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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Modeling the Water and Nutrient Freshwater Aquaculture in Thailand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters 22 5.6 Biodegradation 23 6 Nile tilapia feeding on pellet: Data acquisition and results 24 6 to the canal. Catfish (lat. Clarias batrachus) has the highest production in the area and is also the most of freshwater because of the intensive production. Nutrient loads coming from catfish ponds are the highest

Richner, Heinz

2

Complete genome sequence of the gliding freshwater bacterium Fluviicola taffensis type strain (RW262T)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluviicola taffensis O'Sullivan et al. 2005 belongs to the monotypic genus Fluviicola within the family Cryomorphaceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the genome-sequenced fraction of the tree of life. Strain RW262 T forms a monophyletic lineage with uncultivated bacteria represented in freshwater 16S rRNA gene libraries. A similar phylogenetic differentiation occurs between freshwater and marine bacteria in the family Flavobacteriaceae, a sister family to Cryomorphaceae. Most remarkable is the inability of this freshwater bacterium to grow in the presence of Na + ions. All other genera in the family Cryomorphaceae are from marine habitats and have an absolute requirement for Na + ions or natural sea water. F. taffensis is the first member of the family Cryomorphaceae with a completely sequenced and publicly available genome. The 4,633,577 bp long genome with its 4,082 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Mwirichia, Romano [Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

A reformulated, reconstituted water for testing the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toxicity testing with the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, has routinely been conducted using nonstandard waters. Four waters were tested for acceptability for aqueous reference toxicant testing with H. azteca. These included three formulated (standardized) waters: moderately hard reconstituted water (MHRW), reformulated moderately hard reconstituted water (RMHRW), and 25% dilute mineral water (DMW). The water used for comparison was a nonstandard, in-house culture water mixture of well water and dechlorinated tap water, diluted with Super-Q{reg_sign} deionized water to a hardness of 100 mg/L, as CaCO{sub 3} (LL/SQ). Control survival was less than the 90% minimum control survival criteria in all tests with MHRW. Two of five tests with DMW also failed to pass the minimum control survival criteria. All five tests with the RMHRW passed the control survival criteria. The mean 50% lethal concentration (LC50) for the tests in RMHRW was 320 mg/L KCl, with a coefficient of variation of 8.5%. Concurrent tests with the in-house water yielded control survival greater than 90% and a mean LC50 of 216 mg/L KCl with a coefficient of variation of 13.4%. Tests in an interlaboratory study yielded similar results. Whole-sediment toxicity tests conducted using RMHRW as the overlying water routinely exceed the 80% minimum survival criteria in the control and reference sediments. The failure of MHRW and DMW to produce acceptable results, as well as the inability of other laboratories to produce LL/SQ, makes RMHRW the best candidate for a standard water for H. azteca testing.

Smith, M.E.; Herrin, L.E.; Thoeny, W.T. [SBI Environmental, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lazorchak, J.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Brewer-Swartz, S. [EMPE, Nashville, TN (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Efficacy of open-ocean ballast water exchange as a means of preventing invertebrate invasions between freshwater ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between freshwater ports Derek K. Gray Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University Lakes to European ports. Each vessel had paired ballast tanks, one of which was designated as a control ports. BWE was verified by ship records and, in two cases, by in situ water quality sensors. BWE

6

Division of Water, Parts 662-665: Freshwater Wetlands (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

No person may alter any freshwater wetland or adjacent area without having first submitted an application and obtained an interim permit for the alteration from the department. Some exemptions...

7

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters May 2, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis Diagram of a tankless water heater. Diagram of a tankless water heater. How...

8

early 300 species of mussels inhabit fresh-water rivers, streams, and lakes in the United  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

remnant populations of mussels. Dam construction, siltation, water pollution, mining and industrial wastes important commercial value in the cul- tured pearl and jewelry industry. Our pearly mussels are of unique mussels are underway. However, water pollution continues to threaten streams crucial to their survival

Liskiewicz, Maciej

9

Toxicity of nickel and nickel electroplating water to the freshwater cladoceran Moina macrocopa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study investigates the effects of Ni{sup 2+} and other components of nickel electroplating water on the survival and reproductive capacity of the cladoceran Moina macrocopa, a common inhabitant of small ponds and rice paddies in Hong Kong and Southern China.

Wong, C.K.; Wong, P.K.; Tao, H. (Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Freshwater mussels and water quality: A review of the effects of hydrologic and instream habitat alterations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 ABSTRACT: Hydraulic impacts represent a suite of habitat. These hydraulic impacts thus overlap each other to one degree or another. I have attempted to break them down to divert water to mills and turbines, where its seemingly limitless power ground grain, cut lumber

Watters, G. Thomas

11

Detection limits for real-time source water monitoring using indigenous freshwater microalgae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research identified toxin detection limits using the variable fluorescence of naturally occurring microalgae in source drinking water for five chemical toxins with different molecular structures and modes of toxicity. The five chemicals investigated were atrazine, Diuron, paraquat, methyl parathion, and potassium cyanide. Absolute threshold sensitivities of the algae for detection of the toxins in unmodified source drinking water were measured. Differential kinetics between the rate of action of the toxins and natural changes in algal physiology, such as diurnal photoinhibition, are significant enough that effects of the toxin can be detected and distinguished from the natural variance. This is true even for physiologically impaired algae where diminished photosynthetic capacity may arise from uncontrollable external factors such as nutrient starvation. Photoinhibition induced by high levels of solar radiation is a predictable and reversible phenomenon that can be dealt with using a period of dark adaption of 30 minutes or more.

Rodriguez Jr, Miguel [ORNL; Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water

13

Go to http://water.usgs.gov/wateralert/ and choose a state, data type, and site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Go to http://water.usgs.gov/wateralert/ and choose a state, data type, and site of interest subscription. Go to http://water.usgs.gov/wateralert/ and choose a State, data type, and site of interest subscription. WaterAlert allows you to receive updates at any of the sites where USGS collects real-time water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

14

Impact of Soil Type and Compaction Conditions on Soil Water Characteristic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Soil Type and Compaction Conditions on Soil Water Characteristic C. J. Miller, M.ASCE1 the variation of water content and pore water suction for compacted clayey soils. The soils had varying amounts of clay fraction with plasticities ranging from low to high plasticity. The unsaturated soil behavior

Yu, Sheng-Tao

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian fresh water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: australian fresh water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy River, Victoria. Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy Summary:...

16

Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

Ken Mortensen

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU Physical Oceanography in global warming are studied using simulations of a climate model in which the freshwater flux changes that the warm climate leads to an acceleration of the global water cycle, which causes freshening in the high

18

Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program was undertaken to enhance the manufacturability, constructability, and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation and Plume Abatement Cooling Tower, giving a validated cost basis and capability. Air2Air{TM} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10% - 25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate). This program improved the efficiency and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation Cooling Tower capability, and led to the first commercial sale of the product, as described.

Ken Mortensen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for cheap shipment of a various payloads (oil, coal and water) over long distances. The article contains a computed macroproject in northwest China for delivery of 24 billion cubic meter of gas and 23 millions tonnes of water annually.

Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

20

BIODIVERSITY Freshwater fish introductions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Freshwater fish introductions in mediterranean-climate regions and fragmenta- tion, hydrological alteration, climate change, overexploitation, pollution and the global mediterranean-climate regions: California (USA), central Chile, south-western Australia, the Iberian peninsula

Olden, Julian D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effect of variation in freshwater inflow on phytoplankton productivity and community composition in galveston bay, texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2050, water regulators and managers are faced with the challenge of meeting human needs, while maintaining essential freshwater inflows into estuarine ecosystems. Galveston Bay is of particular concern because 10 million people currently living within...

Thronson, Amanda Mae

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Estimation of freshwater availability in the West African sub-continent using the SWAT hydrologic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because of the lack of local water and agricultural man- agement information. Ş 2007 Elsevier B.V. All water; Green water; Prediction uncertainty; SUFI-2; dGen Summary Accurate knowledge of freshwater availability is indispensable for water resources management at regional or national level. This information

23

Extremely Luminous Water Vapor Emission from a Type 2 Quasar at Redshift z = 0.66  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for water masers in 47 Sloan Digital Sky Survey Type 2 quasars using the Green Bank Telescope has yielded a detection at a redshift of z = 0.660. This maser is more than an order of magnitude higher in redshift than any previously known and, with a total isotropic luminosity of 23,000 L_sun, also the most powerful. The presence and detectability of water masers in quasars at z ~ 0.3-0.8 may provide a better understanding of quasar molecular tori and disks, as well as fundamental quasar and galaxy properties such as black hole masses. Water masers at cosmologically interesting distances may also eventually provide, via direct distance determinations, a new cosmological observable for testing the reality and properties of dark energy, currently inferred primarily through Type 1a supernova measurements.

Richard Barvainis; Robert Antonucci

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

24

In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part II-evaluation of sorption materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The function and longevity of traditional, passive, isolation caps can be augmented through the use of more chemically active capping materials which have higher sorptive capacities, ideally rendering metals non-bioavailable. In the case of Hg, active caps also mitigate the rate and extent of methylation. This research examined low cost, readily available, capping materials for their ability to sequester Hg and MeHg. Furthermore, selected capping materials were evaluated to inhibit the methylation of Hg in an incubation study as well as the capacity of a selected capping material to inhibit translocation of Hg and MeHg with respect to ebullition-facilitated contaminant transport in a column study. Results indicated that bauxite had a better capacity for mercury sorption than the other test materials. However, bauxite as well as soil capping materials did not decrease methylation to a significant extent. Materials with larger surface areas, higher organic matter and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) content displayed a larger partitioning coefficient. In the incubation experiments, the presence of a carbon source (lactate), electron acceptor (sulfate) and the appropriate strains of SRB provided the necessary conditions for Hg methylation to occur. The column study showed effectiveness in sequestering Hg and MeHg and retarding transport to the overlying water column; however, disturbances to the soil capping material resulting from gas ebullition negated its effectiveness.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Yates, Brian J.; Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)] [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States)] [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Sources and fate of freshwater exported in the East Greenland Current Paul A. Dodd,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources and fate of freshwater exported in the East Greenland Current Paul A. Dodd,1,2 Karen J] Monitoring the sources and fate of freshwater in the East Greenland Current (EGC) is important, as this water, with a significant proportion of sea ice drifting into the Nordic Seas or on to the East Greenland Shelf. We conclude

Naveira Garabato, Alberto

26

GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 23 GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS: SCENARIOS AND IMPACTS Scott C. Neubauer Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt, Dennis Whigham & Andrew Baldwin 2009, viii + 320pp Publishers GmbH This chapter was originally published in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy

Neubauer, Scott C.

27

Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

Hohreiter, D.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Fluid Hegemony: A Political Ecology of Water, Market Rule, and Insurgence at Bangalore's Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a system of local water harvesting that had evolved togethergrey water and freshwater) taps, and harvesting rainwater.of water sources. Already, supported by rainwater harvesting

Ranganathan, Malini

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Effects on Freshwater Organisms of Magnetic Fields Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underwater cables will be used to transmit electricity between turbines in an array (interturbine cables), between the array and a submerged step-up transformer (if part of the design), and from the transformer or array to shore. All types of electrical transmitting cables (as well as the generator itself) will emit EMF into the surrounding water. The electric current will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of animals. Because direct electrical field emissions can be prevented by shielding and armoring, we focused our studies on the magnetic fields that are unavoidably induced by electric current moving through a generator or transmission cable. These initial experiments were carried out to evaluate whether a static magnetic field, such as would be produced by a direct current (DC) transmitting cable, would affect the behavior of common freshwater fish and invertebrates.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Turner, Julie W [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Iceberg water transportation from Antarctica to Australia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The amount of iceberg water that annually dissolves into the sea corresponds to a substantial part of the world’s annual consumption of freshwater. The Australian… (more)

Spandonide, B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Water deuterium fractionation in the inner regions of two solar type protostars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The [HDO]/[H2O] ratio is a crucial parameter for probing the history of water formation. So far, it has been measured for only three solar type protostars and yielded different results, possibly pointing to a substantially different history in their formation. In the present work, we report new interferometric observations of the HDO 4 2,2 - 4 2,3 line for two solar type protostars, IRAS2A and IRAS4A, located in the NGC1333 region. In both sources, the detected HDO emission originates from a central compact unresolved region. Comparison with previously published interferometric observations of the H218$O 3 1,3 - 2 2,0 line shows that the HDO and H$_2$O lines mostly come from the same region. A non-LTE LVG analysis of the HDO and H218$O line emissions, combined with published observations, provides a [HDO]/[H2O] ratio of 0.3 - 8 % in IRAS2A and 0.5 - 3 % in IRAS4A. First, the water fractionation is lower than that of other molecules such as formaldehyde and methanol in the same sources. Second, it is similar t...

Taquet, Vianney; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Neri, Roberto; Kahane, Claudine; Coutens, Audrey; Vastel, Charlotte

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a myriad of uses to which our country's freshwater supply is currently committed. Together with increasing quantities of consumption, there are growing constraints on water availability. In our future there will be two elements of consumption at the forefront of concern: availability and efficiency. Availability of freshwater is the most important of these and is the subject of this report. To use water efficiently, we must first have it. Efficiency is key to ensuring availability for future needs. As population grows and economic and technology demands increase - especially for thermoelectric power - needs for freshwater will also increase. Thus, using our limited supplies of freshwater must be done as efficiently as possible. Thermoelectric generating industry is the largest user of our nation's water resources, including fresh, surface, ground, and saline water. Saline water use accounts for approximately 30% of thermoelectric use, while the remaining 70% is from freshwater sources. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimates that thermoelectric generation accounts for roughly 136,000 million gallons per day (MGD), or 39% of freshwater withdrawals. This ranks slightly behind agricultural irrigation as the top source of freshwater withdrawals in the U.S. in 2000. For Americans to preserve their standard of living and maintain a thriving economy it is essential that greater attention be paid to freshwater availability in efforts to meet energy demands - particularly for electric power. According to projections by the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO 2006) anticipated growth of thermoelectric generating capacity will be 22% between 2005 and 2030. In the 2007 Report, EIA estimates that capacity to grow from approximately 709 GW in 2005 to 862 GW in 20303. These large increases in generating capacity will result in increased water demands by thermoelectric power plants and greater competition over water between the energy sector and domestic, commercial, agricultural, industrial, and instream use sectors. The implications of these increased demands have not been adequately researched. This report is a preliminary effort to explore these implications. In addition, since this report was completed in draft form in 2007, there have been several updates and important issues brought to bear on water for energy that should be mentioned. Uncertainties include drought and climate change impacts. Policies such as commitments to Coal-to-Liquids (CTL) quotas; Ethanol production requirements; Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) mandates; increasing nuclear power plant construction; valuing carbon and carbon dioxide emissions all have significant implications on water use and on the need for water in the power sector by 2025.

David Feldman; Amanda Slough; Gary Garrett

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

WATER DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION IN THE INNER REGIONS OF TWO SOLAR-TYPE PROTOSTARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The [HDO]/[H{sub 2}O] ratio is a crucial parameter for probing the history of water formation. So far, it has been measured for only three solar-type protostars and yielded different results, possibly pointing to a substantially different history in their formation. In the present work, we report new interferometric observations of the HDO 4{sub 2,2}-4{sub 2,3} line for two solar-type protostars, IRAS2A and IRAS4A, located in the NGC 1333 region. In both sources, the detected HDO emission originates from a central compact unresolved region. A comparison with previously published interferometric observations of the H{sub 2}{sup 18}O 3{sub 1,3}-2{sub 2,0} line shows that the HDO and H{sub 2}O lines mostly come from the same region. A non-LTE large velocity gradient analysis of the HDO and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O line emissions, combined with published observations, provides an [HDO]/[H{sub 2}O] ratio of 0.3%-8% in IRAS2A and 0.5%-3% in IRAS4A. First, the water fractionation is lower than that of other molecules such as formaldehyde and methanol in the same sources. Second, it is similar to that measured in the solar-type protostar prototype, IRAS16293-2422, and, surprisingly enough, larger than that measured in NGC 1333 IRAS4B. The comparison of the measured values toward IRAS2A and IRAS4A with the predictions of our gas-grain model GRAINOBLE gives similar conclusions to those for IRAS 16293, arguing that these protostars share a similar chemical history, although they are located in different clouds.

Taquet, V.; Lopez-Sepulcre, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Neri, R. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique (IRAM), 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin dHeres (France); Coutens, A.; Vastel, C. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Plasma Kinetics in the Ethanol/Water/Air Mixture in "Tornado" Type Electrical Discharge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the results of a theoretical and experimental study of plasma-assisted reforming of ethanol into molecular hydrogen in a new modification of the "tornado" type electrical discharge. Numerical modeling clarifies the nature of the non-thermal conversion and explains the kinetic mechanism of nonequilibrium plasma-chemical transformations in the gas-liquid system and the evolution of hydrogen during the reforming as a function of discharge parameters and ethanol-to-water ratio in the mixture. We also propose a scheme of chemical reactions for plasma kinetics description. It is shown that some characteristics of the investigated reactor are at least not inferior to characteristics of other plasma chemical reactors.

Levko, D; Chernyak, V; Olszewski, S; Nedybaliuk, O

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Water+works : a new ecological infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the global water crisis as catalyst, Water+Works acts as a model for a localized water initiative that will mitigate flooding and provide a freshwater resource in times of crisis, while enriching urban ecosystems and ...

Hedstrom, Lisa Kristin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Phytoplankton consists of one-celled marine and freshwater microalgae and other plant-like organisms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phytoplankton consists of one-celled marine and freshwater microalgae and other plant-like organisms. They are used in the production of pharmaceuticals, diet supplements, pigments, and biofuels, taking up carbon dioxide and nutrients from the water and using light as an energy source. The microalgae

Florida, University of

37

Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental Ponds1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENY-670 Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental fish, and supplying water for wildlife, the potential for new mosquito breeding sites is increasing. Small insectivorous fish are a valuable tool in controlling mosquitoes and midges ("blind mosquitoes

Watson, Craig A.

38

Nitrogen Cycling and Ecosystem Exchanges in a Virginia Tidal Freshwater Marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loading due to watershed development and urbanization. We present a process-based mass balance model of N habitats for juvenile fishes, and buffering storm and flood waters (Odum et al. 1984; Mitsch and Gosselink dominated tidal freshwater marsh in the York River estuary, Virginia. The model, which was based

Neubauer, Scott C.

39

NREL Fall 2013 Seminar Series "Using Aquatic Ecosystem Science to Inform Freshwater Resource Use and Sustainability"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected by the combination of physical, biological and chemical transformations within aquatic ecosystems Freshwater Ecosystems" Dec 6 Ted Stets, US Geological Survey Title: "Century of Trends: Historical Perspectives on the Evolution of Water Quality in the US" Dec 13 Brian Bledsoe, CSU's Department of Civil

MacDonald, Lee

40

AQUATIC CONSERVATION: MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst. 17: 361374 (2007)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiversity and are the mainstay of most conservation polices, the coverage of biodiversity by existing PA biodiversity conservation using data records for water beetles in a Mediterranean river basin. 3. Although and natural-flow maintenance are indispensable strategies for freshwater biodiversity conservation. Copyright

Murcia, Universidad de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Accumulation of Am-241 and Cm-244 from water and sediments by Hyalella sp. and Tubifex spp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the bioaccumulation of americium and curium by freshwater invertebrates in laboratory experiments. Uptake by benthic invertebrates will affect both the biogeochemical cycling of these elements and the potential exposure of man through accumulation in aquatic food chains. Am and Cm isotopes are produced by nuclear reactions in commercial reactors and are major components of high level wastes. Both elements bind strongly to sediments which may be the principal source for uptake by benthic organisms in freshwater and marine environments. The principal objectives of this research were: (1) to determine the extent of bioaccumulation of Am and Cm for freshwater species; (2) to compare bioaccumulation from water with bioaccumulation from various types of sediment particles; and (3) to evaluate the similarities and differences in the behavior of Am and Cm.

Sibley, T.H.; Stohr, J.S. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Marine and freshwater fish support important angling industries that provide substantial benefit to local  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marine and freshwater fish support important angling industries that provide substantial benefit, it is important to evaluate how different stressors associated with this type of fishing affect fish survival. What follows is a brief Q & A review on the effects of air exposure. How long can a fish live out

Watson, Craig A.

43

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

Acute lethal toxicity of some reference chemicals to freshwater fishes of Scandinavia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relevance of the choice of a test organism intended to be representative for a given environment seems to be under continual debate in aquatic ecotoxicology. For instance, it is commonly argue that acute toxicity tests with rainbow trout, the species most often recommended as a standard cold water teleost, were not representative for Nordic countries because the species is an alien in local faunas. A comparative study with several freshwater species was therefore initiated to clarify the validity of this assumption. As a first approximation, standard LC 50 assays were conducted. The species used were chosen only on the basis of their local availability, i.e, they randomly represented the fish fauna of Nordic inland waters. Furthermore, inter-species variation of toxicity response was compared with certain other, quantitatively more important, intra-species sources of variability affecting the toxicity of chemicals. Use of reference toxicants has been recommended as a means of standardizing bioassays. Compounds, characteristic of effluents from the pulp and paper industry, were selected for the present study. The toxicity of organic acids such a phenols and resin acids, as well as that of pupmill effluents, strongly depends on water pH. Because of the possibility that species differences could exist in this respect, effects of water acidity on toxicity of these types of substances to a randomly selected local species was investigated. Finally, as an example of the biological source of assay variability, the effect of yolk absorption was studied with a subsequent crisis period due to moderate starvation under laboratory conditions.

Oikari, A.O.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Poly(Pyridinium Phenylene)s: Water-Soluble N-Type Polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poly(pyridinium phenylene) conjugated polymers are synthesized by a cross-coupling and cyclization sequence. These polyelectrolytes are freely soluble in water and display high degrees of electroactivity. When reduced ...

Swager, Timothy Manning

46

TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Publishers, Weikersheim, 2009 Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy attached is provided by Margraf Publishers Gmb

Newman, Michael C.

47

In-Pile SCC Growth Behavior of Type 304 Stainless Steel in High Temperature Water at JMTR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is one of the critical concerns when stainless steel components have been in service in light water reactors (LWRs) for a long period. In general, IASCC can be reproduced on the materials irradiated over a certain threshold fluence level of fast neutron by the post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). It is, however, considered that the reproduced IASCC by PIEs must be carefully compared with the actual IASCC in nuclear power plants, because the actual IASCC occurs in the core under simultaneous effects of radiation, stress and high temperature water environment. In the research field of IASCC, mainly PIEs for irradiated materials have been carried out, because there are many difficulties on SCC tests under neutron irradiation. Hence as a part of the key techniques for in-pile SCC tests, we have embarked on a development of the test technique to obtain information concerning effects of applied stress level, water chemistry, irradiation conditions, etc. A high temperature water loop facility was installed at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) to carry out the in-pile IASCC testing under a framework of cooperative research program between JAERI and the JAPC. In-pile IASCC growth tests have been successfully carried out using the compact tension (CT) type specimens of type 304 stainless steel that had been pre-irradiated up to a neutron fluence level around 1 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} before the in-pile testing since 2004. The tests were carried out in pure water simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) coolant condition. In the paper, results of the in-pile SCC growth tests will be discussed comparing with the result obtained by PIEs from a viewpoint of the synergistic effects on IASCC. (authors)

Yoshiyuki Kaji; Hirokazu Ugachi; Takashi Tsukada; Yoshinori Matsui; Masao Ohmi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Nobuaki Nagata; Koji Dozaki; Hideki Takiguchi [Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Center forCenter for FreshwaterFreshwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cyanobacteria can affect consumption and recreational usage of waters by their unsightliness, taste, and odor across much of the world in cases of toxicosis involving wildlife, pets, and humans. Our laboratory, including vegetation, carrion, animal protein, detritus, and algae. Through direct consumption of algae

New Hampshire, University of

49

Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rooc Z TA245.7 8873 N0.1380 r--- u ----!i -- B-1380 Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes Sterling K. Johnson* Fish grubs are the immature forms of parasitic worms that invade the flesh of fishes. Grubs appear as round or bead...

Johnson, Sterling K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regime on vernal pool hydrology. Freshwater Biology 50:and L. Stromberg. (1998). Hydrology of vernal pools on non-Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools

Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent marine waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEMINAR Diatom Based Quantitative Reconstructions of Summary: . The bay ecosystem is affected by changes in water quality and quantity in the adjacent marine... and freshwater...

52

Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

Routine and Active Metabolic Rates of Migrating Adult Wild Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka Walbaum) in Seawater and Freshwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in freshwater at all swimming speeds except those approaching critical swimming speed. Dur- ing a 45-min- water. When fish performed a second swim test, active meta- bolic rates again remained 28%­81% higher for fish in seawater except at the critical swimming speed. Despite their differences in metabolic rates

Farrell, Anthony P.

54

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal...

55

Monitoring of Total Type II Pyrethroid Pesticides in Citrus Oils and Water by Converting to a Common Product 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring of Total Type II Pyrethroid Pesticides in Citrus Oils and Water by Converting to a Common Product 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid Mark R. McCoy, Zheng Yang, Xun Fu,§ Ki Chang Ahn, Shirley J. Gee an alternative method that converts the type II pyrethroids to a common chemical product, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid

Hammock, Bruce D.

56

Modulating LC-PUFA biosynthesis in freshwater farmed fish.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work focused on the in vivo fatty acid metabolism of freshwater fish, towards minimising the unsustainable use of fish oil in aquaculture feed. A… (more)

Senadheera , Shymalie Dhammika

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

annual continental freshwater: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology Websites Summary: important problems such as assessing the safety of high-level radioactive waste storage facilities Gascoyne of contaminants in freshwater environments....

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - atherinopsid freshwater fishes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Central Plateau, where the Laja River is located, hosts around 100 native freshwater fish... webs. Reservoirs and non-native fishes have altered food webs in Mexican freshwater...

59

Pressure Build-Up During the Fire Test in Type B(U) Packages Containing Water - 13280  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials with content containing liquids requires special consideration. The main focus is on water as supplementary liquid content in Type B(U) packages. A typical content of a Type B(U) package is ion exchange resin, waste of a nuclear power plant, which is not dried, normally only drained. Besides the saturated ion exchange resin, a small amount of free water can be included in these contents. Compared to the safety assessment of packages with dry content, attention must be paid to some more specific issues. An overview of these issues is provided. The physical and chemical compatibility of the content itself and the content compatibility with the packages materials must be demonstrated for the assessment. Regarding the mechanical resistance the package has to withstand the forces resulting from the freezing liquid. The most interesting point, however, is the pressure build-up inside the package due to vaporization. This could for example be caused by radiolysis of the liquid and must be taken into account for the storage period. If the package is stressed by the total inner pressure, this pressure leads to mechanical loads to the package body, the lid and the lid bolts. Thus, the pressure is the driving force on the gasket system regarding the activity release and a possible loss of tightness. The total pressure in any calculation is the sum of partial pressures of different gases which can be caused by different effects. The pressure build-up inside the package caused by the regulatory thermal test (30 min at 800 deg. C), as part of the cumulative test scenario under accident conditions of transport is discussed primarily. To determine the pressure, the temperature distribution in the content must be calculated for the whole period from beginning of the thermal test until cooling-down. In this case, while calculating the temperature distribution, conduction and radiation as well as evaporation and condensation during the associated process of transport have to be considered. This paper discusses limiting amounts of water inside the cask which could lead to unacceptable pressure and takes into account saturated steam as well as overheated steam. However, the difficulties of assessing casks containing wet content will be discussed. From the authority assessment point of view, drying of the content could be an effective way to avoid the above described pressure build-up and the associated difficulties for the safety assessment. (authors)

Feldkamp, Martin; Nehrig, Marko; Bletzer, Claus; Wille, Frank [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 44, 12205 Berlin (Germany)] [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 44, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War: Results from a Global Spatial Time Organizers: Centre for the Study of Civil War, International Peace Research Institute, Oslo (PRIO) & Centre Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War: Results from a Global Spatial Time Series

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE DURING THE LAST DEGLACIATION Anders E the sources of sea level rise and freshwater dis- charge to the global oceans associated with retreat of ice­10 m sea level rise at 19.0­19.5 ka, sourced largely from Northern Hemisphere ice sheet retreat

Carlson, Anders

62

Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global priorities for biodiversity conservation are only as robust as the data used to identify them of freshwater biodiversity patterns. Given that many conservation priorities are currently driven by terrestrialLETTER Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1 , Michele Thieme1

Vermont, University of

63

Freshwater biodiversity conservation: recent progress and future challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater biodiversity conservation: recent progress and future challenges David L. Strayer1 Cary their marine or terrestrial counterparts. Here, we review progress in conservation of freshwater biodiversity of Ecology and Biodiversity, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People

64

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian freshwater fish Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fish Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: australian freshwater fish...

66

Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantial leakage of CO{sub 2} from deep geological strata to shallow potable aquifers is likely to be rare, but chemical detection of potential leakage nonetheless remains an integral component of any safe carbon capture and storage system. CO{sub 2} that infiltrates an unconfined freshwater aquifer will have an immediate impact on water chemistry by lowering pH in most cases and by altering the concentration of total dissolved solids. Chemical signatures in affected waters provide an important opportunity for early detection of leaks. In the presence of CO{sub 2}, trace elements such as Mn, Fe, and Ca can increase by an order of magnitude or more above control concentrations within 100 days. Therefore, these and other elements should be monitored along with pH as geochemical markers of potential CO{sub 2} leaks. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity can also be rapidly responsive to CO{sub 2} and are stable indicators of a leak. Importantly, such changes may be detectable long before direct changes in CO{sub 2} are observed. The experimental results also suggest that the relative severity of the impact of leaks on overlying drinking-water aquifers should be considered in the selection of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. One primary selection criteria should be metal and metalloid availability, such as uranium and arsenic abundance, to carefully monitor chemical species that could trigger changes above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Overall, the risks of leakage from underground CO{sub 2} storage are real but appear to be manageable if systems are closely monitored.

Jackson, Robert

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

D/H isotope ratios of kerogen, bitumen, oil, and water in hydrous pyrolysis of source rocks containing kerogen types I, II, IIS, and III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Immature source rock chips containing different types of kerogen (I,II,IIS,III) were artificially matured in isotopically distinct waters by hydrous pyrolysis and by pyrolysis in supercritical water. Converging isotopic trends of inorganic (water) and organic (kerogen, bitumen, oil) hydrogen with increasing time and temperature document that water-derived hydrogen is added to or exchanged with organic hydrogen, or both, during chemical reactions that take place during thermal maturation. Isotopic mass-balance calculations show that, depending on temperature (310--381 C), time (12--144h), and source rock type, between ca. 45 and 79% of carbon-bound hydrogen in kerogen is derived from water. Estimates for bitumen and oil range slightly lower, with oil-hydrogen being least affected by water-derived hydrogen. Comparative hydrous pyrolyses of immature source rocks at 330 C for 72h show that hydrogen in kerogen, bitumen, and expelled oil/wax ranks from most to least isotopically influenced by water-derived hydrogen in the order IIS {gt} II {approximately} III {gt} I. Pyrolysis of source rock containing type II kerogen in supercritical water at 381 C for 12 h yields isotopic results that are similar to those from hydrous pyrolysis at 250 C for 72 h or 330 C for 133 h. Bulk hydrogen in kerogen contains several percent of isotopically labile hydrogen that exchanges fast and reversibly with hydrogen in water vapor at 115 C. The isotopic equilibration of labile hydrogen in kerogen with isotopic standard water vapors significantly reduces the analytical uncertainty of D/H ratios when compared with simple D/H determination of bulk hydrogen in kerogen. If extrapolation of their results from hydrous pyrolysis is permitted to natural thermal maturation at lower temperatures, the authors suggest that organic D/H ratios of fossil fuels in contact with formation water are typically altered during chemical reactions, but that D/H ratios of generated hydrocarbons are subsequently little or not affected by exchange with water hydrogen at typical reservoir conditions over geologic time. It will be difficult to utilize D/H ratios of thermally mature bulk or fractions or organic matter to quantitatively reconstruct isotopic aspects of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment. Hope resides in compound-specific D/H ratio of thermally stable, extractable biomarkers (molecular fossils) that are less susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water-derived hydrogen.

Schimmelmann, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Wintsch, R.P.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Elevated sulfate reduction in metal-contaminated freshwater lake sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although sulfate-reducing prokaryotes have long been studied as agents of metals bioremediation, impacts of long-term metals exposure on biologically mediated sulfur cycling in natural systems remains poorly understood. The effects of long-term exposure to metal stress on the freshwater sulfur cycle were studied, with a focus on biologic sulfate reduction using a combination of microbial and chemical methods. To examine the effects after decades of adaptation time, a field-based experiment was conducted using multiple study sites in a natural system historically impacted by a nearby zinc smelter (Lake DePue, Illinois). Rates were highest at the most metals-contaminated sites (-35 {mu}mol/cm{sup 3}/day) and decreased with decreased pore water zinc and arsenic contamination levels, while other environmental characteristics (i.e., pH, nutrient concentrations and physical properties) showed little between-site variation. Correlations were established using an artificial neural network to evaluate potentially non-linear relationships between sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and measured environmental variables. SRR in Lake DePue were up to 50 times higher than rates previously reported for lake sediments and the chemical speciation of Zn was dominated by the presence of ZnS as shown by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). These results suggest that long-term metal stress of natural systems might alter the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur by contributing to higher rates of sulfate reduction.

Gough, H.L.; Dahl, A.L.; Tribou, E.; Noble, P.A.; Gaillard, J.-F.; Stahl, D.A. (UWASH); (NWU)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

69

Water-related planning and design at energy firms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water related planning and design at energy firms are examined. By identifying production alternatives and specifying the cost of these alternatives under a variety of conditions, one gains insight into the future pattern of water use in the energy industry and the response of industry to water-related regulation. In Part II, the three principal decisions of industry that affect water allocation are reviewed: where to build plants, where to get water, and how much water to use. The cost of water use alternatives is reviewed. Part III presents empirical data to substantiate the inferences derived from engineering/economic analysis. The source of water, type of cooling system, and pattern of discharge for electric plants constructed during the 1970s or projected to come on line in this decade are reported. In the 1970s in the US, there was a trend away from once-through cooling toward use of evaporative cooling. Freshwater, as a source of supply, and discharge of effluent were standard practice. In the 1980s, almost all new capacity in the states and basins surveyed will use evaporative cooling. It is pointed out that a thorough understanding of industrial water use economics and water markets is a precursor to successful regulation.

Abbey, D; Lucero, F

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A GIS COST MODEL TO ASSESS THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESHWATER, SEAWATER, AND SALINE GROUNDWATER FOR ALGAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a limited techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply, and cost models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that combined, within the coterminous US these resources can support production on the order of 9.46E+7 m3 yr-1 (25 billion gallons yr-1) of renewable biodiesel. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Geographically, water availability is most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate and various saline waters are economically available. As a whole, barren and scrub lands of the southwestern US have limited freshwater supplies so accurate assessment of alternative waters is critical.

Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Evaluation of INL Supplied MOOSE/OSPREY Model: Modeling Water Adsorption on Type 3A Molecular Sieve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate Idaho National Lab’s Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) software in modeling the adsorption of water onto type 3A molecular sieve (3AMS). MOOSE can be thought-of as a computing framework within which applications modeling specific coupled-phenomena can be developed and run. The application titled Off-gas SeParation and REcoverY (OSPREY) has been developed to model gas sorption in packed columns. The sorbate breakthrough curve calculated by MOOSE/OSPREY was compared to results previously obtained in the deep bed hydration tests conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coding framework permits selection of various options, when they exist, for modeling a process. For example, the OSPREY module includes options to model the adsorption equilibrium with a Langmuir model or a generalized statistical thermodynamic adsorption (GSTA) model. The vapor solid equilibria and the operating conditions of the process (e.g., gas phase concentration) are required to calculate the concentration gradient driving the mass transfer between phases. Both the Langmuir and GSTA models were tested in this evaluation. Input variables were either known from experimental conditions, or were available (e.g., density) or were estimated (e.g., thermal conductivity of sorbent) from the literature. Variables were considered independent of time, i.e., rather than having a mass transfer coefficient that varied with time or position in the bed, the parameter was set to remain constant. The calculated results did not coincide with data from laboratory tests. The model accurately estimated the number of bed volumes processed for the given operating parameters, but breakthrough times were not accurately predicted, varying 50% or more from the data. The shape of the breakthrough curves also differed from the experimental data, indicating a much wider sorption band. Model modifications are needed to improve its utility and predictive capability. Recommended improvements include: greater flexibility for input of mass transfer parameters, time-variable gas inlet concentration, direct output of loading and temperature profiles along the bed, and capability to conduct simulations of beds in series.

Pompilio, L. M. [Syracuse University; DePaoli, D. W. [ORNL; Spencer, B. B. [ORNL

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

72

Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen K? x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-?m scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

Ohsuka, Shinji, E-mail: ohsuka@crl.hpk.co.jp [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsu-cho, Nishi-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 431-1202 (Japan); Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); Nakano, Tomoyasu [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); Ray-Focus Co. Ltd., 6009 Shinpara, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-0003 (Japan); Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water–tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water–tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with x{sub TBA} ? 0.03–0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at x{sub TBA} ? 0.05. We note that “islands” of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, x{sub TBA} ? 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman, E-mail: bbagchi@sscu.iisc.ernet.in [SSCU, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)] [SSCU, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water - tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water - tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with $x_{\\text{TBA}} \\approx 0.03 - 0.07$. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at $x_{\\text{TBA}} \\approx 0.05$. We note that "islands" of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak non-linearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, $x_{\\text{TBA}} \\approx 0.45$, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

Saikat Banerjee; Jonathan Furtado; Biman Bagchi

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Effects of liquid pore water on acoustic wave propagation in snow as a Biot-type porous material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method to estimate phase velocity and attenuation of acoustic waves in the presence of liquid water in a snowpack is presented. The method is based on Biot's theory of wave propagation in porous materials. Empirical relations and a priori information is used to characterize snow as a porous material as a function of porosity. Plane wave theory and an equivalent pore fluid are used to solve Biot's differential equations and to asses the impact of the air and water in the pore space. The liquid water in the pore space of a snow pack reduces the velocity of the first compressional wave by roughly 300 m/s for every 0.1 increase in liquid water saturation. Also the attenuation of the compressional waves is increased with increasing liquid water content. Two end member models for compaction are evaluated to asses the importance of an independent density measurement for an estimate of liquid pore water saturation in snow with acoustic waves. The two end members correspond to no compaction at all and to a melting s...

Sidler, Rolf

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Dolomitization by ground-water flow systems in carbonate platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dolomite occurs throughout the subsurface of modern carbonate platforms such as the Bahamas. Groundwater flow systems must be responsible for delivery of reactants needed for dolomitization. Reflux, freshwater lens flows, and thermal convection are large-scale flow systems that may be widespread in active platforms. The author has evaluated some aspects of the dynamics and characteristics of these processes with ground-water flow theory and by scaled sandbox experiments. Reflux is not restricted to hypersaline brines, but can occur with bankwaters of only slightly elevated salinity such as those found on the Bahama Banks today (42%). The lack of evaporites in a stratigraphic section, therefore, does not rule out the possibility that reflux may have operated. Flows associated with freshwater lenses include flow in the lens, in the mixing zone, and in the seawater beneath and offshore of the lens. Upward transfer of seawater through the platform margins occurs when surrounding cold ocean water migrates into the platform and is heated. This type of thermal convection (Kohout convection) has been studied by Francis Kohout in south Florida. The ranges of mass flux of magnesium in these processes are all comparable and are all sufficient to account for young dolomites beneath modern platforms. Each process yields dolomitized zones of characteristic shape and location and perhaps may be distinguishable in ancient rocks. The concepts presented here may have application to exploration for dolomite reservoirs in the Gulf Coast and elsewhere.

Simms, M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the effect on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields (EMF) created by the projects. The submerged electrical generator will emit an EMF into the surrounding water, as will underwater cables used to transmit electricity from the generator to the shore, between individual units in an array (inter-turbine cables), and between the array and a submerged step-up transformer. The electric current moving through these cables will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of fish and benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011). Those experiments found little indication that the behaviors of these freshwater species were a

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types of water management organizations, environmental NGOs,environmental policy and integrated water management hasenvironmental and water infrastructure stakeholders involved in Bay Area water management.

Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Effects of atrazine and nicosulfuron on freshwater microalgae Christophe Leboulanger*, Frederic Rimet, Mathilde Heme de Lacotte, Annette Berard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of atrazine and nicosulfuron on freshwater microalgae Christophe Leboulanger*, Fre, freshwater microalgae are often used as test organisms in laboratory ecotoxicological inves- tigations (USEPA

Jacquet, Stéphan

80

Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui Abstract Five species of freshwater green algae, including three strains of Botryococcus braunii (two in the algae, including alkadienes, botryococcenes, heptadecenes, fatty acids, and phytadiene, were measured

Sachs, Julian P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

Minnesota, University of

82

Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited growth rate effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and spe- cies. Organic Geochemistry. Two species of freshwater green algae, Eudorina unicocca and Volvox aureus, were grown in batch

Sachs, Julian P.

83

Determining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of freshwater into the bay. A second model using Sr2+ /Ca2+ ratios was developed to discern fresh groundwater. Florida . Submarine groundwater discharge Introduction The timing and sources of freshwater deliveryDetermining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge

Miami, University of

84

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

85

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Modeling blue and green water availability in Africa Jurgen Schuol,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling blue and green water availability in Africa Ju¨rgen Schuol,1,2 Karim C. Abbaspour,1 Hong a semidistributed hydrological model SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool), the freshwater components blue water. J. B. Zehnder (2008), Modeling blue and green water availability in Africa, Water Resour. Res., 44

87

Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;i Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China Bachelor Thesis Civil, Yangling, China Keywords: Agricultural crops, water footprint, Shaanxi province, CROPWAT #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT The water footprint, introduced by professor A.Y. Hoekstra, is an indicator of freshwater use

Vellekoop, Michel

88

The Nexus of Energy & Water APS, Berkeley, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater Is A Small Part of the Total Supply Liquid Assets, Jill Boberg, RAND #12;Michael E. Webber, Ph There Are Two Main Cooling Approaches Open-Loop Cooling Closed-Loop Cooling Most water that is withdrawn and Water 16 March 5, 2011 The Thermoelectric Power Sector Uses Water for Cooling Withdrawals [gal

Kammen, Daniel M.

89

Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War: Results from a Global Spatial Time, Asker, near Oslo, 21­23 June 2005 Organizers: Centre for the Study of Civil War, International Peace War: Results from a Global Spatial Time Series Analysis1 Abstract We investigated the relationship

Columbia University

90

Hydrothermal interaction of crushed Topopah Spring tuff and J-13 water at 90, 150, and 250{sup 0}C using Dickson-type, gold-bag rocking autoclaves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Package Environment subtask of the Waste Package task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project, experiments were conducted to study the hydrothermal interaction of rock and water representative of a potential high-level waste repository in tuff. These experiments used crushed Topopah Spring tuff from both drillcore and outcrop samples. The data, when considered in conjunction with results from analogous experiments using solid wafers of tuff, define near-field repository conditions and can be used to assess the ability to use "accelerated" tests based on the surface area/volume (SA/V) parameter and temperature; allow the measurement of chemical changes due to reaction in phases present in the tuff before reaction; and permit the identification and chemical analysis of secondary phases resulting from hydrothermal reactions. Some of the results presented in this report have been used to demonstrate the usefulness of geochemical modeling in a repository environment using the EQ3/6 thermodynamic/kinetic geochemical modeling code. The tuff was reacted with a natural ground water in Dickson-type gold-bag rocking autoclaves that were periodically sampled under in situ conditions. Five short-term (<90-day) experiments using crushed tuff were run covering the range 90 to 250{sup 0}C and 50 to 100 bars. This report will focus on the results of experiments with crushed tuff, while a companion report will cover results of analogous short-term experiments run with solid waters of tuff.

Knauss, K.G.; Beiriger, W.J.; Peifer, D.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Future Water Supply and Demand in the Okanagan Basin, British Columbia: A Scenario-Based Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. An integrated water management model (Water Evaluation and Planning system, WEAP) was used to consider future . Reservoir management . Instream flows . Mountain Pine Beetle Water Resour Manage (2012) 26:667­689 DOI 10 misperception of an abundance of renewable freshwater has inhibited integrated planning for water management

92

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage climate system sim- ulated by earth system models (ESMs). The continental freshwater reservoirs represent

Ribes, Aurélien

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - anoxic freshwater sediments Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on diffusion, was quantified in freshwater sediments at submillimeter resolution. Sediment cores... the sediment surface. In clayey and silty sediments from the oxic ( 80 m...

94

E-Print Network 3.0 - american freshwater routing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin at Madison Collection: Geosciences 5 Freshwater biodiversity conservation: recent progress and future challenges Summary: and journals...

95

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydroelectricity for agriculture and hydroelectricity. Large volumes of waterElectricity Production Hydroelectricity The most common type

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Water Use Permitting (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Withdrawers in the Great Lakes Basin who withdraw water in quantities that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period are required to get a water use permit. Two types of water...

97

Lawn Water Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties...

McAfee, James

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

98

Complex hydraulic and substrate variables limit freshwater mussel species richness and abundance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex hydraulic and substrate variables limit freshwater mussel species richness and abundance. We examined how substrate and complex hydraulic variables limit the distribution of freshwater mussels. We sampled mussels and measured substrate and hydraulic variables (at low and high flows) at 6

Vaughn, Caryn

99

Climate change and standing freshwaters: informing adaptation strategies for conservation at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and standing freshwaters: informing adaptation strategies for conservation received 26 July 2012 Climate change will have a major impact on freshwater environments globally and producing well-informed climate change adaptation strategies is a priority. Links between climate, hydrology

Hammerton, James

100

The potential impacts of climate-change policy on freshwater use in thermoelectric power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential impacts of climate-change policy on freshwater use in thermoelectric power generation to generate electricity. We analyze what these changes could entail for electricity generation in the United carbon prices (4$50/tonne CO2), however, retrofitting coal plants to capture CO2 increases freshwater

Jackson, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing Freshwater flux Latent heat flux Longwave radiation Satellite remote sensing Sea surface flux estimation Sensible heat flux Shortwave radiation Surface wind fields 2 #12;Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat

Yu, Lisan

102

early 800 native fish species in 36 families inhabit the freshwater rivers, streams, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N early 800 native fish species in 36 families inhabit the freshwater rivers, streams, and lakes of the United States and Canada. North America has the most diverse temperate freshwater fish fauna in the world. Only about 5 percent of these are the familiar sport or game fishes like trout and bass. The remaining

Liskiewicz, Maciej

103

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

COLLINS, KELLY ALYSSA. A Field Evaluation of Four Types of Permeable Pavement with Respect to Water Quality Improvement and Flood Control. (Under the direction of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Water Quality Improvement and Flood Control. (Under the direction of Dr.William F. Hunt.) In North were compared to permeable pavement exfiltrate quality for pH and concentrations of total nitrogen (TN capabilities in reducing runoff, but are not credited for improving water quality. To further test

Hunt, William F.

106

Nitrogen Dynamics in Sandy Freshwater Sediments (Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of added 15NH4 + from lake water passing over dark sediment cores. Sediment-water fluxes of nitrogen at the sediment- water interface is derived from ammonium pro- duced from organic matter mineralization in surface ABSTRACT. Sediment-water nitrogen fluxes and transformations were examined at two sites in Sagi- naw Bay

107

Waterways Centre for Freshwater Management University of Canterbury & Lincoln University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, runanga and environmental consultancies · Water-dependent industries such as hydroelectricity, irrigation

Hickman, Mark

108

Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewater and other Freshwater Disasters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater flooding can seriously affect soil fertility and the physical and chemical properties of soil. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded soil. Having the soil tested for microbes, pesticides, hydrocarbons and other contaminants...

Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.; Pitt, John L.; McFarland, Mark L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

CILIATE-SYMBIONT SPECIFICITY OF FRESHWATER ENDOSYMBIOTIC CHLORELLA (TREBOUXIOPHYCEAE, CHLOROPHYTA)1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CILIATE-SYMBIONT SPECIFICITY OF FRESHWATER ENDOSYMBIOTIC CHLORELLA (TREBOUXIOPHYCEAE, CHLOROPHYTA)1 of Chlorella symbioses in invertebrates and protists has attracted much interest, but the uncertain taxonomy Chlorella isolated from pelagic ciliate species of dif- ferent lakes, Paramecium bursaria symbionts

Sommaruga, Ruben

110

Climate change impacts on freshwater recreational fishing in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We estimated the biological and economic impacts of climate change on freshwater fisheries in the United States (U.S.). Changes in stream temperatures, flows, and the spatial extent of suitable thermal habitats for fish ...

Jones, Russell

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial freshwater lakes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

were abundant in the upper St. Lawrence River and on an artificial reef in central Lake Erie. A small... death of zebra mussel colonies by freshwater sponges in ... Source:...

112

Secondary metabolite gene expression and interplay of bacterial functions in a tropical freshwater cyanobacterial bloom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) appear to be increasing in frequency on a global scale. The Cyanobacteria in blooms can produce toxic secondary metabolites that make freshwater dangerous for drinking and ...

Penn, Kevin

113

Magnitude and spatio-temporal variability of methane emissions from a eutrophic freshwater lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and it can significantly impact global climate change. Considerable amounts of methane can be released to the atmosphere from freshwater lakes, ...

Varadharajan, Charuleka, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Time-series analysis of high-resolution ebullition fluxes from a stratified, freshwater lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] Freshwater lakes can emit significant quantities of methane to the atmosphere by bubbling. The high spatial and temporal heterogeneity of ebullition, combined with a lack of high-resolution field measurements, has made ...

Varadharajan, Charuleka

115

Ice Shelf Water plume flow beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Shelf Water plume flow beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica Paul R. Holland,1 Daniel L Filchner- Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica and its underlying ocean cavity. Ice Shelf Water (ISW) plumes are initiated by the freshwater released from a melting ice shelf and, if they rise, may become supercooled

Feltham, Daniel

116

Global impacts of conversions from natural to agricultural ecosystems on water resources: Quantity versus quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for $90% of global freshwater consumption. Irrigation based on surface water reduced streamflow and raised is a critical issue because 1.1 billion of the world's 6 billion people lack access to safe drinking water [World Health Organization, 2003]. Agricultural food pro- duction accounted for an average of $90

Scanlon, Bridget R.

117

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Anaerobic Redox Cycling of Iron by Freshwater Sediment Microorganisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for microbially-mediated anaerobic redox cycling of iron (Fe) was examined in a first-generation enrichment culture of freshwater wetland sediment microorganisms. MPN enumerations revealed the presence of significant populations of Fe(III)-reducing (ca. 108 cells mL-1) and Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organisms (ca. 105 cells mL-1) in the sediment used to inoculate the enrichment cultures. Nitrate reduction commenced immediately following inoculation of acetate-containing (ca. 1 mM) medium with a small quantity (1% vol/vol) of wetland sediment, and resulted in the transient accumulation of NO2- and production of a mixture of end-products including NH4+. Fe(III) oxide (high surface area goethite) reduction took place - after NO3- was depleted and continued until all the acetate was utilized. Addition of NO3 after Fe(III) reduction ceased resulted in the immediate oxidation of Fe(II) coupled to reduction of + NO3-to NH4 . No significant NO2- accumulation was observed during nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. No Fe(II) oxidation occurred in pasteurized controls. Microbial community structure in the enrichment was monitored by DGGE analysis of PCR amplified 16s rDNA and RT-PCR amplified 16S rRNA, as well as by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries for four different time points during the experiment. Strong similarities in dominant members of the microbial community were observed in the Fe(III) reduction and nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation phases of the experiment, specifically the common presence of organisms closely related (= 95% sequence similarity) to the genera Geobacter and Dechloromonas. These results indicate that the wetland sediments contained organisms such as Geobacter sp. which are capable of both + dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction and oxidation of Fe(II) with reduction of NO3-reduction to NH4 . Our findings suggest that microbially-catalyzed nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation has the potential to contribute to a dynamic anaerobic Fe redox cycle in freshwater sediments.

Weber, Karrie A.; Urrutia, Matilde M.; Churchill, Perry F.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Selecting a new water heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the types of water heaters available (storage water heaters, demand water heaters, heat pump water heaters, tankless coil and indirect water heaters, and solar water heaters). The criteria for selection are discussed. These are capacity, efficiency rating, and cost. A resource list is provided for further information.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Federal Water Use Indices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Seasonal patterns in energy partitioning of two freshwater marsh ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The study period included several wet and dry seasons and variable water levels, allowing us to gain better and affect the magnitude of seasonal change in water levels through water loss as LE (evapotranspiration (ET that produce considerable variation in the hydrologic cycle, affecting nutrient delivery, ecosystem primary

122

Consumption of freshwater fish in Kahnawake: Risks and benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kahnawake is a Mohawk community located on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River near Montreal. A comprehensive study was conducted in 1996--1997 to address the local concern regarding health risks of contaminant exposure associated with freshwater fish consumption. Forty-two participants, including most of the identified active fishermen were interviewed. Walleye, perch, bullhead, and smallmouth bass were the species most consumed. Average daily intake of locally caught fish was 23 g/day. Nutrient and contaminant levels of locally collected fish were analyzed. Fish were good sources of protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, calcium, zinc, and iron. Levels of cadmium, lead, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other chlorinated pesticides were at least 10 times lower than the guideline levels. Mercury levels of some predatory fish exceeded the guideline of 0.5 {micro}g/g. Average daily intakes of all contaminants were below the guideline levels by a factor of 10 except for mercury. Average mercury intake rate was about one-third that of the guideline level. Contrary to residents` perception, Kahnawake fish were not particularly contaminated. In view of the nutritional as well as cultural benefits, fishing and fish consumption may be promoted.

Chan, H.M.; Trifonopoulos, M.; Ing, A.; Receveur, O. [McGill Univ., Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec (Canada)] [McGill Univ., Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec (Canada); Johnson, E. [Kahnawake Environment, Quebec (Canada)] [Kahnawake Environment, Quebec (Canada)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy intensive of the four types—consume 2,951 kWh of electricity per million gallons (3.8 million liters) of treated water

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

TYPES OF FLOODING IN AUSTRALIA Floods are part of the natural water cycle or a "Hydrologic Cycle". In this natural cycle, the energy of the sun causes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to carry the water that has entered the river network, and the banks overflow. The area that gets inundated an emergency kit containing: o a first aid kit o a torch and portable radio with spare batteries o candles records, including wills, birth/marriage certificates, banking, financial records, etc · keep a list

Greenslade, Diana

125

LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiéro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER of the Nhecolândia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland in Brazil, is the presence of both saline and freshwater manuscript, published in "Wetlands 22, 3 (2002) 528-540" DOI : 10.1672/0277-5212(2002)022[0528:GOWAGW]2.0.CO

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Geothermal aquaculture: a guide to freshwater prawn culture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological data of the Malaysian prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, are summarized. A history on its rearing techniques is given, but through the use of geothermal water or industrial warm water effluent, its range can be expanded. The use of wasted geothermal water at the Oregon Institute of Technology for prawn ponds is noted. Pond management and design; the hatchery design and function for larval culture; and geothermal applications (legal aspects and constraints) are discussed. (MCW)

Hayes, A.; Johnson, W.C.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

australian freshwater fishes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in fish is a regulated, cellular process. The ambient water is an additional magnesium source for fish, implicating the gills as a secondary route for magnesium uptake. Certainly,...

128

Energy and Water Flux during Terrestrial Estivation and Overland Movement in a Freshwater Turtle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distance gained in this energy "trade-off" fits our previous observations that more tur- tles estivate when, energy allocated to one function is typically unavailable for others. Owing to these trade of energy trade-offs are for reproductive effort, where individuals may cease foraging and expend variable

Canberra, University of

129

i.-NOTES ON THE FRESH-WATER 'FISHES OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, By W, C. KENDALL.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was very limited, the areas examined comparatively circutnscrlbedv aud the facilities for collecting was once conducted, it has been abandoned. Alewives are caught in Deunys River, and three salmon weirs River, once very important, has been almost entirely abandoned, though of late years it has shown slight

130

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than standard storage water heaters [2]. However, they aredown for both storage-type water heaters and tankless water1]. The typical water heater storage tank wastes energy to

Lu, Alison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Use of Copper in Freshwater Aquaculture and Farm Craig Watson and Roy P.E. Yanong2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FA-13 Use of Copper in Freshwater Aquaculture and Farm Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Roy P.E. Yanong2 1 Dean Introduction Copper has been used for many years as a chemical tool in freshwater farm ponds of copper is that there is a thin line that separates effective treatment levels from overdoses, which can

Watson, Craig A.

132

amazonian freshwater turtles: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of organic C in Amazonian Dark Earths 25 February 2007 Abstract Amazonian Dark Earths (ADE) are a unique type of soils developed through reserved. 0016-7037 - see...

133

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

134

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation of surface flux adjustments made to the initial NCEP re-analysis-1 products. During the state estimation the boundary current regions, they are consistent with known large-scale deficiencies in the NCEP products

135

Dr. Caroline Schmidt University Tuebingen 1) Iron cycling in freshwater and marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sediments Freshwater and marine sediments show a clear redox stratification which fluctuates in dimensions resolution distribution and interconnections between Fe- and N-redox processes in profundal lake sediments sediments. Geomicrobiology J., in press. #12;Melton, E.D., Schmidt, C., Kappler, A. (2012) Mircrobial iron

Ould Ahmedou, Mohameden

136

Climate Change Vulnerability of Native and Alien Freshwater Fishes of California: A Systematic Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Vulnerability of Native and Alien Freshwater Fishes of California: A Systematic and climate change vulnerability scores were derived for 121 native and 43 alien fish species. The two scores baseline and greater climate change vulnerability than did alien species. Fifty percent of California

137

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes in Freshwater Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes in Freshwater Sediments: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4314671@jstor.org. . Springer and Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve

Palmer, Margaret A.

138

Photosynthetic and growth responses of three freshwater algae to phosphorus limitation and daylength  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photosynthetic and growth responses of three freshwater algae to phosphorus limitation., green alga Sphaerocystis schroeteri and cyanobacterium Phormidium luridum, were grown under contrasting of the green alga S. schroeteri decreased the most (ca. sixfold) under P limitation compared with the other two

Bossard, Peter

139

Introduction to Freshwater Fish Parasites 1 RuthEllen Klinger and Ruth Francis Floyd2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CIR716 Introduction to Freshwater Fish Parasites 1 RuthEllen Klinger and Ruth Francis Floyd2 1 Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place , Dean Introduction Fish culture as a hobby or business is well established in Florida. Increased interest in fish culture has also

Watson, Craig A.

140

Abrupt Climate Change linked to Sea-level Rise from Freshwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abrupt Climate Change linked to Sea-level Rise from Freshwater Outbursts affecting the THC Matt-sheet decay, sea-level rise and abrupt climate change · Torbjorn E. Tornqvist, Marc P. Hijma, 2012. Reduced) Flesche Kleiven, et al., 2008. #12;Overview · Holocene sea level rise · Tornqvist and Hijima ­ Lake

Fountain, Andrew G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Deep-Sea Research I 52 (2005) 519542 Davis Strait volume, freshwater and heat fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle is a complex combination of land runoff, precipitation, ice freezing­melting and input of salty that the freshwater flux coming out of Baffin Bay asso- ciated with the sea ice melting in that area repre- sents 70 to the melting of ice drifting with the shelf Labrador Current (Khatiwala et al., 2002). Hud- son Bay runoff

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Freshwater conservation options for a changing climate in California's Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater conservation options for a changing climate in California's Sierra Nevada Joshua H, and all ignore anticipated impacts of climate change. We recommend that (1) existing legislation be fully, widespread loss in amphibian abundance and increases in non-native species. California's Mediterranean

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

143

Anti-predatory behaviour of wild-caught vs captive-bred freshwater angelfish, Pterophyllum scalare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anti-predatory behaviour of wild-caught vs captive-bred freshwater angelfish, Pterophyllum scalare of captive bred and wild caught individuals have been observed recurrently. In fish, hatchery raised. Wild-caught and captive-bred fish were exposed to a natural predator and measured for their anti

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

144

Growth rate and mortality of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata, in four freshwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth rate and mortality of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata, in four freshwater, Queensland, Australia Abstract Growth and total mortality of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata impoundments, ranging from 5.0 to 7.8 cm yr)1 among fish 20-cm total length (TL) and 1.7 to 4.9 cm yr)1 among

Wilde, Gene

145

A realistic freshwater forcing protocol for ocean-coupled climate models J. van den Berk a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a b s t r a c t A high-end scenario of polar ice loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet is presented with sepa- rate projections for different mass-loss sites up to the year 2100. For each large ice through melt of drifting ice- bergs. The location and relative magnitude of freshwater forcing due

146

Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae Manier nanoparticle (nCeO2) suspensions, towards freshwater micro-algae assessing the effect nCeO2 suspensions microscopy (TEM). In addition, the interaction between NPs and algae were investigated using flow

Boyer, Edmond

147

Organic carbon flux at the mangrove soil-water column interface in the Florida Coastal Everglades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??????????????????.?.. 24 8 Salinity vs. DOC concentration plot of water samples during study sampling periods????????????..??????.??. 32 viii LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 delta13C values and amount of DOC... leached over a 24-hour period for three mangrove species and one freshwater marsh sedge???...? 25 2 Comparison of DOC and TOC concentrations of various wetland studies..?????????????????????????. 28 3 Estimates of net...

Romigh, Melissa Marie

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Agreements --Europe 77 78 Atlas of International Freshwater Agreements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Countries km2 % Romania 228,500 28.93 Hungary 92,800 11.74 Austria 81,600 10.32 Yugoslavia (Serbia on transboundary waters between Hungary and Ukraine September 30, 1997 Danube, Prut, Siret, Tisza Romania; Ukraine Agreement between the government of Romania and the government of Ukraine on cooperation in the field

Wolf, Aaron

150

APPLIED ISSUES Biomanipulation: a useful tool for freshwater wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this paper we show that biomanipulation may have a strong potential for wetland eutrophication abatement variability, eutrophication sources and gradients of wind exposure and water colour. Keywords: eutrophication the structure and function of many natural wetlands have been severely altered by eutrophication, which has

McMaster University

151

Freshwater Biology (1997) 37, 149161 SPECIAL APPLIED ISSUES SECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to similar storm events. A distributed parameter model linked to a geographical information system predicted for joint management of land and water remains poorly understood. An interdisciplinary case study of a river in small urban areas. More recently, the amount of agricultural land has declined and forested land has

Allan, David

152

Understanding barotrauma in fish passing hydro structures: a global strategy for sustainable development of water resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Freshwater fishes are one of the most imperiled groups of vertebrates and species declines have been linked to a number of anthropogenic influences. This is alarming as the diversity and stability of populations are at risk. In addition, freshwater fish serve as important protein sources, particularly in developing countries. One of the focal activities thought to influence freshwater fish population declines is water resource development, which is anticipated to increase over the next several decades. For fish encountering hydro structures, such as passing through hydroturbines, there may be a rapid decrease in pressure which can lead to injuries commonly referred to as barotraumas. The authors summarize the research to date that has examined the effects of rapid pressure changes on fish and outline the most important factors to consider (i.e., swim bladder morphology, depth of acclimation, migration pattern and life stage) when examining the susceptibility of barotraumas for fish of interest.

Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Boys, Craig A.; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Silva, Luiz G.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mallen-Cooper, Martin; Phonekhampeng, Oudom; Thorncraft, Garry; Singhanouvong, Douangkham

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

153

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Texas Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Texas Surface Water Quality Standards 30 TAC Chapter 307 Lori Hamilton Water Quality Standards of the water quality standards for a water body will be conducted Types of UAAs Aquatic Life Use (ALU) UAAs 2 procedures in conjunction with Standards revision Before Conducting a UAA Coordinate with your TCEQ project

155

Variation of Fish Habitat and Extent of the Low-Salinity Zone with Freshwater Flow in the San Francisco Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prey, and fish early-life histories to striped bass Moroneby striped bass larvae. Trans Am Fish Soc 117(1):72–77.fish, freshwater flow, resource selec- tion function, delta smelt, longfin smelt, striped bass,

Kimmerer, Wim J.; MacWilliams, Michael L.; Gross, Edward S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Countervailing effects of atrazine on water recreation: How do recreators evaluate them?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Carpenter [1997], the value of freshwater ecosystem services, such as those provided by Clinton Lake to Lawrence residents, can be quite large. Estimates of such values can help to clarify the stakes in environmental debates, including the evaluation... the two dimensions. [7] By examining recreators’ responses to these potential trade-offs involving water quality, our analysis sheds new light on the societal valuation of water resources. This improved understanding facilitates well-informed ecological...

Earnhart, Dietrich H.; Smith, Val H.

2003-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

The LBNL Water Heater Retail Price Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

display the distribution of water heater models by fee typeelectric and gas-fired water heaters, respectively. DeliveryDistribution of Electric Water Heaters by Fee Type Figure B-

Lekov, Alex; Glover, Julie; Lutz, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Toxicity of ammonia to larvae of the freshwater shrimp, Macrobrachium rosenbergii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to larval and juvenile shrimps (Armstrong et al. , 1976; Wickins, 1976) and to fish (Russo et al. , 1974", Smith and Williams, 1974", Smith and Russo' 1975; Crawford and Allen, 1977; Thurston et al. , 1978; Wedemeyer and Yasutake, 1978) and can.... Although the toxicity of ammonia to freshwater shrimp larvae has been reported by Armstrong et al. (1978), other aspects require further investigation before a reliable estimate of safe concentrations can be esta'blished. This study, which examines...

Llobrera, Jose Alvarez

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Identification of the essential and free amino acids of the freshwater shrimp, Macrobrachium ohione  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to protein and other compounds. Shewbart et al (1973) list total lipid content for Penaeus astecue as 2. 0% and ash as 3. 91% (whole carcase measurement). If these data are applicable for Hacrohrachium ohione, then the experimental values are reasonable... IDENTIFICATION OF THE ESSENTIAL AND FREE AMINO ACIDS OF THE FRESHWATER SHRIMP, MACROBRACHIUN OH?ONE A Thesis by LESTER SHIGEMI MIYAJIMA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Miyajima, Lester Shigemi

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Helminth Parasites of Freshwater Fishes of the Pnuco River Basin, East Central Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helminth Parasites of Freshwater Fishes of the Pµnuco River Basin, East Central Mexico GUILLERMO Biologi´a, Universidad Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Apartado Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Me´xico D. F., Mexico (e-mail: gsalgado@mail.ibiologia.unam.mx), 2 Laboratorio de Ictiologi´a y Limnologi´a, Escuela

Mercado-Silva, Norman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Incipient toxicity of lithium to freshwater organisms representing a salmonid habitat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because the eventual development of fusion power reactors could increase the mining, use and disposal of lithium five-fold by the year 2000, potential effects from unusual amounts of lithium in aquatic environments were investigated. Freshwater oganisms representing a Pacific Northwest salmonid habitat were exposed to elevated conentrations of lithium. Nine parameters were used to determine the incipient toxicity of lithium to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), insect larvae (Chironomus sp.), and Columbia River periphyton. All three groups of biota were incipiently sensitive to lithium at concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 1 mg/L. These results correspond with the incipient toxicity of beryllium, a chemically similar component of fusion reactor cores. A maximum lithium concentration of 0.01 mg/L occurs naturally in most freshwater environments (beryllium is rarer). Therefore, a concentration range of 0.01 to 0.1 mg/L may be regarded as approaching toxic concentrations when assessing the hazards of lithium in freshwaters.

Emery, R.; Klopfer, D.C.; Skalski, J.R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Property:Water Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead Jump to:TechnologyUtilityLocation Jump to:ft Wave

163

The ecology and emergence of diseases in fresh waters PIETER T. J. JOHNSON AND SARA H. PAULL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ecology and emergence of diseases in fresh waters PIETER T. J. JOHNSON AND SARA H. PAULL tumours in Tasmanian devils, Correspondence: Pieter T. J. Johnson, Ramaley N122, CB334, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, U.S.A. E-mail: pieter.johnson@colorado.edu Freshwater Biology (2011) 56, 638

Johnson, Pieter

164

Biodiversity in Inland Waters --Priorities for its Protection and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Biodiversity Conservation in Freshwaters - brought together scientists, policy makers and managers to exchange ideas on the issues and challenges confronting the conservation of freshwater biodiversity in Australia in freshwater systems. Biodiversity conservation has received significant attention over the past decade

Canberra, University of

165

Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Drinking Water Problems: Corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drinking Water Problems: Corrosion Mark L. McFarland, Tony L. Provin, and Diane E. Boellstorff and fail. Corrosion can cause three types of damage: · The entire metal surface gradually thins and red (Fig. 1). · Deep pits appear that can penetrate pipe or tank walls. This type of corrosion may not add

167

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

168

Drain-Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

works well with all types of water heaters, especially with demand and solar water heaters. Drain-water heat exchangers can recover heat from the hot water used in showers,...

169

Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Green Water on Ship Decks Marilena Greco  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Norway #12;Steps of Physical Investigation Water shipping scenarios Green-water kinematics and loads Dam-Breaking (DB) type Dam DB #12;Water-on-Deck Scenarios #12;Water-on-Deck Scenarios Plunging-wave;Water-on-Deck Scenarios Existence diagram Dam-Breaking events Plunging wave plus Dam-Breaking events

Nørvåg, Kjetil

171

Automatic underwater radiotelemetry system to monitor temperature responses of fish in a freshwater environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated radiotelemetry system developed to monitor body and water temperature of free-swimming fish is described. The receiving and data acquisition unit can be programmed to monitor as many as 16 transmitters (fish); each transmitter can time-multiply data from up to 9 resistive transducers. A typical transmitter with saddle-type attachment, suitable for fish weighing 1 to over 10 kg, has a submerged weight of less than 10 g. The typical range is 2700 m for fish 1 m below the surface. Complete schematics and operational logic are provided for the receiver and data processing printed circuit boards, for 3 types of fish transmitters, and for an environmental parameter monitor. Construction methods, calibration and tagging procedures, and the required computer programs are detailed. This system was in operation for 3 years at the Point Beach Nuclear Power Plant, Two Creeks, Wisconsin. Of the 89 fish tagged, 77 fish provided useable body and water temperature information with tracking times ranging from 0.5 to 505 hours. Modifications which would further improve the system's reliability are discussed.

Prepejchal, W.; Thommes, M.M.; Spigarelli, S.A.; Haumann, J.R.; Hess, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Full Water Disposal Ways and Study on Central Air-conditioning Circulation Cooling Water System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with automatic inspection, control the condense times and installing toroidal swirl type filtering water purifier. We have solved the water quality fundamentally of the circulation cooling water. This way will make the chem..with medicine more reliable...

Zhang, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Climate Change Vulnerability of Freshwater Fishes of the San Francisco Bay Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and require releases of water from dams. Estuary-dependentof vegetation, lowering of water tables, and pollution Ruralto habitat quality from water removal, streambed alteration,

Quińones, Rebecca M.; Moyle, Peter B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Evaluation of Common Angling-Induced Sources of Epithelial Damage for Popular Freshwater Sport Fish using Fluorescein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Angling is a popular recreational activity across the globe and a large proportion of fish captured by anglers are released due to voluntary or mandatory catch-and-release practices. The handling associated with hook removal and return of the fish to their environment can cause physical damage to the epidermal layer of the fish which may affect the condition and survival of released fish. This study investigated possible sources of epithelial damage associated with several different handling methods (i.e. landing net types, interactions with different boat floor surfaces, tournament procedures) commonly used in recreational angling for two popular freshwater sport fish species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius). Epithelial damage was examined using fluorescein, a non-toxic dye, which has been shown to detect latent epithelial damage. Northern pike exhibited extensive epithelial damage after exposure to several of the induced treatments (i.e., interaction with a carpeted surface, knotted nylon net, and line rolling) but relatively little epithelial damage when exposed to others (i.e., knotless rubber nets, smooth boat surfaces, or lip gripping devices). Largemouth bass did not show significant epithelial damage for any of the treatments, with the exception of fish caught in a semi-professional live release tournament. The detection of latent injuries using fluorescein can be an important management tool as it provides visual examples of potential damage that can be caused by different handling methods. Such visualizations can be used to encourage fish friendly angler behaviour and enhance the survival and welfare of released fish. It can also be used to test new products that are intended to or claim to reduce injury to fish that are to be released. Future research should evaluate the relationship between different levels of epithelial damage and mortality across a range of environmental conditions.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Cooke, Steven J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Are there signs of acidification reversal in freshwaters of the low mountain ranges in Germany? Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 367378 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are there signs of acidification reversal in freshwaters of the low mountain ranges in Germany? 367 in freshwaters of the low mountain ranges in Germany? C. Alewell1 , M. Armbruster2 , J. Bittersohl3 , C.D. Evans4 of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany 2 Institute of Soil Science, Technical University of Dresden, D-01735

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

176

Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters, a conclusion Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 589595 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters, a conclusion 589 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 589595 (2004) © EGU Sustainability of UK forestry entitled Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters by presenting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Anaerobic oxidation of methane in an iron-rich Danish freshwater lake sediment Katrin a. Nori,a,* Bo Thamdrup,a and Carsten J. Schubert b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic oxidation of methane in an iron-rich Danish freshwater lake sediment Katrin a´. Norði Freshwater systems are identified as one of the main natural methane sources, but little is known about the importance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in these systems. We investigated AOM in a lake sediment

Wehrli, Bernhard

178

Water vulnerabilities for existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Water consumption by all users in the United States over the 2005-2030 time period is projected to increase by about 7% (from about 108 billion gallons per day [bgd] to about 115 bgd) (Elcock 2010). By contrast, water consumption by coal-fired power plants over this period is projected to increase by about 21% (from about 2.4 to about 2.9 bgd) (NETL 2009b). The high projected demand for water by power plants, which is expected to increase even further as carbon-capture equipment is installed, combined with decreasing freshwater supplies in many areas, suggests that certain coal-fired plants may be particularly vulnerable to potential water demand-supply conflicts. If not addressed, these conflicts could limit power generation and lead to power disruptions or increased consumer costs. The identification of existing coal-fired plants that are vulnerable to water demand and supply concerns, along with an analysis of information about their cooling systems and related characteristics, provides information to help focus future research and development (R&D) efforts to help ensure that coal-fired generation demands are met in a cost-effective manner that supports sustainable water use. This study identified coal-fired power plants that are considered vulnerable to water demand and supply issues by using a geographical information system (GIS) that facilitated the analysis of plant-specific data for more than 500 plants in the NETL's Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) (NETL 2007a) simultaneously with 18 indicators of water demand and supply. Two types of demand indicators were evaluated. The first type consisted of geographical areas where specific conditions can generate demand vulnerabilities. These conditions include high projected future water consumption by thermoelectric power plants, high projected future water consumption by all users, high rates of water withdrawal per square mile (mi{sup 2}), high projected population increases, and areas projected to be in a water crisis or conflict by 2025. The second type of demand indicator was plant specific. These indicators were developed for each plant and include annual water consumption and withdrawal rates and intensities, net annual power generation, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. The supply indictors, which are also area based, include areas with low precipitation, high temperatures, low streamflow, and drought. The indicator data, which were in various formats (e.g., maps, tables, raw numbers) were converted to a GIS format and stored, along with the individual plant data from the CPPDB, in a single GIS database. The GIS database allowed the indicator data and plant data to be analyzed and visualized in any combination. To determine the extent to which a plant would be considered 'vulnerable' to a given demand or supply concern (i.e., that the plant's operations could be affected by water shortages represented by a potential demand or supply indicator), criteria were developed to categorize vulnerability according to one of three types: major, moderate, or not vulnerable. Plants with at least two major demand indicator values and/or at least four moderate demand indicator values were considered vulnerable to demand concerns. By using this approach, 144 plants were identified as being subject to demand concerns only. Plants with at least one major supply indicator value and/or at least two moderate supply indicator values were considered vulnerable to supply concerns. By using this approach, 64 plants were identified as being subject to supply concerns only. In addition, 139 plants were identified as subject to both demand and supply concerns. Therefore, a total of 347 plants were considere

Elcock, D.; Kuiper, J.; Environmental Science Division

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Geography 347: Water as a Resource Lecture Schedule -Fall, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Use; types, patterns & trends; Agricultural; Thermoelectric cooling and industry Ch.17 Th Water Tu Guest Lecture or film: TBA -------- Th Thanksgiving Break, Nov. 22 -------- 15 Tu Environmental

James, L. Allan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recreational uses. ?The Commission will seek substantial additional public comment on any proposed changes to the standards before adopting them into the state admin- istrative code,? Davenport said. ?Because of the com- plexity and regulatory importance... Conservation Board?s state watershed coordinator, said the standards for contact recreation, with only a few exceptions, are uniformly applied regardless of water body type or the actual level of recreation use. ?Because a minimum of 10 water samples over a...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of desalination research. The primary technological method of generating additional water supplies is through desalination and enhanced water reuse and recycling technologies....

184

Accumulation and distributions of {sup 137}Cs in fresh water snail Pila ampullacea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pila ampullacea are found in tropical freshwaters of Indonesia. This snail exhibit several characteristics of ideal indicator organisms in order to understand the bioaccumulation of {sup 137}Cs. Biokinetic experiment was performaced in aquaria system and under influenced of concentration K{sup +} in water. The result of experiment shown that Under difference K{sup +} concentration in water, Pila ampullacea have capability to accumulated {sup 137}Cs with CF value range 8.95 to 12.52 ml.g{sup ?1}. Both uptake and depuration rate were influenced by concentration of K{sup +} in water.

Suseno, Heny, E-mail: henis@batan.go.id [Marine Radioecology Group, Center for Radiation Safety Technology and Metrology - National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Kotak Pos 7043 JKSKL Jakarta Selatan 12070 (Indonesia)

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

A cure? A way to sustain our environment? Solutions to help preserve the world's freshwater? A groundbreaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Bioproducts for a Sustainable Future Energy and Mineral Resources: Technology and Public Policy institutions positioned to help solve global challenges at the intersection of human, animal and environmental's Freshwater Resources give.usask.ca/online #12; In the 1940s and`50s, the U of S was a pioneer in the use

Saskatchewan, University of

186

Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Droplet-Type Microemulsions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a molecular thermodynamic theory for droplet-type microemulsions, both water-in-oil and oil/W) or spherical water droplets dispersed in a continuous medium of oil (water-in-oil microemulsions, W/O). The OMolecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Droplet-Type Microemulsions Livia A. Moreira and Abbas

Firoozabadi, Abbas

187

Hardness of water.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project is helpful to those people who live in the coastal based and they are suffering every year with problem of safe drinking water and not available throughout the year. It has given ideas, technology and economical way of solution for water crisis and it’s also solving problem of scare by use of different methods to development evelopment new water source in water scare area of Saurashtra and Kutch in Gujarat. Saurashtra land is containing of different types of minerals specially bauxite, calcite, fluoride so many mineral based industries are developed here and those who continuous nuous need this as raw materials and they used many mines and processes units. These minerals are creating problem to polluted ground water some are melting and increasing TDS more than 6000 mg/l and

Rahul Oza

188

Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Marketing water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management, water conservation programs Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 17 public information programs and materials that increase awareness about regional water issues. The company recently opened the TecH2O, a water resource learning center...tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Projected freshwater withdrawals in the United States under a changing climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

withdrawals in the United States under a changing climate, Water Resour. Res., 49, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20076. 1. Introduction [2] Offstream water use in the United States increased over 10-fold during the twentieth century future water use in the United States assuming that water supply will be no less limiting to future

RamĂ­rez, Jorge A.

191

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering (First printing) By Larry W. Mays Corrections as of 4.8.2 should read, "Water flows in a rectangular channel ..." Chapter 3 Page 46 Delete second equal sign 5.3.1, steep S1 the type of flow is "subcritical" not "supercritical" Page 110 Figure 5

Mays, Larry W.

192

Water Sim 5.0 Model API Both researchers and water managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Sim 5.0 Model API Both researchers and water managers indicated that a different type not similar between different researchers and between different water managers. Thus it would not be possible that implements a simplified visual interface to the model is provided as an example of using the What is Water

Hall, Sharon J.

193

High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity, Polymer-type Membranes Based on Disulfonated Poly(arylene ether) Block and Random Copolymers Optionally Incorporating Protonic Conducting Layered Water insoluble Zirconium Fillers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research group has been engaged in the past few years in the synthesis of biphenol based partially disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) random copolymers as potential PEMs. This series of polymers are named as BPSH-xx, where BP stands for biphenol, S stands for sulfonated, H stands for acidified and xx represents the degree of disulfonation. All of these sulfonated copolymers phase separate to form nano scale hydrophilic and hydrophobic morphological domains. The hydrophilic phase containing the sulfonic acid moieties causes the copolymer to absorb water. Water confined in hydrophilic pores in concert with the sulfonic acid groups serve the critical function of proton (ion) conduction and water transport in these systems. Both Nafion and BPSH show high proton conductivity at fully hydrated conditions. However proton transport is especially limited at low hydration level for the BPSH random copolymer. It has been observed that the diffusion coefficients of both water and protons change with the water content of the pore. This change in proton and water transport mechanisms with hydration level has been attributed to the solvation of the acid groups and the amount of bound and bulk-like water within a pore. At low hydration levels most of the water is tightly associated with sulfonic groups and has a low diffusion coefficient. This tends to encourage isolated domain morphology. Thus, although there may be significant concentrations of protons, the transport is limited by the discontinuous morphological structure. Hence the challenge lies in how to modify the chemistry of the polymers to obtain significant protonic conductivity at low hydration levels. This may be possible if one can alter the chemical structure to synthesize nanophase separated ion containing block copolymers. Unlike the BPSH copolymers, where the sulfonic acid groups are randomly distributed along the chain, the multiblock copolymers will feature an ordered sequence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments. If, like in Nafion, connectivity is established between the hydrophilic domains in these multiblock copolymers, they will not need as much water, and hence will show much better protonic conductivity than the random copolymers (with similar degree of sulfonation, or IEC) at partially hydrated conditions. The goal of this research is to develop a material suitable for use as a polymer electrolyte membrane which by the year 2010 will meet all the performance requirements associated with fuel cell operation at high temperatures and low relative humidity, and will out-perform the present standard Nafion{reg_sign}. In particular, it is our objective to extend our previous research based on the use of thermally, oxidatively, and hydrolytically, ductile, high Tg ion containing polymers based on poly(arylene ethers) to the production of polymer electrolyte membranes which will meet all the performance requirements in addition to having an areal resistance of < 0.05 ohm-cm{sup 2} at a temperature of up to 120 C, relative humidity of 25 to 50%, and up to 2.5 atm total pressure. In many instances, our materials already out performs Nafion{reg_sign}, and it is expected that with some modification by either combining with conductive inorganic fillers and/or synthesizing as a block copolymer it will meet the performance criteria at high temperatures and low relative humidity. A key component in improving the performance of the membranes (and in particular proton conductivity) and meeting the cost requirements of $40/m{sup 2} is our development of a film casting process, which shows promise for generation of void free thin films of uniform thickness with controlled polymer alignment and configuration.

McGrath, James E.; Baird, Donald G.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

194

UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................ Sidney Area Deals with Drought 6................ Water and Electricity Are Inseparable 10's East Campus. "Consolidating administration,faculty and staff and facilities is costeffectiveandper or commercial products constitute endorsement by the U.S. Government. WATER CURRENT Water Center University

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

195

UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSIDE UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT PROTECTING NEBRASKAĂ­S WATER RESOURCES THROUGH RESEARCH with a vision, thereĂ­s an untapped market using resources right under our feet,Ă® the University of Nebraska outdoors in India, Bangladesh, China and Viet- nam. Thousands of them have been grown to harvest

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

196

Water Conservation and Water Use Efficiency (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wisconsin has several statutes that promote water conservation and controlled water use, and this legislation establishes mandatory and voluntary programs in water conservation and water use...

197

Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: Lutz J.D. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution

198

Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

Chen, Tsuhan

199

Literature review of the concentration ratios of selected radionuclides in freshwater and marine fish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentration ratios (CR's) used for modeling the uptake and food chain transport of radionuclides in fish have usually been conservative; that is, at the high end of reported values. This practice ensures that the dose to the consumer of contaminated fish will not be underestimated. In many models, however, conservative values have been used for all variables that have any uncertainty associated with them. As a result the dose to the consumer is overestimated. Realistic CR values need to be developed to establish model parameters that will accurately reflect tissue burdens in fish and resulting dose rates to consumers. This report reviews and summarizes published literature on the uptake and distribution of stable and radioactive isotopes of 26 elements. Based on this review, we have made recommendations on CR values to be used for modeling the accumulation of radionuclides in fish. Our recommendations are compared with CR values reported in other publications. A generic discussion of abiotic and biotic factors that influence CR values is provided so that CR values may be adjusted based on site-specific characteristics of the fishes habitat. Recommended CR values for freshwater fish and for marine fish are listed. Although this report emphasizes radionuclides, it is applicable to stable elements as well.

Poston, T.M.; Klopfer, D.C.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Computerized Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ing 2002?2005 and documented in TWRI?s Technical Report 284 released in January 2006, include: ? Capabilities for short-term reliability analyses based on current storage conditions (Or what is the likelihood of meeting water needs in the near... System Reference Manual. TWRI Technical Report 255, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Water Rights Analysis Package Modeling System Users Manual. TWRI Technical Report 256, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Fundamentals of Water Availability Modeling...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

202

Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Management This department applies multi-disciplinary science and technology-based modeling to assess complex environmental systems. It integrates ecology, anthropology, and...

203

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can accumulate to harmful levels in drinking water. As radionuclides decay, they emit radioactive parti- cles such as alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Each type of particle produces different effects on humans. Alpha particles... penetrating, alpha particles cause more damage per unit volume than do beta particles or gamma rays. Beta particles and gamma rays deposit their ener- gy over longer distances. Beta particles can be stopped by a piece of wood or a thin sheet of metal...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

204

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. ­ 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive ­ Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or

Boisvert, Jeff

205

Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants: Evaluation of the combined cost of makeup water treatment and increased condenser fouling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology is presented to calculate the total combined cost (TCC) of water sourcing, water treatment and condenser fouling in the recirculating cooling systems of thermoelectric power plants. The methodology is employed to evaluate the economic viability of using treated municipal wastewater (MWW) to replace the use of freshwater as makeup water to power plant cooling systems. Cost analyses are presented for a reference power plant and five different tertiary treatment scenarios to reduce the scaling tendencies of MWW. Results indicate that a 550 MW sub-critical coal fired power plant with a makeup water requirement of 29.3 ML/day has a TCC of $3.0 - 3.2 million/yr associated with the use of treated MWW for cooling. (All costs USD 2009). This translates to a freshwater conservation cost of $0.29/kL, which is considerably lower than that of dry air cooling technology, $1.5/kL, as well as the 2020 conservation cost target set by the U.S. Department of Energy, $0.74/kL. Results also show that if the available price of freshwater exceeds that of secondarytreated MWW by more than $0.13-0.14/kL, it can be economically advantageous to purchase secondary MWW and treat it for utilization in the recirculating cooling system of a thermoelectric power plant.

Walker, Michael E.; Theregowda, Ranjani B.; Safari, Iman; Abbasian, Javad; Arastoopour, Hamid; Dzombak, David A.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Miller, David C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An evaluation of legal strategies for protecting freshwater inflows into Texas estuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The term "coastal area" includes the bed and waters of the Gulf of Mexico within the jurisdiction of Texas, and "coastal public land" includes state-owned submerged land and the water overlying that land. The power to purchase land, therefore, might well... include the power to purchase water rights. However, the purchases which are authorized appear to be restricted to areas specifically designated as preserves or recreation areas, rather than to an estuary system as a whole. The interests may...

Kelly, Sharon Marie

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Public Health Surveillance of Toxic Cyanobacteria in Freshwater Systems Using Remote Detection Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vicinity of the Klamath Hydroelectric Project: April, MayReport, Klamath Hydroelectric Project, Water Resources.2010). "Klamath River Hydroelectric Project Overview."

Mackie, Trina Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Improvements and assessments of water auditing techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tasks by default are considered ?unaccounted-for-water?. The object of task four is to identify potential water losses and estimate the volumes of each type of loss. These losses can include accounting errors, unauthorized connections, evaporation... from the system (leaks). There are two additional phrases associated with the Manual M36 audit. ? Accounted-for-water is defined as ?water that is either metered or used for an authorized, unmetered use? (AWWA 1999). ? Unaccounted-for...

Meyer, Sarah Ruth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Laboratory Studies of the Short-term Responses of Freshwater Fish to Electromagnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies are being proposed as an environmentally preferred means of generating electricity from river and tidal currents. Among the potential issues that must be investigated in order to resolve environmental concerns are the effects on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields created by underwater generators and transmission cables. The behavioral responses of common freshwater fishes to static and variable electromagnetic fields (EMF) that may be emitted by hydrokinetic projects were evaluated in laboratory experiments. Various fish species were exposed to either static (DC) EMF fields created by a permanent bar magnet or variable (AC) EMF fields created by a switched electromagnet for 48 h, fish locations were recorded with a digital imaging system, and changes in activity level and distribution relative to the magnet position were quantified at 5-min intervals. Experiments with fathead minnows, redear sunfish, striped bass, lake sturgeon, and channel catfish produced mixed results. Except for fathead minnows there was no effect on activity level. Only redear sunfish and channel catfish exhibited a change in distribution relative to the position of the magnet with an apparent attraction to the EMF source. In separate experiments, rapid behavioral responses of paddlefish and lake sturgeon to onset of the AC field were recorded with high-speed video. Paddlefish did not react to a variable, 60-Hz magnetic field like that which would be emitted by an AC generator or cable, but lake sturgeon consistently responded to the variable, AC-generated magnetic field with a variety of altered swimming behaviors. These results will be useful for determining under what circumstances cables or generators need to be positioned to minimize interactions with sensitive species.

Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, D.M.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

211

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Performance Evaluation of Hot Water Efficiency Plumbing System Using Thermal Valve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Korea two popular water distribution systems—the branch type and the separate type systems—have serious drawbacks. The branch type suffers from temperature instability while the separate type suffers from excessive piping. Neither of them re...

Cha, K. S.; Park, M. S.; Seo, H. Y.

213

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................... 193 Lesson 11 Water and Pollution........................................................................................................................ 195 Activity 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere...! ............................................................................. 205 Record Sheet 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere! ..................................................................... 207 Activity 11.2, Pollution at Its Source...

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

214

Water Privatisation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

Zölls, Elisa

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

The potential for phosphorus pollution remediation by calcite precipitation in UK freshwatersHydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(1), 119131 (2001) EGS The potential for phosphorus pollution remediation by calcite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

119 The potential for phosphorus pollution remediation by calcite precipitation in UK freshwatersHydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(1), 119­131 (2001) © EGS The potential for phosphorus pollution remediation carbonate to reduce phosphate pollution in freshwaters by co-precipitation, a process known as a "self

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

216

Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the amount and type of precipitation that falls across the western United States. Research shows a trend1 Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you Water is a crucial, industry, energy, recreation, and the natural resources we manage and care about. While most citizens

217

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas-fired Storage Water Heater .. 418 Assess California’s Small Gas Storage Water Heaters Small Gas Storage Water Heater Market The objective of

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

Peplow, Dan

1999-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources regulates the use and diversion of surface waters. An entity that creates additional stream volumes by releases from impoundments built and financed by...

222

An experimental study on the effects of an upstream gate valve on the accuracy of an insertion type flowmeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flowmeters measure the consumption of chilled water or hot water in buildings. Depending on the accuracy, cost consideration, and available space, the flowmeter selected could be an insertion type or fixed type such as orifices or venturi meters...

Wornyoh, Emmanuel Yao Atsu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie M.; Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Measure Guideline: Transitioning to a Tankless Water Heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Measure Guideline provides information to help residential builders and retrofitters with the design, specification, selection, implementation, installation, and maintenance issues of transitioning from tank-type water heaters to tankless water heaters. The report compares the differences between tankless and tank-type water heaters, highlighting the energy savings that can be realized by adopting tankless water heaters over tank-type water heaters. Selection criteria and risks discussed include unit sizing and location, water distribution system, plumbing line length and diameter, water quality, electrical backup, and code issues. Cost and performance data are provided for various types of tankless and tank-type water heaters, both natural gas fired and electric. Also considered are interactions between the tankless water heater and other functional elements of a house, such as cold water supply and low-flow devices. Operating costs and energy use of water distribution systems for single- and two-story houses are provided, along with discussion of the various types of distribution systems that can be used with tankless water heaters. Finally, details to prepare for proper installation of a tankless water heater are described.

Brozyna, K.; Rapport, A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: · Investment allocated

Boisvert, Jeff

226

The responses of freshwater macroinvertebrates to different wavelengths in submerged aquatic light traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

macroinvertebrate taxa were significantly more attracted to certain wavelengths of light, and that the green and yellow lightsticks attracted more individual macroinvertebrates than the other colors. Tests also were conducted using water samples and organisms from a...

Moeller, Edward F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs) · Audience: homeowners Outcome 4: Increase water reuse and recycling programs · Example program: Water harvesting ­ rain barrels and cisterns · Audience: home owners #12;: Water conservation. Conserve Florida's finite water resources by teaching rural, suburban and urban

Kane, Andrew S.

228

Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

229

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Health and water quality monitoring of Pure Home Water's ceramic filter dissemination in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pure Home Water (PHW) is a social enterprise that promotes and disseminates household drinking water technologies in the Northern Region of Ghana. Currently their main product is a pot-shaped Potters for Peace-type ceramic ...

Johnson, Sophie M. (Sophie Marie)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in water heater. Scale buildup in pipes and re duced water flow. Hard water due to calcium and magnesiumHousehold Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension Many areas have water containing impurities from natural or artificial sources. These impurities may

Liskiewicz, Maciej

233

Grabbing water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

UNH Center for Freshwater Biology Research 6(3): 45-62 (2004) An ecological assessment of the trophic structure of York Pond in Coos County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as nutrient loading through poor farming practices, development of wetland systems and riparian zonesUNH Center for Freshwater Biology Research 6(3): 45-62 (2004) An ecological assessment composition and interspecific interactions), which is the driving force behind biocomplexity of the ecosystem

New Hampshire, University of

235

Alternatives for reducing hot-water bills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two stage approach to reducing residential water heating bills is described. In Stage I, simple conservation measures were included to reduce the daily hot water energy consumption and the energy losses from the water tank. Once these savings are achieved, Stage II considers more costly options for further reducing the water heating bill. Four alternatives are considered in Stage II: gas water heaters; solar water heaters (two types); heat pump water heaters; and heat recovery from a heat pump or air conditioner. To account for variations within the MASEC region, information on water heating in Rapid City, Minneapolis, Chicago, Detroit, and Kansas City is presented in detail. Information on geography, major population centers, fuel prices, climate, and state solar incentives is covered. (MCW)

Bennington, G.E.; Spewak, P.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Types of Reuse  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

237

Depositional Influences on Porewater Arsenic in Sediments of a Mining-Contaminated Freshwater Lake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arsenic-containing minerals mobilized during mining activities and deposited to Lake Coeur d'Alene (CDA), Idaho sediments represent a potential source of soluble As to the overlying water. Our objective was to delineate the processes controlling porewater As concentrations within Lake CDA sediments. Sediment and porewater As concentrations were determined, and solid-phase As associations were probed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Although maximum As in the sediment porewaters varied from 8.4 to 16.2 microM, As sorption on iron oxyhydroxides at the oxic sediment-water interface prevented flux to overlying water. Floods deposit sediment containing variable amounts of arsenopyrite (FeAsS), with majorfloods depositing large amounts of sediment that bury and preserve reduced minerals. Periods of lower deposition increase sediment residence times in the oxic zone, promoting oxidation of reduced minerals, SO4(2-) efflux, and formation of oxide precipitates. Depositional events bury oxides containing sorbed As, transitioning them into anoxic environments where they undergo dissolution, releasing As to the porewater. High Fe:S ratios limit the formation of arsenic sulfides in the anoxic zone. As a result of As sequestration at the sediment-water interface and its release upon burial, decreased concentrations of porewater As will not occur unless As-bearing erosional inputs are eliminated.

Toevs, G.; Morra, M.J.; Winowiecki, L.; Strawn, D.; Polizzotto, M.L.; Fendorf, S.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

238

Freshwater flooding from rivers, overflowing sewage and septic systems and other sources can have a signifi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there is no hazardous flood debris such as pro- pane tanks, pressurized-gas cylinders, refrigerators, air conditioners/sewer lines and oil/ gas pipelines, but you will be told whether or not you will have to contact those will locate all electrical, natural gas, communications and telephone lines.It may or may not locate water

239

Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health). Water Safety Plans A Water Safety Plan (WSP) is a preventive management approach used to manage threats to a drinking water system--from catchment to consumer. It helps in the · Management of activities

240

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

Saldin, Dilano

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water Supply and Demand Jim Schneider, Ph · How Nebraska manages water · Dealing with uncertain water supplies: adaptive management #12;Regional-wide, systematic approach · Flexible--Adaptive Management Adaptive Manageme nt #12;Integrated Water Management

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

242

Water Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water...

243

Protected Water Sources (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter designates protected water sources, which are subject to additional special conditions regarding water use. Permit applications for water withdrawals from these sources may still be...

244

Storm Water Analytical Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL...

245

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

246

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2013 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

247

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

248

Efficient Water Use & Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goals Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL....

249

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition InformationInteractionsWater

250

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtectiveWaste to beswim WatchingWaterW

251

Economic-Engineering Optimization for California Water Andrew J. Draper1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale water resources optimization models driven by economic objective functions are both possible-term value for all types of water resources analysis. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0733-9496 2003 129:3 155 CE Database recycling, water transfers among water users, water use efficiency and demand management, as well

Pasternack, Gregory B.

252

Evidence for ground-water circulation in the brine-filled aquitard, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical methods were used to assess active ground-water circulation in a brine-filled, deep (> 50 m below land surface) aquitard underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. In places, the brine which was presumed to be stagnant in the past, contains various contaminants. If ground-water circulation is viable in the brine-containing formations, then remediation or containment of the deep-seated contaminants should be considered a high priority. Data used to determine this included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the aquitard, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) vertical temperature gradients, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline ground water. Conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and fresh-water-(< 500 mg/l) bearing units. Consequently, influx of young water (and contamination) from land surface does occur. Potential discharge into the shallow aquifers was assumed where the hydraulic head of the saline water was higher than that in the shallow aquifers, accounting for temperature and salinity anomalies observed close to land surface. The confined water (and dissolved solutes) move along open conduits at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units.

Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

254

Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

Cadeddu, Maria

256

Water watch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Water Resources Policy & Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

Buehrer, R. Michael

258

Water Sustainability Program Challenges to Sustainable Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Drought, Climate Change · Growth and the need for additional supplies · Water and Energy · Water the Southwest, nation, semi-arid and arid regions, and the world. · Today's program provides just a glimpse to and utilization of renewable supplies · Transboundary water issues · The surface water/groundwater interface

Cushing, Jim. M.

259

Typed Self-Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type T y[O]. The operator IsIs is self-applicative, in thatargument t is any of Is[O] or IsIs, and otherwise behavesproof constant introduced by IsIs proves that the type of t

Brown, Matt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Water Footprint | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Footprint Blue water represents water withdrawn from surface water and groundwater for feedstock irrigation and refinery processing. Blue water represents water withdrawn from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (< 30 psi) is less than half the pressure on the 7th floor (>80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled “Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River.” Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

263

Ultimate lower lethal temperature of red drum Sciaenops Ocellatus as a function of water hardness and salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S UE PR OCAR ION E Approved as to style and content by: William H. Neill ( Chair of Committee) Edwin H. Robinson (Member ) ff y D. Hart ( Member) Dav id . Schmidly (Head o Department) Dec ember 1 986 ABSTRACT Ult' t L L th l t p t f R D D ~p... in water as cold as 2 C in both Texas (Simmons and Breuer 1962) and Florida (Springer 1960). In contr ol led experiments, Miranda and Sonski (in pr ess) found the median lower-lethal temperatur e for 25- and 15-C-acclimated red drum in freshwater...

Procarione, Lynne S

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Document Type: Subject Terms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Authors: Source: Document Type: Subject Terms: Abstract: Full Text Word Count: ISSN at creating team results. In fact, it's priceless. Managers in Western corporations have received a lifetime

Major, Arkady

266

LONG-TERM GLOBAL WATER USE PROJECTIONS USING SIX SOCIOECONOMIC SCENARIOS IN AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FRAMEWORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we assess future water demands for the agricultural (irrigation and livestock), energy (electricity generation, primary energy production and processing), industrial (manufacturing and mining), and municipal sectors, by incorporating water demands into a technologically-detailed global integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change – the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Base-year water demands—both gross withdrawals and net consumptive use—are assigned to specific modeled activities in a way that maximizes consistency between bottom-up estimates of water demand intensities of specific technologies and practices, and top-down regional and sectoral estimates of water use. The energy, industrial, and municipal sectors are represented in fourteen geopolitical regions, with the agricultural sector further disaggregated into as many as eighteen agro-ecological zones (AEZs) within each region. We assess future water demands representing six socioeconomic scenarios, with no constraints imposed by future water supplies. The scenarios observe increases in global water withdrawals from 3,578 km3 year-1 in 2005 to 5,987 – 8,374 km3 year-1 in 2050, and to 4,719 – 12,290 km3 year-1 in 2095. Comparing the projected total regional water withdrawals to the historical supply of renewable freshwater, the Middle East exhibits the highest levels of water scarcity throughout the century, followed by India; water scarcity increases over time in both of these regions. In contrast, water scarcity improves in some regions with large base-year electric sector withdrawals, such as the USA and Canada, due to capital stock turnover and the almost complete phase-out of once-through flow cooling systems. The scenarios indicate that: 1) water is likely a limiting factor in climate change mitigation policies, 2) many regions can be expected to increase reliance on non-renewable groundwater, water reuse, and desalinated water, but they also highlight an important role for development and deployment of water conservation technologies and practices.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Moss, Richard H.; Kim, Son H.

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities Overview...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

geothermal operations, and power cycles. Process freshwater efficiency in carbon capture, bioenergy feedstock production, and industrial processes can be improved. 9 Figure 8....

268

Water Use and Quality Assessment | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy security and climate change, and not on the possible effects increased biofuel production may have on the quality and quantity of local and regional freshwater...

269

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14 Water Pollution #12;Factory-style hog farms in North Carolina Each pig produces, September 1999. #12;Hogs killed by flooding #12; Water pollution Common water pollutants Treating water pollution Wastewater treatment and renovation Learning Objectives #12; Water pollution refers

Soerens, Thomas

270

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

271

Grains, Water Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grains, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near the Shore Surf Induced Sand Dynamics Discussion Dry Granular Flows, Water Waves & Surf, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

272

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculationsheat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for...

274

A Study of the Occurrence of Supercooling of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water supercooling has received considerable research attention. The parameters influencing supercooling include the initial temperature of the water and the temperature of the chilling medium. In this study, we investigated an additional parameter, the type of chilling medium. We correlated the occurrence of supercooling with the minimum temperature anywhere in the water. If the minimum temperature is higher, ice nucleation is unlikely and supercooling will take place. Besides distilled water, we also investigated supercooling of water found in nature, and found that impurities in such water do not facilitate ice nucleation.

Tan, K -C; Katz, J I; Feng, S -J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part I—Bench-scale microcosm study to assess methylmercury production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absence of an aqueous inorganic Hg spike, and the presence/absence of inoculums of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) commonly found in the natural sediments of aquatic environments. Incubations were analyzed for both the rate and extent of (methylmercury) MeHg production. Methylation rates were estimated by analyzing MeHg and Hg after 2, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days. The production of metabolic byproducts, including dissolved gases as a proxy for metabolic utilization of carbon substrate, was also monitored. In all treatments amended with lactate, sulfate, Hg, and SRB, MeHg was produced (37 ng/g-sediment dry weight) after only 48 h of incubation and reached a maximum sediment concentration of 127 ng/g-sediment dry weight after the 42 day incubation period. Aqueous phase production of MeHg was observed to be 10 ng/L after 2 day, reaching a maximum observed concentration of 32.8 ng/L after 14 days, and declining to 10.8 ng/L at the end of the incubation period (42 day). The results of this study further demonstrates that, in the presence of an organic carbon substrate, sulfate, and the appropriate consortia of microorganisms, sedimentary Hg will be transformed into MeHg through bacterial metabolism. Further, this study provided the basis for evaluation of an in-situ subaqueous capping strategy that may limit (or potentially enhance) MeHg production. -- Highlights: • Hg methylation by SRB is limited by the depletion of sulfate and carbon. • Hg methylation is sensitive to competition by methanogens for carbon substrate. • In high lactate environment, all lactate was utilized in the microcosms within seven days. • In the absence of adequate metabolic fuel, MeHg levels decreased on the time scale of days to weeks. • Capping materials should sequester MeHg produced and not contribute to the production of MeHg.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States)] [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States); Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)] [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

current pricing policies and legal structures. In analyzing energy-water relationships, wasteful may be obscured by others such as energy, environment, and quality of life, but in the long run of water to all major social issues is finally driven home. The energy crisis is a case in point. Water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

277

Remote Sensing of WaterRemote Sensing of WaterRemote Sensing of Water One of the most pressing resource issues facing humanity in the 21st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(World Meteorological Organization (WMO), Comprehensive Assessment of the Freshwater Resources), Comprehensive Assessment of the Freshwater Resources of the World (WMO, Geneva, 1997), p. 9.). #12;A 1997 assessment by the United Nations estimates that approximately one-third of the world's population lives

278

Water Rights (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality regulates the water rights for the state of Texas. Water and state water may be appropriated, stored, or diverted in the state of Texas for beneficial...

279

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews...

Adler, J.

280

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power plants, water withdrawals for electricity generationelectricity generation in 2009 (33). Water used in thermal electric power plantsplant with CCS technologies requires roughly 1,000 gallons of water for every megawatt-hour of electricity generation (

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. , Groves D. California Water 2030: An Efficient Future,Preemption of California’s Water Conservation Standards for2Epdf Biermayer P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Water cooling of HVDC thyristor valves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is generally accepted that water is a very effective medium to remove heat losses from any type of equipment. When used for HVDC thyristor valves, the fundamentals of electrolyte conduction and water chemistry need to be considered in the design of the cooling circuit. The characteristics of the materials used, in conjunction with high voltage stresses and circuit configuration, play an important role to assure longevity and corrosion-free performance.

Lips, H.P. (Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental policy and integrated water management hastypes of water management organizations, environmental NGOs,environmental and water infrastructure stakeholders involved in Bay Area water management.

Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction in Your Building Portfolio Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction in Your Building Portfolio...

286

Effect of makeup water properties on the condenser fouling in power planr cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of fresh water. As available freshwater for use in thermoelectric power production becomes increasingly limited, use of nontraditional water sources is of growing interest. Utilization of nontraditional water, in cooling systems increases the potential for mineral precipitation on heat exchanger surfaces. In that regard, predicting the accelerated rate of scaling and fouling in condenser is crucial to evaluate the condenser performance. To achieve this goal, water chemistry should be incorporated in cooling system modeling and simulation. This paper addresses the effects of various makeup water properties on the cooling system, namely pH and aqueous speciation, both of which are important factors affecting the fouling rate in the main condenser. Detailed modeling of the volatile species desorption (i.e. CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}), the formation of scale in the recirculating system, and the relationship between water quality and the corresponding fouling rates is presented.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

What's your water footprint?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 21 What?s your water footprint? When it comes to your water use, do you tread lightly or are you an H2O Sasquatch? How much water do you think you consume every day? You might initially consider the length of your daily shower... water footprint is the amount of water you directly or indirectly consume. This includes ?virtual water??the amount of water needed to produce everyday things such as food, clothing, and energy. ] What?s your water footprint? tx H2O | pg. 22...

Jordan, Leslie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Water Efficiency Goal Guidance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued water efficiency goal guidance in Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514. This...

289

Drinking Water Problems: Copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

290

Water-heating dehumidifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

291

Excess electron relaxation dynamics at water/air interfaces dm Madarsz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the relaxation of a ground state excess electron at interfaces of different phases of water with air with the surrounding water bath. The systems exhibiting the most stable SB excess electron states supercooled water to contain double acceptor-type water molecules in the close vicinity of the electron. These surface states

Simons, Jack

292

The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

2003-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-to-water heat pump Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuels 20 piwf AFR ( )piwttp AkR Summary: for simulating refrigeration and air conditioning equipment of all types: air-to-air, air-to-water, water... flow is...

294

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, effectiveness of best management practices and trends in water quality. SCOPE This report is for continued water Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station with auto- sampler and data sonde. The Portland site. Garret Bridge site. 2 #12;Figure 2 Portland site. METHODS The Garrett Bridge site is a full storm-water

Soerens, Thomas

295

Water Waves Roger Grimshaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

296

ABSTRACT: In this paper we seek to identify historical indicators of international freshwater conflict and cooperation and to create a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with water con- flict, such as high population density, low per capita GDP, and over- all unfriendly or energy ­ explained conflict/cooperation over water. Even indicators showing a significant correlation definitions of cooperation and conflict, and our approach incorporates a spatial per- spective. In essence, we

Wolf, Aaron

297

Dust around Type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

Wang, Lifan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Vadose zone water fluxmeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

Faybishenko, Boris A.

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

299

Wolter type i LAMAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observational objectives for the LAMAR and their influence on the instrument design are discussed. It is concluded that the most important design parameter is the angular resolution of the LAMAR modules since it so strongly influences sensitivity, optical identifications, source confusion, spectral resolution for objective gratings and the ability to resolve small extended sources. A high resolution Wolter Type I LAMAR module is described, its hardware status discussed, and the performance of a LAMAR observatory presented. A promising technique for enhancing the reflectivity of Wolter Type I X-ray optics in a selected bandpass at high energy has been investigated and the performance of the LAMAR module, utilizing this method, has been calculated.

Catura, R.C.; Joki, E.G.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Definitions: Types of Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workshop on the Continuous Commissioning® Process Joseph T. Martinez, PCC Carlos Yagua, PE Hiroko Masuda, Juan-Carlos Baltazar, PhD, PE Ahmet Ugursal, PhD Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference, Dallas, Texas. November 18, 2014... 5. Continuous Commissioning Measures 6. Measurement and Verification ESL-KT-14-11-41 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Definitions: Types of Commissioning Joseph T. Martinez, PCC Carlos Yagua, PE Hiroko...

Martinez, J. T.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SPERT Destructive Test - I on Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

SPERT - Special Power Excursion Reactor Tests Destructive Test number 1 On Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core. A test studying the behavior of the reactor under destructive conditions on a light water moderated pool-type reactor with a plate-type core.

None

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 1985 Power Plant Type Electricity Generation (1015BTU)Electricity Generation and Capacity for Po'". :cr Plant Typeelectricity generation energy will form the major por- tion of water requirements Since coast, almost all the power for future plants

Sathaye, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

High temperature hot water systems: A primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fundamental principles of high temperature water (HTW) system technology and its advantages for thermal energy distribution are presented. Misconceptions of this technology are also addressed. The paper describes design principles, applications, HTW properties, HTW system advantages, selecting the engineer, load diversification, design temperatures, system pressurization, pump considerations, constant vs. VS pumps, HTW generator types, and burners and controls.

Govan, F.A. [NMD and Associates, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Comparing strategies: State funding of capital projects versus water conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?new water? is also just as permanent as a reservoir because the old, ine#16;cient plumbing is no longer available. Unless familiar with the billions of gallons of water produced by San Antonio?s or El Paso?s water conservation e orts, one might... of water produced and the time required to have the #30;rst water available would need to be included in any analysis. #31;e purpose of this discussion is not to dismiss the capital projects; it is to suggest that both types of projects must...

Finch, Dr. Calvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types A document describing how different forecast types are implemented in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Forecast Types Background Different `types' of forecast are possible for a specified area

307

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Property:DIA/Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed Jump to: navigation,Cost(perEconomicDIA/Types

310

Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING.m~ Mondays, 206 Agricultural Engihee~1n~Build1ng January 2~ January 31' Februar;"'7 February 14 " February 21 Irrigation Development and Implications Recreational Potential Economic Importance of the Sandhills Film

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

312

El Paso landscape perspective: Researchers study water conservation, plant-tolerance, and water reuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cover. #29;ose are relatively low-maintenance and colorful landscape plants, which can save water, add to landscape appearance, and reduce costs.? Some of the plants Niu is researching are yallow (Achillea millefolium), blanket owers, lantana... conducting research testing salt tolerance on di#28;erent types and varieties of chile peppers. #29;is research will help growers select appropriate varieties for their #18;eld and water conditions, help breeders develop improved varieties...

Kalisek, Danielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Landscaping Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document lays-out step by step instructions to estimate landscaping water using two alternative approaches: evapotranspiration method and irrigation audit method. The evapotranspiration method option calculates the amount of water needed to maintain a healthy turf or landscaped area for a given location based on the amount of water transpired and evaporated from the plants. The evapotranspiration method offers a relatively easy “one-stop-shop” for Federal agencies to develop an initial estimate of annual landscape water use. The document presents annual irrigation factors for 36 cities across the U.S. that represents the gallons of irrigation required per square foot for distinct landscape types. By following the steps outlined in the document, the reader can choose a location that is a close match their location and landscape type to provide a rough estimate of annual irrigation needs without the need to research specific data on their site. The second option presented in the document is the irrigation audit method, which is the physical measurement of water applied to landscaped areas through irrigation equipment. Steps to perform an irrigation audit are outlined in the document, which follow the Recommended Audit Guidelines produced by the Irrigation Association.[5] An irrigation audit requires some knowledge on the specific procedures to accurately estimate how much water is being consumed by the irrigation equipment.

McMordie Stoughton, Kate

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

Inter-annual variability in phytoplankton summer blooms in the freshwater tidal reaches of the Schelde estuary (Belgium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Schelde estuary (Belgium) Marie Lionard a,*, Koenraad Muylaert b , Abdel Hanoutti c , Tom Maris d , Miche to be negligible due to the high turbidity of the water (e.g. Uncles and Stephens, 1993). An increase

Vincent, Warwick F.

315

Assessment of the Species Composition, Densities, and Distribution of Native Freshwater Mussels along the Benton County Shoreline of the Hanford Reach, Columbia River, 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River is the last unimpounded section of the river and contains substrate characteristics (cobble, gravel, sand/silt) suitable for many of the native freshwater mussels known to exist in the Pacific Northwest. Information concerning the native mussel species composition, densities, and distributions in the mainstem of the Columbia River is limited. Under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an assessment of the near-shore habitat on the Hanford Reach. Surveys conducted in 2004 as part of the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance project documented several species of native mussels inhabiting the near-shore habitat of the Hanford Reach. Findings reported here may be useful to resource biologists, ecologists, and DOE-RL to determine possible negative impacts to native mussels from ongoing near-shore remediation activities associated with Hanford Site cleanup. The objective of this study was to provide an initial assessment of the species composition, densities, and distribution of the freshwater mussels (Margaritiferidae and Unionidae families) that exist in the Hanford Reach. Researchers observed and measured 201 live native mussel specimens. Mussel density estimated from these surveys is summarized in this report with respect to near-shore habitat characteristics including substrate size, substrate embeddedness, relative abundance of aquatic vegetation, and large-scale geomorphic/hydrologic characteristics of the Hanford Reach.

Mueller, Robert P.; Tiller, Brett L.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Turner, Gerald; Welch, Ian D.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Drinking Water Problems: Benzene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drinking water in Texas sometimes contains potentially harmful chemicals, including benzene. Well owners can learn how to treat their well water to remove these chemicals. 4 pages, 3 images...

Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

General Water Quality (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this water quality rule is to protect, maintain and improve the quality of waters of the State. Any applicant for a federal license, permit or project to conduct any activity...

318

Water Pollution Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Water Pollution Control Board are tasked with the prevention of pollution in the waters of the state. The Board may adopt rules and...

319

Outdoor Water Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-438 Outdoor Water Conservation The City of OKLAHOMA CITY UTILITIES DEPARTMENT Oklahoma.JustinQ.Moss 1 #12;2 SEVEN PRINCIPLES FOR CREATING A WATER CONSERVING LANDSCAPE 1. GOOD LANDSCAPE PLANNING

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

320

A gathering of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The act of immersion is a powerful catalyst for the affirmation or transformation of identity. How we place ourselves in water expresses cultural valuations of our bodies, water, and social relations, as well as categories ...

Horowitz, Naomi Leah, 1970-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perchlorate is a potential contaminate of well water that can have harmful effects on human health. Methods of removing perchlorate from water are described and illustrated. There is information to help well owners select and maintain treatment...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

State Water Quality (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to: (1) protect existing high quality state waters and restore the quality of all other state waters to permit all reasonable public uses and...

323

Water Quality (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Quality Act establishes cumulative remedies to prevent, abate and control the pollution of the waters of the state. The act establishes responsibilities of the Oklahoma Department of...

324

California's Water Energy Relationship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................................................................................7 THE ENERGY INTENSITY OF THE WATER USE CYCLE.........................................................................................9 ENERGY INTENSITY IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support

325

Walking on water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ingenious methods employed by insects and spiders to move across a water surface rely on microphysics that is of little use to larger water walkers but of considerable interest to the microfluidics community.

Bush, John W. M.

326

Decision Support for IntegratedDecision Support for Integrated WaterWater--Energy PlanningEnergy Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Environmental Science and Management University of California, Santa Barbara April 10, 2009 #12;Project Impetus/Commercial -Industrial -Agriculture -Environment -Energy Energy Providers -Peak/Base -Generation Type -Location -Capacity Surface Water Ground Water Population Growth Industry Fuels Wind Hydro Solar Thermoelectric #12;System

Keller, Arturo A.

327

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spinach Beets Bush, Pole Beans Carrots Cucumbers Eggplant Peas Peppers Summer Squash Pumpkins Tomatoes Watermelon Winter Squash Water

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Be Water Smart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of native or non-invasive adapted trees, shrubs, grasses and flowers that can tolerate temporary wet conditions. A layer of mulch prevents weed growth and aids in filtration. These low spots fill with water during periods of heavy rain, helping...W aterSmart, a water conservation program, uses a unique approach to protect and conserve water quality and quantity in upper Texas Gulf Coast urban landscapes. Part of the Texas Coastal Watershed Program (TCWP), WaterSmart is creating rain...

Swyden, Courtney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

birds, the overall water requirements are minimal and exist only for washing the blades of wind turbines

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Innovative Water Reuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management 1.Rain gardens 2.Porous pavement 3.Green roofs Hydrologic Cycle ISSUES ? Water Conservation ? Is there enough? ? Can conservation make a difference? ? Water Quality ? Contamination/pollution due to runoff Eagle...-drought conditions ? A breakdown of energy use by department shows that the Austin Water Utility uses 60% of the total amount of energy used by the City of Austin. What Can We Do? ? Water Conservation ? Indoors ? Bathrooms ? Kitchen ? Showers ? Laundry...

Jaber, F. H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Water Management Best Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Energy Star Programs ? www.epa.gov/watersense www.energystar.gov ? Conserve Florida Water Clearinghouse ? http://www.conservefloridawater.org/ ? Arizona Department of Water Resources ? www.azwater.gov/conservation The True Cost of Water... Future Demands Municipal Manufacturing Mining Steam Electric Agriculture New Codes & Standards Green Certification& Labeling Programs ? Green Restaurants, Hotels, etc. ? Green Guide for Health Care ? LEED ? GBI ? EPA Water Sense ? EPA...

Hoffman, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Minerals leached into drinking water from rubber stoppers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drinking water and its delivery system are potential sources of variation in animal research. Concern arose that rubber stoppers used to cork water bottles might be a source of some nutritionally required minerals which could leach into drinking water. Six types of stoppers, each having different compositions, were cleaned with stainless-steel sipper tubes inserted into them and attached to polypropylene bottles filled with either deionized water (pH 4.5) or acidified-deionized water (pH 2.5). After six days of contact, water levels of copper, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, chromium, and selenium were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, three of the stopper types were analyzed for mineral content. Minerals were present in both stoppers and drinking water. Acidified-deionized water generally leached minerals from the stoppers than did deionized water. The black stopper which is commonly used in animal facilities contained and leached measurable levels of some minerals, but it still can be recommended for typical animal husbandry uses, although other types of stoppers would be more suitable for specific nutritional and toxicologic studies.

Kennedy, B.W.; Beal, T.S. (Carbohydrate Nutrition Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, MD (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

334

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the embodied energy in drinking water supply systems: a caselosses to 5% of total drinking water supply for threeResearch Council. Drinking Water Distribution Systems:

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH); Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy-Water Nexus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) energy and water are interconnected; (2) new energy sources will place increased demands on water supplies; (3) existing energy sources will be subjected to increasing restrictions on their water use; and (4) integrated decision support tools will need to be developed to help policy makers decide which policies and advanced technologies can address these issues.

Horak, W.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of best management practices and trends in water quality. SCOPE This project is a cooperative effort Bridge, AR and near Portland, AR. The Garret Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station with auto;METHODS The Garret Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station. It uses an automatic sampler

Soerens, Thomas

338

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

PROCEEDINGS Stockholm Water Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-0127 The Joint Conference 7th Stockholm Water Symposium1 3rd InternationalConference a11 tlie Enviro~~mnent;~l Ma.A.G.M, a Systematic Approach to Lake Water Pollution Assessment, - Eindhoven: University of Technology, Eindhoven Assessment, Water Pollution in the Catchment of Lake Victoria, Dares Salaam, Tanzania, August, 1994

Boynton, Walter R.

340

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-photosynthesis, energy transfer in animals, and so on. Life as we know it is water-centric (and organic carbon 20, 2012 6 / 17 #12;Water availability Total renewable (defined using the water cycle) per-capita, per year. Country cu. m. Congo 275,000 Canada 94,000 Brazil 48,000 Mongolia, Indonesia 13,000 Japan

Sohoni, Milind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

STORM WATER Residential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

California at Santa Cruz, University of

342

International Freshwater Agreements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population Distribution ..................................................... 16 Population Density per, circa 1995............................................... 20 Dam Density per International River Basin ............................ 25 Africa ................................................................

Wolf, Aaron

343

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hydrogen and Water: An Engineering, Economic and Environmental Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-year program plan for the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technology Program (USDOE, 2007a) calls for the development of system models to determine economic, environmental and cross-cutting impacts of the transition to a hydrogen economy. One component of the hydrogen production and delivery chain is water; water's use and disposal can incur costs and environmental consequences for almost any industrial product. It has become increasingly clear that due to factors such as competing water demands and climate change, the potential for a water-constrained world is real. Thus, any future hydrogen economy will need to be constructed so that any associated water impacts are minimized. This, in turn, requires the analysis and comparison of specific hydrogen production schemes in terms of their water use. Broadly speaking, two types of water are used in hydrogen production: process water and cooling water. In the production plant, process water is used as a direct input for the conversion processes (e.g. steam for Steam Methane Reforming {l_brace}SMR{r_brace}, water for electrolysis). Cooling water, by distinction, is used indirectly to cool related fluids or equipment, and is an important factor in making plant processes efficient and reliable. Hydrogen production further relies on water used indirectly to generate other feedstocks required by a hydrogen plant. This second order indirect water is referred to here as 'embedded' water. For example, electricity production uses significant quantities of water; this 'thermoelectric cooling' contributes significantly to the total water footprint of the hydrogen production chain. A comprehensive systems analysis of the hydrogen economy includes the aggregate of the water intensities from every step in the production chain including direct, indirect, and embedded water. Process and cooling waters have distinct technical quality requirements. Process water, which is typically high purity (limited dissolved solids) is used inside boilers, reactors or electrolyzers because as it changes phase or is consumed, it leaves very little residue behind. Pre-treatment of 'raw' source water to remove impurities not only enables efficient hydrogen production, but also reduces maintenance costs associated with component degradation due to those impurities. Cooling water has lower overall quality specifications, though it is required in larger volumes. Cooling water has distinct quality requirements aimed at preserving the cooling equipment by reducing scaling and fouling from untreated water. At least as important as the quantity, quality and cost of water inputs to a process are the quantity, quality and cost of water discharge. In many parts of the world, contamination from wastewater streams is a far greater threat to water supply than scarcity or drought (Brooks, 2002). Wastewater can be produced during the pre-treatment processes for process and cooling water, and is also sometimes generated during the hydrogen production and cooling operations themselves. Wastewater is, by definition, lower quality than supply water. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities can handle some industrial wastewaters; others must be treated on-site or recycled. Any of these options can incur additional cost and/or complexity. DOE's 'H2A' studies have developed cost and energy intensity estimates for a variety of hydrogen production pathways. These assessments, however, have not focused on the details of water use, treatment and disposal. As a result, relatively coarse consumption numbers have been used to estimate water intensities. The water intensity for hydrogen production ranges between 1.5-40 gallons per kilogram of hydrogen, including the embedded water due to electricity consumption and considering the wide variety of hydrogen production, water treatment, and cooling options. Understanding the consequences of water management choices enables stakeholders to make informed decisions regarding water use. Water is a fundamentally regional commodity. Water resources vary in quality and qu

Simon, A J; Daily, W; White, R G

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

345

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 7). Nitrate ions are drawn through the membrane pores with elec- trical currents. The nitrate is pulled from the water into a brine waste stream. Ni trate-contaminated water Treated water Nitrate Chloride or hydroxide Exchange resin Figure 6. Ion... and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Texas Cooperative Extension, The Texas A&M University System B-6184 3-08 ' the safe levels of chemicals for U.S. drinking water. The EPA conducts research to determine the level of a contaminant in drinking water...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) establishes the water pollution control program. The WQCA identifies the responsibilities and extent of authority for the Commissioner of the Water Quality...

347

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called Ground Water Management Areas (GWMA). Currently,...

348

Planning Water Use in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mechanism design with approximate types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In mechanism design, we replace the strong assumption that each player knows his own payoff type exactly with the more realistic assumption that he knows it only approximately: each player i only knows that his true type ...

Zhu, Zeyuan Allen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Types of Farming in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......... .......-.----------------------. 8 Labor -..-.....-----...------------------------------------------------. 9 Land Tenure .--.----....---....--------------------------------- 9 Number and Size of Farms ....----...----.-._--------- 10 Capital... -------------...-------.---------------------------- 21 Hogs -......-....--------------------------------------------------- 22 Poultry .-.---.-.....--.-..------.---------------------------------- 22 Horses and Mules ---..-....---..--..------------------------ 23 Types of Farming and Type-of-farming...

Bonnen, C. A.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Environmental Change Network (ECN) was established in 1992 to provide a framework for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. The Alice Holt ECN site represents the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems the functioning of ecosystems. Identifying the cause and effect of individual drivers is a major challenge for environmental monitoring, as it requires that the effects of those drivers are distinguished from background

352

Dr Stephen Dry, Canada Research Chair in Northern Hydrometeorology, discusses research projects on the Quesnel River Basin in British Columbia and wider concerns for freshwater supply in the area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focuses on the impacts of climate change on Canada's northern and alpine regions.The anthropogenic. In particular, I am attempting to determine what effect climate change will have on the environment in Canada in the oil and gas sectors with subsurface extraction (through fracking) requiring abundant freshwater

Dery, Stephen

353

This is an earlier view of the accepted manuscript for the article "Fish fins as non-lethal surrogates for muscle tissues in freshwater food web studies using stable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is an earlier view of the accepted manuscript for the article "Fish fins as non- lethal is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/rcm.6265/abstract. Fish fins as non-muscle relationships for 14 European freshwater fish species Nicolas Hette-Tronquart*a , Laurent Mazeasa , Liana

Boyer, Edmond

354

Water Quality and Quantity Concerns Population growth, increasing water demands,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, private water well screening, and soil nutrient management. Water conservation programs of Agri, efficient use, sustainable practices, watershed management and environmental stewardship. Through 660 and utilizing water-conservation practices will be essential to sustain the state's water supply

355

Tornado type wind turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 5: Public supply water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000.

Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Integration of SWAP and MODFLOW-2000 for modeling groundwater dynamics in shallow water table areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a combination of topology, soil type, land use, water management practices using geographic information systems for sustainable groundwater management. However, the groundwater recharge and evapotranspiration are influenced by a range of factors such as topography, soil type, land use, and water management practices (Petheram et al

Zhan, Hongbin

358

TEXAS A&M ARSENIC WATER FOLLOW UP STUDY Arsenic Follow Up Study Codebook 2/19/07  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use a water treatment device in your home? 1 Yes 2 No (SKIP TO A13) A10 What type of water treatment device? (READ IF NEEDED: Also - examples of water treatment devices are shown in the brochure.) For A10/19/07 Page 3 A11 Why do you use a water treatment device in your home? (DO NOT READ; SELECT ALL

Shaw, W. Douglass

359

SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;' Our Mission The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse aims to advance the science and technology of sustainable water management through fundamental and applied research. Our Vision To be Australia's leading research centre for water reuse

Li, Jiuyong "John"

360

SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;2 The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse was established in 2004 as a joint venture between the South Australian Water Corporation and the University of South Australia (UniSA), adding significant expertise to the water research capability in South

Li, Jiuyong "John"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

US Army Corps of Engineers

362

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

363

Gas Water Heater Energy Losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Input Screens SCREEN D1: WATER HEATER SPECIFICATIONS 1. Tankthe house. Supply pipe – this is the water heater inlet pipewith refills the water heater with cold water Note: The TANK

Biermayer, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

365

Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system for harvesting and returning clean water to Lakeharvesting for landscape and species health, and surface water and

Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE Annual Progress Report: Water Needs and Constraints for Hydrogen Pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water is a critical feedstock in the production of hydrogen. In fact, water and many of the energy transformations upon which society depends are inextricably linked. Approximately 39% of freshwater withdrawals are used for cooling of power plants, and another 8% are used in industry and mining (including oil and gas extraction and refining). Major changes in the energy infrastructure (as envisioned in a transformation to a hydrogen economy) will necessarily result in changes to the water infrastructure. Depending on the manner in which a hydrogen economy evolves, these changes could be large or small, detrimental or benign. Water is used as a chemical feedstock for hydrogen production and as a coolant for the production process. Process and cooling water must meet minimum quality specifications (limits on mineral and organic contaminants) at both the inlet to the process and at the point of discharge. If these specifications are not met, then the water must be treated, which involves extra expenditure on equipment and energy. There are multiple options for water treatment and cooling systems, each of which has a different profile of equipment cost and operational requirements. The engineering decisions that are made when building out the hydrogen infrastructure will play an important role in the cost of producing hydrogen, and those decisions will be influenced by the regional and national policies that help to manage water resources. In order to evaluate the impacts of water on hydrogen production and of a hydrogen economy on water resources, this project takes a narrowly-scoped lifecycle analysis approach. We begin with a process model of hydrogen production and calculate the process water, cooling, electricity and energy feedstock demands. We expand beyond the production process itself by analyzing the details of the cooling system and water treatment system. At a regional scale, we also consider the water use associated with the electricity and fuel that feed hydrogen production and distribution. The narrow scope of the lifecycle analysis enables economic optimization at the plant level with respect to cooling and water treatment technologies. As water withdrawal and disposal costs increase, more expensive, but more water-efficient technologies become more attractive. Some of the benefits of these technologies are offset by their increased energy usage. We use the H2A hydrogen production model to determine the overall cost of hydrogen under a range of water cost and technology scenarios. At the regional level, we are planning on following the hydrogen roll-out scenarios envisioned by Greene and Leiby (2008) to determine the impact of hydrogen market penetration on various watersheds. The economics of various water technologies will eventually be incorporated into the temporal and geographic Macro System Model via a water module that automates the spreadsheet models described. At the time of this progress report, the major achievement for FY2009 has been the completion of the framework and analytical results of the economic optimization of water technology for hydrogen production. This accomplishment required the collection of cost and performance data for multiple cooling and water treatment technologies, as well as the integration of a water and energy balance model with the H2A framework. 22 (twenty-two) different combinations of production method (SMR, electrolysis), scale (centralized, forecourt), cooling (evaporative tower, dry) and water treatment (reverse osmosis, ion exchange) were evaluated. The following data were collected: water withdrawal, water discharge, electricity consumption, equipment footprint, equipment cost, installation cost, annual equipment and material costs and annual labor costs. These data, when consolidated, fit into a small number of input cells in H2A. Items such as capital cost end up as line-items for which there is space in the existing H2A spreadsheets. Items such as electricity use are added to the values that already exist in H2A. Table 1 lists eight potential technology combina

Simon, A; Daily, W

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

Arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

Modification and modeling of water ingress in limestone after application of a biocalcification treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the water transfer properties of the stone, attributable to the bio- treatment, were measured and quantified. Bio-treatment has a limited service life over the period of the experimental run. Abstract Water. As water is involved in many types of stone decay [1], different surface treatments aimed at avoiding

370

Integration of SWAP and MODFLOW-2000 for modeling groundwater dynamics in shallow water table areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for sustainable water resources management in shallow water table areas. The hydrologic processes are highly in MODFLOW are derived from a combination of topology, soil type, land use, water management practices using and evapotranspiration is signifi- cant for sustainable groundwater management. However, the groundwater recharge

Zhan, Hongbin

371

Effects of Woody Vegetation Removal on Soil Water Dynamics in a South Texas Shrubland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal on various soil textures we studied changes in soil water, rooting depth, and the role of water redistribution by woody vegetation. Woody vegetation was removed using common methods of cut-stump and roller chop across three soil types. Soil water...

Mattox, April Marie

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Relative Importance of Road Density and Physical Watershed Features in Determining Coastal Marsh Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with overall Water Quality Index scores. Road density also showed positive correlations with total nitrate Marsh Water Quality in Georgian Bay Rachel DeCatanzaro Ă? Maja Cvetkovic Ă? Patricia Chow-Fraser Received and physical watershed features (watershed size, wetland cover, and bedrock type) on water quality in coastal

McMaster University

373

On the asymptotic homotopy type of inductive limit Type ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note we exhibit large classes of (projeetionless) stable, nuclear C*- algebras whose asymptotic homotopy type is determined by K-theoretical data.

374

The Mystery of Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water is essential for our existence on this planet - critical to countless physical, biological, geological and chemical processes - it has defied scientific understanding. Exhibiting peculiar properties such as increased density upon melting and high surface tension, water is one of the most intriguing problems in condensed matter and chemical physics. Current research at SSRL, however, is illuminating the nature of H-bonding, presenting exciting new avenues of research and challenging existing models of water's structure.

Nilsson, Anders

2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

375

Drinking Water Problems: MTBE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This compound belongs to a chemical family of fuel oxygenates that enhance gaso- line combustion by increasing oxygen available for the process. Added to gasoline, MTBE has reduced carbon monoxide and ozone emissions by promoting more complete burning.... Texas follows the EPA drinking water advisory of 20 to 40 micrograms per liter. How can MTBE be Removed from Well Water? MTBE requires a specific treatment process for removal from water. Well owners can use granular activated carbon or charcoal...

Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Water purification in Borexino  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Astroparticle Physics and Underground experiments searching for rare nuclear events, need high purity materials to act as detectors or detector shielding. Water has the advantage of being cheap, dense and easily available. Most of all, water can be purified to the goal of obatining a high level of radiopurity. Water Purification can be achieved by means of a combination of processes, including filtration, reverse osmosis, deionization and gas stripping. The Water Purification System for the Borexino experiment, will be described together with its main performances.

Giammarchi, M. [Infn Milano (Italy)] [Infn Milano (Italy); Balata, M.; Ioannucci, L.; Nisi, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy)] [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Goretti, A.; Ianni, A. [Princeton University (United States)] [Princeton University (United States); Miramonti, L. [Dip. di Fisica dell'Universitŕ di Milano e Infn (Italy)] [Dip. di Fisica dell'Universitŕ di Milano e Infn (Italy)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

377

Water Conservation Best Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal sites across the country are incorporating water efficiency measures as part of their overall comprehensive UESC projects. As it becomes more difficult to secure internal funding for...

378

Water Pollution Fee (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Groundwater Program regulates discharge to groundwater under Part 31, Water Resources Protection, of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451 and Part 22 Rules....

379

Water Pollution (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for water quality standards, effluent standards, monitoring and reporting methods, sewer discharge criteria and information about permits. It is the purpose of...

380

Cooling water distribution system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

What's In My Water?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.The salts in conductivity levels are conductivity levels. allow for too much water to evaporate water are not just table high, evaluate other from the surface, or where soils are salt, but are often a individual characteristics naturally high in salts...- tive safety margin. You can have your water analyzed by a government agency or a private company. 13 Salt: an organic or inorganic com- pound that is subject to dissociation when water is added, resulting in a dis- tinct increase in specific anions...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

382

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar thermal production facilities are those with power towers,tower where water or molten salt is flowing to absorb the solar

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Involved in the Selection of Alternatives.. 7 Gasification/liquefaction with Subsequent Transportation. 7 of the Slurry Waste- water as a Function of Residence T

Soerens, Thomas

384

Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

Fay, Noah

385

Light-Water Breeder Reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a light-water-moderated and -cooled nuclear breeder reactor of the seed-blanket type characterized by core modules comprising loosely packed blanket zones enriched with fissile fuel and axial zoning in the seed and blanket regions within each core module. Reactivity control over lifetime is achieved by axial displacement of movable seed zones without the use of poison rods in the embodiment illustrated. The seed is further characterized by a hydrogen-to-uranium-233 atom ratio in the range 10 to 200 and a uranium-233-to-thorium-232 atom ratio ranging from 0.012 to 0.200. The seed occupies from 10 to 35 percent of the core volume in the form of one or more individual islands or annuli. (NSA 26: 55130)

Beaudoin, B. R.; Cohen, J. D.; Jones, D. H.; Marier, Jr, L. J.; Raab, H. F.

1972-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

officials on the new Phase II Storm Water NPDES regulations and Best Management Practices available requirements. In addition, they are typically unaware of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that are availableArkansas Water Resources Center STORMWATER POLLUTION PREVENTION BMP WORKSHOP, DEMONSTRATION

Soerens, Thomas

387

Purge water management system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Secondary condenser Cooling water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Receiver Secondary condenser LC LC Reboiler TC PC Cooling water PC FCPC Condenser LC XC Throttling valve ¨ mx my l© ª y s § y m «¬ ly my wx l n® ® x np © ¯ Condenser Column Compressor Receiver Super-heater Decanter Secondary condenser Reboiler Throttling valve Expansion valve Cooling water

Skogestad, Sigurd

389

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

390

Purge water management system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

states. Recycling of nutrients and organic matter is essential in reducing the need for fertilization closely with colleges, universities and other organizations in Arkansas to address the states water Descriptors: animal waste, feed additive, water quality, land application, non-point source pollution

Soerens, Thomas

392

Watering the Sun Corridor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watering the Sun Corridor Managing Choices in Arizona's Megapolitan Area #12;#12;Managing ChoicesSored by Printing generously provided by SRP. Watering the Sun Corridor Tom Buschatzke, City of Phoenix Peter Culp i C y | 5 Introduction............................................7 I. The Sun Corridor

Hall, Sharon J.

393

Environmentally related water trading, transfers and environmental flows: welfare, water demand and flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

43 44 47 48 48 59 62 66 74 75 77 78 78 80 81 82 87 92 95 96 107 111 113 x CHAPTER IV ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF FRESHWATER INFLOWS TO TEXAS BAYS AND ESTUARIES………………………. 4.1. Introduction.../Flows…………………... Table IV-1. Recommended Freshwater Inflows (MinQ) to Estuaries……………... Table IV-2. Annual Net Benefit (NB) under the FWIB Constraint Scenarios…….. Table IV-3. NB under the FWIB-Avg by Sector………………………………....... Page 92 94 96 97 99...

Han, Man Seung

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Selective spectroscopic methods for water analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation explores in large part the development of a few types of spectroscopic methods in the analysis of water. Methods for the determination of some of the most important properties of water like pH, metal ion content, and chemical oxygen demand are investigated in detail. This report contains a general introduction to the subject and the conclusions. Four chapters and an appendix have been processed separately. They are: chromogenic and fluorogenic crown ether compounds for the selective extraction and determination of Hg(II); selective determination of cadmium in water using a chromogenic crown ether in a mixed micellar solution; reduction of chloride interference in chemical oxygen demand determination without using mercury salts; structural orientation patterns for a series of anthraquinone sulfonates adsorbed at an aminophenol thiolate monolayer chemisorbed at gold; and the role of chemically modified surfaces in the construction of miniaturized analytical instrumentation.

Vaidya, B.

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate Scale Water Quality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salish Sea, including Puget Sound, is a large estuarine system bounded by over seven thousand miles of complex shorelines, consists of several subbasins and many large inlets with distinct properties of their own. Pacific Ocean water enters Puget Sound through the Strait of Juan de Fuca at depth over the Admiralty Inlet sill. Ocean water mixed with freshwater discharges from runoff, rivers, and wastewater outfalls exits Puget Sound through the brackish surface outflow layer. Nutrient pollution is considered one of the largest threats to Puget Sound. There is considerable interest in understanding the effect of nutrient loads on the water quality and ecological health of Puget Sound in particular and the Salish Sea as a whole. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a coupled hydrodynamic and water quality model. The water quality model simulates algae growth, dissolved oxygen, (DO) and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound to inform potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or control human impacts to DO levels in the sensitive areas. The project did not include any additional data collection but instead relied on currently available information. This report describes model development effort conducted during the period 2009 to 2012 under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cooperative agreement with PNNL, Ecology, and the University of Washington awarded under the National Estuary Program

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Author's personal copy Unexpected new phase detected in FT30 type reverse osmosis membranes using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Unexpected new phase detected in FT30 type reverse osmosis membranes using Available online 13 July 2011 Keywords: Reverse osmosis membranes X-ray microscopy Poly phenylene diamine a b s t r a c t FT30 type thin film composite membranes used for reverse osmosis water purification

Hitchcock, Adam P.

398

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OF THE DIRECTOR . . . April 1973 NEBRASKA AND THE NATIONAL WATER COMMISSION REPORT The National Water Commission grew out of con t r-ovc rey over water resource deve lopment in the Colorado River Basin. Rp

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

399

Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;Contents Our Breaking News 35 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse University of South Australia Mawson Lakes Campus Mawson Lakes SA 5095 Telephone: +61 (08) 8302 3338 Fax: +61 (08) 8302 3386 Web: unisa.edu.au/water

Mayer, Wolfgang

400

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING . . . July 1973 The final report of the National Water Commission entitled Water Policies for the Future has been issued. Because its con- cluslons -a-rid -re-commend-atlOnsmay have far-reaching effects on water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Water Management in A PEMFC: Water Transport Mechanism and Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Management in A PEMFC: Water Transport Mechanism and Material Degradation in Gas Diffusion on the water management of the PEMFC, namely the transport of product water (both liquid and vapor its water management performance and func- tion as indicators of the degradation of GDL material

Kandlikar, Satish

402

Soft Typing PHP Patrick Camphuijsen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft Typing PHP Patrick Camphuijsen Jurriaan Hage Stefan Holdermans Technical Report UU-CS-2009.O. Box 80.089 3508 TB Utrecht The Netherlands #12;Soft Typing PHP with PHP-validator Patrick Camphuijsen@cs.uu.nl Abstract PHP is a popular language for building websites, but also notori- ously lax in that almost every

Utrecht, Universiteit

403

Cofinal types of directed orders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ) directed partial orders #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P orders Tukey reducibility: (P, ) T (Q, ) if f : P Q X P unbounded = f [X] Q unbounded g : Q P Y Q cofinal = g[Y ] P cofinal #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P

Mátrai, Tamás

404

Shallow-Water Piscivore-Prey Dynamics in California's Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of native fish species than striped bass and Sacramentolargemouth bass are primarily a freshwater fish that cannotbass were piscivorous at about 115 mm, native fish use

Nobriga, Matthew L.; Feyrer, Frederick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water and the three constituent binary systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for methanol + ethanol + water and its three constituent binary systems methanol + ethanol, ethanol + water, and methanol + water were measured at 101.3 kPa using a liquid-vapor ebullition-type equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system methanol + ethanol + water was predicted by means of the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Nakamichi, Mikiyoshi; Kojima, Kazuo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away? oIgnition in Type Ia Supernovae. II. A Three- dimensionalnumber modeling of type Ia supernovae. I. hydrodynamics.

Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

Martin Chaplin

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

DESIGNER WATER Dr. Torleiv Bilstad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGNER WATER Dr. Torleiv Bilstad Professor of Environmental Engineering, University of Stavanger #12;Pictures #12;OIL ­ GAS - WATER - SOLIDS MANAGEMENT #12;Job done All produced water discharge Reservoir wettability determines the flow of oil and water in the reservoir #12;DESIGNER WATER Designer

409

WATER SUPPLY A Handbook on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER SUPPLY HANDBOOK A Handbook on Water Supply Planning and Resource Management Institute for Water Resources Water Resources Support Center U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 7701 Telegraph Road Studies Division December 1998 Revised IWR Report 96-PS-4 #12;U.S. Army Institute for Water Resources

US Army Corps of Engineers

410

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The most common type of hydroelectric generation takes placethe reservoir and reused. Hydroelectric generation causesand ecosystems (40, Hydroelectric power generation is

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Accounting for water-column variability in shallow-water waveguide characterizations based on modal eigenvalues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of water-column variability on the characterization of shallow-water waveguides using modal eigenvalue information is considered. This work is based on the relationship between the acoustic pressure field in shallow water and the depth-dependent Green's function through the Hankel transform. In many practical situations, the Hankel transform can be approximated by a Fourier transform, in which case the Green's function is approximated by a horizontal wave number spectrum with discrete peaks corresponding with individual modal eigenvalues. In turn, the wave number data can be used in inverse algorithms to determine geoacoustic properties of the waveguide. Wave number spectra are estimated from measurements of a point-source acoustic field on a horizontal aperture array in the water column. For range-dependent waveguides, techniques analogous to using a short-time Fourier transform are employed to estimate range-dependent wave number spectra. In this work, water-column variability due to linear internal waves and mesoscale features are considered. It will be shown that these two types of variability impact the estimation of range-dependent modal eigenvalues in different ways. Approaches for accounting for these different types of variability will be discussed as they apply to waveguide characterization.

Becker, Kyle M. [Pennsylvania State University, Applied Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 30, State College, PA 16804-0030 (United States); Ballard, Megan S. [Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713-8029 (United States)

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

412

Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for consumption, for producing food, and for manufacturing; we also are attracted to water for its esthetic value pets and livestock--all depend on water. Competition for water among humans and between humans

413

Burbank Water and Power- Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Burbank Water and Power is providing incentives for the purchase of solar water heaters. Incentives are only available to residential customers with electric water heaters. There is a limit of one...

414

Champions of Texas Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reuse, she is a firm believer in the market system. ?I think the market is the solution. I think the state forcing rural people to give under- priced water to urban areas is not right.? Solving these water issues needs to be sooner rather than later..., a South Texas lawyer for 40 years, has worked with Combs and White on several water issues. ?They both have real high quality of moral courage; they stand for and support what they believe in as opposed to what people might want them to stand...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Plugging Abandoned Water Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is recommended that before you begin the process of plugging an aban- doned well that you seek advice from your local groundwater conservation district, a licensed water well driller in your area, or the Water Well Drillers Program with the Texas Department... hire a licensed water well driller or pump installer to seal and plug an abandoned well. Well contractors have the equipment and an understanding of soil condi- tions to determine how a well should be properly plugged. How can you take care...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Regular Type III and Type N Approximate Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New type III and type N approximate solutions which are regular in the linear approximation are shown to exist. For that, we use complex transformations on self-dual Robinson-Trautman metrics rather then the classical approach. The regularity criterion is the boundedness and vanishing at infinity of a scalar obtained by saturating the Bel-Robinson tensor of the first approximation by a time-like vector which is constant with respect to the zeroth approximation.

Philip Downes; Paul MacAllevey; Bogdan Nita; Ivor Robinson

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

P-type gallium nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

P-type gallium nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Montara, CA); Fu, Tracy (Berkeley, CA); Ross, Jennifer (Pleasanton, CA); Chan, James (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - africa risk distribution Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

takes volumes of water (IWMI, 2008). Africa has... .51% of world freshwater resources. It further highlights the projected freshwater crises in ... Source: Ecole...

420

California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality Certification Website Abstract This website...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type Size Category (Btu/h) Size.ahridirectory.org/ceedirectory/pages/ac/cee/defaultSearch.aspx 12,000 Btu/h = 1 ton Less than 65,000 Btu/h Air Conditioners, Air Cooled Air Conditioners, Water completed by the California Energy Commission at a rate of 12,000 Btu/h per ton of air conditioning Source

422

UV water disinfector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system, and an air-suspended bare UV lamp. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA); Garud, Vikas (Bombay, IN)

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

Cooling Water System Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower...

Aegerter, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Water Quality Control (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy of the state of Texas is to promote the quality of the state's water by regulating existing industries, taking into consideration the economic development of the state, and by...

425

Water Rules (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules and regulations shall apply to all water systems subject to the jurisdiction of the Alabama Public Service Commission. They are intended to promote good utility practices, to assure...

426

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Production .quality water (2, 32). Oil Production In 2009, oil supplied90% of U.S. onshore oil production uses between 2.1 and 5.4

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Water Resource Management (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Water may be used in reasonable amounts for beneficial purposes, which are defined by the state of Indiana to include power generation and energy conversion. This section describes other...

428

UV water disinfector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system and an air-suspended bare UV lamp are disclosed. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir. 7 figs.

Gadgil, A.; Garud, V.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced water from production of crude oil, natural gas,the production and processing of each gallon of crude oil (production and processing of 1 gallon (3.8 liters) of crude oil

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Storm Water Individual Permit.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

information meeting to discuss the biannual update on the NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit. Wednesday, January 22, 2014 5:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center 10 Cities of...

431

Water Sample Concentrator  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

Idaho National Laboratory

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

432

Optimization of Cooling Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems....

Matson, J.

433

Report on Produced Water  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the pond, as well as the quality of the produced water. In semiarid regions, hot, dry air moving from a land surface will result in high evaporation rates for smaller ponds. As...

434

Thermoelectrically cooled water trap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

Micheels, Ronald H. (Concord, MA)

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

Contaminating Fresh Waters (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is illegal to discharge any dyestuff, coal tar, oil, sawdust, poison, or deleterious substances into any fresh running waters in Florida in quantities sufficient to injure, stupefy, or kill fish...

436

Water Resources (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state policy of Montana requires that water resources of the state be put to optimum beneficial use and not wasted. The state must promote the conservation, development, and beneficial use of...

437

Dehumidifying water heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drawings and specifications are included for the system to heat water for the swimming pool and dehumidify the building of the Glen Cove YMCA. An overview is presented of the Nautica product used in this system. (MHR)

Not Available

1992-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Electrophoretic Clarification of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

purification by electrochemical means overcame this problem and was successful both operationally and economically. As a result of the experimental testing, an example design of a small semiautomated electrochemical water system is offered which incorporates...

Hiler, E. A.; Lyle, W. M.

439

Legal Definition of "Traditional Navigable Waters" Waters that Qualify as Waters of the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) "Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Following the U.S. Supreme.F.R. § 230.3(s)(1). The guidance also states that, for purposes of the guidance, these "(a)(1) waters" are the "traditional navigable waters." These (a)(1) waters include all of the "navigable waters of the United States

US Army Corps of Engineers

440

Water Quality and Water Law Headline UNL's Fifth Annual Water Law, Policy and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Quality and Water Law Headline UNL's Fifth Annual Water Law, Policy and Science Conference "Water Quality Challenges in the Great Plains" is the theme of this year's University of Nebraska-Lincoln Water, Law, Policy and Science conference. The fifth annual UNL conference is April 22 and 23 at Lincoln

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act states regulations for the quality of surface water in the state. It also states designated uses of classified surface waters, surface water quality criteria and an antidegradation policy...

442

Water Resources Act (Ontario, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ontario Water Resources Act is designed to conserve, protect and manage Ontario's water resources for efficient and sustainable use. The act focuses on both groundwater and surface water...

443

Water Quality Criteria Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX G Water Quality Criteria CONTENTS Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798 EPA's Water Quality Criteria and Standards Plan -- Priorities for the Future............................798 Compilation of Recommended Water Quality Criteria and EPA's Process for Deriving New

Pitt, Robert E.

444

Water Resource Districts (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Water Resource Districts are created throughout the state of North Dakota to manage, conserve, protect, develop, and control water resources. Each District will be governed by a Water Resource...

445

Gas Water Heater Energy Losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential gas-fired storage water heater was modeled underin a typical residential storage water heater that meets thereplace a gas-fired storage water heater with a conventional

Biermayer, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Innovative Water Reuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Variable Frequency Drive Air Cooled ? Geothermal ? Thermal absorption and desiccant systems Direct Expansion Air Cooling Hybrid Cooling Tower Old Chiller Replaced With Geothermal Loop Other Ways to Reduce Water Use ? Energy Conservation...Air Conditioning & Refrigeration ? Energy Meets Water H.W. (Bill)Hoffman, P.E. H.W. (Bill)Hoffman & Associates, LLC 512-294-7193 billhoffmantx@earthlink.net Cooling Towers The purpose of a cooling tower is to get rid of unwanted...

Hoffman, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Purifying contaminated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Factors affecting water coning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(December 1977) Randy Keith Parker, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Conmittee: Dr. Richard A. Morse The production of oil that is underlain by water, through a partially penetrating well at a production rate greater than a certain... of well, reservoir, and fluid parameters, it was found that equivalent systems could be determined that had the same water and oil production characteristics. Most of the we' ll, reservoir, and fluid relationships are based on two equations which were...

Parker, Randy Keith

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Water Heating Products and Services | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless or Demand-Type WaterTravelVentilationWater Heating Products

450

Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary l

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

USEtox - The UNEP-SETAC toxicity model: recommended characterisation factors for human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background, Aim and Scope. In 2005 a comprehensive comparison of LCIA toxicity characterisation models was initiated by the UNEP-SETAC Life Cycle Initiative, directly involving the model developers of CalTOX, IMPACT 2002, USES-LCA, BETR, EDIP, WATSON, and EcoSense. In this paper we describe this model-comparison process and its results--in particular the scientific consensus model developed by the model developers. The main objectives of this effort were (i) to identify specific sources of differences between the models' results and structure, (ii) to detect the indispensable model components, and (iii) to build a scientific consensus model from them, representing recommended practice. Methods. A chemical test set of 45 organics covering a wide range of property combinations was selected for this purpose. All models used this set. In three workshops, the model comparison participants identified key fate, exposure and effect issues via comparison of the final characterisation factors and selected intermediate outputs for fate, human exposure and toxic effects for the test set applied to all models. Results. Through this process, we were able to reduce inter-model variation from an initial range of up to 13 orders of magnitude down to no more than 2 orders of magnitude for any substance. This led to the development of USEtox, a scientific consensus model that contains only the most influential model elements. These were, for example, process formulations accounting for intermittent rain, defining a closed or open system environment, or nesting an urban box in a continental box. Discussion. The precision of the new characterisation factors (CFs) is within a factor of 100-1000 for human health and 10-100 for freshwater ecotoxicity of all other models compared to 12 orders of magnitude variation between the CFs of each model respectively. The achieved reduction of inter-model variability by up to 11 orders of magnitude is a significant improvement.Conclusions. USEtox provides a parsimonious and transparent tool for human health and ecosystem CF estimates. Based on a referenced database, it has now been used to calculate CFs for several thousand substances and forms the basis of the recommendations from UNEP-SETAC's Life Cycle Initiative regarding characterization of toxic impacts in Life Cycle Assessment. Recommendations and Perspectives. We provide both recommended and interim (not recommended and to be used with caution) characterisation factors for human health and freshwater ecotoxicity impacts. After a process of consensus building among stakeholders on a broad scale as well as several improvements regarding a wider and easier applicability of the model, USEtox will become available to practitioners for the calculation of further CFs.

Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Bachmann, Till M.; Swirsky Gold, Lois; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Jolliet, Olivier; Juraske, Ronnie; Koehler, Annette; Larsen, Henrik F.; MacLeod, Matthew; Margni, Manuele; McKone, Thomas E.; Payet, Jerome; Schuhmacher, Marta; van de Meent, Dik; Hauschild, Michael Z.

2008-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

452

Molded polymer solar water heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

453

The Chilled Water and Hot Water Building Differential Pressure Setpoint Calculation - Chilled Water and Hot Water Pump Speed Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A&M University College Station, TX ABSTRACT More and more variable frequency devices (VFD) are being installed on the chilled water and hot water pumps on the TAMU campus. Those pump speeds are varied to maintain chilled water... and the rest 46 buildings are located on the west campus. More and more variable frequency devices (VFD) are installed on chilled water and hot water pumps. The variable speed pump has reduced the over-pressuring of water systems and reduced pump...

Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H., Jr.; Claridge, D.; Liu, C.; Deng, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Institutional impediments to using alternative water sources in thermoelectric power plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Obtaining adequate water supplies for cooling and other operations at a reasonable cost is a key factor in siting new and maintaining existing thermoelectric power plant operations. One way to reduce freshwater consumption is to use alternative water sources such as reclaimed (or recycled) water, mine pool water, and other nontraditional sources. The use of these alternative sources can pose institutional challenges that can cause schedule delays, increase costs, or even require plants to abandon their plans to use alternative sources. This report identifies and describes a variety of institutional challenges experienced by power plant owners and operators across the country, and for many of these challenges it identifies potential mitigating approaches. The information comes from publically available sources and from conversations with power plant owners/operators familiar with using alternative sources. Institutional challenges identified in this investigation include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Institutional actions and decisions that are beyond the control of the power plant. Such actions can include changes in local administrative policies that can affect the use of reclaimed water, inaccurate growth projections regarding the amount of water that will be available when needed, and agency workloads and other priorities that can cause delays in the permitting and approval processes. (2) Developing, cultivating, and maintaining institutional relationships with the purveyor(s) of the alternative water source, typically a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and with the local political organizations that can influence decisions regarding the use of the alternative source. Often a plan to use reclaimed water will work only if local politics and power plant goals converge. Even then, lengthy negotiations are often needed for the plans to come to fruition. (3) Regulatory requirements for planning and developing associated infrastructure such as pipelines, storage facilities, and back-up supplies that can require numerous approvals, permits, and public participation, all of which can create delays and increased costs. (4) Permitting requirements that may be difficult to meet, such as load-based discharge limits for wastewater or air emissions limitations for particulate matter (which will be in the mist of cooling towers that use reclaimed water high in dissolved solids). (5) Finding discharge options for cooling tower blowdown of reclaimed water that are acceptable to permitting authorities. Constituents in this wastewater can limit options for discharge. For example, discharge to rivers requires National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits whose limits may be difficult to meet, and underground injection can be limited because many potential injection sites have already been claimed for disposal of produced waters from oil and gas wells or waters associated with gas shale extraction. (6) Potential liabilities associated with using alternative sources. A power plant can be liable for damages associated with leaks from reclaimed water conveyance systems or storage areas, or with mine water that has been contaminated by unscrupulous drillers that is subsequently discharged by the power plant. (7) Community concerns that include, but are not limited to, increased saltwater drift on farmers fields; the possibility that the reclaimed water will contaminate local drinking water aquifers; determining the 'best' use of WWTP effluent; and potential health concerns associated with emissions from the cooling towers that use recycled water. (8) Interveners that raise public concerns about the potential for emissions of emergi

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

455

Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain surface water quality standards, stream classifications, discussion of lakes and impounded basins, and water...

456

Scientists ignite aluminum water mix  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an atom of one of the reactants (water) is substituted with its isotope (deuterium, or "heavy water") and the two reactions are compared for differences. This effect is...

457

Water Pollution Control Act (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act gives the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency broad responsibility to establish pollution standards for state waters; monitor water conditions and sources of pollution; review construction,...

458

Appropriation of Water (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes procedures for applications to appropriate water for beneficial uses, including irrigation, municipal, and industrial use. Once granted, water users must continue to seek...

459

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

460

Water Network Design by MINLP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a solution method for a water-network optimization problem using a ... The optimal design of a WDN (Water Distribution Network) consists, in its ...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Turing Water into Hydrogen Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turning Water into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Water into Hydrogen Fuel New method creates highly reactive catalytic surface, packed with hydroxyl species May 15, 2012 | Tags: Franklin,...

462

Water Quality Trading Program (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Water quality trading is a tool for achieving water quality improvements. Under the right circumstances, trading has the potential to yield both environmental and economic benefits, while...

463

Water for future Mars astronauts?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments...

464

Water Network Design by MINLP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 13, 2008 ... We propose a solution method for a water-network optimization problem ... The optimal design of a WDN (Water Distribution Network) consists, ...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

465

Disinfecting Water after a Disaster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains how to disinfect water after a flood, as well as where to find water in an emergency when supplies are limited....

Dozier, Monty; Schoessow, Courtney

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New ResidentialApril 2006 Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residentialwater and waste water tariffs in California cities and

Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Environmental Protection, Water Resource Management—of Environmental Protection, Water Resource Management,of Environmental Protection, Water Resources Management:

Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency...

469

Eau Canada: The Future of Canada's Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water, and especially drinking water, in Canada. The editor,near Quebec City, where drinking water was contaminated over

Laberge, Yves

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Simulation Models for Improved Water Heating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage Water Heater .point for modeling storage water heaters. The algorithmsfired, natural draft storage water heater. Figure 1 shows a

Lutz, Jim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Update on use of mine pool water for power generation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004, nearly 90 percent of the country's electricity was generated at power plants using steam-based systems (EIA 2005). Electricity generation at steam electric plants requires a cooling system to condense the steam. With the exception of a few plants using air-cooled condensers, most U.S. steam electric power plants use water for cooling. Water usage occurs through once-through cooling or as make-up water in a closed-cycle system (generally involving one or more cooling towers). According to a U.S. Geological Survey report, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 136 billion gallons per day of fresh water in 2000 (USGS 2005). This is almost the identical volume withdrawn for irrigation purposes. In addition to fresh water withdrawals, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 60 billion gallons per day of saline water. Many parts of the United States are facing fresh water shortages. Even areas that traditionally have had adequate water supplies are reaching capacity limits. New or expanded steam electric power plants frequently need to turn to non-traditional alternate sources of water for cooling. This report examines one type of alternate water source-groundwater collected in underground pools associated with coal mines (referred to as mine pool water in this report). In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to evaluate the feasibility of using mine pool water in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. That report (Veil et al. 2003) identified six small power plants in northeastern Pennsylvania (the Anthracite region) that had been using mine pool water for over a decade. It also reported on a pilot study underway at Exelon's Limerick Generating Station in southeastern Pennsylvania that involved release of water from a mine located about 70 miles upstream from the plant. The water flowed down the Schuylkill River and augmented the natural flow so that the Limerick plant could withdraw a larger volume of river water. The report also included a description of several other proposed facilities that were planning to use mine pool water. In early 2006, NETL directed Argonne to revisit the sites that had previously been using mine pool water and update the information offered in the previous report. This report describes the status of mine pool water use as of summer 2006. Information was collected by telephone interviews, electronic mail, literature review, and site visits.

Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Water Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule states regulations for water withdrawals, permits required for withdrawals and water use during water droughts and emergencies. Self-supplied business and industrial water users subject...

473

Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Protection, Water Resource Management—Drinking WaterEnvironmental Protection, Water Resource Management—Drinking Waterof Environmental Protection, Water Resource Management,

Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Integrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy 2. Energy Intensity of Water 3. Water Intensity of Energy 1. Integrated Energy and Water Policy 2. Energy Intensity of Water 3. Water Intensity of Energy #12;Total Water Withdrawals, 2000Total Water at Edmonston #12;Energy Intensity of WaterEnergy Intensity of Water Energy intensity, or embedded energy

Keller, Arturo A.

475

Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BNL 52608 Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water Supply Wells Under Contract with the United States Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 #12;BNL 52608 Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water Supply Wells December 27, 2000

476

Water Current University of Nebraska Water Center/Environmental Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, nonpoint source issues, recycling, composting, remediation, hazardous waste and many other waste- and water pages of many Nebraska newspapers featured stories on the report "Tap Water Blues" produced by the EnvWater Current University of Nebraska Water Center/Environmental Programs wASTEmanagement problem

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

477

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 68503 Volume 5 Number 6 FROM THE DESK OF THE DIRECTOR of Water Use; (2) Nonpoint Source Pollution; (3) Meeting Water Requirements; (4) Energy-Water Relationships; (5) Maintenance of Environmental Quality; and (6) Conjunctive Management of Ground and Surface Water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

478

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability Corporation Polyethylene Polyvinyl chloride Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Water Distribution System

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

DRINKING WATER ON EMPTY RINK WATER ON EMPTY STOMACHD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRINKING WATER ON EMPTY STOMACH RINK WATER ON EMPTY STOMACHD It is popular in Japan today to drink water immediately after waking up every morning. Furthermore, scientific tests have proven its value.. We publish below a description of use of water for our readers. For old and serious diseases as well

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

480

Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water falling on surface higher evaporation higher rainfall greater intensity of floods and droughts. Water use has grown four on How much storage compared to average flow Demand as percentage of supply How much ground water is used

Houston, Paul L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water type freshwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW Department of Agronomy, Purdue University. Agric. Exp. Stn., West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. SUMMARY The swelling of clay-water systems and the thermodynamic, hydrodynamic and spectroscopic properties of water in these systems are discussed. The swelling

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

482

Water transport through functionalized nanotubes with tunable hydrophobicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the occupancy and flow of water through nanotubes comprised of hydrophobic and hydrophilic atoms, which are arranged on a honeycomb lattice to mimic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We consider single-file motion of TIP3P water through narrow channels of (6,6) CNTs with varying fractions (f) of hydrophilic atoms. Various arrangements of hydrophilic atoms are used to create heterogeneous nanotubes with separate hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains along the tube as well as random mixtures of the two types of atoms. The water occupancy inside the nanotube channel is found to vary nonlinearly as a function of f, and a small fraction of hydrophilic atoms (f ~ 0.4) are sufficient to induce spontaneous and continuous filling of the nanotube. Interestingly, the average number of water molecules inside the channel and water flux through the nanotube are less sensitive to the specific arrangement of hydrophilic atoms than to the fraction, f. Two different regimes are observed for the water flux dependence on f - an approximately linear increase in flux as a function of f for f water occupancy. We are able to define an effective interaction strength between nanotube atoms and water's oxygen, based on a linear combination of interaction strengths between hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanotube atoms and water, that can quantitatively capture the observed behavior.

Ian Moskowitz; Mark A. Snyder; Jeetain Mittal

2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

483

Water transport through functionalized nanotubes with tunable hydrophobicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the occupancy and flow of water through nanotubes comprised of hydrophobic and hydrophilic atoms, which are arranged on a honeycomb lattice to mimic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We consider single-file motion of TIP3P water through narrow channels of (6,6) CNTs with varying fractions (f) of hydrophilic atoms. Various arrangements of hydrophilic atoms are used to create heterogeneous nanotubes with separate hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains along the tube as well as random mixtures of the two types of atoms. The water occupancy inside the nanotube channel is found to vary nonlinearly as a function of f, and a small fraction of hydrophilic atoms (f ? 0.4) are sufficient to induce spontaneous and continuous filling of the nanotube. Interestingly, the average number of water molecules inside the channel and water flux through the nanotube are less sensitive to the specific arrangement of hydrophilic atoms than to the fraction, f. Two different regimes are observed for the water flux dependence on f – an approximately linear increase in flux as a function of f for f < 0.4, and almost no change in flux for higher f values, similar to the change in water occupancy. We are able to define an effective interaction strength between nanotube atoms and water's oxygen, based on a linear combination of interaction strengths between hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanotube atoms and water, that can quantitatively capture the observed behavior.

Moskowitz, Ian; Snyder, Mark A.; Mittal, Jeetain, E-mail: jeetain@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

484

Division of Water, Parts 700-750 and Parts 800-941: Classes and Standards of Quality and Purity (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections describe general standards of water quality and purity as well as standards for specific water bodies (Parts 800-941). The regulations provide classifications for different types of...

485

Raman Scattering of Water and Photoluminescence of Pollutants Arising from Solid-Water Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic Raman experiments performed on water and water-ethanol samples, stored in different containers (fused silica, polypropylene, soda-lime glass type III) for several hours, have shown that the luminescence contribution to the Raman signal fluctuations is directly related to the container composition. Intensity fluctuations as large as 98%, have been observed in the spectral regions corresponding to the both water intramolecular and intermolecular vibrations, despite the fact that the wavenumbers of the modes remained unchanged. We undoubtedly attribute these fluctuations to a luminescence phenomenon on the basis of : i) the absence of such effect in the anti-Stokes domain, ii) its dependence on the excitation laser wavelength, iii) other relevant photoluminescence experiments. This luminescence is attributed to pollutants at ultra-low concentration coming from the different containers.

Vallée, P; Ghomi, M; Jouanne, M; Vall\\'{e}e, Philippe; Lafait, Jacques; Ghomi, Mahmoud; Jouanne, Michel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Water quality criteria for colored smokes: Solvent Green 3: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of Solvent Green 3, an anthraquinone dye used in colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of human health and of aquatic life and its uses. Sufficient data to determine the toxicity of Solvent Green 3 in freshwater aquatic organisms are lacking. The 96-hr TL/sub 50/ for Pimephales promelas is >100 mg/L. Solvent Green 3, at a concentration of 10 mg/L, causes a transient reduction in growth of the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum. No data are available concerning the chronic toxicity or bioaccumulation of Solvent Green 3 in aquatic organisms. No data are available on any of the toxicity parameters for Solvent Green 3 in humans. No data on the pharmacokinetics of Solvent Green 3 administered orally in laboratory animals are available. Solvent Green 3 has a low order of toxicity whether administered by the oral, dermal, or inhalation route. The acute oral LD/sub 50/ is >3.16 g/kg in rats, but may be as high as 15 g/kg, >1 g/kg in dogs, and 10 g/kg in rabbits. Sufficient pertinent data were not available for deriving a water quality criterion for the protection of human health. 83 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Fuel cell water transport  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Requirements for Foreign National Payments Type of Payment Visa Type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8233 36% 36% Royalty* NA NA NA NA Yes NA* No Yes W8BEN Varies 1. The visa types listed are the most related to the field of study on the I-20. 10. For Royalty payments the visa doc is not needed when

Wolpert, Robert L

489

Bishop's Bottled Water Free Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water on Earth #12;Environmental Impacts Recycling...or lack there of! · In Toronto alone, as few as 50Bishop's Bottled Water Free Campaign #12;What's the point? Bottled water is deeply embedded not agree with bottled water free campaign, it is important to keep in mind that Bishop's University

490

Green Systems Solar Hot Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Systems Solar Hot Water Heating the Building Co-generation: Heat Recovery System: Solar panels not enough Generates heat energy Captures heat from generator and transfers it to water Stores Thermal Panels (Trex enclosure) Hot Water Storage Tank (TS-5; basement) Hot Water Heaters (HW-1

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

491

Water, law, science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a world with water resources severely impacted bytechnology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end,this paper is an earth scientist s attempt to comprehend essentialelements of water law, and to examine their connections to science.Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with apriori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science,observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while inlaw, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law inEurope and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago byRoman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason.Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the seawere governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that theseelements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as privateproperty. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jusgentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast,jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jusgentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in whichscience plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all.This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, followstheir evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit ofscience inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving waterand environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In atechnological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of waterlaw. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophicalunderstanding of the relationships between science and law willcontribute to their constructively coming together in the service ofsociety.

Narasimhan, T.N.

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

492

Water Management Strategies for Improved Coalbed Methane Production in the Black Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern coalbed methane industry was born in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama and has to date produced more than 2.6 trillion cubic feet of gas and 1.6 billion barrels of water. The coalbed gas industry in this area is dependent on instream disposal of co-produced water, which ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride water. This study employed diverse analytical methods to characterize water chemistry in light of the regional geologic framework and to evaluate the full range of water management options for the Black Warrior coalbed methane industry. Results reveal strong interrelationships among regional geology, water chemistry, and gas chemistry. Coalbed methane is produced from multiple coal seams in Pennsylvanian-age strata of the Pottsville Coal Interval, in which water chemistry is influenced by a structurally controlled meteoric recharge area along the southeastern margin of the basin. The most important constituents of concern in the produced water include chlorides, ammonia compounds, and organic substances. Regional mapping and statistical analysis indicate that the concentrations of most ionic compounds, metallic substances, and nonmetallic substances correlate with total dissolved solids and chlorides. Gas is effectively produced at pipeline quality, and the only significant impurity is N{sub 2}. Geochemical analysis indicates that the gas is of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin. Stable isotopic analysis of produced gas and calcite vein fills indicates that widespread late-stage microbial methanogenesis occurred primarily along a CO{sub 2} reduction metabolic pathway. Organic compounds in the produced water appear to have helped sustain microbial communities. Ammonia and ammonium levels increase with total dissolved solids content and appear to have played a role in late-stage microbial methanogenesis and the generation of N{sub 2}. Gas production tends to decline exponentially, whereas water production tends to decline hyperbolically. Hyperbolic decline indicates that water volume is of greatest concern early in the life of a coalbed methane project. Regional mapping indicates that gas production is controlled primarily by the ability to depressurize permeable coal seams that are natively within the steep part of the adsorption isotherm. Water production is greatest within the freshwater intrusion and below thick Cretaceous cover strata and is least in areas of underpressure. Water management strategies include instream disposal, which can be applied effectively in most parts of the basin. Deep disposal may be applicable locally, particularly where high salinity limits the ability to dispose into streams. Artificial wetlands show promise for the management of saline water, especially where the reservoir yield is limited. Beneficial use options include municipal water supply, agricultural use, and industrial use. The water may be of use to an inland shrimp farming industry, which is active around the southwestern coalbed methane fields. The best opportunities for beneficial use are reuse of water by the coalbed methane industry for drilling and hydraulic fracturing. This research has further highlighted opportunities for additional research on treatment efficiency, the origin of nitrogen compounds, organic geochemistry, biogenic gas generation, flow modeling, and computer simulation. Results of this study are being disseminated through a vigorous technology transfer program that includes web resources, numerous presentations to stakeholders, and a variety of technical publications.

Pashin, Jack; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Merkel, David

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

493

National Smart Water Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

Beaulieu, R A

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

494

Technology in water conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be accomplished with instruments a#22;ached to pipelines at manholes. #27;ese devices ?listen? to the water #16;ow in the pipe; when they detect the characteristic sound of a leak, they report by radio to permanent or mobile collection points. Even a small... leak can be detected. Rainwater catchment may be a good way to replace water from other potable sources. In some situations, this involves using the simple technology of capturing rainfall runo#21; from a roof or another surface. In a hot, dry...

Finch, Dr. Calvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Cooperating for Cleaner Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to date. TCEQ contracted with James Miertschin & Associates to develop the Leon River TMDL. The company is using a water quality model to mimic the hydrologic conditions on the impaired segment of the river. The Leon River Bacteria TMDL Advisory Group... water quality data during run-off events. Niemann said the TMDL report should be finalized by August 2006. After the TMDL is reviewed internal- ly and a public meeting held, then the TCEQ com- missioners and EPA will examine it for approval. Once...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Fresh Water Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water for Future Generations ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 The demand for water in Texas will soon outstrip our supply. ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Worst yearlong drought... in Texas history. ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Record-breaking wildfires across the state. ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 We must plan for the future. ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas...

Huffman, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Water Success Stories  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradleyBudget Water Power Program1 Water Success

498

Water, Sun, Energy | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition3 Water Vapor ExperimentIrrigatingWater,

499

The Design and Evaluation of Prototype Eco-Feedback Displays for Fixture-Level Water Usage Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the design of future water eco-feedback systems but also for other types of consumption (e.g., electricity ABSTRACT Few means currently exist for home occupants to learn about their water consumption: e.g., where to extract, water suppliers and governments are shifting their focus from finding new supplies to using

Anderson, Richard

500

Water effects of the use of western coal for electrical production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water may be a constraint on the expanded development of coal resources in the semi-arid western United States. Water allocation in the West has been determined by the appropriative rights doctrine which allows perpetual use of water sources by those who first claim it for beneficial purposes. This has had the effect of placing a dominative interest in water allocation in one economic sector: agriculture. New water sources are available to coal producers but political and economic problems must be overcome. Water is required by every phase of coal development. Mines use water for dust control and land reclamation. Coal slurry pipelines would use water as a transport medium. Steam electric power plants use water for cooling, cleaning, and in the boiler. Coal gasification plants would use water for cooling, cleaning, and as a material input. In addition to these direct uses of water by coal development, the people who build and operate the development demand water for domestic and recreational purposes. The quantity of water required for a given element of a coal development is site specific and dependent on many factors. The available literature cites a range of estimates of the amount of water required for each type of development. The width of this range seems related to the stage of development of the particular technology. Estimates of water requirements for various schemes to provide an average electrical load of 9 GWe to a load center 1000 miles from western mines are shown in Table 5.

Rogers, E.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z