Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    supply diversions, several hydroelectric plants and numerous environ- mental instream flow requirements. Each of these active permits is included in the datasets. Besides the commission using the WAM/WRAP modeling system in water rights permiting... actions be consistent with relevant regional plans. River authorities, water districts and other water management organizations are beginning to use the WRAP model in operational planning studies to optimize operations of their facilities...

  8. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  9. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  10. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  11. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .2,7.1,4.4,2.6,1.3,3,6.8 "Central Warm-Air Furnace",19.1,4.6,5.5,3.6,2.2,1.2,0.6,1.4,3.5 "Heat Pump",9.8,1.4,2,2,1.4,1,0.6,1.3,0.9 "Built-In Electric Units",5.7,1.9,1.6,0.9,0.6,0.3...

  13. University of Toronto Page 1 of 5 Design Requirements for Eyewash and Safety Shower Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    unobstructed feet. When acids or strong caustics/corrosive are used, equipment should be located within 10 continuously. The eyewash unit should deliver tepid (lukewarm) water. The temperature of water should at least. Control valves shall be resistant to corrosion from potable water. #12;University of Toronto Page 2 of 5

  14. Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management Supervisor's Vehicle Incident Report (Complete all sections of this form and return within 24 hours of incident to the Office of Risk Management Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management Unsafe Conditions or Actions (describe all contributing

  15. Low Power and Shutdown Risk Assessment Benchmarking Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.Mitman, J. Julius, R. Berucio, M. Phillips, J. Grobbelaaar, D. Bley, R. Budniz

    2002-12-15

    (B204)Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) insights are now used by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to confirm the level of safety for plant operations and to justify changes in nuclear power plant operating requirements, both on an exception basis and as changeds to a plant's licensing basis. This report examines qualitative and quantitative risk assessments during shutdown plant states, providing feedback to utilities in the use of qualitative models for outage risk management, and also providing input to the development of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) Low Power and Shutdown PRA Standard.

  16. 80 units of core courses 70 units of core courses 70 units of core courses 80 units of core courses Semester 1 Semester 1 Semester 1 Semester 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    80 units of core courses 70 units of core courses 70 units of core courses 80 units of core courses Semester 1 Semester 1 Semester 1 Semester 1 ARBE1303 10 units ARBE2101 10 units ARBE3100 10 units ARBE4101 10 units Introduction to the Construction Industry Construction Ecology 2 Construction Technology 3

  17. Technology maturity analysis for assessing capacity and schedule risk of future automation projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frackleton, Conor J

    2014-01-01

    The need to improve risk assessment methods for automation projects within United States manufacturers exists due to a shift toward increased in factory automation stemming from industry pressure to reduce manufacturing ...

  18. OPERATIONAL RISK RODNEY COLEMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Rodney

    the business environment. These include terrorism, civil unrest, systems fail- ings including hacking RISKS ARISING FROM BUSINESS ACTIVITY You lose business opportunities while your computer systems a business beyond those from its money-making activities. This is operational risk, often shortened to oprisk

  19. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS PRACTICES TRENDS AUDITS policies #12;2 Privacy & Information Security Annual Update Thursday, June 20, 2013 of Breach statistics Plan to comply with requirements · Training and Education Information Security · Risk

  20. Recognizing liability risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, C.; Zimmer, M.J.; Karas, J.L. (Reid Priest, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Project developers, owners, investors, and lenders face potential liability for environmental contamination and cleanup. Being aware of the risks is the first step in mitigating future concerns. Independent power participants are wise to be concerned with a range of risks arising from off- or on-site contamination, civil and criminal violations of rules and regulations, and future compliance costs.

  1. Hydro unit commitment in hydro-thermal optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.; Hsu, E.; Svoboda, A.J.; Tseng, C.; Johnson, R.B. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    In this paper the authors develop a model and technique for solving the combined hydro and thermal unit commitment problem, taking into full account the hydro unit dynamic constraints in achieving overall economy of power system operation. The combined hydrothermal unit commitment problem is solved by a decomposition and coordination approach. Thermal unit commitment is solved using a conventional Lagrangian relaxation technique. The hydro system is divided into watersheds, which are further broken down into reservoirs. The watersheds are optimized by Network Flow Programming (NFP). Priority-list-based Dynamic Programming is used to solve the Hydro Unit Commitment (HUC) problem at the reservoir level. A successive approximation method is used for updating the marginal water values (Lagrange multipliers) to improve the hydro unit commitment convergence, due to the large size and multiple couplings of water conservation constraints. The integration of the hydro unit commitment into the existing Hydro-Thermal Optimization (HTO) package greatly improves the quality of its solution in the PG and E power system.

  2. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Jonathan

    . Twery Mike Rechlin Abstract Five forest harvest methods (single-tree selection, group selection, two harvest treatments look like and how various logging methods affect different communities of forest plants a clean and perpetual supply of clean water, and nourishing the human spirit by providing numerous

  3. A Methodology for Estimating Construction Unit Bid Prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erbatur, Osman 1978-

    2012-11-28

    all bids) for the past three years. ? Develop three (sanitary sewer, water, pavement and storm drainage) construction item unit price databases using the data collected. The cost items for the three types of construction improvement projects... estimating provide more reasonable information, such as theoretical distribution functions. 13 Methodology The City of Fort Worth construction projects can be separated into three categories: paving and drainage, water, and sanitary sewer...

  4. Energy Management in Olefins Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit...

  5. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolkova, Elena

    UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Carlos M. Gutierrez Secretary NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC in a modeled tsunami caused by each of 804 unit earthquakes (tsunami sources) in the Pacific and 194

  6. Value creation in water allocation negotiations : lessons from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River and Lower Colorado River Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solis, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Intense water disputes in the United States are being caused by new and conflicting demands from many quarters and changes in water availability that appear to be caused by climate change. Projections of heightened water ...

  7. Energy Exchange Continuing Education Units

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) continuing education units (CEUs) will be available for designated training sessions.

  8. Water, law, science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2007-10-17

    In a world with water resources severely impacted bytechnology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end,this paper is an earth scientist s attempt to comprehend essentialelements of water law, and to examine their connections to science.Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with apriori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science,observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while inlaw, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law inEurope and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago byRoman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason.Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the seawere governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that theseelements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as privateproperty. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jusgentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast,jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jusgentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in whichscience plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all.This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, followstheir evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit ofscience inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving waterand environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In atechnological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of waterlaw. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophicalunderstanding of the relationships between science and law willcontribute to their constructively coming together in the service ofsociety.

  9. Model Risk in Finance Department of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Robert A.

    worth taking Statistical issues Multiplicity Transformations to obtain "independence" Orthogonality Year Valueof$100Investment Case-Shiller Housing Total Stock Market 3 #12;Wharton default Correlation risk Regulatory risk Reputation risk Operational risk Systemic risk, market risk

  10. Entanglement Storage Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Caneva; T. Calarco; S. Montangero

    2012-09-27

    We introduce a protocol based on optimal control to drive many body quantum systems into long-lived entangled states, protected from decoherence by big energy gaps, without requiring any apriori knowledge of the system. With this approach it is possible to implement scalable entanglement-storage units. We test the protocol in the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model, a prototype many-body quantum system that describes different experimental setups, and in the ordered Ising chain, a model representing a possible implementation of a quantum bus.

  11. Unite2 States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1afr+39J t% (3740~ - Unite2

  12. l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , cMarchW W e e luse-_ ._UNITED

  13. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278 United States Government Department

  14. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278 United States Government

  15. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278 United States Government. v-w. ' ;H;

  16. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278 United States Government. v-w. '

  17. United States Government DATE:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278 United States Government. v-w.

  18. Uniter+ States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278 United States Government.EP AEFG

  19. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE:Administrationfollowing tableUNITED STATES-ANSWER

  20. FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SH 11 .A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES ^ 1951 &ch 3. \\§^ ^/'· m:^ STATISTICAL DIGEST. Farley, Director Statistical Digest 30 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1951 BY A. W. ANDERSON;Fishery Statistics of the United States and Alaska are compiled and published annually to make available

  1. United States Department of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    United States Department of Agriculture Keys to Soil Taxonomy Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;#12;Keys to Soil Taxonomy By Soil Survey Staff United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits

  2. B. Joseph Guglielmo, EDUCATION UNIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, David

    AND ADVISORY UNITS ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS Dean's Office Management Staff Susan Abby, executive assistant Pharmaceutical Services, UCSF Medical Center Daniel Wandres, PharmD, associate dean; vice chair, DepartmentD, chair Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences James Wells, PhD, chair ORGANIZED RESEARCH UNIT Molecular

  3. Buccal Spectral Markers for Lung Cancer Risk Stratification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartline, Jason D.

    Buccal Spectral Markers for Lung Cancer Risk Stratification Andrew J. Radosevich1 *, Nikhil N, United States of America Abstract Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US with .150,000 deaths per year. In order to more effectively reduce lung cancer mortality, more sophisticated

  4. Systemic risk in consumer finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceSystemic risk in consumer finance Martha Poon, NYU At the

  5. Risk in the Weapons Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C

    2012-08-14

    When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

  6. Risk Management in Biopharmaceutical Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yao

    2011-01-01

    Supply Chain Risk Managementof Recent Work on Supply Chain Risk Management . . . . .M. , Supply chain risk management: Outlining an agenda for

  7. Iowa State Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a major water quality problem in the United States, especially in the North Central Region (Nolan et al contain nitrate above the drinking water standard of 10 mg/l as N. Another 37% of the wells have levelsIowa State Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research

  8. Model Selection for the Competing-Risks Model With and Without Masking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Thomas

    Department of Statistics Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523-1877 (tlee@stat.colostate.edu) The competing-risks model is useful in settings in which individuals (or units) may die (or fail) because for competing-risks data with and without masking involves the specification of cause-specific hazard rates

  9. Risk Management Process Overview | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Risk Management Process Overview Risk Management Process Overview figure depicting three tier risk management process The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the...

  10. Global Asteroid Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumpf, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Potentially impacting asteroids were analysed for their impact risk on the Earth. To this end, the Asteroid Risk Mitigation Optimization and Research (ARMOR) tool is currently being developed. The tool's modules are described and their validation is documented. Based on the asteroid ephemeris, the tool calculates the impact location probability distribution on the surface of the Earth (in the literature, occasionally referred to as risk corridor). NASA's Near Earth Object (NEO) risk list served as the source for asteroid ephemerides. The Line of Variation (LOV) method was employed to find virtual impactors. While offering a simple and fast way of identifying virtual impactors, the method provides a low impactor identification rate. This is because the search space is tightly constricted to the LOV and thus excludes virtual impactors located elsewhere in the asteroid position uncertainty region. The method's performance was evaluated and suggestions for improvements are provided. Application of the tool showed...

  11. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-7.

  12. Livestock Risk Protection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

    2008-10-21

    Livestock risk protection (LRP) insurance policies protect producers from adverse price changes in the livestock market. This publication explains how LRP works, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these polices, and gives examples...

  13. Catalog Year: 2014 Fall Quarter Units Winter Quarter Units Spring Quarter Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THIRD YEAR FOURTH YEAR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING To earn a B.S., you must complete all CollegeCatalog Year: 2014 Fall Quarter Units Winter Quarter Units Spring Quarter Units CS 010* 4 CS 013 4 Linear Methodsfor Engr. Analysis ENGL 001A 4 MATH 009B 4 MATH 009C 4 Beginning Composition First Year

  14. Water Privatisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zölls, Elisa

    2011-08-17

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  15. Grabbing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Pedro Miguel

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the ...

  16. Arsenic Methylation and Bladder Cancer Risk in CaseControl Studies in Argentina and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Arsenic Methylation and Bladder Cancer Risk in Case­Control Studies in Argentina and the United's susceptibility to bladder cancer. Methods: Urinary methylation products were measured in subjects from Argentina (114 cases and 114 controls) and the United States (23 cases and 49 controls). Results: In Argentina

  17. Assessment of the risk of transporting liquid chlorine by rail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the risk of shipping liquid chlorine by rail. While chlorine is not an energy material, there are several benefits to studying chlorine transportation risks. First, chlorine, like energy materials, is widely used as a feedstock to industry. Second, it is the major purification agent in municipal water treatment systems and therefore, provides direct benefits to the public. Finally, other risk assessments have been completed for liquid chlorine shipments in the US and Europe, which provide a basis for comparison with this study. None of the previous PNL energy material risk assessments have had other studies for comparison. For these reasons, it was felt that a risk assessment of chlorine transportation by rail could provide information on chlorine risk levels, identify ways to reduce these risks and use previous studies on chlorine risks to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the PNL risk assessment methodology. The risk assessment methodology used in this study is summarized. The methodology is presented in the form of a risk assessment model which is constructed for ease of periodic updating of the data base so that the risk may be reevaluated as additional data become available. The report is sectioned to correspond to specific analysis steps identified in the model. The transport system and accident environment are described. The response of the transport system to accident environments is described. Release sequences are postulated and evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a direct comparison with other reports in this series.

  18. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950...

  20. Unsuspected Pulmonary Embolism in Observation Unit Patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limkakeng, Alexander T.; Glickman, Seth W; Cairns, Charles B; Chandra, Abhinav

    2009-01-01

    department observation unit. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2001;ED) managed acute care unit on ED overcrowding and emergencyof a chest pain observation unit compared with routine care.

  1. Unit 100 - Data Quality Measurement and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100, CC in GIScience; Veregin, Howard; Hunter, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Page 18 Unit 100 - Data Quality Measurement and AssessmentPage 19 Unit 100 - Data Quality Measurement and AssessmentData Quality Measurement and Assessment Unit 100 - Data

  2. Mexico-United States Migration: Health Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuniga, Elena; Wallace, Steven P.; Berumen, Salvador; Castaneda, Xotichl; al., et

    2005-01-01

    Americans. Mexico-United States Migration • Health issuesMexico-United States Migration Health Issues © ConsejoMéxico D. F. Mexico-United States Migration Health Issues

  3. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  4. Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique le Bihan Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique Le Bihan, Sophie Pardo, Patrice and their businesses contribute to defining their degree of risk perception and reliance on management tools. Beyond

  5. THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uryasev, Stanislav

    THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION AND STATISTICAL ESTIMATION1 R be confronted in numerous situations. Dealing with them systematically for purposes in risk management Statistical estimation is inevitably a partner with risk management in handling hazards, which may be known

  6. Optimal risk allocation for convex risk functionals in general domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rüschendorf, Ludger

    Optimal risk allocation for convex risk functionals in general domains Swen Kiesel and Ludger R of cash invariant, strictly convex risk functionals on Ed the uniqueness of Pareto optimal allocations up¨uschendorf University of Freiburg Abstract In this paper we extend the classical optimal risk allocation problem

  7. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  8. Power systems simulations of the western United States region.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Poch, L.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2010-03-15

    This report documents a part of a broad assessment of energy-water-related issues in the western United States. The full analysis involved three Department of Energy national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. Argonne's objective in the overall project was to develop a regional power sector expansion forecast and a detailed unit-level operational (dispatch) analysis. With these two major analysis components, Argonne estimated current and future freshwater withdrawals and consumption related to the operation of U.S. thermal-electric power plants in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region for the period 2005-2025. Water is withdrawn and used primarily for cooling but also for environmental control, such as sulfur scrubbers. The current scope of the analysis included three scenarios: (1) Baseline scenario as a benchmark for assessing the adequacy and cost-effectiveness of water conservation options and strategies, (2) High nuclear scenario, and (3) High renewables scenario. Baseline projections are consistent with forecasts made by the WECC and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in its Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (EIA 2006a). Water conservation scenarios are currently limited to two development alternatives that focus heavily on constructing new generating facilities with zero water consumption. These technologies include wind farms and nuclear power plants with dry cooling. Additional water conservation scenarios and estimates of water use associated with fuel or resource extraction and processing will be developed in follow-on analyses.

  9. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

    2008-02-28

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

  10. Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water Heaters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.

    2012-06-01

    In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. A more-realistic ratings draw is proposed that eliminates most bias by improving mains inlet temperature and by specifying realistic hot water use. This paper outlines the current and the proposed draws and estimates typical ratings changes from draw specification changes for typical systems in four cities.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide corrosion inhibitor for hydrocracking units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varfolomeev, D.F.; Kesareva, L.M.; Naletova, G.P.; Neprina, N.K.; Nikolaeva, N.M.; Safin, A.Z.

    1986-05-01

    Data obtained on the degree of protection at 80 C by the inhibitors NVS (oil-water-hydrogen sulfide) and Norust with a hydrogen sulfide content of 600-650 mg/liter are presented, and data obtained with an inhibitor concentration of 220 mg/liter and a variable hydrogen concentration are shown. The degree of protection and the corrosion rates on St3 low-carbon steel coupons were determined graviemetrically. The differences of the inhibitors in an autoclave and in a hydrocracking unit are presented. In the stream of drain water with a high content of hydrogen sulfide, the Norust did not give any protection even at a dosage of 37 g/ton; in fact, the inhibitor increased the corrosion rate. The NVS under the same conditions lowered the corrosion rate by a factor of nearly 2. The inhibitor NVS can be recommended for use under the conditions described in the hydrocracking unit in place of the currently used Norust inhibitor.

  12. Disparities in nuclear power plant performance in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Kent F.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents data comparing the performance of light water reactors in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The comparisons are made for the years 1980-1983 and include 21 Westinghouse ...

  13. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement in the United States Petroleum Refining Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01

    AKU - Alkylation Unit BFW - Boiler Feed Water CCU CDU CKUrefinery offsites (e.g. , boiler efficiency improvements)PJ)  1  Reduce stand?by boiler requirements  Reduce hot 

  14. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01

    Suh, S. Water Embodied in Bioethanol in the United States.Use in the Production of Bioethanol and Petroleum Gasoline.for Producing Biofuels: Bioethanol and Biodiesel. Biomass

  15. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01

    and Sustainability: U.S. Electricity Consumption for Water116 Table 38: Electricity Consumption/Generation at SWPattributional LCA of electricity consumption in the United

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY13 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2013-09-01

    Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY13.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY12 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2012-09-01

    Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY12.

  18. Risk Management Policy and Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    Risk Management Policy and Procedures #12;Risk Management Policy and Procedures Queen's University Belfast Updated January 2014 1. PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT 1.1 This Risk Management Policy (the policy explains the University's underlying approach to risk management, documents the roles and responsibilities

  19. Model-Driven Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Střlen, Ketil

    1 123 Model-Driven Risk Analysis The CORAS Approach | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | >springer.com ISBN 978-3-642-12322-1 Model-DrivenRiskAnalysis Mass Soldal Lund Bjřrnar Solhaug Ketil Střlen Lund·Solhaug Střlen Lund · Solhaug · Střlen Model-Driven Risk Analysis The term"risk"is known from many

  20. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT January 2008 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT CP-320 714-278-7346 #12;2006 ­ 2007 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Executive Summary A. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management