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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Invited paper in the Proceedings of the United Engineering Foundation Conference on Risk-Based Decision-Making in Water Resources IX, "20-Year Retrospective and Prospective of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Invited paper in the Proceedings of the United Engineering Foundation Conference on Risk- Based with information from other sources, in the form of a business case [Bowles 2000b] for proceeding with dam safety

Bowles, David S.

2

Ground water contamination in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...volume of ground water in storage exceeds the vol-ume...geo-thermal water; intruded seawater; water affected by evapotranspiration...pressure and the volume in storage may fluctuate according...Estimates of ground water in storage in the United States...communities have over-pumped their freshwater aquifers...

VI Pye; R Patrick

1983-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

3

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States Report describes an analysis of water rate escalations...

4

Arsenic in your water?: Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenic in water?your tx H2O | pg. 27 Story by Kathy Wythe Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic In several ?hot spots? across the United States people may be drinking water with high levels of naturally... occurring arsenic without understanding the associated risks, according to agricultural economists. ?Many households in arsenic ?hot spots? are in fact being exposed to harmful doses of arsenic,? said Dr. Douglass Shaw, professor of agricultural...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

RIS0-M-2319 RISK ANALYSIS OF A DISTILLATION UNIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RIS0-M-2319 RISK ANALYSIS OF A DISTILLATION UNIT J. R. Taylor**, 0. Hansen*, C. Jensen*, 0. F. A risk analysis of a batch distillation unit is de- scribed. The analysis has been carried out at several.2. Objectives and organisation 5 1.2.2. Philosophy and approach 6 1.3.1. The distillation unit 8 1

6

United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water Washington, D. C. 20460 United States) OF THE CLEAN WATER ACT I. PURPOSE AND SCOPE. The United States Department of the Army (Army) and the United they determine the geographic jurisdictional scope of waters of the United States for purposes of section 404

US Army Corps of Engineers

7

Legal Definition of "Traditional Navigable Waters" Waters that Qualify as Waters of the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) "Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Following the U.S. Supreme.F.R. § 230.3(s)(1). The guidance also states that, for purposes of the guidance, these "(a)(1) waters" are the "traditional navigable waters." These (a)(1) waters include all of the "navigable waters of the United States

US Army Corps of Engineers

8

BUILDING A UNITED STATES DATA BASE: POPULATIONS AT RISK TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING A UNITED STATES DATA BASE: POPULATIONS AT RISK TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTIONBUILDING A UNITED STATES DATA BASE: POPULATIONS AT RISK TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

Sacks, Susan T.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Risk-based principles for defining and managing water security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...5, p.-1] couple an acceptable level of water-related risks with the availability of an acceptable quantity and quality of water...concerned with satisfying an acceptable level of water-related risks rather than maximizing returns...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

W. A. Owca

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

Generation risk assessment in volatile conditions with wind, hydro, and natural gas units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies a generating company (GENCO)’s midterm (a few months to a year) scheduling payoffs and risks in volatile operating conditions. The proposed algorithm considers the integration of intermittent wind units into a GENCO’s generation assets and coordinates the GENCO’s hourly wind generation schedule with that of natural gas (NG) units (with volatile gas prices) and hydro units (with water inflow forecast) for maximizing the GENCO’s payoff. The proposed midterm GENCO model applies market price forecasts to the risk-constrained stochastic price-based unit commitment (PBUC) for calculating the GENCO’s risk in energy and ancillary services markets. The proposed PBUC minimizes the cost of (a) NG contracts, storage, startup and shutdown, (b) startup and shutdown of cascaded hydro units, and (c) penalty for defaulting on the scheduled power delivery. Simulation results show that the diversification of generating assets including bilateral contracts (BCs) could enhance the GENCO’s midterm planning by increasing the expected payoff and decreasing the financial risk.

Cem Sahin; Mohammad Shahidehpour; Ismet Erkmen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy...

13

Technical evaluation of a small-scale reverse osmosis desalination unit for domestic water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tunisian standards for drinking water tolerate a maximum Total Dissolved Salts (TDS) of 1.5 g/L. The domestic water presents usually a salinity greater than 0.5 g/L. In the last few years, several small capacity reverse osmosis desalination prototypes have been marketed. They are used to desalinate brackish water with TDS lower than 1.5 g/L. The performances of such type of RO units with respect to the Tunisia tap waters are needed. A technico-economical evaluation of small-scale (100 L/day) reverse osmosis desalination unit has been studied. Water pre-treatment is composed of three filtration operations. Water is pumped through the RO membrane with maximum pressure of 6 bars. Before use, the desalinated water is treated with UV light. The salinity and the temperature of the tested domestic water are located respectively between 0.5 and 1.3 g/L and between 12 and 29°C. The pre-treatment allows eliminating all the suspension matters, as the turbidity and the Solid Density Index are reduced to zero FTU and surrounding one unit respectively. No chemicals are used in the pre-treatment, so membrane scaling can not be avoided if reject water presents a high scaling power. The supersaturation relative to calcium carbonate and gypsum were estimated for reject water. Their values indicate that the tested waters have no risk to scale the RO membrane. The recovery rate of the RO unit was evaluated vs. different operating conditions such as applied pressure, raw water TDS and water temperature. The small capacity unit was able to deliver a treated water of a 100 mg/L TDS with a conversion rate ranging between 25 and 37%. The water treatment cost was evaluated at 0.01 €/L which is roughly the tenth of that of bottled table water.

H. Elfil; A. Hamed; A. Hannachi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk Assessment September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand JunctionOffice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number MSG-035-0004-00-000 Document Number Q0002l 00 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-03 This page intentionally blank , ** 1 ( ( Document Number Q00021 00 Contents Contents Page Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ix Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. xi 1.0 Introduction I-I 2.0 Problem Formulation : 2-1 2.1 Site Description 2-1 2.1.1 Physical Setting 2-1 2.1.2 Ecological Setting '.' 2-5 2.2 Ecological Contaminants of Concern 2-9 2.3 Contaminant Fate and Transport, Ecosystems Potentially at Risk, and Complete Exposure Pathways 2-11 i3.1

15

2 Risk perceptions of arsenic in tap water and consumption 3 of bottled water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.htm). In the United States today bottled water 25 constitutes a significant proportion of the beverage indus- 26 try water is safe to drink in most areas of the United States, so 36 one could question why people in the United States drink 37 bottled water, especially when bottled water can be 240 and 38 10,000 times more

Shaw, W. Douglass

16

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States Elisabeth Giever Kate McMordie Stoughton Susan Loper October 2010 Executive Summary This document provides an overview of an analysis that examined changes in water rates across the country to develop a basic understanding of water rate escalations and how water rates are impacted from outside influences. The analysis investigated how water rates are influenced by the geographic region, water source, and drought tendencies. For example, one observation of the analysis found that cities located in regions of long term drought may have higher escalation rates than cities in water rich environments. Typical escalation rates were found to be between 4 and 8%. This information can be

17

Dealing with Extreme Events : Challenges for Terrorism Risk Coverage in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dealing with Extreme Events : Challenges for Terrorism Risk Coverage in the United States Howard : Challenges for Terrorism Risk Coverage in the United States Howard KUNREUTHER1 Erwann MICHEL-KERJAN2 July leurs couvertures. En cette absence d'offre d'assurance par le secteur privé, la loi du Terrorism Risk

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

18

Design and Operation of Fan-Coil Units in Using River Water as Chilled Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the case research for China's first central air conditioning system utilizing natural cool river water as chilled water, this paper analyzes the technical design-and-innovation process and operating characteristics of Fan-Coil Units (FCUs...

Jiang, A.; Chen, H.; Ma, W.; Zhu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Financial analysis of the implementation of a Drain Water Heat Recovery unit in residential housing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the ways of diminishing energy consumption for hot water heating is the use of Drain Water Heat Recovery (DWHR) units. The aim of the use of these devices is thermal energy recovery from warm drain water and transferring it to incoming cold water. This paper presents the calculation model that allows the estimation of the financial efficiency of the project involving the construction of a shower Drain Water Heat Recovery system in a single-family dwelling house. The presented method of investment risk assessment can be used for decision making by individual users, designers and others. The study of the financial performance was carried out for the various parameters of the installation and the different heat recovery system configurations. From investors point of view the most beneficial option of heat recovery system installation is the system in which preheated water is fed to both the hot water heater and shower mixing valve. Additionally, it was proved that obtained financial results are affected by showering time and water consumption. DWHR units will be therefore particularly beneficial to apply in case of swimming pools, sports facilities or fitness clubs, where high rotation of users is observed.

Daniel S?y?; Sabina Kordana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Risk Management Analysis of Our Water Infrastructure's Soft, Chewy Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National security has become a growing concern since the terrorist attacks on the United States in September of 2001. A safe public drinking water supply has undoubtedly always been considered a priority nationwide. Now, ...

Wolff, Mark

2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ library search · Water balance, climate change and land-use planning in the Pear Harbor Basin, Hawaii basin DSS to support the search for reasonable strategies of investment in wastewater treatment.K. Stuart Chancellor's Distinguished Chair ­Professor, Department of Management Climate, Water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

22

Baseline risk assessment of the perched water system at the INEL test reactor area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A baseline health risk assessment (HRA) was prepared to evaluate potential risks to human health and the environment posed by the Perched Water System (PWS) at the Test Reactor Area (TRA). The PWS has been designated Operable Unit 2-12, one of the 13 operable units identified at TRA. During the period from 1962 to 1990, a total of 6770 million gal of water were discharged from the TRA to unlined surface ponds. Wastewater discharged to the surface ponds at TRA percolates downward through the surficial alluvium and the underlying basalt bedrock. A resulting shallow perched water zone has formed at the interface between the surficial sediments and the underlying basalt. Further downward movement of groundwater is again impeded by a low-permeability layer of silt, clay, and sand encountered at a depth of [approximately]150 ft. The deep perched water zone occurs on top of this low-permeability interbed. An evaluation was made as to whether potential risks for the PWS could justify implementing a remedial action. The risk evaluation consisted of two parts, the human health evaluation and the ecological evaluation.

Gordon, J.W.; Sinton, P.O. (Dames Moore, Denver, CO (United States)); Jensen, N. (DOE, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); McCormick, S. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic ecosystem sustainability?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic and Environmental Science (BRGM), Orléans, France ; 2 National Research Institute for Rural Engineering, Water systems. Since degradation rates in conventional sewage treatment plants (STP) are rather low, ECs enter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

EPA and the Army Corps' Proposed Rule to Define "Waters of the United States"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPA and the Army Corps' Proposed Rule to Define "Waters of the United States" Claudia Copeland.crs.gov R43455 #12;EPA and the Army Corps' Proposed Rule to Define "Waters of the United States regulatory definition of "waters of the United States" consistent with legal rulings--especially the Supreme

Gilbes, Fernando

29

An approach for assessing engineering risk from shale gas wells in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In response to a series of “energy crises” in the 1970s, the United States government began investigating the potential of unconventional, domestic sources of energy to offset imported oil. Hydraulic fracturing applied to vertical tight sand and coal bed methane wells achieved some degree of success during a period of high energy prices in the early 1980s, but shale gas remained largely untapped until the late 1990s with the application of directional drilling, a mature technology adapted from deepwater offshore platforms that allowed horizontal wells to penetrate kilometers of organic-rich shale, and staged hydraulic fracturing, which created high permeability flowpaths from the horizontal wells into a much greater volume of the target formations than previous completion methods. These new engineering techniques opened up vast unconventional natural gas and oil reserves, but also raised concerns about potential environmental impacts. These include short-term and long-term impacts to air and water quality from rig operations, potential migration of gas, fluids and chemicals through the ground, and effects on small watersheds and landscapes from roads, pads and other surface structures. Engineering risk assessment commonly uses integrated assessment models (IAMs), which define sources of risk from features, events and processes. The risk from each system element is assessed using high-fidelity models. Output from these is simplified into reduced-order models, so that a large, integrated site performance assessment can be run using the IAM. The technique has been applied to engineered systems in geologic settings for sequestering carbon dioxide, and it is also applicable to shale gas, albeit with some modifications of the various system elements. Preliminary findings indicate that shale gas well drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques are generally safe when properly applied. Incident reports recorded by state environmental agencies suggest that human error resulting from the disregard of prescribed practices is the greatest cause of environmental incidents. This can only be addressed through education, regulations and enforcement.

Daniel J. Soeder; Shikha Sharma; Natalie Pekney; Leslie Hopkinson; Robert Dilmore; Barbara Kutchko; Brian Stewart; Kimberly Carter; Alexandra Hakala; Rosemary Capo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reckoning with risk: a rhetorical analysis of the social construction of risk associated with Texas drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these recommendations to improve the risk communication process and the construction of risk messages, utilizing communication strategies that are acceptable to a democratic society. The following discussion about risks related to water use illustrates how the risk... only. Cultural input from this perspective has been characterized as "deviant but comprehensible" (304). Only if risk communicators can accept that "two inconsistent decisions can be rational and consistent on independent criteria" will this deviant...

Friedrich, Cynthia Juanita Matthes

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Treatment of produced water using chemical and biological unit operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water generated along with oil and gas during coal bed methane and oil shale operations is commonly known as produced water, formation water, or oilfield… (more)

Li, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Precipitation Trends and Water Consumption Related to Population in the Southwestern United States, 1930–83  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possible effects of climatic fluctuations on renewable water supplies in the western United States was examined, especially as it is impacted by the growth of population and water consumption in recent decades.

Henry F. Diaz; Ronald L. Holle; Joe W. Thorn Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

An Analysis of the Risks of a Terrorist Attack on LNG Receiving Facilities in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Analysis of the Risks of a Terrorist Attack on LNG Receiving Facilities in the United States #12;An Analysis of the Risks of a Terrorist Attack on LNG Receiving Facilities in the United States 3-D Aerial View from Proposed SES LNG Receiving Facility Site to Downtown Long Beach [White line is 2

Wang, Hai

34

Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Heidi Borchers University of New Hampshire, Environmental Ultraviolet (UV) lamps generate ultraviolet light through the vaporization of elemental mercury, by using

35

Triazine herbcides: Ecological risk assessment in North American surface waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The triazine herbicides are some of the most widely used pesticides in North America. Some are found in surface waters in North America and risks to aquatic ecosystems are a possible concern. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive aquatic ecological risk assessment conducted using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The assessment of exposure data concentrated on Midwestern us watersheds, the area of greatest triazine use in North America and showed that concentrations of some triazines rarely exceeded 20 {mu}g/L in rivers, streams, and reservoirs. The effects assessment showed that phytoplankton were the most sensitive organisms to triazines followed, in decreasing order of sensitivity, by macrophytes, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton and fish. Distribution analysis of sensitivity to atrazine showed 10th percentile of 37 {mu}g/L for LC50s in all organisms and 5.4 {mu}g/L for LC50s in algae and plants. Simazine showed 10th percentiles of 188 {mu}g/L for LC50s in all organisms and 27 {mu}g/L for LC50s in aquatic plants. Comparisons of the exposure and effects distributions showed low probabilities of exceeding the 10th percentiles of the sensitivity distributions. These results will be discussed in relation to the mechanism of action of these substances and other stressors in the environment.

Solomon, K.R. [Univ. of Guelph (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Increased salinization of fresh water in the northeastern United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Term Ecological Research (LTER) project. Samples were collected weekly...sampling stations for tributaries to Liberty Reservoir, a drinking water supply...program in Water and Watersheds (Project No. GAD-R825792), and the A...

Sujay S. Kaushal; Peter M. Groffman; Gene E. Likens; Kenneth T. Belt; William P. Stack; Victoria R. Kelly; Lawrence E. Band; Gary T. Fisher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community along the U regarding the quality of municipal drinking water supplies The Arizona Republic. 2007. Thirsty Arizona. Vol of bottled and tap water used by residents in Nogales, AZ according to the EPA primary drinking water

Fay, Noah

38

Title 33 CFR 328 Definition of the Waters of the United States...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the territorial seas." To provide clarity and to avoid confusion with other Corps of Engineer regulatory programs, the term "waters of the United States" is used throughout 33 CFR...

39

ORIGINAL PAPER Managing climate change risks in New York City's water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and wastewater treatment systems, has developed a climate risk management framework through its Climate Change to the effects of climate change must become a regular part of planning for water supply, sewer, wastewaterORIGINAL PAPER Managing climate change risks in New York City's water system: assessment

40

United: How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Leslie Lee Summer 2013 tx H2O 3 Photo by Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife UNITED How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible Managing surface water supplies in Texas is complex, to say the least. Multiple... of conditions. W#15;P enables surface water managers throughout Texas to allocate water resources, plan for the future and ensure there is enough water for environmental as well as human needs. A statewide surface water permitting system is born Prior...

Lee, Leslie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Water Loss Test Results: West Main Canal United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-329 2008 Water Loss Test Results: West Main Canal United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station... Guy Fipps Texas AgriLife Extension Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station April 6, 2006 W 1 ATER LOSS TEST RESULTS: WEST MAIN CANAL UNITED IRRIGATION...

Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

42

Statistical estimation of water distribution system pipe break risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deterioration of pipes in urban water distribution systems is of concern to water utilities throughout the world. This deterioration generally leads to pipe breaks and leaks, which may result in reduction in the water-carrying capacity...

Yamijala, Shridhar

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Emergency Water Treatment with Bleach in the United States: The Need to Revise EPA Recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) However, research has dispelled this myth, showing instead that populations have increased waterborne illness risk only in those emergencies that cause flooding or displacement,(3, 4) or when infrastructure systems are damaged and do not provide safe, chlorinated water. ... Colorado ... It should be noted that surface water supplies had by far the most total coliforms contamination, and thus surface water supplies (and in particular flood waters) should only be used if there are no other options for water supply by the emergency-affected population. ...

Daniele Lantagne; Bobbie Person; Natalie Smith; Ally Mayer; Kelsey Preston; Elizabeth Blanton; Kristen Jellison

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

"Table HC3.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,74.5,60.9,4,1.8,2.2,5.5 "2 or More",3.7,3.3,3,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,"Q","Q","N","Q","Q"

45

"Table HC4.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,31.9,7.9,3.4,5.8,13.7,1.1 "2 or More",3.7,0.4,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.7,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q"

46

Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions, 2006. Millions of persons around the world are exposed to low doses of arsenic through drinking water from drinking water over a significant period of time. The authors evaluated dose-response relations

van Geen, Alexander

47

Focused risk assessment: Mound Plant, Miami-Erie Canal Operable Unit 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1969, an underground waste line at Mound Plant ruptured and released plutonium-238 in a dilute nitric acid solution to the surrounding soils. Most of the acid was neutralized by the native soils. The plutonium, which in a neutral solution is tightly sorbed onto clay particles, remained within the spill area. During remediation, a severe storm eroded some of the contaminated soil. Fine grained plutonium-contaminated clay particles were carried away through the natural drainage courses to the remnants of the Miami-Erie Canal adjacent to Mound Plant, and then into the Great Miami River. This focused risk assessment considers exposure pathways relevant to site conditions, including incidental ingestion of contaminated soils, ingestion of drinking water and fish, and inhalation of resuspended soils and sediments. For each potential exposure pathway, a simplified conceptual model and exposure scenarios have been used to develop conservative estimates of potential radiation dose equivalents and health risks. The conservatism of the dose and risk estimates provides a substantive margin of safety in assuring that the public health is protected.

Rogers, D.R.; Dunning, D.F.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

50

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Gabrielle Wong-Parodi James McMahon Victor Franco Date: May 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the new single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this study, the authors use a life-cycle cost analysis approach that accounts for uncertainty and variability of inputs to assess the economic benefits of installing different gas furnace and water heater combinations. Among other factors, it assesses the economic feasibility of eliminating the traditional metal vents and replacing them with vents made of plastic materials used in condensing and power vent

51

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

52

Risks and responses to universal drinking water security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...providers were introduced, with utility pay points closed, saving...LIFELINK system, which uses solar panels to pump groundwater...2004 Water for Asian cities. Utilities performance and civil society...water and sewerage regulation. Utilities Policy 14, 175-184. ( doi...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

54

Solar desalination in the southwest United States| A thermoeconomic analysis utilizing the sun to desalt water in high irradiance regions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in the… (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Feasibility Study of Developing a Virtual Chilled Water Flow Meter at Air Handling Unit Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a virtual Air handling unit (AHU) level water flow meter is explored by using a control valve as a measurement device. The flow through the valve is indirectly calculated using differential pressure over both the valve and its...

Song, L.; Swamy, A.; Shim, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Risks and responses to universal drinking water security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Burkina Faso, Ghana, Nigeria and Tanzania with an investment of over 400 million...their LIFELINK system, which uses solar panels to pump groundwater to a raised...implementation of rural water supplies in Tanzania. Uppsala, Sweden: Scandinavian...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Macroscopic three-dimensional physical simulation of water flooding in multi-well fracture-cavity unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A macroscopic three-dimensional physical simulating model of multi-well fracture-cavity units was designed and constructed based on similarity theory. The characteristics and the water breakthrough pattern of fracture-cavity reservoirs developed in bottom water depletion and water injection modes were investigated by the model. The results show that, in bottom water drive, under the effect of bottom water depletion and water breakthrough, the wells had high productivity in early stage and fast decline. After energy supplement by injecting water, the productivity rebounded in a short time and then began a slow decline. The bottom water tended to coning to the wells at the place of bottom water entry. The water breakthrough pattern is spot pattern and the water breakthrough time is controlled by the well's connectivity to the bottom water; the water injection can inhibit coning and intrusion of bottom water, turning the spot pattern water breakthrough in bottom water drive period into planar line form, and the water breakthrough time in water injection period was mainly influenced by the well depth. The water cut of wells in water flooding multi-well fracture-cavity units changes in three patterns: slow rise, staircase rise and abrupt watered-out, which is influenced by the reservoir type and the coordination number. When the well encounters cavity, the water cut increasing rate slows down with the increase of the coordination number; when the well drilled fractures, the water cut changes in staircase pattern with the increase of coordination number.

Jirui HOU; Haibo LI; Yu JIANG; Ming LUO; Zeyu ZHENG; Li ZHANG; Dengyu YUAN

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Risk based ISI application to a boiling water reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ASME Section XI Working Group on Implementation of Risk-Based Examination produced a code case to define risk-based selection rules that could be used for In-Service Inspection (ISI) of Class 1, 2, and 3 piping. To provide guidelines for practical implementation of the code case, EPRI sponsored work to develop evaluation procedures and criteria. As part of an EPRI sponsored pilot study, these procedures have been applied to a BWR plant. Piping within the scope of the existing Section XI program has been analyzed. The results of this effort indicate that implementation of RBISI programs can significantly reduce the cost and radiation exposure associated with in-service inspections. The revised program was compared to the previous program and a net gain in safety benefit was demonstrated.

Smith, A. [New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY (United States); Dimitrijevic, V.B.; O`Regan, P.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Incorporation of Agricultural Risk into Water Resource Planning Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the demand for water at an alarming rate. With this in mind, the U. S. Congress has instructed our federal agencies to investigate "The needs and possibilities for all significant resource uses and purposes of development, including, but not limited to...

Conner, J. R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Am J Epidemiol . Author manuscript Aluminum and silica in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimers disease'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Am J Epidemiol . Author manuscript Page /1 10 Aluminum and silica in drinking water and the risk associations between exposure to aluminum or silica from drinking water and risk of cognitive decline, dementia of dementia, aged' 65 years and over living in 91 civil drinking water areas in Southern France. Two measures

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

62

Current Directions in the Practice of Environmental Risk Assessment in the United Kingdom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental risk assessment, where applied to these situations, must be able to inform and improve regulatory and business decisions on how best to manage risks from environmental hazards. ... The handling of “risk” by governments and their agencies has moved up the political agenda in the last 10 years. ... The Environment Agency and DEFRA have put significant investment into understanding environmental extremes. ...

Simon J. Pollard; Roger Yearsley; Nick Reynard; Ian C. Meadowcroft; Raquel Duarte-Davidson; Susan L. Duerden

2001-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

Fixed-flowrate total water network synthesis under uncertainty with risk management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work addresses the problem of integrated water network synthesis under uncertainty with risk management. We consider a superstructure consisting of water sources, regenerators, and sinks that leads to a mixed-integer quadratically-constrained quadratic program (MIQCQP) for a fixed-flowrate total water network synthesis problem. Uncertainty in the problem is accounted for via a recourse-based two-stage stochastic programming formulation with discrete scenarios that gives rise to a multiscenario MIQCQP comprising network design in the first stage and its operation in the second stage acting as recourse. In addition, we extend the model to address risk management using the Conditional Value-at-Risk (CVaR) metric. Because a large number of scenarios is often required to capture the underlying uncertainty of the problem, causing the model to suffer from the curse of dimensionality, we propose a stepwise solution strategy to reduce the computational load. We illustrate this methodology on a case study inspired from the water network of a petroleum refinery in Malaysia. The presence of nonconvex bilinear terms necessitates the use of global optimization techniques for which we employ a new global MIQCQP solver, GAMS/GloMIQO and verify the solutions with BARON. Our computational results show that total water network synthesis under uncertainty with risk management problems can be solved to global optimality in reasonable time.

Cheng Seong Khor; Benoit Chachuat; Nilay Shah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Risk-based site-specific water quality criteria for treated mine-tailings effluent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mine development project proposes to discharge a combined effluent into marine waters in southeast Alaska. The discharge will consist of sewage, storm water, and tailings pond effluent. With the exception of arsenic, the discharge and its subsequent dispersion will comply with state and federal water quality criteria. The proposed discharge will comply with acute and chronic arsenic standards for the protection of marine life, but will not comply with the arsenic standard for the protection of human health via consumption of seafood. The arsenic standard for the protection of human health is based on a risk management objective that the likelihood of skin cancer be no more than 1 excess case per 100,000 people (10{sup {minus}5}) who ingest arsenic in seafood. Based on USEPA methodology for developing ambient water quality criteria, the seawater concentration that corresponds to this risk management objective is 1.4,{micro}g/L, which is less than the naturally-occurring arsenic concentration in seawater. Consequently, a site-specific risk-based evaluation was conducted to identify more realistic and achievable goals for arsenic in seawater that are consistent with the risk management objective of 10{sup {minus}5}. Parameters evaluated were discharge transport, chemical speciation and fate of arsenic, fish exposure, bioaccumulation and metabolism, patterns of fish catch and consumption, and toxic potency of arsenic. Results of the evaluation showed numerous, substantial differences between the assumptions inherent in the risk assessment model used by USEPA to estimate water quality criteria, and site-specific values that could be applied to the proposed discharge. Overall, the collective weight of evidence indicates that the concentration of arsenic in seawater that corresponds to the 10{sup {minus}5} risk management objective may be substantially (i.e., 10 to 1,000 times) higher than the 1.4 {micro}g/L criterion.

Williams, L.G.; Fendick, E.; LaKind, J.; Stern, B.; Strand, J.A.; Tardiff, R.G. [EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Redmond, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Uncertainty in Octanol?Water Partition Coefficient:? Implications for Risk Assessment and Remedial Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

U. S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4201; USGS:? Reston, VA, 2001. ... (37)?Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment for the Hudson River Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study; U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Prepared by Menzie-Cura & Associates and TAMS Consultants, Inc. July, 1999. ...

Igor Linkov; Michael R. Ames; Edmund A. C. Crouch; F. Kyle Satterstrom

2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

67

Water chemistry of the system for cooling the electrical generator’ stator of the power unit at a thermal power station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from studies of the water chemistry used in the system for cooling the stator windings of alternators used in supercritical-pressure power units are presented, and a solution is ... suggested using which ...

B. M. Larin; A. B. Larin; A. N. Korotkov; M. Yu. Oparin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Agility and Risk Management at Pacific Life: Optimizing Business Unit Autonomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Life is a diversified financial services company with a history of autonomous business units. Pacific Life had five independent divisions, including Life Insurance, Annuities and Mutual Funds, and Investments. These ...

Ross, Jeanne W.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Demand-Supply Optimization with Risk Management for a Multi-Connection Water Reservoir Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a framework to solve a demand-supply optimization problem of long-term water resource allocation on a multi-connection reservoir network which, in two aspects, is different to the problem considered in previous works. First, while all previous works consider a problem where each reservoir can transfer water to only one fixed reservoir, we consider a multi-connection network being constructed in Thailand in which each reservoir can transfer water to many reservoirs in one period of time. Second, a demand-supply plan considered here is static, in contrast to a dynamic policy considered in previous works. Moreover, in order to efficiently develop a long-term static plan, a severe loss (a risk) is taken into account, i.e. a risk occurs if the real amount of water stored in each reservoir in each time period is less than what planned by the optimizer. The multi-connection function and the risk make the problem rather complex such that traditional stochastic dynamic programming and determi...

Chatpatanasiri, Ratthachat

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or unwanted chemicals can become a big problem. Some common disposal practices not only threaten ground water but also may be illegal. Small, unusable amounts of these products often wind up spilled, buried, dumped, or flushed onto a property. Minimizing... rules require that environmentally protective conditions be met before some disposal practices are permit- ted. Other previously common disposal prac- tices are now illegal because of their potential risks to human health and the environment. This new...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Diablo Canyon Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a compilation of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system failure information which has been screened for risk significance in terms of failure frequency and degradation of system performance. It is a risk-prioritized listing of failure events and their causes that are significant enough to warrant consideration in inspection planning at Diablo Canyon. This information is presented to provide inspectors with increased resources for inspection planning at Diablo Canyon. The risk importance of various component failure modes was identified by analysis of the results of probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) for many pressurized water reactors (PWRs). However, the component failure categories identified in PRAs are rather broad, because the failure data used in the PRAs is an aggregate of many individual failures having a variety of root causes. In order to help inspectors to focus on specific aspects of component operation, maintenance and design which might cause these failures, an extensive review of component failure information was performed to identify and rank the root causes of these component failures. Both Diablo Canyon and industry-wide failure information was analyzed. Failure causes were sorted on the basis of frequency of occurrence and seriousness of consequence, and categorized as common cause failures, human errors, design problems, or component failures. This information permits an inspector to concentrate on components important to the prevention of core damage. Other components which perform essential functions, but which are not included because of high reliability or redundancy, must also be addressed to ensure that degradation does not increase their failure probabilities, and hence their risk importances. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Harrison, D.G.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

74

Reducing the Vulnerability of Societies to Water Related Risks at the Basin Scale (Proceedings of the third International Symposium on Integrated Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), generated from evaporation, and advective (Pa), generated from atmospheric moisture. The recycling ratio components of the regional water cycle are: Qin and Qout the incoming and outgoing atmospheric moistureReducing the Vulnerability of Societies to Water Related Risks at the Basin Scale (Proceedings

Haak, Hein

75

Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive decline: findings of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive,2 , Commenges Daniel1,2 , Helmer Catherine2,3 , Jean-François Dartigues2,3 . Abbreviations: Al, Aluminum; AD, Alzheimer's Disease; MMSE, Mini Mental State Examination; Si, Silica Running head: Aluminum, silica in water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

76

A practical strategy for reducing the future security risk of United States spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depletion calculations show that advanced oxide (AOX) fuels can be used in existing light water reactors (LWRs) to achieve and maintain virtually any desired level of US (US) reactor-grade plutonium (R-Pu) inventory. AOX fuels are composed of a neutronically inert matrix loaded with R-Pu and erbium. A 1/2 core load of 100% nonfertile, 7w% R-Pu AOX and 3.9 w% UO{sub 2} has a net total plutonium ({sup TOT}Pu) destruction rate of 310 kg/yr. The 20% residual {sup TOT}Pu in discharged AOX contains > 55% {sup 242}Pu making it unattractive for nuclear explosive use. A three-phase fuel-cycle development program sequentially loading 60 LWRs with 100% mixed oxide, 50% AOX with a nonfertile component displacing only some of the {sup 238}U, and 50% AOX, which is 100% nonfertile, could reduce the US plutonium inventory to near zero by 2050.

Chodak, P. III; Buksa, J.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Group

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Risk assessment of surface vs subsea blowout preventers (bops) on mobile offshore drilling units focusing on riser failure and the use of subsea shear rams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RISK ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE VS SUBSEA BLOWOUT PREVENTERS (BOPS) ON MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS FOCUSING ON RISER FAILURE AND THE USE OF SUBSEA SHEAR RAMS A Thesis by JORGE LUIS MELENDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2006 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RISK ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE VS SUBSEA BLOWOUT PREVENTERS (BOPS) ON MOBILE OFFSHORE...

Melendez, Jorge Luis

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluation of military field-water quality: Volume 7, Performance evaluation of the 600-gph reverse osmosis water purification unit (ROWPU): Reverse osmosis (RO) components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this work is to ascertain whether the performance of the current 600-gph reverse osmosis water-purification unit (ROWPU) is adequate to meet the water-quality standards recommended in Volume 4 of this study. A secondary objective is to review the design of the treatment units used in the ROWPU, as well as the prescribed mode of operation, and to make constructive recommendations. Reverse osmosis (hyperfiltration) is a complicated water-treatment process that is not described easily with a few process parameters. Furthermore, published literature on the type of membrane currently used in the ROWPU was scarce. Therefore, we required a mathematical model that could be used to extrapolate existing information to different operating conditions. It was successful for seawater and single-salt solutions, but it proved to be unsuccessful for just any mix of salts that might be encountered in nature. 99 refs., 69 figs., 60 tabs.

Marinas, B.J.; Ungun, Z.; Selleck, R.E.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Pump and control unit for a solar heating installation for a water tank and particularly for a swimming pool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pump and control unit for a solar heating installation system for a water tank, particularly for a swimming pool. The system contains a solar collector, a hydraulic circuit which includes an outward-flow pipe, a return-flow pipe, a pump, a derivative-action control unit and two sensors mounted on the outward-flow pipe and on the return-flow pipe, respectively. The pump, the control unit and the two sensors are integrated into a single case. The case is provided in its top wall with a transparent opening which faces the return-flow sensor and through which said sensor can be exposed to solar radiation, such that the pump may be automatically activated during periods of sunshine, i.e., when the solar collector is heating the water returning to the tank, and stopped due to lack of sunshine.

Cannaux, G.; Calvet, G.

1985-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assess of physical antiscale-treatments on conventional electrodialysis pilot unit during brackish water desalination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In electrodialysis (ED) desalination plants, calcium carbonate is the main component of meted scales. To prevent its formation several treatments were proposed. For more efficiency, treatments must be assessed at experimental conditions close to real ones. Thus, this work is a contribution to understand and evaluate three anti-calcareous physical treatments for ED desalination systems simulating real conditions. Magnetic field (MF) and ultrasonic field (UF) were applied to concentrate solution, compartment where scaling is imminent in the used ED pilot unit. The third treatment was a pulsed electric field (PEF) application. Tested solution was a synthetic brackish water. Results show that magnetic and ultrasonic treatments accelerate the precipitation of CaCO3 by reducing the nucleation time and the metastable domain. It is also shown that pulsed electric treatment accelerates CaCO3 precipitation resulting from desalination improvement comparing to stationary mode. However, all these treatments favor the homogeneous precipitation which prevents scale formation on membrane surfaces. It seems that MF improves the desalination only by preventing membrane scaling. However, UF and PEF application improve desalination by preventing membrane scaling and by improving the ions transfer during desalination; UF application acts on ions mobility or diffusion, while PEF application reduces the concentration polarization layer.

Ilhem BEN SALAH SAYADI; Philippe SISTAT; Mohamed Mouldi TLILI

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Don't water down: Enhance content learning through the unit organizer routine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The writer considers a content enhancement routine called the unit organizer routine. This routine focuses on how a teacher introduces, builds, and gains closure on a content area unit's critical ideas and information. In ...

Bouda, Daniel J.; Lenz, B. Keith; Bulgren, Janis A.; Schumaker, Jean B.; Deshler, Donald D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Causes of Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water in the United States from 1971 to 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waterborne disease in the United States. INTRODUCTION Statistical...outbreaks (WBDOs) in the United States have been collected...in U.S. states, territories, localities, and Freely...Federated States of Micronesia, and the Republic of...

Gunther F. Craun; Joan M. Brunkard; Jonathan S. Yoder; Virginia A. Roberts; Joe Carpenter; Tim Wade; Rebecca L. Calderon; Jacquelin M. Roberts; Michael J. Beach; Sharon L. Roy

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Causes of Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water in the United States from 1971 to 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...weighted more heavily than water quality data. Outbreaks without water...E., is an environmental engineer in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Centers for...is a licensed professional engineer and provides outbreak support...

Gunther F. Craun; Joan M. Brunkard; Jonathan S. Yoder; Virginia A. Roberts; Joe Carpenter; Tim Wade; Rebecca L. Calderon; Jacquelin M. Roberts; Michael J. Beach; Sharon L. Roy

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Board (2005). Water Resources Management onEnvironmental Valuation and Its Economic Critics. Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management,Environmental Cooperation Commission, has encouraged unilateral decision making, as water management

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents ORNL RA Graphic Results ORNL Baseline Risk Assessment Results ORNL Screening Risk Assessment Results ORNL Other Risk Assessment Results ORNL RA Graphic Results WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse (No Fish) Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Industrial Landuse

87

A Critical Review of the Risks to Water Resources from Unconventional Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States Avner Vengosh,*, Robert B. Jackson,, Nathaniel Warner,§ Thomas H: The rapid rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has hydraulic fracturing. This paper provides a critical review of the potential risks that shale gas operations

Jackson, Robert B.

88

Efficiency of producing additional power in units of nuclear power stations containing water-cooled-water-moderated reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a basic possibility to raise the maximum power of a unit containing the VVÉR-1000 reactor in the course of the fuel charge burn-up and with lowering the coefficient of the energy-release nonuniformity...

R. Z. Aminov; V. A. Khrustalev; A. A. Serdobintsev…

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Mapping water availability, projected use and cost in the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New demands for water can be satisfied through a variety of source options. In some basins surface and/or groundwater may be available through permitting with the state water management agency (termed unappropriated water), alternatively water might be purchased and transferred out of its current use to another (termed appropriated water), or non-traditional water sources can be captured and treated (e.g., wastewater). The relative availability and cost of each source are key factors in the development decision. Unfortunately, these measures are location dependent with no consistent or comparable set of data available for evaluating competing water sources. With the help of western water managers, water availability was mapped for over 1200 watersheds throughout the western US. Five water sources were individually examined, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water, municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped was projected change in consumptive water use from 2010 to 2030. Associated costs to acquire, convey and treat the water, as necessary, for each of the five sources were estimated. These metrics were developed to support regional water planning and policy analysis with initial application to electric transmission planning in the western US.

Vincent C. Tidwell; Barbara D. Moreland; Katie M. Zemlick; Barry L. Roberts; Howard D. Passell; Daniel Jensen; Christopher Forsgren; Gerald Sehlke; Margaret A. Cook; Carey W. King

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- I~:-:ii*.i: i,<;.;.-;_r- --:-:ir-- - . . - -. . - . . - , -, . , , , - - - - . BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URAN~UM MILL TAILINGS SITE NEAR RIVERTON, WYOMING I i I I I Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque, New Mexico September 1995 INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Avai and microfiche Number of pages in this report: 166 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (61 5) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 DOEIAL162350-65

92

Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from consuming aquatic food resources from chemically contaminated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from contaminated waters must confront the problems of long latency and rarity of the end point (cancer). The latency problem makes determination of diet history more difficult, while the low frequency of cancer as an end point reduces the statistical power of the study. These factors are discussed in relation to the study designs most commonly employed in epidemiology. It is suggested that the use of biomarkers for persistent chemicals may be useful to mitigate the difficulty of determining exposure, while the use of more prevalent and timely end points, such as carcinogen-DNA adducts or oncogene proteins, may make the latency and rarity problems more tractable.

Ozonoff, D. (Boston Univ. School of Public Health, MA (United States)); Longnecker, M.P. (UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy, Water and Fish: Biodiversity Impacts of Energy-Sector Water Demand in the United States Depend on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption would more rapidly increase by 26% due to increased biofuel production, going from 16 is evaporation from hydroelectric reservoirs, followed by irrigation water for biofuel feedstocks and water used, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: Most authors had no specific research grants

Olden, Julian D.

94

The Impact of Non-Drinking Water Exposures on Drinking Water Standards: A Problem of Acceptable Levels of Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under the Safe drinking Water Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required to establish highly protective drinking water standards for compounds which are likely to contaminant public water supplies...

Paul S. Price

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Break-even Cost for Residential Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48986 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. SS10.2110 Technical Report

96

Regional ground-water mixing and the origin of saline fluids: Midcontinent, United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground waters in three adjacent regional flow systems in the midcontinent exhibit extreme chemical and isotopic variations that delineate large-scale fluid flow and mixing processes and two distinct mechanisms for the generation of saline fluids. Systematic spatial variations of major ion concentrations, H, O, and Sr isotopic compositions, and ground-water migration pathways indicate that each flow system contains water of markedly different origin. Mixing of the three separate ground waters exerts a fundamental control on ground-water composition. The three ground waters are: (i) dilute meteoric water recharged in southern Missouri; (ii) saline Na-Ca-Cl water in southeastern Kansas of far-traveled meteoric origin that acquired its salinity by halite dissolution; and (iii) Na-Ca-Cl brines in north-central Oklahoma that may have originated as Paleozoic seawater. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Musgrove, M.; Banner, J.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1993-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solar Energy Water Desalination in the United States and Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five solar energy water desalination systems are described. The systems will each deliver 6000 m3/day of desalted water from either seawater or brackish water. After the system definition study is completed in August 1981, two systems will be selected for pilot plant construction. The pilot plants will have capacities in the range of 1 00 to 400 m3/day.

Luft, W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie M.; Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in water and energy efficient technologies and policies of integrated water and energy efficiency. CWEE AFFILIATE GIFT PROGRAM Supporting innovations in integrated

California at Davis, University of

100

Causes of Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water in the United States from 1971 to 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...outbreak occurrence and transmission dynamics. J. Clin...Intelligence Service (EIS) officer, assigned...of waterborne disease transmission in the United States...Intelligence Service (EIS) officer in 2001 and...Diseases epidemiology transmission Disease Outbreaks Disease...

Gunther F. Craun; Joan M. Brunkard; Jonathan S. Yoder; Virginia A. Roberts; Joe Carpenter; Tim Wade; Rebecca L. Calderon; Jacquelin M. Roberts; Michael J. Beach; Sharon L. Roy

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Comparison of Advanced Residential Water Heating Technologies in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage, gas tankless, condensing, electric storage, heat pump, and solar water heaters were simulated in several different climates across the US installed in both conditioned and unconditioned space and subjected to several different draw profiles. While many preexisting models were used, new models of condensing and heat pump water heaters were created specifically for this work.

Maguire, J.; Fang, X.; Wilson, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A SCOPING STUDY: Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Reactivity Insertion Accidents During Shutdown In U.S. Commercial Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the scoping study of developing generic simplified fuel damage risk models for quantitative analysis from inadvertent reactivity insertion events during shutdown (SD) in light water pressurized and boiling water reactors. In the past, nuclear fuel reactivity accidents have been analyzed both mainly deterministically and probabilistically for at-power and SD operations of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since then, many NPPs had power up-rates and longer refueling intervals, which resulted in fuel configurations that may potentially respond differently (in an undesirable way) to reactivity accidents. Also, as shown in a recent event, several inadvertent operator actions caused potential nuclear fuel reactivity insertion accident during SD operations. The set inadvertent operator actions are likely to be plant- and operation-state specific and could lead to accident sequences. This study is an outcome of the concern which arose after the inadvertent withdrawal of control rods at Dresden Unit 3 in 2008 due to operator actions in the plant inadvertently three control rods were withdrawn from the reactor without knowledge of the main control room operator. The purpose of this Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Model development project is to develop simplified SPAR Models that can be used by staff analysts to perform risk analyses of operating events and/or conditions occurring during SD operation. These types of accident scenarios are dominated by the operator actions, (e.g., misalignment of valves, failure to follow procedures and errors of commissions). Human error probabilities specific to this model were assessed using the methodology developed for SPAR model human error evaluations. The event trees, fault trees, basic event data and data sources for the model are provided in the report. The end state is defined as the reactor becomes critical. The scoping study includes a brief literature search/review of historical events, developments of a small set of comprehensive event trees and fault trees and recommendation for future work.

S. Khericha

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Risk Perception and Willingness to Pay for Removing Arsenic in Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with (i) how to estimate the perceived mortality risk, (ii) how to calculate the welfare change of mortality risk reduction and (iii) whether ambiguity aversion influences subjects' treatment decision. This study...

Chen, Sihong

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

National radiation exposures and risks caused by implementing EPA`s proposed revised national primary drinking water regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report estimates risks to workers and the public associated with treatment processes and their associated waste products that would be mandated under proposed regulations of radium, radon, and uranium in drinking water. Three scenarios were examined: (1) all wastes flushed to the sanitary sewer; (2) all wastes disposed on land; (3) similar to (2) but radon removal by granulated activated carbon rather than packed tower aeration. Risks considered included accidental injury and cancer. Worker risks for both scenarios I and II were estimated to be 0.025 and 0.01 deaths per year of operation for radium-226 and radium-228, respectively. Worker risks for uranium were estimated to be 0.13 deaths/year of operation for scenario I and 0.5 deaths/year of operation for scenario II. Worker risks for radon removal were estimated to be 1.7 deaths/year of operation for scenario I and 2.2 deaths/year of operation for scenario II. Risks to the public for scenarios I and II for radium-226 were 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and for radium-228 were 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} deaths/year of operation. Risks to the public for scenarios I and II for uranium were 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} and 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. Risks to the public for scenario I and II for radon were 24 deaths/year of operation and for scenario III were nil. Public risks were quantified only for people exposed during a year of operation. For example, effects of public exposures in future years via groundwater contamination associated with landfill of treatment waste were not considered.

Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the US Jeff Maguire 4/30/13 Outline * Why HPWHs? * US Water Heating Market * Overview of HPWHs * Model Description * Results o HPWH Performance o Energy Savings Potential o Breakeven Cost 2 Heat Pump Water Heaters Save $300 a year over standard electric? Save $100 a year over standard gas? Heat Pump Electric Gas 3 Questions about HPWHs * Are HPWHs a good replacement for typical gas and electric storage water heaters? o In different locations across the country? o In conditioned/unconditioned space? o Source energy savings?

107

Haloacetic acids in swimming pool and spa water in the United States and China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to investigate the occurrence of haloacetic acids (HAAs), a group of disinfection byproducts, in swimming pool and spa water. The samples were collected from six indoor pools, six o...

Xiaomao Wang; Garcia Leal M I; Xiaolu Zhang…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measured from the original canal we see an average water savings of 78%. While this would be considered much improvement, the district?s expectations for their new pipeline were higher. Following minor repairs, due to the apparent leakage occurring... measured from the original canal we see an average water savings of 78%. While this would be considered much improvement, the district?s expectations for their new pipeline were higher. Following minor repairs, due to the apparent leakage occurring...

Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

109

Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Models for Consumption of Raw Vegetables Irrigated with Reclaimed Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The practice of adding water to cut surfaces to keep...waxed boxes, wherein water pools. Feeding damage by insects...Agriculture methods Conservation of Natural Resources...Food Contamination Fresh Water virology Models, Biological...

Andrew J. Hamilton; Frank Stagnitti; Robert Premier; Anne-Maree Boland; Glenn Hale

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States *Barbara L. Rowe1 , Patricia L. Toccalino2 , Michael J. Moran1 , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA

111

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Supporting MELCOR calculations, Volume 6, Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To gain a better understanding of the risk significance of low power and shutdown modes of operation, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research at the NRC established programs to investigate the likelihood and severity of postulated accidents that could occur during low power and shutdown (LP&S) modes of operation at commercial nuclear power plants. To investigate the likelihood of severe core damage accidents during off power conditions, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) were performed for two nuclear plants: Unit 1 of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, which is a BWR-6 Mark III boiling water reactor (BWR), and Unit 1 of the Surry Power Station, which is a three-loop, subatmospheric, pressurized water reactor (PWR). The analysis of the BWR was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories while the analysis of the PWR was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This multi-volume report presents and discusses the results of the BWR analysis. The subject of this part presents the deterministic code calculations, performed with the MELCOR code, that were used to support the development and quantification of the PRA models. The background for the work documented in this report is summarized, including how deterministic codes are used in PRAS, why the MELCOR code is used, what the capabilities and features of MELCOR are, and how the code has been used by others in the past. Brief descriptions of the Grand Gulf plant and its configuration during LP&S operation and of the MELCOR input model developed for the Grand Gulf plant in its LP&S configuration are given.

Kmetyk, L.N.; Brown, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A pilot application of risk-informed methods to establish inservice inspection priorities for nuclear components at Surry Unit 1 Nuclear Power Station. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed risk-informed approaches for inservice inspection plans of nuclear power plants. This method uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) results to identify and prioritize the most risk-important components for inspection. The Surry Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 was selected for pilot application of this methodology. This report, which incorporates more recent plant-specific information and improved risk-informed methodology and tools, is Revision 1 of the earlier report (NUREG/CR-6181). The methodology discussed in the original report is no longer current and a preferred methodology is presented in this Revision. This report, NUREG/CR-6181, Rev. 1, therefore supersedes the earlier NUREG/CR-6181 published in August 1994. The specific systems addressed in this report are the auxiliary feedwater, the low-pressure injection, and the reactor coolant systems. The results provide a risk-informed ranking of components within these systems.

Vo, T.V.; Phan, H.K.; Gore, B.F.; Simonen, F.A.; Doctor, S.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

International cooperation between the United States and Mexico: addressing water quality of the Lower Rio Grande  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concerns, and later concentrates on the United States/Mexico border and transboundary issues in the Rio Grande Basin. Policy Building and Sttstainable Development Ascher and Healy (1990), focusing their analysis on third world nations, approach... provides insight into pitfalls of policy development in third world nations. The 19 pitfalls often are apparent in natural resource depletion, environmental degradation, and inefficiencies in aiding populations, usually poor, who were to benefit from...

Crouch, Kellie Gene

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW (low level waste) disposal units: Annual report, October 1985-September 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the humid eastern part of the United States, trench covers have, in general, failed to prevent some of the incident precipitation from percolating downward to buried wastes. It is the purpose of the present work to investigate and demonstrate a procedure or technique that will control water infiltration to buried wastes regardless of above or below ground disposal. Results to date show the proposed procedure to be very promising and are applicable to shallow land burial as well as above ground disposal (e.g., Tumulus). In essence, the technique combines engineered or positive control of run-off, along with a vegetative cover, and is named ''bioengineering management''. To investigate control of infiltration, lysimeters are being used to make complete water balance measurements. The studies have been underway at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky, low-level waste disposal facility for the past three seasonal years. When the original Maxey Flats site closure procedure is followed, it is necessary to pump large amounts of water out of the lysimeters to prevent the water table from rising closer than 2 meters from the surface. Using the bioengineering management procedure, no pumping is required. As a result of the encouraging initial findings in the rather small-scale lysimeters at Maxey Flats, a large-scale facility for demonstration of the bioengineering management technique has been constructed at Beltsville, Maryland. This facility is now operational with the demonstration and data collection underway. 6 refs., 15 figs.

Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O'Donnell, E.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Impacts of Water Loop Management on Simultaneous Heating and Cooling in Coupled Control Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impacts of the water loop management on the heating and cooling energy consumption are investigated by using model simulation. The simulation results show that the total thermal energy consumption can be increased by 24% for a typical AHU in San...

Guan, W.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Potentially Pathogenic Bacteria in Shower Water and Air of a Stem Cell Transplant Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...E-mail: la249cornell.edu 1 Department of Energy, Environmental Chemical Engineering...141-147. 14 Chate, R. A. 2006. An audit improves the quality of water within the...in background levels. | Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering...

Sarah D. Perkins; Jennie Mayfield; Victoria Fraser; Largus T. Angenent

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

117

Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community along the U.S.-Mexico Border.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community along the U Dental Association (ADA) is concerned that individuals who primarily drink bottled water may, elucidated why Latinos perceive tap water to be unsafe for drinking, and identified whether individuals have

Fay, Noah

118

Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluates water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria.

120

Recommendations for at-risk water supplies in Capiz Province, Philippines : using water source and community assessments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The following thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Provincial Health Office (PHO) in Capiz Province, Philippines for expert advice to support its drinking water quality testing ...

Patrick, Jessica Molly

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Managing political risk through increased local participation : innovations in water sector PSP from Tirupur, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using primary data from an innovative water project in Tirupur, India with findings from two well-documented water projects in Latin America, this thesis asks: How might greater equity participation and decision-making ...

Brown, Michael D. (Michael David)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Drinking Water Arsenic in Northern Chile: High Cancer Risks 40 Years after Exposure Cessation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Articles Drinking Water Arsenic in Northern Chile: High Cancer...worldwide are exposed to arsenic-contaminated water. In the largest city in northern Chile...people were exposed to high arsenic drinking water concentrations from 1958 until 1970 when...

Craig M. Steinmaus; Catterina Ferreccio; Johanna Acevedo Romo; Yan Yuan; Sandra Cortes; Guillermo Marshall; Lee E. Moore; John R. Balmes; Jane Liaw; Todd Golden; Allan H. Smith

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 C-617-A Sanitarv Waterline- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: - REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Between southeast corner of C-531 Switchyard and C-617-A Water Treatment Facility. 4 feet...

124

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States: A review of current understanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves between water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be adsorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rates commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: (1) polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides; (2) carbamate and organophosphorus; (3) herbicides; (4) phenols; (5) halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (6) phthalate esters; (7) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and (8) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Process that influence the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate process are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison to concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where sufficient data exist, regional and temporal contamination trends in the US are discussed. 699 refs., 26 figs., 47 tabs.

Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, P.J.; Fusillo, T.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Foreign offshore worker injuries in foreign waters: why a United States forum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When foreigners are injured or killed in offshore oil operations in foreign jurisdictional waters, US laws do not always apply as they would if the plaintiffs are American or resident aliens. The courts must first consider whether the Jones Act, Death on the High Seas Act, general maritime law, or a combination of laws applies and whether the court should assume jurisdiction or use the doctrine of forum non conveniens. Cases involving foreign offshore workers are used to illustrate the factors involved in each application and to consider the foreign-policy implication when foreign nationals assume that American laws and morality accompany multinational business. Congress has yet to resolve the issues, although a bill was proposed in 1980. 75 references. (DCK)

Sutterfield, J.R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-point Source Water Pollution Motor vehicles are a majorpreventing water pollution from motor vehicles would be muchcosts of controlling water pollution from motor vehicles. It

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Control of water infiltration into near surface low-level waste disposal units. Final report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study`s objective was to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work was carried out in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (70 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration were investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management.

Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O`Donnell, E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Risk Factors for Contamination of Hotel Water Distribution Systems by Legionella Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...period. DISCUSSION Our data indicate that at the time...www.ewgli.org/data/data_tables/year_onset...rates were higher than in big towns, where hotels generally...heaters powered directly by electricity and solar water heaters...

Varvara Mouchtouri; Emmanuel Velonakis; Andreas Tsakalof; Christina Kapoula; Georgia Goutziana; Alkiviadis Vatopoulos; Jenny Kremastinou; Christos Hadjichristodoulou

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

129

NUREG-1150 risk assessment results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology developed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) evaluation of severe accident risks in NUREG-1150 is noted. This paper discusses the results. The principal technical analyses for NUREG-1150 were performed at Sandia National Labs. under the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program and the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program. The analyses have been completed so far for four reference plants: (a) a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with a dry, subatmospheric containment (Surry Unit 1), (b) a PWR with an ice condenser containment (Sequoyah Unit 1), (c) a boiling water reactor (BWR) with a Mark I containment (Peach Bottom Unit 2), and (d) a BWR with a Mark III containment (Grand Gulf Unit 1). A fifth NUREG-1150 plant, a PWR with a large, dry containment (Zion Unit 1), has been evaluated separately by Brookhaven National Lab. Sample risk results for one of the plants (Surry) are presented. The results for Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, and Grand Gulf are broadly compared with those for Surry.

Benjamin, A.S.; Kunsman, D.M.; Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Amos, C.N.; Smith, L.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@BCL@A8059DC2.DOC (DO NOT DELETE) 8/17/2009 7:50 AM 428 COMPARATIVE WATER LAW AND MANAGEMENT: THE YELLOW RIVER BASIN IN WESTERN CHINA AND THE STATE OF KANSAS IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Burke W. Griggs Counsel, Division of Water Resources... Kansas Department of Agriculture John C. Peck Professor of Law, University of Kansas School of Law Special Counsel, Foulston Siefkin, LLP Xue Yunpeng Deputy Division Chief / Senior Engineer Department of Water Resources Management and Regulation Yellow...

Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Drinking Water Arsenic in Northern Chile: High Cancer Risks 40 Years after Exposure Cessation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...water and cancer, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer...adjusted for (e.g., diet, radon) is also possible, but there...cam.ac.uk/research/projects/arsenic/symposium/S1...Vol 84. Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer...

Craig M. Steinmaus; Catterina Ferreccio; Johanna Acevedo Romo; Yan Yuan; Sandra Cortes; Guillermo Marshall; Lee E. Moore; John R. Balmes; Jane Liaw; Todd Golden; and Allan H. Smith

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

Estimating surface water risk at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Effects of site conditions on modeling results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple source term and groundwater modeling runs were executed to estimate surface water {sup 90}Sr concentrations resulting from leaching of sludges in five 180,000 gallon Gunite{trademark} tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Four release scenarios were analyzed: (1) leaching of unstabilized sludge with immediate tank failure; (2) leaching of unstabilized sludge with delayed tank failure due to chemical degradation; (3) leaching of stabilized sludge with immediate tank failure; and (4) leaching of residual contamination out of the shells of empty tanks. Source terms and concentrations of {sup 90}Sr in the stream directly downgradient of the tanks were calculated under these release scenarios. The following conclusions were drawn from the results of the modeling: (1) small changes in soil path length resulted in relatively large changes in the modeled {sup 90}Sr concentrations in the stream; (2) there was a linear relationship between the amount of sludge remaining in a tank and the peak concentration of {sup 90}Sr in the stream; (3) there was a linear relationship between the cumulative {sup 90}Sr release from a tank and the peak concentration of {sup 90}Sr in the stream; (4) sludge stabilization resulted in significantly reduced peak concentrations of {sup 90}Sr in the stream; and (5) although radioactive decay of {sup 90}Sr during the period of tank degradation resulted in incrementally lower peak {sup 90}Sr concentrations in surface water than under the immediate tank failure scenarios these concentrations were equivalent under the two scenarios after about 90 years.

Curtis, A.H. III

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Graphite-moderated, gas-cooled, and water-moderated, water-cooled reactors as power units in nuclearelectric power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article reviews a number of papers submitted at the Second International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy bearing on water-cooled, water-moderated, graphite-moderated, and gas-coole...

Yu. I. Koryakin

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Main Report and Appendix A: Evaluates water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects.

136

EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

137

8th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-2008: Urban waters: resource or risks? 13-16 May 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or risks? 13-16 May 2008 Identification of particulate heavy metal pollution sources in urban river of their different sources and their eventual mobility in the environment. Keywords Heavy metal carrier; binding water quality criteria. This includes heavy metal concentration, which remains a main concern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

138

Integrated assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) climate change projections on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In response to a congressional mandate, the US Global Change Research Program organized a National Assessment of Climate Change focusing on geographic regions (e.g. Alaska, Great Plains) and sectors (e.g. public health, agriculture, water resources). This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory contributing to the water sector analysis. The subsequent paper makes use of the water supply results to estimate the climate change impacts on irrigated agriculture. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous US to climate changes in 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095 as projected by the Hadley/United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) general circulation model (GCM; HadCM2) were modeled using the Hydrologic Unit Model for the United States (HUMUS). HUMUS, a biophysically based hydrology model, consists of a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the eight-digit United States Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Unit Area (HUA) of which there are 2101 in the conterminous US. Results are aggregated to the four- and two-digit (major water resource region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of maximum/minimum temperature and precipitation (PPT) from 1961 to 1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY), used as a measure of water supply for irrigation, increases from the 1961–1990 baseline period over most of the US in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm (35%) from baseline in the Pacific Northwest. Driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation, WY is projected to decrease in the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins. The HadCM2 (2095) scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in water yield increases of 38% on average. Water yield increases are projected to be significant throughout the eastern US—39% in the Ohio basin, for example. Water yields increase significantly in the western US, as well—57 and 76% in the Upper and Lower Colorado, respectively. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased water yields in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations [CO2] to account for the potential impacts of the ‘CO2-fertilization’ effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated [CO2] but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Norman J Rosenberg; Robert A Brown; R.Cesar Izaurralde; Allison M Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Experience of using the turbine-generator units of the Kolyma hydroelectric station for idle discharge of water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. Before the start of reservoir drawdown it is necessary to clean the trash racks and water surface in front of...

B. N. Yurkevich; A. Ya. Afonin; S. G. Kukarskii; I. N. Lukin

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Application of the bioecological model and health belief model to self-reported health risk behaviors of adolescents in the united states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health risk behaviors are responsible for the majority of morbidity and mortality among adolescents. Researchers have identified three sources of risk-taking in adolescents – dispositional, ecological and biological. The Bioecological Model...

Fleary, Sasha A.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

The role of the United States Water Resources Engineering Community in responding to the water related needs of the developing world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 5 Structure of Research. ? II DEVELOPING COUNTRIES AND THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS. . . . . 2. 1 Defining Development. . 2. 2 Defining World Regions. 2. 3 Development Indicators . . 2. 4 The Process of Development. 20 34 IH THE ROLE OF WATER... Benefits. . 4. 3 The Interrelationship of Benefits. . 57 57 63 CHAPTER V U. S. INVOLVEMENT IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES??. 5. 1 Need For U. S. Involvement. . 5. 2 General Assistance 5. 3 Water Resources Sector. Page 66 66 71 VI CHANNELS...

Ormond, Timothy Paul

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Risk of Gastrointestinal Disease Associated with Exposure to Pathogens in the Water of the Lower Passaic River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and R. Cantu. 2006. Water ingestion during swimming activities in a pool: a pilot study. J. Water Health 4: 425-430...Department of Environmental Conservation. 2004. State enforcement targets quality of water near New York City...

Ellen Donovan; Ken Unice; Jennifer D. Roberts; Mark Harris; Brent Finley

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; preventionUnited States Environmental Protection Agency Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry/R-02/008 January 2002 Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry, and Assessment of Nitrogen

145

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units. Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland: Volume 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study`s objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (75 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care.

Schulz, R.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ridky, R.W. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Geology; O`Donnell, E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units: Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study`s objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (70 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care.

Schulz, R.K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ridky, R.W. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; O`Donnell, E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Scale-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations: Volume 5, North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ANSI/ANS 8.1 requires that calculational methods for away-from- reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experiment. This report summarizes part of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial PWRs. Codes and data in the SCALE-4 code system were used. This volume documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. The KENO V.a criticality calculations for the North Anna 1 Cycle 5 beginning-of-cycle model yielded a value for k{sub eff} of 1. 0040{+-}0.0005.

Bowman, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Suto, T. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Health Risk from the Use of Roof-Harvested Rainwater in Southeast Queensland, Australia, as Potable or Nonpotable Water, Determined Using Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4 101 (with a mean of 1.2 101 from Monte Carlo analysis) and from 1.0 101 to 6.5 101 cases (with a mean of 1.6 101 from Monte Carlo...initiated the Home Water Wise Rebate Scheme, which provides...sampled tanks ranged between 500 and 20,000 liters (i...

W. Ahmed; A. Vieritz; A. Goonetilleke; T. Gardner

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Holding Pen Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open lots or holding pens for feeding or holding livestock can be sources of ground water contamination. The safety of such operations depends on their separation from water wells, characteristics of the site, and proper management. This publication...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can release large amounts of bacteria, nitrates and other contam- inants that could pollute well water. The Texas Water Well Drillers Act (1985), the Water Well Pump Installer Act (1991) and vari- ous other legislative actions have guided devel- opment... of regulations, primarily contained in Chapter 287 of the Texas Administrative Code, to provide for licensing of well drillers and pump installers and establish standards for drilling, capping and plugging water wells. For wells drilled before the effective date...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

Risk and risk reduction results for Surry, obtained in support of NUREG-1150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Severe Accident Risk Rebaselining/Risk Reduction Program has completed a rebaselining of the risks to the public from a particular pressurized water reactor with a subatmospheric containment (Surry, Unit 1). Emphasis was placed on determining the magnitude and character of the uncertainties, rather than focusing on a point estimate. The risk reduction potential of a set of proposed safety option backfits was also studied, and their costs and benefits were evaluated. It was found that the risks from internal events are generally lower than previously evaluated in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS). However, certain unresolved issues (such as direct containment heating) cause the top of the uncertainty band to appear at a level that is comparable with the RSS point estimate. None of the postulated safety options appears to be cost-effective for the Surry power plant.

Benjamin, A.S.; Boyd, G.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A Risk-based Optimization Modeling Framework for Mitigating Fire Events for Water and Fire Response Infrastructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Generalized Barrois Model Fitted to Observations in Finland (Tillander and Keski-Rahkonen 2002)???????? ? 85 4.2 Annual Frequency Distribution of Wind Direction ??????? . 95 4.3 Highest Risk Scenarios for Micropolis Generated from Monte Carlo...

Kanta, Lufthansa Rahman

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evaluation of Selective Ion Exchange Resins for Removal of Mercury from the H-Area Water Treatment Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the ability of seven ion exchange (IX) resins, some of which were mercury specific, to remove mercury in H-Area WTU waters from three sources (Reverse Osmosis (RO) Feed, RO Permeate from Train A, and a mercury ''hot spot'' extraction well HEX 18). Seven ion exchange resins, including ResinTech CG8 and Dowex 21K (the cation and anion exchange resins currently used at the H-Area WTU) were screened against five alternative ion exchange materials plus an experimental blank. Mercury decontamination factors (DFs), mercury breakthrough, and post-test contaminant concentrations of IX resins were determined for each IX material tested.

Serkiz, S.M.

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

From Emergency to Fix: Point-of-Use Water Filtration Technology in Colonias Along the United States-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sanitation, health care, electricity and paved roads (Korc and Ford 2013, pg. 80). In August 2011, the EPA supported and promoted POU devices in a regional conference (“BienESTAR”) attended by stakeholders and researchers at the University of Texas – El... of the millions of people across the globe without access to it. In September 2010, the UN Human Rights Council confirmed that it was legally binding upon states to respect, protect, and fulfill the human “right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation...

Vandewalle, Emily Lauren

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

The impact of sexual experiences of young minority group members in the United States, and the associated risks of sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission among adults in the United States and China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with regard to STI transmission rates. The thesis involves three separate analyses including a comparative study of teens (age 15-19) and adults (age 20-44) in the United States, a comparative study of adults aged 20-44 in the United States and China... note, I am most thankful for my mom (Alicia Zemanek) and dad (Cesar Garcia) who continue to advise and help me in many aspects of life. I would not have made it this far without them and hope that I have made them proud. I will continue to do my...

Garcia, Ginny Elizabeth

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Remediation of Risks in Natural Gas Storage Produced Waters: The Potential Use of Constructed Wetland Treatment Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas storage produced waters (NGSPWs) are generated in large volumes, vary in composition, and often contain constituents in concentrations and forms that are toxic… (more)

Johnson, Brenda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

United States natural gas markets, contracts and risks: What lessons for the European Union and Asia-Pacific natural gas markets?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The article examines the natural gas markets of the United States, the European Union and the Asia-Pacific region and their regulation and contractual structures. The article?s main focus is on the United States natural gas markets. The European Union and Asia-Pacific markets are compared to this more developed market. By comparing the physical and ideological characteristics of, and differences between, the three main international gas markets, the article exposes the limits of regulatory and contractual transplants in this area of law and policy. Each of these markets is unique, which limits the opportunities for modelling certain market institutions on the basis of the more developed markets in the United States. This applies for both the EU and the Asia-Pacific region.

Kim Talus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improperly managed manure can contaminate both ground and surface water. Storing manure allows producers to spread it when crops can best use the nutrients. This publication explains safe methods of manure storage, as well as specifics about safe...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

163

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Water Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency Water Efficiency Water is one of our most precious natural resources, and although the United States has an abundant supply, it is not evenly distributed...

166

Breakout Group 3: Water Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ideas: - Water imaging, (with that of other cell component substances) - diffusivity measurement (2) - Confirmed diagnostics to map water at full-size unit cell in-situ (water...

167

?Framework for a Risk-Informed Groundwater Compliance Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Note: This document was prepared before the NTS was renamed the Nevada National Security Site (August 23, 2010); thus, all references to the site herein remain NTS. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98, Frenchman Flat, at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was the location of ten underground nuclear tests between 1965 and 1971. As a result, radionuclides were released in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Corrective Action Unit 98 and other CAUs at the NTS and offsite locations are being investigated. The Frenchman Flat CAU is one of five Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs at the NTS that are being evaluated as potential sources of local or regional impact to groundwater resources. For UGTA sites, including Frenchman Flat, contamination in and around the test cavities will not be remediated because it is technologically infeasible due to the depth of the test cavities (150 to 2,000 feet [ft] below ground surface) and the volume of contaminated groundwater at widely dispersed locations on the NTS. Instead, the compliance strategy for these sites is to model contaminant flow and transport, estimate the maximum spatial extent and volume of contaminated groundwater (over a period of 1,000 years), maintain institutional controls, and restrict access to potentially contaminated groundwater at areas where contaminants could migrate beyond the NTS boundaries.

Sam Marutzky

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

API unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

API unit [An arbitrary unit of the American Petroleum Institute for measuring natural radioactivity; used in certain well logging methods] ? API-Einheit f

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Risks of Risk Decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...manuscript. 17. B. Fischhoff, P. Slovic, S. Lichtenstein, S. Read, B. Combs, Policy Sci...Perspectives on Benefit-Risk Decision Making...20. P. Slovic, B. Fischhoff, S. Lichtenstein, in So-cietal Risk Assessment: How Safe...

Chauncey Starr; Chris Whipple

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

170

An Assessment of Use, Need for, and Capacity to Integrate Climate Information Among Water Managers in Southeastern United States and the ACF Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Assessment of Use, Need for, and Capacity to Integrate Climate Information Among Water Managers-year droughts, floods, and associated water management decisions have long concerned water managers in Western states. Similar concerns are now facing water managers in Southeastern states, including those in Georgia

Miami, University of

171

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

173

Human health risk implications of multiple sources of faecal indicator bacteria in a recreational waterbody  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We simulate the influence of multiple sources of enterococci (ENT) as faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in recreational water bodies on potential human health risk by considering waters impacted by human and animal sources, human and non-pathogenic sources, and animal and non-pathogenic sources. We illustrate that risks vary with the proportion of culturable ENT in water bodies derived from these sources and estimate corresponding ENT densities that yield the same level of health protection that the recreational water quality criteria in the United States seeks (benchmark risk). The benchmark risk is based on epidemiological studies conducted in water bodies predominantly impacted by human faecal sources. The key result is that the risks from mixed sources are driven predominantly by the proportion of the contamination source with the greatest ability to cause human infection (potency), not necessarily the greatest source(s) of FIB. Predicted risks from exposures to mixtures comprised of approximately 30% ENT from human sources were up to 50% lower than the risks expected from purely human sources when contamination is recent and ENT levels are at the current water quality criteria levels (35 CFU 100 mL-1). For human/non-pathogenic, human/gull, human/pig, and human/chicken faecal mixtures with relatively low human contribution, the predicted culturable enterococci densities that correspond to the benchmark risk are substantially greater than the current water quality criteria values. These findings are important because they highlight the potential applicability of site specific water quality criteria for waters that are predominantly un-impacted by human sources.

Jeffrey A. Soller; Mary E. Schoen; Arun Varghese; Audrey M. Ichida; Alexandria B. Boehm; Sorina Eftim; Nicholas J. Ashbolt; John E. Ravenscroft

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A study of the future water requirements of the state of Texas and the projected plan to meet them as presented by the United States Study Commission - Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that my education could be continued. G. W. August, 1963 111 CONTENTS Page List of Tables List of Plates Chapter vi I. Introduction II. Water Resources I II. Water Requirements IV. The Water Development Plan 15 31 34 V. Views and Comments... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Sanuary, 1964 Major Subject Business Adzninistration A STUDY OF THE FUTURE WATER REQUIREMENTS. OF THE STATE OF TEXAS AND THE PROJECTED PLAN TO MEET...

Wortham, Gene Rye

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Unit environmental transport assessment of contaminants from Hanford`s past-practice waste sites. Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) contracted Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide support to Advanced Sciences, Incorporated (ASI) in implementing tile regional no-action risk assessment in the Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement. Researchers at PNL were charged with developing unit concentrations for soil, groundwater, surface water, and air at multiple locations within an 80-km radius from the center of tile Hanford installation. Using the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS), PNL simulated (1) a unit release of one ci for each radionuclide and one kg for each chemical from contaminated soils and ponded sites, (2) transport of the contaminants in and through various environmental media and (3) exposure/risk of four exposure scenarios, outlined by the Hanford Site Baseline Remedial Action Methodology. These four scenarios include residential, recreational, industrial, and agricultural exposures. Spacially and temporally distributed environmental concentrations based on unit releases of radionuclides and chemicals were supported to ASI in support of the HRA-EIS. Risk for the four exposure scenarios, based on unit environment concentrations in air, water, and soil. were also supplied to ASI. This report outlines the procedure that was used to implement the unit transport portion of the HRA-EIS baseline risk assessment. Deliverables include unit groundwater, surface water, air, and soil concentrations at multiple locations within an 80-km radius from the center of the Hanford installation.

Whelan, G.; Buck, J.W.; Castleton, K.J. [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

177

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

178

PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Richardson, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Integrated solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an integral solar heating unit with an integral solar collector and hot water storage system, the unit comprising: (a) a housing; (b) a flat plate solar collector panel mounted in the housing and having a generally horizontal upper edge and an uninsulated, open back surface; (c) a cylindrical hot water tank operatively connected to the solar collector panel and mounted in the housing generally parallel to and adjacent to the upper edge; (d) the housing comprising a hood around the tank a pair of side skirts extending down at the sides of the panel. The hood and side skirts terminate at lower edges which together substantially define a plane such that upon placing the heating unit on a generally planar surface, the housing substantially encapsulates the collector panel and hot water tank in a substantially enclosed air space; (e) the collector including longitudinally extended U-shaped collector tubes and a glazed window to pass radiation through to the collector tubes, and a first cold water manifold connected to the tubes for delivering fresh water thereto and a second hot water manifold connected to the tubes to remove heated water therefrom. The manifolds are adjacent and at least somewhat above and in direct thermal contact with the tank; and, (f) the skirts and hood lapping around the collector panel, exposing only the glazed window, such that everything else in the heating unit is enclosed by the housing such that heat emanating from the uninsulated, open back face of the collector and tank is captured and retained by the housing to warm the manifolds.

Larkin, W.J.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

174 10 12 92 UNIT NAME: C-745-K Low Level Storage Area REGULATORY STAU: -AOC LOCATION: Inside Security Fence , South of C-333 Cascade Building. APPROXIMATE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Diesel Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately southeast of C-611 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 1000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL...

182

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 KOW Toluene SDill Area UNIT NAME: REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southwest of plant site APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 feet wide by 800 feet ong FUNCTION: Storage of Toluene...

183

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 UNIT NAME C-746-Al REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Northwest corner of C-746-A APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 4000 gallons FUNCTION: Underground storage tanks OPERATIONAL STATUS:...

184

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Gasoline Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately east of C-61l APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 50 ga on FUNCTION: Gasoline storage OPERATIONAL...

185

United States Government Memorandum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: March 21, 2008 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-08-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-321 (A07LV042) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Accountability of Sensitive and High Risk Property at the Nevada Site Office" TO: Acting Manager, Nevada Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE and control over sensitive and high risk property because of the vulnerability to loss, theft or misuse and its potential impact on national security interests or proliferation concerns. Items such as portable and desktop computers, ammunition. and firearms are examples of sensitive property. In addition, federal regulations require that Departmental organizations and designated contractors account for and control govemroent-owned high risk property, such as body armor and gas masks,

186

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagram 1: A Typical Tank Water Heater Source: http://to-unit comparisons of tank versus tankless water heaters.Energy Use MJ/(unit*year) Tank Tankless MJ/(unit*year) Tank

Lu, Alison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.8,0.1,0.2,0.6,0.1 1,108.1,67.5,6.5,8.8,18.5,6.8 "2 or More",2.7,2.5,0.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,69.5,6.5,8.9,18.6,6.8 1,3.1,2.2,0.2,0.2,0.5,"Q"

188

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Security Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Water Security Program Water Security CustomersPartners Awards Key Publications Staff Biographies Water Security In many areas of the United States and multiple regions of...

189

Analysis of field-test data from domestic solar-water heaters in the southern United States, period through September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The monitored performance data used here was gathered from 137 solar water heaters. All but 51 are located in Florida. The gathered data accumulated from weekly mailers consists of the following measurements: total gallons of hot water consumed; total kWh of electricity used; total hours the circulating pump operated; hot and cold water temperatures at the top; number of household members at home since last reading; tank thermostat setting and any changes to it; total number of hours that the tank's backup heating element had power available; and problems or comments concerning system operational status or component reliability and maintenance. The data analysis is described and results are presented. (MHR)

Jones, W.M.; Fenner, M.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The challenges of a water system management handover in eastern Ethiopia : from the United Nations Refugee Agency to a local community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the height of a political crisis in the late 1980s, hundreds of thousands of Somali refugees crossed into eastern Ethiopia. A humanitarian crisis soon unfolded as water was in short supply in the arid region. In ...

Chung, Christophe (Christopher J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acceptability of risk is a complex subject. Judgments of acceptability ... and by the society at large. A risk may be acceptable to the consumer of a product or ... but those who receive no benefit but some risk

Chris Whipple

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Risk Prioritization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Managers Quality Managers Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee Reference Document SQAS21.01.00 - 1999 Software Risk Management A Practical Guide February, 2000 Abstract This document is a practical guide for integrating software risk management into a software project. The purpose of Risk Management is to identify, assess and control project risks. Identified risks are analyzed to determine their potential impact and likelihood of occurrence. Risk Management Plans are developed to document the project's approach to risk management, risks, and decisions made about what should be done with each risk. Risks and risk actions are then tracked to closure. Software Risk Management: A Practical Guide SQAS21.01.00 Acknowledgments This document was prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) by a Working Group of the DOE

193

Political Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investors in nondomestic securities face a number of risks beyond those of domestic securities. Political risk can affect a bond investor in a...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- I - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

196

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-333 North Side PCB Soil Contamination REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: North side of C-333 Building APPROXIMATE OIMENSIONS: 150 ft by 100 ft FUNCTION: Dust Palliative...

197

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 KPDES Outfall Ditch 017 Flume- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: - REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: South of plant on the west side of the access road APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 30 feet wide...

198

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME C-720 Inactive TCE Oegreaser REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: C-720 Building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: Approx. 10 ft by 10 ft by 20 f1: deep FUNCTION: Used for cleaning...

199

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 46 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: 2000 ft southwest of curve on Kentucky Highway 473- near east end of Mitchell Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: About 100 ft...

200

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME Rubble oile 45 REGULATORY STATUS AOC LOCATION: West end of Mitche Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 2000 ft long, ft thick 4 ft wide FUNCTION: Control erosion on face of dam...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 43 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West end of Happy Ho ow Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long by 4 ft wide -concrete 4-6 in thickness FUNCTION:...

202

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 UNIT NAME C-740 TCE Soill Site REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Northwest corner C-740 concrete pad area) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 5 ft by 5 ft spill FUNCTION: Drum storage area...

203

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 C-I00 South Side Berms UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: South Side C-IOO APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 2 berms approximately 200 ft long by SO ft wide eac FUNCTION:...

204

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 UNIT NAME: C-331 PCB Soil Contamination -West Side REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West side C-331 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 100 feet wide by 420 feet long FUNCTION: Dust...

205

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 C-750B Diesel UST UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-750 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 10,000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL STATUS: Removed...

206

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-633 PCB So111 Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-633 Transformer area (Mac location 75) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS I Unknown FUNCTION Soill site OPERATIONAL STATUS...

207

Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 feet wide by 30 feet long FUNCTION: Provide cooling water for computer systems and HVAC systems various plant buildings. OPERATIONAL STATUS: Active DATES OPERATED: 1953 to...

209

Study of the UEO-50-4/12. 5 electrodialysis unit for use in providing coolant water for hydraulic turbine generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods for obtaining water suitable for cooling hydraulic turbines in hydroelectric power plants are discussed. These methods are ionite desalination and electrodialysis. The desalination method was found to be unsatisfactory but the electrodialysis method was largely free of the disadvantages of the desalination method. The performance of the electrodialysis method is discussed.

Vysotskii, S.P.; Parykin, V.S.; Vlasova, S.A.; Keshelava, V.G.; Khodorchenko, Z.G.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Regional terrestrial water storage change and evapotranspiration from terrestrial and atmospheric water balance computations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

like to thank Illinois State Water Survey for providing thecollected by the Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS) fromSurface water balance of the continental United States,

Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Famiglietti, J. S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

WATER CONSERVATION PLAN  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

i WATER CONSERVATION PLAN TONOPAH TEST RANGE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY January 10, 2011 Prepared for: Tonopah Test Range Post Office Box 871 Tonopah, Nevada 89049 (702)...

212

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system's design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system`s design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

SWMU ASSESSMENT REPORT UNIT NUMBER: AOC 205 I} UNIT NAME: Eastern...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UNIT NUMBER: AOC 205 - I UNIT NAME: Eastern Portion of Yellow Water Line (tot f1 A DATE: AOC 205 notification submitted on June 10, 1996 u tI l'JO . REGULATORY STATUS:...

215

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,68.7,7.4,7.6,15.9,6.7 "2 or More",3.7,3.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater"

216

Political risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A book that considers political risk and how it can be managed: what political risk is; the types of risk; how to forecast regime instability; case histories; using scenarios; regional and global corporate strategies; managing political analysis and decision making in the international company and bank including staff-line relationships; the question of centralization and information gathering; risk aversion; risk management; insurance and hedging.

Overholt, W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A, and I-22 Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................... ..9 Acknowledgements........................................................................................................................................... 13 List of Figures Figure 1. Photo of leaking pipeline control structure... I-19/I-18 52080 63653 58.4 71.3 SJ17 I-7A 50193 61347 56.2 68.7 J18 I-22 36490 44599 40.9 50.0 * Water loss rates given are based on an in-service use of 24 hours/day and 365 days/year. Figure 1 shows a leaking pipeline control structure...

Fipps, G.; Leigh, E.

218

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

219

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

220

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

222

A NEW MULTIPLE-UNIT ELECTRODIALYSIS APPARATUS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...NEW MULTIPLE-UNIT ELECTRODIALYSIS APPARATUS 10.1126...NEW MULTIPLE-UNIT ELECTRODIALYSIS APPARATUS. | Journal...maturity, variety and treatment on the iodine value...CHICAGO, ILLINOIS WATER SOLUBLE MAGNESIUM...NEW MULTIPLE-UNIT ELECTRODIALYSIS ous fields of science...

Aasulv Löddesöl

1932-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

The water footprint of humanity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...America (the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Argentina...Ehrlich PR ( 1996 ) Human appropriation of renewable fresh water . Science 271 : 785 – 788 . 6...domestic water supply sector. Water use in energy production is included in the figures...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Mesfin M. Mekonnen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The water footprint of humanity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the United Arab Emirates (571), Egypt (527), Libya...policies (aimed to increase water use efficiency) versus consumption policies...domestic water supply sector. Water use in energy production is included in the figures...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Mesfin M. Mekonnen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The water footprint of humanity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the United Arab Emirates (571), Egypt (527...Ehrlich PR ( 1996 ) Human appropriation of renewable fresh water . Science 271 : 785 – 788 . 6...domestic water supply sector. Water use in energy production is included in the figures...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Mesfin M. Mekonnen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water H. R. Warman In...the geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Earth's deeper water areas, an attempt...United Kingdom 1981 Hydrocarbon potential of deep water Warman H. R. Author...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing carcinogenic risks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(mg... ) exists for carcinogens, units for carcinogens are set in terms of risk factors. Acceptable risk levels... for carcinogens range ... Source: Pint, Bruce A. - Materials...

228

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr. OBERSTAR, Mr. BEDELL. Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB, Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL; Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JACT. Mr. TRAKLER, and Mr. Vxrrro. H. Con. Res. 107: Mr. KASICH. Mr. AUCOIN. Mr. CARPER, and Mr. SIZHFIJER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH. Mr. LANTOS.

229

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ongrees;ional Record ongrees;ional Record United States of America __._ -.. I. :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9tth CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmcqton. Cl C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $300 Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Governme3n:jPnntmg OfIce SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' June 28, 1983 -: I H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WA-. Mr. OBERSTAFC, M' r. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB. Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL,. Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JAGT. Mr. TRAKLER. and Mr. VENTO. H. Con. Res. iO7: Mr. KASICH. Mr. ALCOIN. Mr. CARPER. and Mr. SCHEUER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH, Mr. LANTOS. Mr. KILDEE. Mr. SOLARZ Mr. Bmrr, Mr. BELWLL, Mr. RANG~L, Mr. DYMALLY. Mr.

230

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

231

Definition: British thermal unit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal unit thermal unit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png British thermal unit The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit; often used as a unit of measure for the energy content of fuels.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The British thermal unit (BTU or Btu) is a traditional unit of energy equal to about 1055 joules. It is the amount of energy needed to cool or heat one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. In scientific contexts the BTU has largely been replaced by the SI unit of energy, the joule. The unit is most often used as a measure of power (as BTU/h) in the power, steam generation, heating, and air conditioning industries, and also as a measure of agricultural energy production (BTU/kg). It is still used

232

The formation of volcanic centers at the Colorado Plateau as a result of the passage of aqueous fluid through the oceanic lithosphere and the subcontinental mantle: New implications for the planetary water cycle in the western United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We provide new petrological evidence for the strong influence of water on the formation of the oceanic lithospheric mantle, the subcontinental mantle above, and the continental lithosphere. Our analysis throws new light on the hypothesis that new continental lithosphere was formed by the passage of silicate-rich aqueous fluid through the sub-continental mantle. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed a representative collection of lherzolite and harzburgite xenoliths from the sample volcano known as “The Thumb”, located in the center of the Colorado Plateau, western United States. The studied sample collection exhibits multi-stage water enrichment processes along point, line and planar defect structures in nominally anhydrous minerals and the subsequent formation of the serpentine polymorph antigorite along grain boundaries and in totally embedded annealed cracks. Planar defect structures act like monomineralic and interphase grain boundaries in the oceanic lithosphere and the subcontinental mantle beneath the North American plate, which was hydrated by the ancient oceanic Farallon plate during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic eras. We used microspectroscopical, petrological, and seismological techniques to confirm multi-stage hydration from a depth of ?150 km to just below the Moho depth. High-resolution mapping of the water distribution over homogeneous areas and fully embedded point, line and planar defects in olivine crystals of lherzolitic and harzburgitic origin by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy enabled us to resolve local wet spots and thus reconstruct the hydration process occurring at a depth of ?150 km (T ? 1225 °C). These lherzolites originated from the middle part of the Farallon mantle slab; they were released during the break up of the Farallon mantle slab, caused by the instability of the dipping slab. The background hydration levels in homogeneous olivines reached ?138 ppm wt H2O, and the water concentration at the planar defects could reach up to ?1000 ppm wt H2O. However, the formation of antigorite in grain boundaries was found to be the primary hydration mechanism for harzburgitic samples originating from the subcontinental mantle (for hydration, T ? 600 °C). Additionally, the formation of antigorite in lherzolites could be found in annealed cracks. From these observations, we conclude that hydration induces multi-stage water enrichment of the mantle wedge by a process that is dominated by the growth and movement of ubiquitous cracks, which acts as planar defects. Cracks in the mantle seem to be the an important feature in both the water cycle of the subduction zone and the formation of the continental lithosphere.

Holger Sommer; Klaus Regenauer-Lieb; Biliana Gasharova; Haemyeong Jung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Risk Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The last step of the risk assessment process, risk characterization, combines the results of the toxicity and exposure assessment to arrive at a risk estimate. The results of the toxicity assessment vary depending on whether the substance is identified as a carcinogen or a noncarcinogen. In the former case, the risk characterization provides an estimate of the incidence of cancer; e.g., additional cases per one million exposed individuals. In the latter, the characterization describes whether or not the risk exceeds an acceptable threshold.

M.A. Kamrin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Workshop overview: Arsenic research and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chronic exposure of humans through consumption of high levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs)-contaminated drinking water is associated with skin lesions, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, and cancers. Additionally, humans are exposed to organic arsenicals when used as pesticides and herbicides (e.g., monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) also known as cacodylic acid). Extensive research has been conducted to characterize the adverse health effects that result from exposure to iAs and its metabolites to describe the biological pathway(s) that lead to adverse health effects. To further this effort, on May 31, 2006, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) sponsored a meeting entitled 'Workshop on Arsenic Research and Risk Assessment'. The invited participants from government agencies, academia, independent research organizations and consultants were asked to present their current research. The overall focus of these research efforts has been to determine the potential human health risks due to environmental exposures to arsenicals. Pursuant in these efforts is the elucidation of a mode of action for arsenicals. This paper provides a brief overview of the workshop goals, regulatory context for arsenical research, mode of action (MOA) analysis in human health risk assessment, and the application of MOA analysis for iAs and DMA{sup V}. Subsequent papers within this issue will present the research discussed at the workshop, ensuing discussions, and conclusions of the workshop.

Sams, Reeder [Integrated Risk Information System Program, National Center for Environmental Assessment, MC: B-243 01, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)], E-mail: sams.reeder@epa.gov; Wolf, Douglas C. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ramasamy, Santhini; Ohanian, Ed [Health and Ecological Criteria Division, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Chen, Jonathan [Antimicrobials Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Lowit, Anna [Health Effects Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Arsenic Epidemiology and Drinking Water Standards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...occurrences of arsenic in ground water." Dictionaries and...History, Study and Remediation is an Arsenic Project...also provided. The Ground Water and Drinking Water Division...resource page on arsenic in ground water of the United States...

Allan H. Smith; Peggy A. Lopipero; Michael N. Bates; Craig M. Steinmaus

2002-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide 1. Introduction The purpose of this calculator is to assist Remedial Project Managers (RPMs), On Scene Coordinators (OSC's), risk assessors and others involved in decision-making at hazardous waste sites and to determine whether levels of contamination found at the site may warrant further investigation or site cleanup, or whether no further investigation or action may be required. The risk values presented on this site are chemical-specific values for individual contaminants in air, water, soil and biota that may warrant further investigation or site cleanup. It should be noted that the risks in this calculator are based upon human health risk and do not address potential ecological risk. Some sites in sensitive ecological settings may also need to be evaluated for potential

238

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

239

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Bullet Baseline Risk Assessments Bullet Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Environmental Assessment Report South Campus Facility, Oak Ridge Tenn [DOE/OR/02-1274&D] Bullet Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek [DOE/OR/1119 & D2 & V2] Bullet Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study Report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit [DOE/OR/01 1282 & D1] [ORNL/ER-2] Bullet The Utility of Existing Data Conducting a CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (draft) [ORNL/ER-?] Bullet East Fork Poplar Creek Sewer Line Beltway Remedial Investigation Report [DOE/OR/02-1119&D2] Bullet Screening Risk Assessments Bullet Preliminary Assessment of Radiation Doses to the Public from Cesium

240

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Document Number Q0029500 Baseline Risk Assessment Update 4.0 Baseline Risk Assessment Update  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline Risk Assessment Update Baseline Risk Assessment Update 4.0 Baseline Risk Assessment Update This section updates the human health and the ecological risk assessments that were originally presented in the 1998 RI (DOE 1998a). The impacts on the 1998 risk assessments are summarized in Section 2.9. 4.1 Human Health Risk Assessment Several activities completed since 1998 have contributed to changes in surface water and ground water concentrations. Activities that have impacted, or likely impacted surface water and ground water concentrations are Millsite Excavation (Section 2.1) Remediation of Soil and Sediment Along Montezuma Creek (Section 2.3) Millsite Dewatering and Treatment (Section 2.5) PRB Treatability Study (Section 2.6) Surface water and ground water monitoring data have been used to refine the list of COCs

242

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TexMex Energy, LLC TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) . On August 25,2004, DOE issued Order No. EA-294 authorizing TexMex Energy LLC (TexMex) to transmit electric energy fiom the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 25, 2006. On September 8, 2006, TexMex applied to renew the electricity export authority

243

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

244

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tenaslta Power Services Co. Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) ( Z 6 U. s.c.824a(e)j1. On August 16,2001, DOE issued Order No. EA-243 authorizing Tenaska Power Scrvices Co. (Tenaska) to transmit electric cncrgy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 16,2003. On August 14,2006, Teilaska applied to renew the electricity export authority

245

Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

before the United States House of before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to appear before you today to discuss the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 budget request for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development More Documents & Publications

247

EPA 402-R-93-076 ESTIMATING RADIOGENIC CANCER RISKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparing health risk estimates due to low level exposures of low-LET radiation based on models recently This document presents a revised methodology for EPA's estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population

248

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) – Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station – Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of United Irrigation District’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 3 Detailed Location of United Irrigation District’s Office in Mission, TX . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 4 Illustrated Layout of United Irrigation District...-2003 . . . . . . . . . . 55 2 Historic Water Use (acre-feet) for United Irrigation District, 1999-2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 3 Selected Summary Information for United Irrigation District, 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 4 Data Summary for United Irrigation...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

249

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTV-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and TVA. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a frequency of approximately 60 hertz at the outgoing terminals of the Cumberland

250

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTVI-1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

251

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

252

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule JW-2-F Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Florida Power Corporation (or Progress Energy Florida, hereinafter called the Company). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric energy generated at the Jim Woodruff Project (hereinafter called the Project) and sold to the Company in wholesale quantities. Points of Delivery: Power sold to the Company by the Government will be delivered at the connection of the Company's transmission system with the Project bus. Character of Service: Electric power delivered to the Company will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 cycles per second.

253

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

254

Global land and water grabbing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ratio between blue water and irrigation efficiency. Values per unit area refer to green and max blue water per...Arab Emirates, India, United Kingdom, Egypt, China, and Israel (Table 2...land and water grabbing enhance food and energy availability in the grabbing country...

Maria Cristina Rulli; Antonio Saviori; Paolo D’Odorico

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters: resource or risks? 26-30 October 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stormwater management; source control; hydrological models; sustainability; Best Management Practices, especially in U.S. literature, as Best Management Practices (BMPs). Other denominations exist, referring9th World Wide Workshop for Young Environmental Scientists WWW-YES-Brazil-2009: Urban waters

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

256

UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in Developing Countries AgencyCompany Organization United...

257

Integrated assessment of Hadley Center (HadCM2) climate-change impacts on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: Part II. Regional agricultural production in 2030 and 2095  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A national assessment (NA) evaluated the potential consequences of climate change and variability on the agriculture, water resources, as well as other economic and natural resource sectors in the United States. As part of this process, we used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate-change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from national records for 1961–1990. The scenario runs for 2025–2034 and 2090–2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Crops were simulated under both dryland and irrigated management, with irrigation water supply estimates taken from the HUMUS simulations in Paper 1. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the northeast. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. Regionally, dryland corn yields could increase, decrease or remain unchanged under the two scenarios. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward trends under scenarios of climate-change. Evapotranspiration in dryland corn is expected to increase in both future periods while water-use efficiency will decrease. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization. Irrigation requirement by irrigated crops declines under these scenarios as transpiration is suppressed.

R.César Izaurralde; Norman J. Rosenberg; Robert A. Brown; Allison M. Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Other Construction Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate See Page Four of Utility Application: $100-$50,000/customer/year depending on utility and remaining funding Custom:40% of project cost Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Trap Repair or Replacement: $50/unit Boilers: $1-$1.50/MBH Furnace Replacement: $1.50/MBH or $150/unit Boiler Modulation Burner Control Retrofit: $1000/unit Boiler Water Reset Control: $300/unit

259

Political risk insurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As international project development continues to expand, the insurance risks faced require more careful planning and consideration. Successful risk management and insurance needs for non-US projects demand careful thought and planning. Understanding the options available and the various pitfalls to avoid can be beneficial to project development. The concept of a successful implementation of a non-recourse, asset-based financing for an independent power producer in the electricity generation-starved areas of the world creates many opportunities. Developers, investment bankers, attorneys and equipment suppliers are positioning their companies in this emerging market. In the last year, opportunities have expanded around the world. In response, much time, effort and money have been consumed in developing projects. Insurance, often overlooked until the later phases of project development, has caused problems for a number of projects -- some of them insurmountable. On a macro basis, the project's broker will need to answer certain questions. For example, are the risks the same as they would be for project development in the United States or United Kingdom Are the underwriting philosophies of insurance companies the same Can insurance be purchased on the same term and conditions as usual, leading to successful project financing conclusions Without any question, the risks are greater, underwriters' philosophies are different, the terms and conditions offered by local markets will be significantly different and the procurement of insurance is much different from in the United States. The developer who can deal with governmental and special interest considerations, which often force the profile of insurance programs to become much more complicated, cumbersome and costly, will have an advantage.

Fritz, C. (Johnson Higgins, New York, NY (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tests with Outdoor Fan Coil Unit ............. ................. 2 1.2.1 Space and water heating ....................... ... ........ .......................... 10 4. Outdoor Fan Coil Unit Tests ...... ......... ......... . ........................ . 11 4

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

United States Government Memorandum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION * 002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: August 15, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-22 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT006) SUBJECT: Report on "Hazardous Chemicals Inventory Management at the Savannah River Site" TO: Manager, Savannah River Operations Office BACKGROUND The Savannah River Site (Savannah River) maintains large inventories of hazardous chemicals for its scientific, environmental cleanup and production operations. Many of these chemicals are known carcinogens; some are corrosive, while others are highly flammable. As such, these chemicals can pose serious health and safety risks to workers and members of the public, the environment, and to emergency first responders if not properly managed and controlled.

262

Termination unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

16 - Nanotechnology for domestic water purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Water, a nonsubstitutional natural resource, is best described by Leonardo Da Vinci as ‘the vehicle of nature’ (‘vetturale di natura’). This is the single most essential commodity responsible for the existence and sustenance of life on the planet earth. It is not at all an exaggeration to state that water is primarily responsible for the restoration of health, environment and prosperiy of human civilization. Unfortunately, this most precious natural resource is becoming increasingly scarce day by day. Water scarcity is among the main problems facing many societies around the world in the twenty-first century. Water use has been growing at more than twice the rate of population increase in the last century. According to a report from the United Nations, by 2025, 1800 million people will be living in countries or regions with absolute water scarcity, and two-thirds of the world’s population could be under stress conditions. As emphasized in one of the UN’s Millenium Development Goals (MDGs), water scarcity calls for strengthened international cooperation in the fields of technologies for enhanced water productivity. Recent years have witnessed impressive breakthroughs towards application of nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), metal/metal-oxide nanoparticles, zeolites, and dendrimers in the field of water purification. The present chapter aims to give an overview of the developments in the application of nanotechnology in water treatment, with a special emphasis on domestic water purification. The focus is oriented to the fact that the ultimate practical realization of this new technology is based on the assessment of the risks as well as benefits posed by nanostructured materials. The challenges involved in producing a well-defined integrated nano-based water purification device are discussed.

S. Kar; P.K. Tewari

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

New Mexico grape growers unite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Mexico grape growers unite, increase production New Mexico grape growers unite, increase production Grape Growers Association enlivens agriculture Growers association unites small parcels of land, enlivens production, protects water rights for Northern New Mexico agriculturists. August 6, 2012 Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Association The NMSBA Entrepreneurial Networking program is helping Lucia Sanchez (C) Tim Martinez (R) and Robert Naranjo, the Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Association, put small parcels of land back into production in Rio Arriba County. Contact Mariann Johnston (505) 667-4391 Email New Mexico grape growers unite to increase production, with help of Northern New Mexico Connect Over the last decade, a string of wineries has come to grace the scenic High Road to Taos. In 2010, Robert Naranjo, network facilitator for the

265

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Water | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Water Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 77.7 KiB)

267

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,45.5,18.2,21.6,21 "2 or More",3.7,1,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,39.4,17.4,21,21.8 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,7.1,1.4,1.5,"Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q"

268

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

01-1 · Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

269

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

270

United Nations A/67/L.75* General Assembly Distr.: Limited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and related fields Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize water resources, Appreciating the ongoing work of the organizations of the United Nations system

Cambridge, University of

271

What's your water footprint?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) of gasoline = 18?45 gallons Because between 1 and 2.5 gallons of water are needed to refine a single gallon of gasoline, the 384 million gallons of gasoline used each day in the United States translate to more than 1 billion total gallons of water per...) of gasoline = 18?45 gallons Because between 1 and 2.5 gallons of water are needed to refine a single gallon of gasoline, the 384 million gallons of gasoline used each day in the United States translate to more than 1 billion total gallons of water per...

Jordan, Leslie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BNL 52608 Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water Supply Wells Under Contract with the United States Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 #12;BNL 52608 Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water Supply Wells December 27, 2000

273

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fourteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session, Severe accident sequence analysis, Risk analysis/PRA applications, Reference plant risk analysis - NUREG-1150, Innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This six-volume report contains 156 papers out of the 175 that were presented at the Fourteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 27-31, 1986. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included thirty-four different papers presented by researchers from Canada, Czechoslovakia, Finland, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UOEF 1325.8 UOEF 1325.8 (5831 , - a.. L . . L. . c ,, . . . t ,' <, .* -,. .--1^ a "-2 (J 7 , pe-;L, United States Government memorandum Departmen: of Energy DATEAUG 1 0 1984 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: NE-20 SUBJECT: Action Description Memorandum (ADM) Review: Wayne, New Jersey Proposed 1984 Remedial Actions at TO: File After reviewing all of the pertinent facts including the attached Action Description Memorandum (ADM), I have determined that the remedial action described in the subject ADM is an action which in and of itself will have a clearly insignificant impact on the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq. The Conference Report accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act

275

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 - Iq \ b- United States Government memorandum pJ .T\ \b Department of Energy DATE: OCT 9 1984 REPLY TO NE-20 All-N OF: .- Authorizations for Actions Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action SUBJECT: Program (FUSRAP) at the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, MO. and the W. R. Grace Site at Curtis Bay, Md. To: J. LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office St. Louis Airport Storage Site, MO The House and Senate Reports for the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act (P.L. 98-360) directed the Department of Energy "...to take the necessary steps to consolidate and dispose of the waste material from the Latty Avenue site and nearby St. Louis Airport vicinity properties locally, by reacquiring, stabilizing, and using the old 21.7

276

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Power Demand Options in Regions of Water Stress and Future Carbon Management Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a regional modeling assessment of non-traditional water sources for use in thermoelectric power plants. The assessment includes the development of a model to characterize water quantity and quality from several sources of non-traditional water, initially focused within the Southeastern United States. The project includes four primary tasks: (1) identify water sources, needs, and treatment options; (2) assess and model non-traditional water quantity and quality; (3) identify and characterize water treatment options including an assessment of cost; and (4) develop a framework of metrics, processes, and modeling aspects that can be applied to other regions of the United States.

277

Probabilistic Risk Assessment for dairy waste management systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques were used to evaluate the risk of contamination of surface and ground water with wastewater from an open lot dairy in Erath County, Texas. The dairy supported a complex waste management system...

Leigh, Edward Marshall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,28.8,33.4,17.4,15.3,11.4 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,1.1,0.8,0.5,0.6 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,25.3,31.8,16.6,14.6,11.3 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,4.2,2.7,1.6,1.2,0.6

279

NUREG-1150 risk assessment methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology developed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NCR's) evaluation of severe accident risks in NUREG-1150. After the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, the NRC initiated a sever accident research program to develop an improved understanding of severe accidents and to provide a second technical basis to support regulatory decisions in this area. A key product of this program is NUREG-1150, which provides estimates of risk for several nuclear reactors of different design. The principal technical analyses for NUREG-1150 were performed at Sandia National Labs. under the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program and the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program. A major aspect of the work was the development of a methodology that improved upon previous full-scale probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) in several areas which are described.

Benjamin, A.S.; Amos, C.N.; Cunningham, M.A.; Murphy, J.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nanotechnology for water purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the different water treatment devices that incorporate nanotechnology. New sensor technology combined with micro and nanofabrication technology is expected to lead to small, portable and highly accurate sensors to detect chemical and biochemical parameters in water. Potential opportunities and risks associated with this technology are also highlighted.

Farida Valli; Karishma Tijoriwala; Alpana Mahapatra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

RISK ANALYSIS AND QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Risk analysis is a decision-oriented process consisting of risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication. Risk analysis is a formalized scientifically based approach recognized by the World Trade Organization as the tool to address food safety issues and which shall found food safety regulation. Risk analysis is designed to meet specified goals for risk management activities, which should be related to the acceptable level of protection deemed appropriate in a country. Quantitative risk management can be based on relevant risk-based metrics, such as food safety objectives and Performance Objectives. The article addresses the elements and steps involved in risk analysis as currently recommended.

C. Heggum

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

283

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

284

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,5.8,6.2,2.8,2.8,1.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

285

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,3.7,6.2,4.7 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

286

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,9.6,5,2.2,1.5,0.8 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

287

Water and terrorism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The importance of freshwater and water infrastructure to human and ecosystem health and to the smooth functioning of a commercial and industrial economy makes water and water systems targets for terrorism. The chance that terrorists will strike at water systems is real; indeed, there is a long history of such attacks. Water infrastructure can be targeted directly or water can be contaminated through the introduction of poison or diseasecausing agents. The damage is done by hurting people, rendering water unusable, or destroying purification and supply infrastructure. More uncertain, however, is how significant such threats are today, compared with other targets that may be subject to terrorist attack, or how effective such attacks would actually be. Analysis and historical evidence suggest that massive casualties from attacking water systems are difficult to produce, although there may be some significant exceptions. At the same time, the risk of societal disruptions, disarray, and even overreaction on the part of governments and the public from any attack, may be high. This paper reviews the history of past attacks on water systems and the most pressing vulnerabilities and risks facing modern water systems. Suggestions of ways to reduce those risks are also presented.

Peter H. Gleick

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the risk perception of residents near a nuclear power plant in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...political anchoring”: The case of nuclear power in the United Kingdom . Risk Anal...social-cognitive perspective of terrorism risk perception and individual...just global warming and fear of a nuclear power plant accident? Risk Anal 31 ( 5...

Lei Huang; Ying Zhou; Yuting Han; James K. Hammitt; Jun Bi; Yang Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate in California’s Drinking Water report http://Clark Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking waternitrate contamination of drinking water in high-risk areas

Editors, By

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Risk management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the autumn of 1993 an incident occurred with a diving support vessel, whereby a live pipeline from a NAM gas production platform, situated in the Dutch sector of the North Sea, was considerably displaced. Key element in the repair of the line was to identify potential hazards involved in various remedial scenarios and to manage the associated risks.

Visser, M. [Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Velsen (Netherlands)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system in the United States, made the transition from an institution whose risk management functions wereURMIA Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template 2008 URMIA Journal Reprint Howard N. Apsan, Ph.D. The City University of New York University Risk Management

Rosen, Jay

292

Epidemiology of Seafood-Associated Infections in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...April 2010 ARTICLE REVIEWS Epidemiology of Seafood-Associated Infections in the United States...and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia Summary: Seafood is part of a healthful diet, but seafood consumption is not risk-free. Seafood is...

Martha Iwamoto; Tracy Ayers; Barbara E. Mahon; David L. Swerdlow

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Studying the advisability of using gas-turbine unit waste gases for heating feed water in a steam turbine installation with a type T-110/120-12.8 turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of calculation studying of a possibility of topping of a steam-turbine unit (STU) with a type T-110/120-12.8 turbine of the Urals Turbine Works (UTZ) by a gas-turbine unit (GTU) of 25-MW capacity the wast...

A. D. Trukhnii; G. D. Barinberg; Yu. A. Rusetskii

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Water, water everywhere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... available water resources, either locally or globally, are by no means exhausted. At present desalination -- the removal of salt from sea water or brackish water -- is very ... or brackish water -- is very expensive, mainly because it consumes so much energy. Desalination provides less than 0.2 per cent of all the water used in the world ...

Philip Ball

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

United States Environmental Protection Agency Perchlorate Method 332.0 via Microbore and Capillary Chromatographic Formats: Statistical Evaluation of the Use of 18O-Perchlorate Internal Standard with Deionized-Water Matrices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with a deionized-water matrix. The evaluation...matography (LC) and atmospheric-pressure-ionization...organic pollutants in water at trace levels...pump, an eluent generator, a conductivity...supplied by an eluent generator. Electrolytic suppressors...prepared in deionized water at 0.25, 0......

L.E. Vanatta; R.W. Slingsby

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Feasibility of rainwater harvesting for urban water management in Salt Lake City.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water managers in the western United States are being challenged by rapid urban growth and limited water availability. The development of new water resources is… (more)

Jensen, Mark A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

298

Biological pretreatment of produced water for reuse applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry represents a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced water is characterized by high levels of… (more)

Kwon, Soondong, 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Lead levels in the water of suburban Glasgow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... per ml RBC per min (Units). Blood and water lead levels were measured by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Table 1).

GAIL ADDIS; MICHAEL R. MOORE

1974-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.4,0.7,0.5 1,108.1,19.3,25,40.2,23.6 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,0.5,1.2,0.7 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,19.4,25.6,41.2,24.2 1,3.1,1.4,0.3,0.8,0.6 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","N","Q","Q" "Main Water Heater" "Main Water Heater Type" "Storage Tank",110.6,19.4,25.5,41.3,24.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Unit Cost Natural Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281532 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Natural Gas Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

302

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

303

Take Steps to Reduce Heart Risks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Take Steps to Reduce Heart Risks Take Steps to Reduce Heart Risks February is American Heart Month -- a time to reflect on the sobering fact that heart disease remains the number one killer of both women and men in the United States. The good news is you have the power to protect and improve your heart health. NIH and other government agencies have been working to advance our understanding of heart disease so that people can live longer, healthier lives. Research has found that you can lower your risk for heart disease simply by adopting sensible health habits. To protect your heart, the first step is to learn your own personal risk factors for heart disease. Risk factors are conditions or habits that make you more likely to develop a disease. Risk factors can also increase the chances that an existing disease will get worse.

304

Risk Management Tool Attributes:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Tools & SMEs - Tools & SMEs Outline for Breakout Session TOOLS 1. Types of Tools a. Risk Management - Database & Reports, risk register, risk forms, risk tracking & monitoring, basis of estimate, action item tracking, historical record of risks & changes, configuration control, enterprise-wide, metrics, risk performance index, risk checklist, graphical display, management reporting (various levels), risk communications b. Risk Analysis i. Cost, ii. budgets, funding, cash-flow analysis, iii. Schedule iv. tailoring categories v. Integrated Cost & Schedule vi. Project phase analysis; organization ownership & joint planning c. Risk Knowledge and Lessons Learned Database i. Enterprise-wide ii. Job/owner-specific iii. Workshops - project specific, risk management,

305

Statement of Work for Direct Push Technology Characterization Borehole Installations During Fiscal Year 2006, 300-FF-5 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document specifies activities to be performed by FHI to fulfill Part II of the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Limited Field Investigation. The scope includes driving up to 15 direct push technology boreholes to the water table for radiological geophysical logging of the vadose zone to define the vertical extent and concentration of process uranium waste in the subsurface. Drilling and sampling field activates will follow FHI waste management, risk assessment and QA process and procedures. The sampling and analysis of information recovered during this characterization will meet the Hanford Performance Assessment Project QAAP requirements.

Williams, Bruce A.

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

Risk Identification and Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mitigation Technique |Internal Control (if needed)| ||| ||| ||| References RiskOpportunity Categories People - Risks that affect the individual well being. Mission...

307

WESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Key Calendar Dates in Colorado's Compact Apportionments 5 #12;1 Western Water AssessmentWESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT WHITE PAPER The Effect of Changing Hydrographs on Compact Apportionments in the Western United States: A Preliminary Analysis of Potential Trouble-Spots Western Water Assessment Working

Neff, Jason

308

Irrigation in California's Central Valley strengthens the southwestern U.S. water cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water resources management in the southwestern United States andStates, a better understanding of how irrigation impacts local-to- remote climate and waterUnited States, or more generally for accelerating the water

Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION (UNITED  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RTGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER RTGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC04-02AL67628, DOE WAIVER NO. W(A) 02-038. The Petitioner, United Technologies, acting through the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), has requested a waiver of all domestic and foreign patent iights to inventions that may be conceived or first actually reduced to practice in the course of UTRC's work as the prime contractor under Cooperative Agreement Number DI-FC04- 02AL67628 entitled "On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective, Hydrogen Enhancement Technology PEM Fuel Cells" with the U S. Department of Energy (DOE). The work to be done will be the development and fabrication of an integrated high temperature water gas shift reactor/hydrogen separator for use in a PEM fuel cell power

310

Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glossary of Environmental Restoration Terms Glossary of Environmental Restoration Terms These definitions are from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Risk Assessment Program staff and affiliates and the following sources: Click on the letter that begins the term for which you are searching. To search for another term, at the end of each definition, click on the. If a link leaves the glossary to go to an outside page you will see a. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abatement: The reduction in degree or intensity of pollution. Absorbed Dose: The energy imparted to a unit mass of matter by ionizing radiation. The unit of absorbed dose is the rad or gray. One rad equals 100 ergs per gram. The amount of a substance absorbed into the body, usually

312

CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK? It is often hard to explain why one person develops cancer and another does not. There are risk factors that could increase a person's likelihood of developing cancer, however, some people may have many of these risk factors and never get cancer. When thinking about your

Hardy, Christopher R.

313

Biomarkers of Dietary Energy Restriction in Women at Increased Risk of Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Articles Biomarkers of Dietary Energy Restriction in Women at Increased Risk...Edinburgh EH4 2XR, United Kingdom. Dietary energy restriction (DER) reduces risk of spontaneous...chemoprophylactic agents. biomarkers|diet|energy restriction|adipose|breast|obesity...

Kai Ren Ong; Andrew H. Sims; Michelle Harvie; Mary Chapman; Warwick B. Dunn; David Broadhurst; Royston Goodacre; Mary Wilson; Nicola Thomas; Robert B. Clarke; Anthony Howell

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

United Power - Renewable Energy Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United Power - Renewable Energy Rebate Program United Power - Renewable Energy Rebate Program United Power - Renewable Energy Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate PV: 2,250 Wind: 1,500 Solar Water Heating: 1,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV: 0.75/W Wind: 0.50/W Solar Water Heating: 25/MBtu Provider United Power United Power is providing rebates to their customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV), wind, and solar water heating systems. These incentives are separate from the rebates provided by the Colorado Governor's Energy Office and require separate applications. PV and wind systems must be grid-connected. Systems up to 25 kW in capacity may be installed, but

315

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,1,0.5,0.5,3.4,2.4,0.6,0.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

316

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"With 5 or More Units)",19.1,2.3,16.8,"N","N","N","N","N","N",2.3,16.8,"N","N" "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

317

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,2,0.7,1.3,2.6,4.1,3.5,2.5,2.4 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

318

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"With 5 or More Units)",19.1,6.2,3.5,0.5,0.5,1.1,0.6,"Q",0.7,0.4,0.2,2,1.4,0.6 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

319

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.7,0.9,0.4,0.3,"Q",0.6,0.4,"Q",3.8,2.9,0.9 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

320

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,3.7,2.7,0.9,0.6,0.3,0.9,1,0.2,0.6,0.2 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Unit Testing Discussion C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit Testing Discussion C #12;Unit Test public Method is smallest unit of code Input/output transformation Test if the method does what it claims Not exactly black box testing #12;Test if (actual result Expected Computed Input #12;Functionality Computation ­ Easy to test Time based Asynchronous interaction

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

322

Microsoft Word - Appendix B_RiskAssessmenr.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Risk Assessment Information Risk Assessment Information U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page B-3 Summary of Post-Remediation Risk Status at the Weldon Spring Site Baseline risk assessments addressing both human health and ecological risks were performed as part of the remedial investigation phase of the remedial investigation/feasibility study processes conducted. A limited assessment was performed for the Quarry Bulk Waste Operable Unit (OU) consistent with the focused scope of the remedial investigation/feasibility study conducted. These risk assessments are documented in the baseline risk assessment reports that have been prepared for the four operable units of the Weldon Spring Site (DOE 1990, 1992, 1997, 1998).

323

Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} (0.59 mi{sup 2}) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation, Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Dr. Bruce G. Blair Princeton University The United States and eight other countries...

325

Water Efficiency  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wheeler - Water Savers, LLC * fwheeler@watersaversllc.com Topics * Performance contracting analysis * Water industry terms * Federal reduction goals * Water balance * Water...

326

Growing water scarcity in agriculture: future challenge to global water security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...correlation between GDP growth and...societal water demands are high...people per flow unit...unchanged per capita water supply...When water demand increases...supply, energy supply and...health, energy supply...that water demands are increasingly...humanity. The per capita water availability...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Managing Catastrophic Risks Through Redesigned Insurance: Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catastrophic risks associated with natural disasters have been increasing in many countries including the United States because more individuals and firms have located in harm’s way while not taking appropriat...

Howard Kunreuther; Erwann Michel-Kerjan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Introduction Dynamic Risk Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Dynamic Risk Measures Dynamic Risk Measures from BMO martingales Bid-Ask Dynamic Pricing Procedure Conclusion MESURES DE RISQUE DYNAMIQUES DYNAMIC RISK MEASURES Jocelyne Bion-Nadal CNRS Risk Measures Dynamic Risk Measures from BMO martingales Bid-Ask Dynamic Pricing Procedure Conclusion

Bion-Nadal, Jocelyne

330

Water as Property Sandra B. Zellmer, Professor UNL College of Law and Jessica Harder, J.D., Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be characterized as property under the law raises considerable controversy. In the western United States, water that jurisdictions that recognize private property rights in water, as in the western United States, haveWater as Property Sandra B. Zellmer, Professor UNL College of Law and Jessica Harder, J.D., Water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

331

The waters of Southeastern Wisconsin are vast but vulnerable. We depend on our waters for drinking water, irrigation, industry, transportation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The waters of Southeastern Wisconsin are vast but vulnerable. We depend on our waters for drinking for drinking water is rising in the United States and around the world due to population growth. At the same water, irrigation, industry, transportation, power production, recreation and scenic beauty

Saldin, Dilano

332

The water footprint of humanity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the United Arab Emirates (571), Egypt (527...world ( UNESCO , London ). 5 Postel SL Daily GC Ehrlich PR ( 1996 ) Human appropriation of...2008 ) The global component of freshwater demand and supply: An assessment of virtual water...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Mesfin M. Mekonnen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

H.R. 4944: An Act to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to conduct studies regarding the desalination of water and water reuse, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, October 4, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report H.R. 4944 is a bill to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to conduct studies regarding the desalination of water and water reuse. The proposed legislative text is included.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Natural Resources Commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in...

335

H. R. 3113: an act providing for the coordinated operation of the Central Valley project and the State water project in California. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 25, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The House Committee on Energy and Natural Resources rewrote the Bill coordinating operations of the Central Valley Project in California and the state water project, and limited the Secretary of the Interior to no more than 75% of the Central Valley Project's annual yield. The Bill specifies procedures for water delivery contracts and reimbursements. Title II deals with the preservation of the Suisin Marsh District; Title III with the reclamation of small projects; and Title IV with contract validation. The document contains both the original and the amended wording of H.R. 3113.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Country Political Risk Contents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For investors, domestic and international, the assessment of political risk is very important to decide whether to ... not in a particular market or country. Political risk can simply be defined as the risk of lo...

Mohamed A. Ramady

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Perception of risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DECISION-THEORY, ANNUAL REVIEW OF PSYCHOLOGY 12 : 473 ( 1961 ). EDWARDS, W, IN PRESS RISK ANAL . FISCHHOFF, B, ACCEPTABLE RISK ( 1981 ). FISCHHOFF, B, POLICY SCI 8 : 127 ( 1978 ). FISCHHOFF, B, DEFINING RISK, POLICY SCIENCES 17 : 123...

P Slovic

1987-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

The effects of an intermittent piped water network and storage practices on household water quality in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include a target to halve the number of people without access to "improved" water sources, which include piped water supply. However, an "improved" source of water does not ...

Vacs Renwick, Deborah Alexandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Transmission Business Unit Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

(See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Transmission Services, (J7300) Transmission Busiess Unit 615...

340

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

342

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

343

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

344

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

345

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

346

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

347

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

348

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

349

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

350

United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) Name United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) Agency/Company /Organization Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC) Partner Smart Growth America, Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Food Supply, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation Topics Adaptation, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2008 Program End 2015 Country United States Northern America References Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy[1]

351

Women @ Energy: Katrina Waters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Katrina Waters Katrina Waters Women @ Energy: Katrina Waters April 15, 2013 - 10:23am Addthis Dr. Katrina Waters, a senior research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses proteomic and microarray data analysis, data integration and biomarker discovery to understand risks, such as the impact of energy-technology-related nanoparticles. Dr. Katrina Waters, a senior research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses proteomic and microarray data analysis, data integration and biomarker discovery to understand risks, such as the impact of energy-technology-related nanoparticles. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. For Dr. Katrina Waters, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, progress is

352

UNIT NAME: C-611 Se~tic SvBtem REGULATORY STATUS: AOC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UNIT NUMBER: 187 UNIT NAME: C-611 Setic SvBtem REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: DOE property outside the plant security fence, due south of the C-611 Water Treatment Plant. 50...

353

Decomposition of Risk Functionals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that most risk measures (risk functionals) are time .... to identify acceptable strategies in a decision or optimization process: the acceptability ...

Alois Pichler

2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

354

Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Primer on Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States was commissioned through the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC). It is an effort to provide sound technical information on and...

355

Simulation of Summer Diurnal Circulations over the Northwest United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the summer, strong surface heating combines with the terrain and land–water contrasts of the northwest United States to create a complex array of diurnal circulations. Though observational and modeling studies have described some of these ...

Matthew C. Brewer; Clifford F. Mass

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Inc., a small minority-owned business based in Roswell, N.M. United Drilling drills oil, gas, water, geothermal, and environmental wells throughout the southwestern U.S. The...

357

Emerging and Reemerging Neglected Tropical Diseases: a Review of Key Characteristics, Risk Factors, and the Policy and Innovation Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disposal), and poor hygienic household water storage (167 - 169...Australia, Canada, Europe, Japan, and the United States (7...delivery and utilization of household water treatment technologies...in the United States, Japan, Australia, and European...

Tim K. Mackey; Bryan A. Liang; Raphael Cuomo; Ryan Hafen; Kimberly C. Brouwer; Daniel E. Lee

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

United Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Energy Efficiency Rebate Program United Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $2,500 + $150/ton TSGT rebate* Air-Source Heat Pumps: $400 + $125-150/ton TSGT rebate Terminal Units: $235 Energy Star Heat Pump Bonus: $100 - $150 Electric Water Heater: $70 - $650, depending on conditions and features Electric Resistive Heat Units: $350/unit Electric Thermal Storage Units: $350/unit + $16/kW TSGT rebate Energy Star Appliances Refrigerator/Freezer: $40 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $75

359

Controlling O&M Costs of Advanced SMRs using Prognostics and Enhanced Risk Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs) can contribute to safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy production. The economics of small reactors (including AdvSMRs) will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional light water reactors. The most significant controllable element of the day-to-day costs involves operations and maintenance (O&M). Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs through technologies that help control O&M costs will be critical to ensuring their practicality for wider deployment.A significant component of O&M costs is the management and mitigation of degradation of components due to their impact on planning maintenance activities and staffing levels. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk of failure of key components are important in this context. Given the possibility of frequently changing AdvSMR plant configurations, approaches are needed to integrate three elements – advanced plant configuration information, equipment condition information, and risk monitors – to provide a measure of risk that is customized for each AdvSMR unit and support real-time decisions on O&M. This article describes an overview of ongoing research into diagnostics/prognostics and enhanced predictive risk monitors (ERM) for this purpose.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Wood, Richard T.

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

360

WHO OWNS "YOUR" WATER? RECLAIMING WATER AS A PUBLIC GOOD UNDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to export water from its lakes and rivers to the United States if the US demanded it? This issue became so, and with foreign investment becoming a dominant part of water and wastewater management in many countries

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What's New What's New November 2013 Updates ECO mammalian SSLs were updated for cadmium, antimony , arsenic, inorganic, barium, Beryllium, chromium VI, cobalt, copper, lead, silver, vanadium, cyanide (total complex), methyl mercury, sulfide, thallium and tin. October 2013 Updates The biota intake rates for the radionuclide PRG and risk tools were updated to correct an improper units conversion. September 2013 Updates IRIS updates for 1,4-Dioxane and Biphenyl were completed. PPRTV values have been updated for Biphenyl, 3,4-Dichlorobenzotrifluoride, Trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (Tetryl), Endosulfan Sulfate, 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane, Nitromethane, Dibenzothiophene, 2-Ethoxyethanol, 3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine, Butylated hydroxytoluene, Ethyl Acetate, tert-Amyl Alcohol, 2,2-Difluoropropane,

362

Wind Resource Mapping for United States Offshore Areas: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is producing validated wind resource maps for priority offshore regions of the United States. This report describes the methodology used to validate the maps and to build a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to classify the offshore wind resource by state, water depth, distance from shore, and administrative unit.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Economic and Financial Costs of Saving Water and Energy: Preliminary Analysis for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pipeline is anticipated to reduce annual emergency repair expenses by a total of $42,972 (Hinojosa) (Table 4) for the three segments. Thus, a total net annual savings of $96,644 is anticipated across the combined segments. Similar values for individual... occurs with the elimination of emergency repairs to the old (i.e., current) pipeline segments. That is, the current pipelines must be completely drained to facilitate emergency repairs with the drained water effectively lost. Avoiding the emergency...

Sturdivant, Allen W.; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.

364

QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI-URBAN COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in dose-response assessment in QMRA. The risks were significantly higher than the acceptable risk level defined by USEPA and WHO for drinking water, which was used as a guideline acceptable risk in this studyi QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI

Richner, Heinz

365

OF RISKS IN INFORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the process of as sessing risk, taking steps to reduce risk to an acceptable level, and main tainingMarch 1998 MANAGEMENT OF RISKS IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS: PRACTICES OF SUCCESSFUL ORGANIZATIONS that the potential exists for severe damage. Systems are at risk from fraud, user errors, accidents and natural

366

UNIVERSITY SERVICES RISK REGISTER Risk Impact Likelihood Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12 · Alignment of planning and budgeting · Regular budget review · Participation in UoG-wide planning Review Programme 6 The risk that key projects are not managed effectively and that standard business/management tool 1 The risk that US is unable to deliver its plan due to insufficient availability of resource 4 3

Glasgow, University of

367

Impact of Shale Gas Development on Regional Water Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Regulatory...S. J. , Water pollution risk associated...jPlayer( { solution: "flash, html...relatively clean fossil fuel that could potentially...engineering pollutants pollution production risk...

R. D. Vidic; S. L. Brantley; J. M. Vandenbossche; D. Yoxtheimer; J. D. Abad

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

368

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

369

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

370

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, Plenary sessions, reactor licensing topics, NUREG-1150, risk analysis/PRA applications, innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors, severe accident modeling and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 1, discusses the following: plenary sessions; reactor licensing; NUREG-1150; risk analysis; innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors; and severe accident modeling and analysis. Thirty-two reports have been cataloged separately.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ADVANCE WAIVER ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-03NT41953; W(A)-04-014, CH-1184 The Petitioner, United Technologies Corporation (UTC), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Development of a High Latent Effectiveness Energy Recovery Ventilator with Integration into Rooftop Package Equipment." The program will address the key issues of reliability, performance, and cost that have been barriers to entry of heat pump water heaters into the North American market. The risk reduction and technology/feasibility demonstration efforts conducted during this agreement will erode the above barriers and accelerate the commercialization and public acceptance of such products. The objectives will be

372

Extreme rainfall, vulnerability and risk: a continental-scale assessment for South America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...variables to analyse the impact of floods as a water security issue...define the ultimate state of flood-related risk, today and...Understanding the economics of flood risk reduction: a preliminary analysis. Boulder, CO: Institute for Social...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil: 2005 Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the principal components of the environmental remediation program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the assessment of ecological risk. Used to support CERCLA, RCRA, and DOE orders, the ecological risk assessment (ERA) can identify environmental hazards and evaluate remedial action alternatives. Ecological risk assessment is also an essential means for achieving DOE's risk based end state vision for the disposition of nuclear material and waste hazards, the decommissioning of facilities, and the remediation of inactive waste units at SRS. The complexity of an ERA ranges from a screening level ERA (SLERA) to a full baseline ERA. A screening level ecological risk assessments, although abbreviated from a baseline risk assessment, is nonetheless considered a complete risk assessment (EPA, 2001a). One of the initial tasks of any ERA is to identify constituents that potentially or adversely affect the environment. Typically, this is accomplished by comparing a constituent's maximum concentration in surface water, sediment, or soil with an ecological screening value (ESV). The screening process can eliminate many constituents from further consideration in the risk assessment, but it also identifies those that require additional evaluation. This document is an update of a previous compilation (Friday, 1998) and provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil. It describes how the screening values were derived and recommends benchmarks that can be used for ecological risk assessment. The sources of these updated benchmarks include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the State of Florida, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (RIVM), and the scientific literature. It should be noted that ESV's are continuously revised by the various issuing agencies. The references in this report provide the citations of each source and, where applicable, the internet address where they can be accessed. Although radiological screening values are not included herein due to space limitations, these have been recently derived by a technical working committee sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE 2002, 2004). The recommended ecological screening values represent the most conservative concentrations of the cited sources, and are to be used for screening purposes only. They do not represent remedial action cleanup levels. Their use at locations other than SRS should take into account environmental variables such as water quality, soil chemistry, flora and fauna, and other ecological attributes specific to the ecosystem potentially at risk.

Friday, G. P.

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

Enhancing the Effectiveness of Heuristic Rule Curves for Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leader in water management practices Develop a water centre of expertise with international reach University- Current Activities Development of parsimonious tools for water resources planning and management water management Flood risks assessment and management Advanced training in various aspects of water

Painter, Kevin

375

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

376

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

377

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2"...

378

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space...

379

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

380

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

382

United Cool Air  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

While our process may start with a "basic model" it is seldom that we fabricate more than a few units that are identical.  Therefore, the definition of "basic model" has a large impact on the...

383

Associative list processing unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a typical wind energy production facility, the results warrant further research on the use of acoustic;1 INTRODUCTION Over the past decade, wind energy production capacity in the United States has increased

385

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station Proceedings Research Station. 130 p. Declinesinhabitatofgreatersage, grazing practices, changes in wildfire regimes, increased spread of invasive species, gas and oil

386

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: 50% of the cost Windows: $150 Water Heaters/Clothes Washers: 1 Pipe Wrap: Limit of 10 linear ft. Faucet Aerators: 2 High Efficiency Shower Head: 2 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boiler: $200 Furnace: $100 - $200

387

Smart Schools: Water Use Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occupan cy (ppl/unit) Landscap ing Area Single-Family Residence 1 2.5 830 ft2 Multifamily Complex 540 3.5 #12;Baseline water use and zero-net water use goals UC Davis West Village Case Study Site Site Area.065 Multifamily Complex 20 acres 9.24 51.9 Overall Community 220 acres 102.1 154.3 #12;Indoor water use duration

California at Davis, University of

388

CONVERT 15 WELLS TO BORS PUMPING UNITS AND TEST/COMPARE TO CONVENTIONAL UNITS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of fluid lifting equipment called Balanced Oil Recovery System (trade named BORS Lift{trademark}) was installed on several idle oil wells to demonstrate the operating efficiency of this innovative equipment technology. The BORS Lift system is designed to bring oil to the surface without the accompanying formation water. The BORS Lift system uses an innovative strap mechanism that takes oil from the top of the downhole oilwater column and lifts it to the surface, eliminating production of the formation water. Eliminating salt water production could potentially increase oil production, reduce operational costs, benefit the environment, and cut salt water disposal costs. Although the BORS Lift units did not function as intended, lessons learned during the course of the field demonstration project resulted in improvements in the technology and redesign of subsequent generation BORS Lift units which are reported to have significantly improved their performance characteristics. BORS Lift units were installed on 15 temporarily abandoned wells which had been shut down due to low oil production, high water production, and uneconomic operating conditions. The wells had been producing with artificial lift at a high watercut from a shallow (850-900 feet), pressure depleted oil sand reservoir prior to being shut down. The electrical motor driven BORS Lift units provided a possible approach for economically returning the shallow, low-volume oil wells to production. The BORS Lift units used in this field demonstration were designed to recover up to roughly 22 barrels of fluid per day from depths ranging to 1,700 feet, ideal for many marginal stripper well operations. The BORS units were first-production-model test units, operated under oil field conditions for the first time, and were naturally expected to experience some design problems. From the onset, the operator experienced mechanical, design, and operational problems with the BORS Lift units and was unable to maintain un-interrupted production operations. The inventor provided considerable on-site technical support in an ongoing effort to correct the problems with the units and the inventor worked extensively with the operator to make design and manufacturing changes to the units to try to improve their reliability and performance. The operational problems were mostly related to the durability of the various components under oil field operating conditions such as inadequate mechanical, electrical, and electronic design for rough service, extended operation, and severe weather conditions. During the course of the demonstration project, it further appeared that the producing formation lacked sufficient reservoir energy and/or favorable oil properties to mobilize and displace oil from the formation into the well bore in order to recharge the oil column in the well. The BORS Lift units were then moved to a second lease which appeared to have more favorable WTI quality oil properties. Eight of these units were reported to have been installed and placed in operation on the second lease, however, operational difficulties continued. It was determined that the units were inadequately designed and would need to be replace by improved second generation units. Due to the lack of success with the first generation units and the extra cost to replace them with the redesigned units, the operators decided not to continue with the project and the project was terminated at that point.

Walter B. North

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

389

Water Power Technologies Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water Power Technologies Office leads efforts in developing innovative water power technologies to help the United States meet its growing energy demand. The Office is pioneering...

390

U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program Funding...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Office Funding in the United States: MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS Fiscal Years 2008 - 2014 WIND AND WATER POWER TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE WIND AND WATER POWER...

391

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,,,,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Water Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI","IN, OH",,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.4,0.3,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q"

392

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

393

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand Water Heater Basics Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is shown. Cold water flows in one end of a pipe, flows through and around several curved pipes over the heating elements, and out the other end as hot water. Beneath the heating unit, a typical sink setup is shown. The sink has two pipes coming out the bottom, one for the hot water line and one for the cold water line. Both pipes lead to the heating unit, which is installed in close proximity to the area of hot water use, and is connected to a power source (110 or 220 volts). Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as

394

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is shown. Cold water flows in one end of a pipe, flows through and around several curved pipes over the heating elements, and out the other end as hot water. Beneath the heating unit, a typical sink setup is shown. The sink has two pipes coming out the bottom, one for the hot water line and one for the cold water line. Both pipes lead to the heating unit, which is installed in close proximity to the area of hot water use, and is connected to a power source (110 or 220 volts). Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as

395

Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/global_climate_change_risk.pdf Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Screenshot References: Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans[1] Summary "The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of climate change related risks on bank borrowers, utilizing as much data and analysis as possible. The first section of this report reviews the current climate change policies in place in Canada, Europe, and the US, in order to provide

396

Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/global_framework.pdf Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure Screenshot References: Global Framework for Climate Risk Exposure[1] Summary "A group of leading institutional investors from around the world released the Global Framework for Climate Risk Disclosure-a new statement on disclosure that investors expect from companies-in October 2006. Investors require this information in order to analyze a company's business risks and opportunities resulting from climate change, as well as

397

Techno-Economic Evaluation of Renewable Energy Systems for Irrigation Water Pumping in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An attempt to develop a simple framework for techno-economics evaluation of renewable energy (RE) systems for irrigation water pumping has been made. The unit cost of water delivered and unit cost of useful energy

Ishan Purohit; Pallav Purohit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORNL: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ORNL: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. 3001 Storage Canal (OGR) 3517 Filter Pit (Fission Product Development Laboratory) Abandoned Burn Pit Abandoned Sanitary Waste Pipeline and Septic Tank N of 7917 Abandoned Underground Waste Oil Storage Tank 7002A Above-ground Demineralized-water Holding Tanks Aircraft Reactor Experiment Contaminated Tool Storage Aircraft Reactor Experiment Surface Impoundment Buried Scrap Metal Area C-14 Allocation in White Oak Trees C-14 Allocation in White Pine Trees C-14 Allocation in Woody Biomass Plantation Species C-14 Efflux in Yellow Poplar Stand

399

LPP Risk Management Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

History and Process History and Process Slide 2 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management History â—¦ Current Baseline Process Overview â—¦ Identification â—¦ Simulation â—¦ Management Successes & Challenges Slide 3 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks â—¦ 1 Week Risk Summit held week of August 4 th , 2008 Broad representation from all levels of Isotek, DOE, PTC, and outside consultants Focused on risk and opportunity identification Included risk description, assumptions, and triggers No quantification or analysis No restrictions, constraints, or filtering HQ provided facilitator Prescribed format and capture methodology Slide 4 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks â—¦ Risk Summit Results

400

Are water simulation models consistent with steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy experiments?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are water simulation models consistent with steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy, United States b Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States c Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States Received

Fayer, Michael D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Risk Communication: Talking About Risk Reduction Instead of Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The best way to communicate risk is NOT TO. Often the concern raised by people, ostensibly over the hazards associated with facilities in their community, tends to reflect a lack of trust of the firms that own...

Alfred Levinson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Miscellaneous reclamation legislation. Part 4. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Water and Power of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on S. 1884, S. 1981, and S. 2643, September 20, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 4 of the hearing record covers the first session of hearings on S. 1884, S. 1981, and S. 2643, which affect reclamation projects at Elephant Butte Irrigation District, projects covered by the Small Reclamation Projects Act of 1956, the San Luis Unit of the Central Valley Project in California, and other purposes. The text of each bill is inserted in the record along with the testimony of 13 witnesses representing water agencies, environmental groups, and the Department of Interior's Bureau of Reclamation. Senators from several affected states also made statements. At issue was the need to authorize additional funds for the projects because repayment funds are not credited to the program, making it necessary to raise the authorization ceiling. Witnesses noted the merits of the small projects program in promoting conservation by securing funding on the open market and encouraging local initiative. Critics objected to the piecemeal effect of this approach.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Best Buys and Unit Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This guide explains how to determine a unit price--the cost of an item based on a specific unit such as pound or ounce. Unit pricing can be used to identify foods that are the most economical....

Anding, Jenna

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

404

dddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

moisture is key to growing quality wine grapes, but accurately monitoring the soil's water content is in California, and wine is the state's most valuable finished agricultural product, with an industry valued resources is increasing, which has increased the pres- sure on California vintners to use water more

Hubbard, Susan

405

Projected freshwater withdrawals in the United States under a changing climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Projected freshwater withdrawals in the United States under a changing climate Thomas C. Brown,1 increases this projection. The climate-based increase in the projected water use is attributable mainly summarizes past water use and then projects future water use based on the trends in water use efficiency

RamĂ­rez, Jorge A.

406

The use of reverse osmosis water for the production of parenterals in the hospital pharmacy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Only theUnited States Pharmacopeia has included reverse osmosis as an approved process for producing ‘Water...

Drs. Ph. Jacobs

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Types of Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Types of risk associated with range ecosystems include climatic, biological, financial and political risks. These risks are explained so that managers can know how to handle them....

White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Risk Informing the Commercial Nuclear Enterprise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Events V. The Path Forward #12;3 I. Managing Risk to the Business Each CENG nuclear plant Post-Fukushima Response New NRC Regulations EPA Cooling Water Intake regulation GSI 191 4 Cyber Level of Control Mitigation Fukushima Response High cost of studies, modifications, uncertainty

Bernstein, Joseph B.

409

Risk Assess - updated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Software Development Risk Assessment Software Development Risk Assessment Note: The purpose of this prompt list is to provide project managers with a tool for identifying and planning for potential project risks. It is process-based and supports the framework established by the DOE Software Engineering Methodology. It will be used within the stage exit process as an additional tool to ensure that the project manager has identified and is managing known risk factors. Additional detailed information describes the various risk factors and how to score them. Performing a risk assessment is an important step in being prepared for potential problems that can occur within any software project. During the risk assessment, if a potential risk is identified, a solution or plan of action should be developed. (A problem analyzed and planned

410

Country Risk Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are a multitude of organizations providing country risk services using their proprietary benchmarking. The central ... in a quantifiable manner, individual country sovereign risk and the implication of such...

Mohamed A. Ramady

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Enterprise Risk Management Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Model The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Model is a system used to analyze the cost and benefit of addressing risks inherent in the work performed by the Department of Energy....

412

Risk Mitigation and Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are combined to form a technical risk reduction strategy, sometimes referred to as a technology roadmap. The tools can be applied to non-technical, programmatic risk areas as...

413

Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the United States Geological Survey, State Water Resources Research Institute Program allowed the Wyoming and Natural Resources, and at Wyoming State Water Plan meetings. We attended conferences hosted by the WyomingWyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program

414

Desalination of Sea and Brackish Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Government had made arrangements to keep in touch with American research and development in the desalination of sea and brackish waters. The Interdepartmental Committee on Hydrological Research had asked the ... asked the Water Board Association to keep a "watching brief" on all developments in desalination from the United States Office of Saline Water and other bodies active in this field ...

1964-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Second United Nations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nations Nations . DISCLAIMER This report was prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and

416

United States Government  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

.2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG .2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ . 001 United States Government Department of Energy Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 9, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-07 REPLY TO ATTN OF; IG-32 (A050R014) SUBJECT: Audit of "The Department's Management of United States Enrichment Corporation Site Services" TO: Manager, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office INTRODUCTTON AND OBJECTIVE The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), located in western Kentucky, was constructed by the Department of Energy (Department) in the early 1950s to enrich uranium for use in various military and commercial applications. The Department operated the plant until the Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as a Government-owned

417

Uncertainty and Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter shows how multiple realizations can be used to support the assessment of uncertainty and risk.

Mario E. Rossi; Clayton V. Deutsch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Learning and risk aversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

Oyarzun, Carlos

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

Risk, uncertainty and regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...themselves, is What is an acceptable level of risk? The 27 million, 16-volume...deciding whether or not a risk is acceptable is comparison. There is...government should be to reduce risk to a level that is acceptable to most people, and this...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

February 2002 RISK MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to an acceptable level. The objective of performing risk man agement is to enable the organization to accomplishFebruary 2002 RISK MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS By Joan S. Hash, Computer This ITL Bulletin describes risk man agement methodology and how to integrate it into an information tech

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of a Market Optimized Condensing Gas Water Heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program covered the development of a market optimized condensing gas water heater for residential applications. The intent of the program was to develop a condensing design that minimized the large initial cost premium associated with traditional condensing water heater designs. Equally important was that the considered approach utilizes design and construction methods that deliver the desired efficiency without compromising product reliability. Standard condensing water heater approaches in the marketplace utilize high cost materials such as stainless steel tanks and heat exchangers as well as expensive burner systems to achieve the higher efficiencies. The key in this program was to develop a water heater design that uses low-cost, available components and technologies to achieve higher efficiency at a modest cost premium. By doing this, the design can reduce the payback to a more reasonable length, increasing the appeal of the product to the marketplace. Condensing water heaters have been in existence for years, but have not been able to significantly penetrate the market. The issue has typically been cost. The high purchase price associated with existing condensing water heaters, sometimes as much as $2000, has been a very difficult hurdle to overcome in the marketplace. The design developed under this program has the potential to reduce the purchase price of this condensing design by as much as $1000 as compared to traditional condensing units. The condensing water heater design developed over the course of this program led to an approach that delivered the following performance attributes: 90%+ thermal efficiency; 76,000 Btu/hr input rate in a 50 gallon tank; First hour rating greater than 180 gph; Rapid recovery time; and Overall operating condition well matched to combination heat and hot water applications. Over the final three years of the program, TIAX worked very closely with A.O. Smith Water Products Company as our commercial partner to optimize the design for manufacturing. This work included the initiation of a large field testing program (over 125 units) and an in-depth reliability program intended to minimize the risks associated with a new product introduction. At the time of this report, A.O. Smith plans to introduce this product to the marketplace in the early 2006 time period.

Peter Pescatore

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Reactor siting risk comparisons related to recommendations of NUREG-0625  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document evaluates how implementing the remote siting recommendations for nuclear reactors (NUREG-0625) made by the Siting Policy Task Force of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) can reduce potential public risk. The document analyzes how population density affects site-specific risk for both light water reactors (LWRs) and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs).

Barsell, A.W.; Dombek, F.S.; Orvis, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Climate Risk, Perceptions and Development in El Salvador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Risk, Perceptions and Development in El Salvador E. Lisa F. Schipper International Water 93 #12;1 Climate Risk, Perceptions and Development in El Salvador E. Lisa F. Schipper International Salvador in order to understand how development can drive a process of vulnerability reduction, and vice

Watson, Andrew

424

Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancer risks was found in a small cohort study in Japan involving residents using well water con concentrations in water sources piped to households. It is the first large, popula- tion-based lung cancer case

California at Berkeley, University of

425

Solar water heaters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water heaters water heaters (Redirected from - Solar Hot Water) Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of Solar Water Heating technology.)[1] Solar Water Heater One of the most cost-effective ways to include renewable technologies into a building is by incorporating solar hot water. A typical residential solar water-heating system reduces the need for conventional water heating by about two-thirds. It minimizes the expense of electricity or fossil fuel to heat the water and reduces the associated environmental impacts. Solar Water Heating for Buildings Most solar water-heating systems for buildings have two main parts: (1) a solar collector and (2) a storage tank. The most common collector used in solar hot water systems is the

426

Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, water electrolysis technology and its applications for nuclear hydrogen ... of the chapter, a general classification of water electrolysis systems is given, the fundamentals of water electrolysis

Greg F. Naterer; Ibrahim Dincer…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

GCC Composite Risk: Political Risk at the Heart  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The individual GCC country risk chapters have revealed divergent risk parameters in the three core risk areas—economic, financial, and political. This chapter examines the GCC composite risk as a whole, and compa...

Mohamed A. Ramady

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Risk analysis and risk management: a European insight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1996 Challenges in risk assessment and risk management (Preface...the American Academy of Political and Social Science...social, cultural, and political forces that dictate success and failure in risk assessment and risk management......

Zoe Nivolianitou

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Risk analysis and risk management: a European insight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and environmental risks. Scientific analysis of risks cannot allay our fears...social, cultural, and political forces that dictate success and failure in risk assessment and risk...done already in the insurance discipline, where even......

Zoe Nivolianitou

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Risk analysis and risk management: a European insight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ANALYSIS AND RISK MANAGEMENT: AEUROPEAN INSIGHT...public trust. The science of risk assessment...assessment and risk management. Understanding...radically different approaches to risk and environmental management. On the other......

Zoe Nivolianitou

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Quantitative Risk Assessment and the Notion of Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kristen Shrader-Frechette divides the activity of quantitative risk assessment (QRA) into three stages: (1) risk identification, (2) risk estimation, and (3) risk evaluation.1 Given the present level of developme...

James Humber; Robert Almeder

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: For additional copies: U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200 Publications Distribution Forest, New Hampshire, began in 1932. One of the studies, still maintained today, consisted of severalUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northern Research Station Research Paper NRS

434

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station at Durham, New Hampshire. The computer program described in this publication was created usingUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northern Research Station General Technical://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ Published by: For additional copies: U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200

435

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in wildlife management from the University of New Hampshire in 1988. She joined the Intermountain Research Station in 1993 after working for the States of New Hampshire and Wyoming on projects involving wetlandUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General

436

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

copies: USDA FOREST SERVICE USDA Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200 Publications Distribution at Durham, New Hampshire; JENNIFER C. JENKINS, jjenkins@fs.fed.us, is a research foresterUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General

437

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1973 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 67 Prepared by STATISTICS a review of the fishery statistics for the year 1973 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment 1n the fish- eries, quantity of gear operated, number

438

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1971 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 65 Prepared by STATISTICS ry statistics for the year 1971 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment in the fishe ries, quantity of gear operated, number of fishing craft e

439

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

play an important role in a national program for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The conversion potential through conversion of nonforest land to forest land and through the management of forest lands and sinks in the United States can be identified. International treaties on greenhouse gas reduction require

440

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an offset, or for registering carbon dioxide reductions using the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b. Brown Richard A. Birdsey #12;Visit our homepage at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ Published by forestry companies and managers of utility company lands, within the United States who are interested

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

United Nations Development Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Development Policy Energy and Atmosphere Programme Development Programme with support from the Government of Norway #12;The views expressed in this volume. #12;5 Acknowledgements 6 Notes on Authors 7 Foreword 9 Executive Summary 27 Introduction: Energy

442

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hills National Forest uses such a habitat capability model (HABCAP), but its accuracy is largely unknown, Wildlife Biologist with Black Hills National Forest, Custer, SD 2 South Dakota State UniversityUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment

443

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United States Department of Agriculture Managing Habitats for White-tailed DeerForest Service Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Fort Collins, Colorado 80526 General Technical Report RM-GTR-274 Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains of South Dakota and Wyoming Carolyn Hull Sieg and Kieth E

444

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station General.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 25 p. Estimates of forest of California's legislatively mandated green- house gas inventory. Reliable estimates of live-tree carbon stores

Fried, Jeremy S.

445

CoML Review An Overview of Marine Biodiversity in United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CoML Review An Overview of Marine Biodiversity in United States Waters Daphne Fautin1 *, Penelope Research, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States of America Marine biodiversity of the United States (U. Threats to marine biodiversity in the U.S. are the same as those for most of the world: overexploitation

Fautin, Daphne

446

Water-Use Efficiency of the Terrestrial Biosphere: A Model Analysis Focusing on Interactions between the Global Carbon and Water Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon and water cycles are intimately coupled in terrestrial ecosystems, and water-use efficiency (WUE; carbon gain at the expense of unit water loss) is one of the key parameters of ecohydrology and ecosystem management. In this study, the ...

Akihiko Ito; Motoko Inatomi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

GAO United States General Accounting Office Performance and Accountability Series  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GAO GAO United States General Accounting Office Performance and Accountability Series January 2001 Major Management Challenges and Program Risks Department of Energy GAO-01-246 Page 1 GAO-01-246 DOE Challenges Contents Letter 3 Overview 6 Major Management Challenges and Program Risks: Department of Energy 13 Related GAO Products 48 Performance and Accountability Series 52 Page 2 GAO-01-246 DOE Challenges Comptroller General of the United States Page 3 GAO-01-246 DOE Challenges United States General Accounting Office Washington, D.C. 20548 L e t t e r January 2001 The President of the Senate The Speaker of the House of Representatives This report addresses the major performance and accountability challenges facing the Department of Energy (DOE) as it seeks to maintain the nation's

448

Beyond the Aquifer : planning for San Antonio's future water supply.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This report examines water supply planning issues in San Antonio, Texas. San Antonio is unique among large cities in the United States in that it… (more)

Laughlin, Nathan Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Statement Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Committee on Appropriations (3162010) Statement Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Committee on Appropriations, United States House of Representatives By...

450

Assessing How Renewables Affect Water Used for Thermoelectric...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

The Science Water use and energy production are intrinsically linked. Most electric power plants in the United States generate electricity by means of a steam generator....

451

Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Webpage | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Webpage Author United State Environmental Protection...

452

Reducing Herbicide Entry into Surface Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these herbicides may move from the application site into surface waters. Unfortunately , minute quantities of a few herbi- cides have been detected in T exas ground and surface waters. The potential risks associated with the contamination of surface waters... accomplish thr ee major goals: ? Reduce herbicides in runo#31;; ? Reduce water and sediment runo#31;, and; ? Safely clean sprayers and dispose of containers. Reduce Herbicides in Runo#31; Apply Herbicides Accurately Pr operly calibrated sprayers ar e...

Baumann, Paul A.; Bean, Brent W.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

453

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family...

454

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,14,7.2,12.2,12,18.4,17.7,16.1,8.8 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,"Q","Q",0.3,0.3,0.7,1.1,0.4 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

455

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Water Heating",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

456

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Water Heating",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

457

The Enterprise Risk Management Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

needed Cost Effective Risk Management *What is the most effective method for bringing risk down to an acceptable level? *Are the controls most expensive than the risk? 6 Risk...

458

Federal Water Use Indices | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Water Use Indices Federal Water Use Indices Federal Water Use Indices FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably. The following indices should be used only to assist in determining baseline data when no other information is available on site water usage. Conversion factors for the Federal water use indices are also available. Source: American Water Works Association 1996. Data represents gallons per unit per day. Commercial User Unit Range Typical Airport Passenger 4-5 3 Apartment house Person 100-200 100 Boarding house Person 25-50 40 Hotel Guest 40-60 50 Employee 8-13 10 Lodging house and tourist home Guest 30-50 40 Motel Guest 25-40 35

459

Iowa's first electrodialysis reversal water treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1979 the City of Washington was notified by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) that the City was in violation of the radium standard for drinking water. The City of Washington authorized an engineering study to determine the most cost-effective and practical way to remove radium and, at the same time, improve overall water quality. Several possible treatment alternatives were evaluated. It was finally decided to utilize electrodialysis reversal (EDR). Washington obtains its water from three deep wells ranging in capacity from 600–780 gpm. The untreated water withdrawn from the wells first passes through the EDR units. There are three EDR units, each able to produce 285 gpm of finished water. In the future, another EDR unit can be easily added to the other three units, since the new plant was built and plumbed for an additional EDR unit if water demand increased. The Jordan aquifer supply is adequate for current and future needs. The average daily water usage in 1993 was 818,000 gal/d. In order to meet peak flows, it is possible to bypass the EDR units with part of the untreated water and then blend treated and untreated water. The treated water meets IDNR standards of 5.0 pC/L. After the EDR units, the water flows through an aerator where odor-causing gases and carbon dioxide are removed. Aeration reduces the amount of caustic soda and chlorine used in the finished water. The hydrogen sulfide gas leaves the water as it passes through the aerator, and this loss of gas creates less chlorine demand. Total and free chlorine residuals are now detected in every water main of the town, whereas before, the residuals would not be detected in certain area of Washington. Phosphates have been cut back from 7 pounds per day to one pound per day. Better water quality is now being achieved with fewer chemicals added to the finished water. Washington's water treatment plant is the first municipal EDR plant in the State of Iowa and one of the largest municipal installations in the United States.

John Hays

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,10.3,25.2,26.2,23,21.7 "2 or More",3.7,0.4,0.7,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,0.2,0.5,"Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,10.1,22.9,23,22,21.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Agenda: The Water-Energy Nexus | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Agenda: The Water-Energy Nexus Agenda: The Water-Energy Nexus A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review, Hosted by the United States Department of Energy Thursday, June...

462

Solar water heaters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heaters heaters Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of Solar Water Heating technology.)[1] Solar Water Heater One of the most cost-effective ways to include renewable technologies into a building is by incorporating solar hot water. A typical residential solar water-heating system reduces the need for conventional water heating by about two-thirds. It minimizes the expense of electricity or fossil fuel to heat the water and reduces the associated environmental impacts. Solar Water Heating for Buildings Most solar water-heating systems for buildings have two main parts: (1) a solar collector and (2) a storage tank. The most common collector used in solar hot water systems is the flat-plate collector. Solar water heaters use the sun to heat either water

463

United States Government  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

uv /uu/u* ±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . uv /uu/u* ±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . 'A4 .. ± OO, I U444 flmI I.j102 ' -f- $I)002 EP<.1 (o-.vu) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: January 30, 2004 REP.YTO: IG-35 (A03DN039) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-10 SUBJECT: Audit of the Safeguards and Security Program at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site To: Frazer Lockhart, Manager, Rocky Flats Field Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Because of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy (Department) instituted additional security requirements beyond those already in place for normal security operations. These "Security Conditions" requirements were established by Department Notice 473.8 (Notice). The requirements are based on

464

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

465

l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT lb 15 SUBJECT: THORFJM PROCURENENT PMF'N:TBU Jesse C. Johnson, Gtnager of IRaw Materials Operations3s.Office 3 R. W. Cook, Director of Production ~',LL:::+ I--- DATE: MAR ! 9 1951 The following list of suppliers of thorium and the amounts of materials procured from them by the Mew York Operations Office during calendar year 1950 is being supplied in accordance with Mr. Spelmanls telephone request of March 19. Thorium Lannett Bleachery iinde Air Products Co. Lindsey Light & Chemical Co. lliscellaneous NY0 Liscensing Division Rare Earths, Inc. Wolff-Alport Total - (kilograms) 179 38,2;2 -3 4,210 /vyeoi 4 -q- 2 : i ' \ iti 1 i 0 ;;\I:' --' I F 10 i;;;?/ \ --' L & ;:I :,- :,j( EZi 5 1 :' -I I ri _ I ' R i; .- . )- .i

466

United States Government  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ng ng United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: APR 18 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02PR010) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-15 SUBJECT: Audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program TO: Director, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program, EE-2K The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Weatherization Assistance Program (Program) was established to increase energy efficiency in dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons to reduce their residential energy expenditures and improve their health and safety. Since its inception in 1976, the Program has reported that approximately 5 million dwelling units owned or occupied by low-income individuals have been weatherized.

467

United States Government Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OE r 1325.0 OE r 1325.0 (01.93) United States Government Department of memorandum DATE: March 23, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-09 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A060R040) SUBJECT: Audit of"The Department of Energy's Management of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve" TO, Deputy Assistant Secrctary for Petroleum Reserves INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Energy Act of 2000 authorized the Secretary of Energy to create a Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (Reserve). The Reserve was established as an "emergency buffer" to supplement commercial supplies should a severe supply disruption occur in the heavily heating oil-dependent northeast United States. The Reserve consists of 2 million barrels of emergency home heating oil, enough to provide Northeast consumers adequate supplies for approximately

468

United States Government  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States Government United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: July 29, 2005 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-34 (A05HQ002) Audit Report No. OAS-L-05-10 SUBJECT: Agreed-Upon Procedures for Federal Payroll TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget, and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Bulletin No. 01-02, "Audit Requirements for Federal Financial Statement," dated October 16, 2000, requires an annual audit of civilian payroll of executive departments and other Government agencies. Auditors are required to follow the agreed-upon procedures in Appendix I-1 of OMB Bulletin No. 01-02, to assess the reasonableness of life insurance, health benefits, and retirement withholdings and contributions.

469

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Menxmmhmz 9 Menxmmhmz 9 1 / UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT i TO : ThcFFles . mx.f I A. B. Piccct, +3lation section : DATE: .@.eti 16, 1949 SUBJECT: VISIT To HAVY OFfDHAlfCE DEPOT, EARIZ, B.J. FmmlTo ,sYmOL: DH:ARP . . : OnJuly 8,&g the uriterattendedameeting at the Navy Oxdnce Depot at Farle, Ii. J. for the purpose of advising the navy on i-adlatlon hazards involved In the dmping of contadnated AEC wastes at /?ea. " Presint were: J. Cook - Traffic & Transportation, AEC ~J.Moren- Utilifation, AEC ..J. Ccnmigl.io - Chief of Middlesex Operaticns A. PIhot -~Hadiation Section, AEC Captain Blossoin - Navy Captain hall - Navy ThefoSkndngwas agreedupcmby AFC andthe l&v. 1. 2. 3. 4. Contaminatedmaterial dnmied, I (loose in case of large contaminated units) loaded on truck&and lsonltored at'

470

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

472

Hoechst plans Mexican unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hoechst is considering plans to build its first ethoxylates project in Mexico, Mark Sijthoff, head of surfactants and auxiliaries for Hoechst`s specialty chemical business unit, tells CW. The company expects to make a decision on the 30,000-m.t./year project by the end of the year. Sijthoff would not disclose the site or where ethylene oxide (EO) feed would be obtained. The plan may depend on results of the privatization of Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), which is the only producer of EO in Mexico. Hoechst is part of a consortium bidding on the privatization. Sources say the unit will be built at Quimica Hoechst`s Coatzacoalcos site, close to Pemex`s EO plants at Cangregera and Morelos. A planned EO expansion at Morelos will probably move ahead when the sell-off is completed. Sijthoff says that Hoechst is also looking at improving its US surfactants position, although the company has no plans to expand ethoxylates, as there is {open_quotes}plenty of capacity.{close_quotes} Hoechst started up a 150-million lbs/year plant at Clear Lake, TX last year, ending a tolling agreement with Union Carbide. In addition, Rhone-Poulenc recently started a unit at Marcus Hook, PA, and Condea Vista is doubling its ethoxylation capacity at Lake Charles, LA. Meanwhile, Hoechst is still considering construction of 30,000-m.t./year ethoxylation plant in India or China. A decision is expected later this year.

Wood, A.; Alperowicz, N.

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

473

Variability in surface ozone background over the United States: Implications for air quality policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variability in surface ozone background over the United States: Implications for air quality policy background over the United States: Implications for air quality policy, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D24), 4787, doi Agency (EPA) accounts for a background O3 level above which risk to human health is assessed. Since

Liu, Hongyu

474

Marketing water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management, water conservation programs Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 17 public information programs and materials that increase awareness about regional water issues. The company recently opened the TecH2O, a water resource learning center...tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Evaluation of electrodialysis for scaling prevention of nanofiltration membranes at high water recoveries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The water recovery of nanofiltration in drinking water production is limited to 80–85%. When the water recovery is increased, there is a risk of scaling of sparingly soluble salts, such as CaSO4 or CaCO3, onto the membrane surface. There is a need for robust technologies that handle the problem of mineral scaling in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis, allowing operation at higher recoveries, i.e., with a higher production of potable water. In this study, the retentate stream of a nanofiltration unit was therefore desalinated by electrodialysis. Two different ion exchange membrane pairs, namely AMX-CMX (Neosepta, Japan) and FTAM-FTCM (Fumasep, Germany) were used for this purpose. The membrane pairs were compared on the basis of their removal efficiency of the main ions present in natural waters, with special attention to calcium and sulphate ions. The economic feasibility of retentate treatment by electrodialysis is discussed as well. The FTAM anion exchange membranes of Fumasep were able to remove sulphate ions faster, relative to chloride or nitrate ions. This is unexpected, because sulphate ions have a high hydrated ionic radius and steric hindrance typically obstructs their transport through anion exchange membranes, as is the case with the AMX membranes. This feature makes the FTAM membranes appropriate for the desalination of retentate streams of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes, in water recycling applications. The other membranes can be regarded as non-selective.

Steven Van Geluwe; Leen Braeken; Thomas Robberecht; Maarten Jans; Claude Creemers; Bart Van der Bruggen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Sociocultural definitions of risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public constituencies frequently are criticized by technical experts as being irrational in response to low-probability risks. This presentation argued that most people are concerned with a variety of risk attributes other than probability and that is rather irrational to exclude these from the definition and analysis of technological risk. Risk communication, which is at the heart of the right-to-know concept, is described as the creation of shared meaning rather than the mere transmission of information. A case study of utilities, public utility commissions, and public interest groups illustrates how the diversity of institutional cultures in modern society leads to problems for the creation of shared meanings in establishing trust, distributing liability, and obtaining consent to risk. This holistic approach to risk analysis is most appropriate under conditions of high uncertainty and/or decision stakes. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Rayner, S.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Arizona has relatively limited water resources due to its arid climate and limited surface water.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for approximately 20% of non-agricultural water consumption in the United States. The numbers for AZ are slightly lower, with total industrial uses of water making up around 17% of non agricultural water consumption in attempting to characterize technologies is life cycle assessment (LCA). It can be used to attempt

Fay, Noah

478

Water resources and the urban environment--98  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains all the papers presented at the meeting. There are 25 sessions and one poster session in the document. The Sessions are: (1) Landfill gas/groundwater interactions; (2) Urban solids management; (3) Local issues; (4) Surface water quality studies 1; (5) Reductive treatment of hazardous wastes with zero-valent iron; (6) Water reuse 1; (7) Biosolids management; (8) GIS information systems 1; (9) Drinking water distribution; (10) Anaerobic treatment; (11) Water reuse 2; (12) Municipal wastewater treatment technology; (13) GIS information systems 2; (14) Drinking water treatment 1; (15) Risk-based site remediation; (16) Small urban watersheds; (17) Disinfection; (18) Air pollution control and risk assessment; (19) Drinking water treatment 2; (20) Biological wastewater treatment; (21) Wastewater treatment; (22) Decentralized small-scale alternative wastewater management systems; (23) General environmental issues; (24) Drinking water treatment 3; and (25) Groundwater remediation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

Wilson, T.E. [ed.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Water Conservation is a critical priority in Texas. To  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://fcs.tamu.edu/housing/healthy_homes/indo or_air_quality/biological_pollutants/index.php Healthy Homes Some of the most serious health problems risks. Parents can examine risks from lead-based paint, indoor air pollution, and drinking water risks, and control measures related to common residential indoor air problems and to help consumers

480

Chapter 1 - Risk Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter describes the principles of risk management as they apply to the offshore oil and gas industry, the impact the Deepwater Horizon/Macondo event had on the industry and how safety management systems have evolved in response. The fundamentals of safety management are described including: acceptable risk, process safety and culture, the use of risk matrices, the economics of offshore safety, means of measuring progress, and leading and lagging indicators. The distinction between prescriptive and nonprescriptive systems is discussed.

Ian Sutton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water unit risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

482

Israel and US in water deal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... UNDER a new agreement between the United States and Israel a water desalination project likely to cost J$55 million has just been started. A test module ... power plant. America's contribution will amount to $20 million.

Kapai Pines

1975-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

483

Project Risk Management:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The recent increase in international projects has resulted in higher risk along with difficulties in control and coordination. Effective project management can therefore be… (more)

Koelmeyer, Chris

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Political Risk in Finland.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Thesis political risk in Finland will explain the real nature of the financial crisis in Finland in the beginning of 1990’s. Before 1990’s Finland… (more)

Davidsson, Jukka

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities in rural areas can result in sudden and severe changes in every facet of community life, or power, water, and sewage districts become either heavily overloaded or overbuilt. Public leaders find changes in leader- ship. Federal land managers find themselves caught up in con- troversy and facing

Standiford, Richard B.

486

Valuing Groundwater Services and Water Portfolio in Irrigated Agriculture with a Hedonic Pricing Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

163–175. United States v. State Water Res. Control Bd. , 182An Overview. California State Water Resources Control BoardCentral Valley Salinity, State Water Resources Control Board

Mukherjee, Monobina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Will Federal Environmental Regulation be Permitted to Infringe on State Vested Water Rights?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irrigation Dist. v. State Water Resources Control Bd. , 27516. See United States v. State Water Resources Control Bd. ,by the § 8 deference to state water law. 372 U.S. 627, 630-

Dorrity, Kristen

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Environmental Risks to Infrastructure 2014 Environmental Risks to Infrastructure Innovation funding call June 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

failure to guide proactive management and increase the resilience of electricity distribution networks. 8 investment planning 8 2 NE/M00886X/1 Dr Iain Jonathan Rae Understanding the effects of space weather on water and Erosion Risk to Energy Infrastructure on Gravel Shorelines: a case study approach 8 4 NE/M008150/1 Dr Taku

Reece, Sarah

489

Chapter 7 - Test Cell Cooling Water and Exhaust Gas Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Part 1 considers the thermodynamics of water cooling systems, water quality, typical cooling water circuits, and engine coolant control units. Also covered are the commissioning cooling circuits, thermal shock, and chilled water systems. Part 2 covers the design of test cell exhaust systems, exhaust silencers, exhaust gas volume flow, exhaust silencers, and exhaust cowls. Part 3 briefly covers the testing of turbochargers.

A.J. Martyr; M.A. Plint

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphic Results Graphic Results Baseline Risk Assessment Results Screening Risk Assessment Results Other Risk Assessment Results Graphic Results K-25 Groundwater Residential Landuse Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-30) Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Bedrock Wells - Total Risk Bedrock Wells - Arsenic Risk Bedrock Wells - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Bedrock Wells - Trichloroethene Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-150) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-4 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-6 - 10-4) Unconsolidated Wells - Arsenic Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Trichloroethene Risk ORNL WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk

491

Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive Species andWater Levels, Invasive Species and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ­­ ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive." IPCC Risk management is the framework to discuss adaptation to climate change impacts. Risk The Water Resources Working Group will assess and synthesize climate change impacts to Wisconsin's water

Sheridan, Jennifer

492

Water Heating | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Heating Water Heating Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average household expenditures on energy for water heating in the United States in 2005. Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (6 years ago) Keywords Energy Expenditures Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Total.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 70.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Avg.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 69.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

493

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

494

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.5,0.2,0.3,0.3,0.5,0.3,0.3,0.5 1,108.1,13.7,4.9,13,12.8,17.5,16.3,15.6,14.4 "2 or More",2.7,0.3,"Q",0.3,0.2,0.3,0.4,0.5,0.6 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,14,5,13.2,13,17.9,16.6,16,14.9

495

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Water Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.9,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.3 1,108.1,30.2,33.9,17.3,14.9,11.9 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,1.1,0.4,0.4,0.5 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,30.6,34.8,17.5,15.2,12.3 1,3.1,0.7,1,0.5,0.5,0.4 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

496

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Water Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.1 1,108.1,36.8,33.9,13.3,18,6 "2 or More",2.7,0.7,0.8,0.4,0.7,0.1 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters3" 0,110.4,37.4,34.6,13.7,18.5,6.1 1,3.1,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.5,0.1 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N"

497

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.7,0.5,0.3,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.5,0.5 1,108.1,22.9,26.7,20.4,13.4,8.7,5.3,10.6,16.3 "2 or More",2.7,0.1,0.3,0.4,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.9,0.1 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters3"

498

Energy Management in Olefins Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit...

Wells, T. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Industrial and Commercial Heat Pump Applications in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

l:--mUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL HEAT PUMP APPLICATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES Richard C. Niess Dames &. Moore Bethesda, Maryland ABSTRACT The energy crIsIs of 1973 accelerated the develop ment of large-scale heat pumps in the United States. Since... gaining acceptance, including groundwater/geothermal water. INTRODUCTION The large-scale application of heat pumps in the United States had its beginning with the first known installation of an air-to-air heat pump in Reading, Pennsylvania, in 1932...

Niess, R. C.

500

MFR PAPER 1170 Water Surface Area Within  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in hectares for each subsubarea within each subarea. Conversion factor Central latllude Stallstlcal hectares the Gulf coa t. especiall y tho e concerning im- pact of energy-related development. METHODS Water surface.-Converslon factors (hectares per planimeter unit) used to convert average planimeter units to area