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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

E-Print Network 3.0 - avt water treatment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water treatment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: avt water treatment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 This article appeared in a journal...

2

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

3

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH); Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, brackish groundwater, produced water, etc.produced water, etc. Advanced treatmentAdvanced treatment Water© Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on EnergyEnergy--Water LinkagesWater Linkages (The Water Utility Perspective)(The Water

Keller, Arturo A.

6

Boiler System Efficiency Improves with Effective Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water treatment is an important aspect of boiler operation which can affect efficiency or result in damage if neglected. Without effective water treatment, scale can form on boiler tubes, reducing heat transfer, and causing a loss of boiler...

Bloom, D.

7

Mobile water treatment plant special study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. To begin implementation of Phase 11 groundwater remediation, the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested that (1) the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) conduct a study to provide for the design of a mobile water treatment plant to treat groundwater extracted during site characterization studies at completed Phase I UMTRA sites, and (2) the results of the TAC investigations be documented in a special study report. This special study develops the design criteria for a water treatment plant that can be readily transported from one UMTRA site to another and operated as a complete treatment system. The 1991 study provides the basis for selecting a mobile water treatment system to meet the operating requirements recommended in this special study. The scope of work includes the following: Determining contaminants, flows, and loadings. Setting effluent quality criteria. Sizing water treatment unit(s). Evaluating non-monetary aspects of alternate treatment processes. Comparing costs of alternate treatment processes. Recommending the mobile water treatment plant design criteria.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT WASTE WATER TREATMENT MODIFICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR WASTE WATER TREATMENT MODIFICATIONS FOR IMPROVED EFFLUENT COMPLIANCE................................................38 5.3.4 Effects of the Enhanced Treatment Alternative on Water Resources........................39 5.................................................................................................. 21 4.3 Alternative 3 ­ Enhanced Effluent Treatment

Ohta, Shigemi

9

Apparatus and process for water treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed utilizing permeable treatment media for treatment of contaminated water, along with a method for enhanced passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media. The apparatus includes a treatment cell including a permeable structure that encloses the treatment media, the treatment cell may be located inside a water collection well, exterior to a water collection well, or placed in situ within the pathway of contaminated groundwater. The passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media is maintained by a hydraulic connection between a collecting point of greater water pressure head, and a discharge point of lower water pressure head. The apparatus and process for passive flow and groundwater treatment utilizes a permeable treatment media made up of granular metal, bimetallics, granular cast iron, activated carbon, cation exchange resins, and/or additional treatment materials. An enclosing container may have an outer permeable wall for passive flow of water into the container and through the enclosed treatment media to an effluent point. Flow of contaminated water is attained without active pumping of water through the treatment media. Remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and other water contaminants to acceptable regulatory concentration levels is accomplished without the costs of pumping, pump maintenance, and constant oversight by personnel.

Phifer, Mark A. (North Augusta, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced water treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced water treatment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Water Scarcity and Energy: Water and Power...

11

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

John R. Gallagher

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Renewable Energy Powered Water Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are many motivations for choosing renewable energy technologies to provide the necessary energy to power water treatment systems for reuse and desalination. These range from the lack of an existing electricity grid, ...

Richards, Bryce S.; Schfer, Andrea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Waste Water Treatment Modifications for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Actions - Isolate and restore sand filter beds (~10 acres) - Remove UV light sanitation system ­ evaluateENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR Waste Water Treatment Modifications for Improved Effluent Compliance adhering to them. · Develop recharge basins for disposal of treated waste water. Polythiocarbonate

Homes, Christopher C.

14

Reverse osmosis (RO) treatment of Tucson's share of Central Arizona Project (CAP) water is being con-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reverse osmosis (RO) treatment of Tucson's share of Central Arizona Project (CAP) water is being for RO Treatment of CAP Water PROJECT TEAM This Arizona Water Institute PROJECT FACT SHEET is part improve- ments in both are needed to make RO treatment of CAP water truly cost-effective. The results

Fay, Noah

15

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking Water/Wastewater Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Benchmarking WaterWastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking WaterWastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager November...

16

Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Waste water treatment and metal recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste water treatment and metal recovery Nickel catalysts for hydrogen production Nickel and single versions of which contained cobalt, chromium, carbon, molybdenum, tungsten, and nickel. In 1911 and 1912% on their stainless steel production. The company paid sizable dividends to its owners until it was dissolved

Braun, Paul

18

Linking ceragenins to water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceragenins were used to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. While ceragenins have been used on bio-medical devices, use of ceragenins on water-treatment membranes is novel. Biofouling impacts membrane separation processes for many industrial applications such as desalination, waste-water treatment, oil and gas extraction, and power generation. Biofouling results in a loss of permeate flux and increase in energy use. Creation of biofouling resistant membranes will assist in creation of clean water with lower energy usage and energy with lower water usage. Five methods of attaching three different ceragenin molecules were conducted and tested. Biofouling reduction was observed in the majority of the tests, indicating the ceragenins are a viable solution to biofouling on water treatment membranes. Silane direct attachment appears to be the most promising attachment method if a high concentration of CSA-121a is used. Additional refinement of the attachment methods are needed in order to achieve our goal of several log-reduction in biofilm cell density without impacting the membrane flux. Concurrently, biofilm forming bacteria were isolated from source waters relevant for water treatment: wastewater, agricultural drainage, river water, seawater, and brackish groundwater. These isolates can be used for future testing of methods to control biofouling. Once isolated, the ability of the isolates to grow biofilms was tested with high-throughput multiwell methods. Based on these tests, the following species were selected for further testing in tube reactors and CDC reactors: Pseudomonas ssp. (wastewater, agricultural drainage, and Colorado River water), Nocardia coeliaca or Rhodococcus spp. (wastewater), Pseudomonas fluorescens and Hydrogenophaga palleronii (agricultural drainage), Sulfitobacter donghicola, Rhodococcus fascians, Rhodobacter katedanii, and Paracoccus marcusii (seawater), and Sphingopyxis spp. (groundwater). The testing demonstrated the ability of these isolates to be used for biofouling control testing under laboratory conditions. Biofilm forming bacteria were obtained from all the source water samples.

Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Savage, Paul B. (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Pollard, Jacob (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Branda, Steven S.; Goeres, Darla (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Stafslien, Shane (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Marry, Christopher; Jones, Howland D. T.; Lichtenberger, Alyssa; Kirk, Matthew F.; McGrath, Lucas K. (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment Xiaolei Qu, Pedro J.J. Alvarez and wastewater treatment Water reuse Sorption Membrane processes Photocatalysis Disinfection Microbial control. Nanotechnology holds great potential in advancing water and wastewater treatment to improve treatment efficiency

Alvarez, Pedro J.

20

CLSM bleed water reduction test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous testing by BSRI/SRTC/Raytheon indicated that the CLSM specified for the Tank 20 closure generates about 6 gallons (23 liters) of bleed water per cubic yard of material (0.76 m3).1 This amount to about 10 percent of the total mixing water. HLWE requested that the CLSM mix be optimized to reduce bleed water while maintaining flow. Elimination of bleed water from the CLSM mix specified for High-Level Waste Tank Closure will result in waste minimization, time savings and cost savings. Over thirty mixes were formulated and evaluated at the on-site Raytheon Test Laboratory. Improved low bleed water CLSM mixes were identified. Results are documented in this report.

Langton, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Rajendran, N. [Bechtel Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solar Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania Solar Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania October 8, 2010 - 10:39am Addthis Aqua...

22

I. INTRODUCTION Previous research in water treatment has been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. INTRODUCTION Previous research in water treatment has been varied and extensive. In the past, water treatment research included remote plasma processes, such as ozone, UV and electron processes the knowledge gleaned from past research, PAED seems to be a viable water treatment option. PAED may provide

McMaster University

23

Cleaning Membranes with Focused Ultrasound Beams for Drinking Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cleaning Membranes with Focused Ultrasound Beams for Drinking Water Treatment Jian-yu Lu1 , Xi Du2: jilu@eng.utoledo.edu Abstract ­ Traditional methods for water treatment are not effective to remove to clean a large membrane area needed for a typical water treatment plant. In this paper, a focused

Lu, Jian-yu

24

Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

Nyman, May D. (Albuquerque, NM); Stewart, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

COSTS OF WATER TREATMENT DUE TO DIMINISHED WATER QUALITY: A CASE STUDY IN TEXAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COSTS OF WATER TREATMENT DUE TO DIMINISHED WATER QUALITY: A CASE STUDY IN TEXAS David Dearmont and Resources Portland State University P O Box 751 Portland OR 97207-0751 October, 1997 Draft of paper in Water Resources Research, 34(4), 849-854, 1998. #12;2 CHEMICAL COSTS OF WATER TREATMENT DUE TO DIMINISHED WATER

McCarl, Bruce A.

26

Land disposal of water treatment plant sludge -- A feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the following alternative disposal methods for the Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Sludge were evaluated: landfilling, discharge into sanitary sewers, long-term lagooning, use in manufacturing, co-composting, alum recovery and land application. Land application was chosen at the best disposal alternative. Preliminary design resulted in a 1% dry alum sludge loading rate (25 tonnes/ha), requiring 35 ha over a nine-year period and a phosphorus fertilizer supplement of about 50kg/ha.

Viraraghavan, T.; Multon, L.M.; Wasylenchuk, E.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Treatment methods for breaking certain oil and water emulsions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are treatment methods for breaking emulsions of petroleum oil and salt water, fatty oil and water, and those resulting from liquefication of organic material. The emulsions are broken by heating to a predetermined temperature at or above about 200.degree. C. and pressurizing to a predetermined pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the predetermined temperature to produce a heated and pressurized fluid. The heated and pressurized fluid is contained in a single vessel at the predetermined temperature and pressure for a predetermined period of time to effectively separate the emulsion into substantially distinct first and second phases, the first phase comprising primarily the petroleum oil, the second phase comprising primarily the water. The first and second phases are separately withdrawn from the vessel at a withdraw temperature between about 200.degree. C. and 374.degree. C. and a withdraw pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the withdraw temperature. Where solids are present in the certain emulsions, the above described treatment may also effectively separate the certain emulsion into a substantially distinct third phase comprising primarily the solids.

Sealock, Jr., L. John (W. Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Selection of water treatment processes special study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. The restoration of contaminated aquifers is to be undertaken in Phase II of the UMTRA Project. To begin implementation of Phase II, DOE requested that groundwater restoration methods and technologies be investigated by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). and that the results of the TAC investigations be documented in special study reports. Many active and passive methods are available to clean up contaminated groundwater. Passive groundwater treatment includes natural flushing, geochemical barriers, and gradient manipulation by stream diversion or slurry walls. Active groundwater.cleanup techniques include gradient manipulation by well extraction or injection. in-situ biological or chemical reclamation, and extraction and treatment. Although some or all of the methods listed above may play a role in the groundwater cleanup phase of the UMTRA Project, the extraction and treatment (pump and treat) option is the only restoration alternative discussed in this report. Hence, all sections of this report relate either directly or indirectly to the technical discipline of process engineering.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phyllis Fox INTRODUCTION Oil shale retorting produces fromWaste Water from Oil Shale Processing" ACS Division of FuelEvaluates Treatments for Oil-Shale Retort Water," Industrial

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Use and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their homes in their landscapes. This reuse of graywater can reduce the amount of wastewater entering sewers or treatment systems, reduce the amount of fresh water used on landscapes and help preserve limited fresh water supplies. Onsite wastewater...-washing machines ? The code excludes water that has washed materials soiled with human waste, such as diapers, and water that has been in contact with toilet waste. This water, known as blackwater, includes flush water from toilets and urinals and wastewater...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

31

K West integrated water treatment system subproject safety analysis document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Accident Analysis evaluates unmitigated accident scenarios, and identifies Safety Significant and Safety Class structures, systems, and components for the K West Integrated Water Treatment System.

SEMMENS, L.S.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

The EPRI state-of-the-art cooling water treatment research project: A tailored collaboration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPRI Tailored Collaboration State-of-the-Art Cooling Water Treatment Research Program has been initiated with several electric utility participants. Started in January 1995, the program provides O&M cost reduction through improved cooling water system reliability and operation,. This effort is discussed along with the objectives and goals, the participants and project timetable. The program will provide three (3) main results to the participating utilities: cost effective optimization of cooling water treatment, production of a new Cooling Water Treatment Manual and updating of two (2) EPRI software products - SEQUIL and COOLADD. A review of the specific objectives, project timetable and results to date will be presented. 1 tab.

Zammitt, K. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Selby, K.A. [Puckorius & Associates, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Brice, T. [Entergy Operations - River Bend Station, St. Francisville, LA (United States)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Water Treatment using Electrocoagulation Ritika Mohan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reverse Osmosis (HEROTM). Semiconductor industrial waste water amounts to approximately 105 ­ 106 gal of brine amounting to almost 103 104 gal/day water. The difference between conventional Reverse Osmosis

Fay, Noah

34

Selection of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of Urban Runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UC Davis KEYWORDS: Wetlands, Water Treatment, Urban Runoff,of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of UrbanValley Wetlands Biomass Response to Heavy Metal Treatment

Rejmankova, Eliska; Bayer, David E

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment Will Mayes1 & Jon · Circum-neutral pH, high Fe concentrations Treatment wetlands and post-industrial pollution Taff Merthyr The basis for treatment wetlands · `Volunteer' wetlands · pH 12 lime spoil leachate · pH 12 steel slag

Heal, Kate

36

POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous radiological monitoring of the pool water. The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System, Site-Generated Radiological Waste Handling System, Site Radiological Monitoring System, Waste Handling Building Electrical System, Site Water System, and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System.

V. King

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

37

Optimization of California's Water Supply System: Results and Insights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

headings: Optimization; California; Water supply; Water shortage. Introduction Water is scarceOptimization of California's Water Supply System: Results and Insights Marion W. Jenkins1 ; Jay R-engineering optimization model of California's water supply system. The results of this 4-year effort illustrate the value

Pasternack, Gregory B.

38

Chemical Treatment Fosters Zero Discharge by Making Cooling Water Reusable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dramatically. Once-through cooling has been largely replaced by open recirculating cooling water methods. This approach reduces water consumption by increasing the use of recycled water. Simplistically, the circulating cooling water flows through heat... exchanger equipment and is cooled by passing through a cooling tower. The recycled water is cooled by evaporation of some of the circulating water as it passes through the tower. As a result of the evaporation process, the dissolved solids in the water...

Boffardi, B. P.

39

Factor water treatment up-front in IPP plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes how independent power producers profit from drawing on the expertise of a water-treatment supplier at the inception of a project. Concepts presented here apply to other major subsystems. The nature of independent power project development, both domestic and international, has resulted in many innovative approaches to client service. The highly competitive, fast-track nature of project development requires that financial pro forma plans remain fluid, with periodic updates made as the project races from conceptual design through financial closing. Suppliers are continually called upon to provide insight and expertise to facilitate the project. Their expertise is also sought by organizations considering the purchase of an existing independent power producer (IPP) facility. Many foundation steps'' occur during early commercial development. Among these are: response to a request for proposals, power slates agreements, feasibility studies, site qualification, contract negotiation, host development, and steam sales agreements. As the project moves forward, development of comprehensive design and equipment specifications, equipment selection, and financial analysis are required. One aspect frequently overlooked because of the multitude of business and technical issues involved is the water supply. With public water supplies often inaccessible, it may be necessary to make use of a poor-quality source--such as effluent from publicly owned treatment works (POTWs), acid mine drainage, host-facility process discharge, landfill leachate, and produced water from oil fields. Even if surface water or groundwater is available, the quality and often the quantity may be unknown, or there may be no provisions for discharge of wastewater.

Levine, J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing treatment plant. American Water Woks Association Water Quality Technology.plant, representing an existing treatment configuration, to add alternative disinfection and other technologies.

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Energy-Water Nexus: State and Local Roles in Efficiency & Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on the Energy-Water Nexus: State and Local Roles in Efficiency & Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants.

42

Drinking water treatment and distribution systems must comply with US EPA water quality regula-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drinking water treatment and distribution systems must comply with US EPA water quality regula trihalomethanes (THMs). Drinking water providers do frequent, costly testing for THMs. Field real-time sensors PROJECT GOALS The goal of this project was to bring a team of experts in drinking water, polymers

Fay, Noah

43

Acid mine water aeration and treatment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

Ackman, Terry E. (Finleyville, PA); Place, John M. (Bethel Park, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Online Produced Water Treatment Catalog and Decision Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to create an internet-based Water Treatment Technology Catalog and Decision Tool that will increase production, decrease costs and enhance environmental protection. This is to be accomplished by pairing an operator's water treatment cost and capacity needs to specific water treatments. This project cataloged existing and emerging produced water treatment technologies and allows operators to identify the most cost-effective approaches for managing their produced water. The tool captures the cost and capabilities of each technology and the disposal and beneficial use options for each region. The tool then takes location, chemical composition, and volumetric data for the operator's water and identifies the most cost effective treatment options for that water. Regulatory requirements or limitations for each location are also addressed. The Produced Water Treatment Catalog and Decision Tool efficiently matches industry decision makers in unconventional natural gas basins with: 1) appropriate and applicable water treatment technologies for their project, 2) relevant information on regulatory and legal issues that may impact the success of their project, and 3) potential beneficial use demands specific to their project area. To ensure the success of this project, it was segmented into seven tasks conducted in three phases over a three year period. The tasks were overseen by a Project Advisory Council (PAC) made up of stakeholders including state and federal agency representatives and industry representatives. ALL Consulting has made the catalog and decision tool available on the Internet for the final year of the project. The second quarter of the second budget period, work was halted based on the February 18, 2011 budget availability; however previous project deliverables were submitted on time and the deliverables for Task 6 and 7 were completed ahead of schedule. Thus the application and catalog were deployed to the public Internet. NETL did not provide additional funds and work on the project stopped on February 18, 2011. NETL ended the project on March 31, 2012.

J. Arthur

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report: Final Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Document details the evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch diesel, a gas-to-liquid fuel, in medium-duty delivery vehicles at Yosemite Waters. The study was conducted by NREL at the company's Fullerton, California, bottling headquarters.

Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Alleman, T. L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology and Beneficial Use 2013 1 (to sustain instream #12;Coalbed Methane Produced Water Screening Tool for Treatment Technology

47

Produced Water Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cell Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORNL has developed a treatment for produced water using a combination of microbial fuel cells and electrosorption. A collaboration between Campbell Applied Physics and ORNL was initiated to further investigate development of the technology and apply it to treatment of field produced water. The project successfully demonstrated the potential of microbial fuel cells to generate electricity from organics in produced water. A steady voltage was continuously generated for several days using the system developed in this study. In addition to the extraction of electrical energy from the organic contaminants, use of the energy at the representative voltage was demonstrated for salts removal or desalination of the produced water. Thus, the technology has potential to remove organic as well as ionic contaminants with minimal energy input using this technology. This is a novel energy-efficient method to treat produced water. Funding to test the technology at larger scale is being pursued to enable application development.

Borole, A. P.; Campbell, R. [Campbell Applied Physics] [Campbell Applied Physics

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Innovative Treatment Technologies for Natural Waters and Wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this report focused on the development of novel membrane contactor processes (in particular, forward osmosis (FO), pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), and membrane distillation (MD)) in low energy desalination and wastewater treatment applications and in renewable energy generation. FO and MD are recently gaining national and international attention as viable, economic alternatives for removal of both established and emerging contaminants from natural and process waters; PRO is gaining worldwide attention as a viable source of renewable energy. The interrelationship of energy and water are at the core of this study. Energy and water are inextricably bound; energy usage and production must be considered when evaluating any water treatment process for practical application. Both FO and MD offer the potential for substantial energy and resource savings over conventional treatment processes and PRO offers the potential for renewable energy or energy offsets in desalination. Combination of these novel technologies with each other, with existing technologies (e.g., reverse osmosis (RO)), and with existing renewable energy sources (e.g., salinity gradient solar ponds) may enable much less expensive water production and also potable water production in remote or distributed locations. Two inter-related projects were carried out in this investigation. One focused on membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment and PRO for renewable energy generation; the other focused on MD driven by a salinity gradient solar pond.

Childress, Amy E.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of potentially hazardous chemicals, and could be readily adapted to an automated system.

Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternate water sources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Conveyance Water Treatment Distribution Customer Use Wastewater Collection and Treatment 12... ;2000 Urban Water-Related Energy Use Sources ... Source: Keller, Arturo A. -...

51

Biological treatment options for consolidated tailings release waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suncor Inc., Oil Sands Group, operates a large oil sands mining and extraction operation in northeastern Alberta. The extraction plant produces large volumes of a tailings slurry which resists dewatering and treatment, and is toxic to aquatic organisms. Consolidated tailings (CT) technology is used to treat tailings by either acid/lime or gypsum and enhances the possibility of treating residual fine tails in a ``dry`` land reclamation scenario and treating the release water in a wastewater treatment reclamation scenario. The objective was to assess the treatability of CT release water (i.e., the reduction of acute and chronic toxicities to trout, Ceriodaphnia, and bacteria) in bench-scale biological treatment systems. Microtox{reg_sign} IC20 test showed complete detoxification for the gypsum CT release water within 3 to 5 weeks compared with little reduction in toxicity for dyke drainage. Acute toxicity (fish) and chronic toxicity (Ceriodaphnia, bacterial) was removed from both CT release waters. Phosphate and aeration enhanced detoxification rates. Concentrations of naphthenic acids (an organic toxicant) were not reduced, but levels of dissolved organic compounds decreased faster than was the case for dyke drainage water, indicating that some of the organic compounds in both acid/lime and gypsum CT waters were more biodegradable. There was a pattern of increasing toxicity for dyke drainage water which confirmed observations during field-scale testing in the constructed wetlands and which was not observed for CT release waters. Acid/lime and gypsum CT water can be treated biologically in either an aeration pond, constructed wetlands, or a combination of both thereby avoiding the expense of long-term storage and/or conventional waste treatment systems.

Gunter, C.P.; Nix, P.G.; Sander, B. [EVS Environment Consultants, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Knezevic, Z.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

From: "Cheryl Beecroft" Subject: Drinking Water Results-ITB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From: "Cheryl Beecroft" Subject: Drinking Water Results-ITB Date: Fri, 1 Oct samples collected at ITB. The results were below the allowable level of 10ug/L for lead in drinking water 2010 15:54:56 -0400 To: Please see the table below for lead content in water

Thompson, Michael

53

Mobile water treatment plant special study. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. To begin implementation of Phase 11 groundwater remediation, the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested that (1) the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) conduct a study to provide for the design of a mobile water treatment plant to treat groundwater extracted during site characterization studies at completed Phase I UMTRA sites, and (2) the results of the TAC investigations be documented in a special study report. This special study develops the design criteria for a water treatment plant that can be readily transported from one UMTRA site to another and operated as a complete treatment system. The 1991 study provides the basis for selecting a mobile water treatment system to meet the operating requirements recommended in this special study. The scope of work includes the following: Determining contaminants, flows, and loadings. Setting effluent quality criteria. Sizing water treatment unit(s). Evaluating non-monetary aspects of alternate treatment processes. Comparing costs of alternate treatment processes. Recommending the mobile water treatment plant design criteria.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Croatian refiner meets waste water treatment standards, reduces fines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to waste water treatment at a refinery in Croatia produces effluent that not only meets the region`s regulations for disposal into the Adriatic Sea, but also surpasses the refinery`s specifications for recycling process water. Key to the dramatic reduction in pollutants was the installation of a Sandfloat unit developed by Krofta Engineering Corp. The Sandfloat unit is a dissolved air flotation clarifier that combines flocculation, flotation, and multilayer filtration to produce high-quality effluent. In fact, the effluent from the unit has a lower hydrocarbon concentration than water from the underground wells that supply process water to the refinery. While similar systems have been used for decades in industrial applications, this is the first time a Sandfloat unit has been installed in an oil refinery. The article describes the problem, refinery operations, treatment costs, and effluent recycling.

Meier, A.L. [Krofta Engineering Corp., Lenox, MA (United States); Nikolic, O. [INA Oil Refinery, Rijeka (Croatia)

1995-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Short communication Control of brown rot of stone fruits by brief heated water immersion treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short communication Control of brown rot of stone fruits by brief heated water immersion treatments. Several studies have shown that hot water treatments by themselves or in combination with other treatments they require are an issue that has hindered the commercial adoption of hot water treatments. While higher water

Crisosto, Carlos H.

57

Supercritical water oxidation test bed effluent treatment study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents effluent treatment options for a 50 h Supercritical Water Test Unit. Effluent compositions are calculated for eight simulated waste streams, using different assumed cases. Variations in effluent composition with different reactor designs and operating schemes are discussed. Requirements for final effluent compositions are briefly reviewed. A comparison is made of two general schemes. The first is one in which the effluent is cooled and effluent treatment is primarily done in the liquid phase. In the second scheme, most treatment is performed with the effluent in the gas phase. Several unit operations are also discussed, including neutralization, mercury removal, and evaporation.

Barnes, C.M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Photocatalytic oxidation and reduction chemistry and a new process for treatment of pink water and related contaminated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop new photocatalytic or other innovative process chemistry for the treatment of pink water and related contaminated water.

Blake, D.M.; Wolfrum E.; Boulter, J. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Integrated thermal treatment system sudy: Phase 2, Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study, the results of which have been published as an interim report, examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 2 systems. The assumptions and methods were the same as for the Phase 1 study. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in he Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr).

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Desalination and Water Treatment www.deswater.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.22 µm. Seawater, reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate collected from a wastewater reclamation plant for the treatment of saline water and wastewater such as thermal distillation and reverse osmosis [2,3]. MD has several advantages compared to conventional thermal distillation and reverse osmosis processes [3

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerox waste treatment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

process can potentially... to surface water Discharge to Publicly Owned Treatment Works Solid waste disposal Solid waste landfills... of waste treatment ... Source: Yucca...

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid treatment impairs Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

treatment to eliminate the problem. Other programs and projects... in a BMAP may include fertilizer ordinances, advanced waste water treatment systems, redirecting ... Source:...

64

Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand Filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water impacts has led us to the develop- ment of different storm-water treatment strategies. Previous knowledge regarding traditional water treatment systems drink- ing and wastewater and the evaluation

65

MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the first year of the project ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Waters.'' This research project has two objectives. The first objective is to test the use of clay membranes in the treatment of produced waters by reverse osmosis. The second objective is to test the ability of a system patented by the New Mexico Tech Research Foundation to remove salts from reverse osmosis waste streams as a solid. We performed 12 experiments using clay membranes in cross-flow experimental cells. We found that, due to dispersion in the porous frit used adjacent to the membrane, the concentration polarization layer seems to be completely (or nearly completely) destroyed at low flow rates. This observation suggests that clay membranes used with porous frit material many reach optimum rejection rates at lower pumping rates than required for use with synthetic membranes. The solute rejection efficiency decreases with increasing solution concentration. For the membranes and experiments reported here, the rejection efficiency ranged from 71% with 0.01 M NaCl solution down to 12% with 2.3 M NaCl solution. More compacted clay membranes will have higher rejection capabilities. The clay membranes used in our experiments were relatively thick (approximately 0.5 mm). The active layer of most synthetic membranes is only 0.04 {micro}m (0.00004 mm), approximately 1250 times thinner than the clay membranes used in these experiments. Yet clay membranes as thin as 12 {micro}m have been constructed (Fritz and Eady, 1985). Since Darcy's law states that the flow through a material of constant permeability is inversely proportional to it's the material's thickness, then, based on these experimental observations, a very thin clay membrane would be expected to have much higher flow rates than the ones used in these experiments. Future experiments will focus on testing very thin clay membranes. The membranes generally exhibited reasonable stable rejection rates over time for chloride for a range of concentrations between 0.01 and 2.5 M. One membrane ran in excess of three months with no apparent loss of usability. This suggests that clay membranes may have a long useable life. Twenty different hyperfiltration-induced solute precipitation experiments were either attempted or completed and are reported here. The results of these experiments suggest that hyperfiltration-induced solute precipitation is possible, even for very soluble substances such as NaCl. However, the precipitation rates obtained in the laboratory do not appear to be adequate for commercial application at this time. Future experiments will focus on making the clay membranes more compact and thinner in order to obtain higher flux rates. Two alternative methods of removing solutes from solution, for which the New Mexico Tech Research Foundation is preparing patent applications, are also being investigated. These methods will be described in the next annual report after the patent applications are filed. Technology transfer efforts included two meetings (one in Farmington NM, and one in Hobbs, NM) where the results of this research were presented to independent oil producers and other interested parties. In addition, members of the research team gave seven presentations concerning this research and because of this research project T. M. (Mike) Whitworth was asked to sit on the advisory board for development of a new water treatment facility for the City of El Paso, Texas. Several papers are in preparation for submission to peer-reviewed journals based on the data presented in this report.

T.M. Whitworth; Liangxiong Li

2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment heating Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

68

Groundwater Treatment at the Fernald Preserve: Status and Path Forward for the Water Treatment Facility - 12320  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating a water treatment facility at the Fernald Preserve in Cincinnati, Ohio-to support groundwater remediation and other wastewater treatment needs-has become increasingly unnecessary. The Fernald Preserve became a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) site in November 2006, once most of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act environmental remediation and site restoration had been completed. Groundwater remediation is anticipated to continue beyond 2020. A portion of the wastewater treatment facility that operated during the CERCLA cleanup continued to operate after the site was transferred to LM, to support the remaining groundwater remediation effort. The treatment facility handles the site's remaining water treatment needs (for groundwater, storm water, and wastewater) as necessary, to ensure that uranium discharge limits specified in the Operable Unit 5 Record of Decision are met. As anticipated, the need to treat groundwater to meet uranium discharge limits has greatly diminished over the last several years. Data indicate that the groundwater treatment facility is no longer needed to support the ongoing aquifer remediation effort. (authors)

Powel, J. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Harrison, Ohio (United States); Hertel, B.; Glassmeyer, C.; Broberg, K. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nanofiltration/reverse osmosis for treatment of coproduced waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current high oil and gas prices have lead to renewed interest in exploration of nonconventional energy sources such as coal bed methane, tar sand, and oil shale. However oil and gas production from these nonconventional sources has lead to the coproduction of large quantities of produced water. While produced water is a waste product from oil and gas exploration it is a very valuable natural resource in the arid Western United States. Thus treated produced water could be a valuable new source of water. Commercially available nanofiltration and low pressure reverse osmosis membranes have been used to treat three produced waters. The results obtained here indicate that the permeate could be put to beneficial uses such as crop and livestock watering. However minimizing membrane fouling will be essential for the development of a practical process. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy imaging may be used to observe membrane fouling.

Mondal, S.; Hsiao, C.L.; Wickramasinghe, S.R. [Colorado State University, Ft Collins, CO (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

INTEC CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System Closure: Process Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the engineering activities that have been completed in support of the closure plan for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System. This effort includes detailed assessments of methods and equipment for performing work in four areas: 1. A cold (nonradioactive) mockup system for testing equipment and procedures for vessel cleanout and vessel demolition. 2. Cleanout of process vessels to meet standards identified in the closure plan. 3. Dismantlement and removal of vessels, should it not be possible to clean them to required standards in the closure plan. 4. Cleanout or removal of pipelines and pumps associated with the CPP-603 basin water treatment system. Cleanout standards for the pipes will be the same as those used for the process vessels.

Kimmitt, Raymond Rodney; Faultersack, Wendell Gale; Foster, Jonathan Kay; Berry, Stephen Michael

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report of ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Water,'' DOE project No. DE-FC26-00BC15326 describes work performed in the third year of the project. Several good results were obtained, which are documented in this report. The compacted bentonite membranes were replaced by supported bentonite membranes, which exhibited the same salt rejection capability. Unfortunately, it also inherited the clay expansion problem due to water invasion into the interlayer spaces of the compacted bentonite membranes. We noted that the supported bentonite membrane developed in the project was the first of its kind reported in the literature. An {alpha}-alumina-supported MFI-type zeolite membrane synthesized by in-situ crystallization was fabricated and tested. Unlike the bentonite clay membranes, the zeolite membranes maintained stability and high salt rejection rate even for a highly saline solution. Actual produced brines from gas and oil fields were then tested. For gas fields producing brine, the 18,300 ppm TDS (total dissolved solids) in the produced brine was reduced to 3060 ppm, an 83.3% rejection rate of 15,240 ppm salt rejection. For oilfield brine, while the TDS was reduced from 181,600 ppm to 148,900 ppm, an 18% rejection rate of 32,700 ppm reduction, the zeolite membrane was stable. Preliminary results show the dissolved organics, mainly hydrocarbons, did not affect the salt rejection. However, the rejection of organics was inconclusive at this point. Finally, the by-product of this project, the {alpha}-alumina-supported Pt-Co/Na Y catalytic zeolite membrane was developed and demonstrated for overcoming the two-step limitation of nonoxidation methane (CH{sub 4}) conversion to higher hydrocarbons (C{sub 2+}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}). Detailed experiments to obtain quantitative results of H{sub 2} generation for various conditions are now being conducted. Technology transfer efforts included five manuscripts submitted to peer-reviewed journals and five conference presentations.

Robert L. Lee; Junghan Dong

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

72

An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect water relations Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

corrosive water affects the entire household plumbing system... on water testing and treatment and issues ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr Theoretische Informatik,...

74

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects water relations Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

corrosive water affects the entire household plumbing system... on water testing and treatment and issues ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr Theoretische Informatik,...

75

E-Print Network 3.0 - auxiliary water systems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

including drinking water distribution systems (esp. in small rural communities... ), wastewater treatment, storm runoff, irrigation systems, dams, levees, and canals. 9. Water...

76

Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.

Lagana, Domenico, E-mail: monica.mangini@tin.it; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico [University of Insubria, Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (Italy); Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio [University of Insubria, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy); Cuffari, Salvatore [University of Insubria, Department of Anesthesiology (Italy); Fugazzola, Carlo [University of Insubria, Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (Italy)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

www.barrandwray.com Barr + Wray 2013 The Treatment of Scottish Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.barrandwray.com © Barr + Wray 2013 The Treatment of Scottish Water for Private Communities + Wray 2013 Contents B+W Overview Our Approach Water Sources Treatment Decision Trees Case Study Water Treatment Company. Glasgow based SME with over 50 years experience. More than 200 reference sites

Painter, Kevin

78

September 3, 1999 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 3, 1999 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water Treatment Facility in treatment facility finished water may not be low enough to adequately reduce exposure to the carcinogen occurrence in raw water and the costs and removal efficiencies of various treatment options. J.R. Lockwood

79

Modification and modeling of water ingress in limestone after application of a biocalcification treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the water transfer properties of the stone, attributable to the bio- treatment, were measured and quantified. Bio-treatment has a limited service life over the period of the experimental run. Abstract Water. As water is involved in many types of stone decay [1], different surface treatments aimed at avoiding

80

adults treatment results: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

California eScholarship Repository Summary: alcohol use disorders. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment,treatment of the older alcoholic patient. American Journal of Drug and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory implemented a constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) in 2000 to treat industrial discharge and stormwater from the Laboratory area. The industrial discharge volume is 3,030 m{sup 3} per day with elevated toxicity and metals (copper, zinc and mercury). The CWTS was identified as the best treatment option based on performance, capital and continuing cost, and schedule. A key factor for this natural system approach was the long-term binding capacity of heavy metals (especially copper, lead, and zinc) in the organic matter and sediments. The design required that the wetland treat the average daily discharge volume and be able to handle 83,280 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. The design allowed all water flow within the system to be driven entirely by gravity. The CWTS for A-01 outfall is composed of eight one-acre wetland cells connected in pairs and planted with giant bulrush to provide continuous organic matter input to the system. The retention basin was designed to hold stormwater flow and to allow controlled discharge to the wetland. The system became operational in October of 2000 and is the first wetland treatment system permitted by South Carolina DHEC for removal of metals. Because of the exceptional performance of the A-01 CWTS, the same strategy was used to improve water quality of the H-02 outfall that receives discharge and stormwater from the Tritium Area of SRS. The primary contaminants in this outfall were also copper and zinc. The design for this second system required that the wetland treat the average discharge volume of 415 m{sup 3} per day, and be able to handle 9,690 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. This allowed the building of a system much smaller than the A-01 CWTS. The system became operational in July 2007. Metal removal has been excellent since water flow through the treatment systems began, and performance improved with the maturation of the vegetation during the first season of growth of each system. Sediment samples after the first and third years of operation indicated that copper was being bound in the sediments very rapidly after entering the treatment system. The design of the system encourages low redox and sulfide production in the sediments. The objective is to stabilize metals, including mercury, as sulfide compounds in the sediments. Costs for maintenance and operation of the systems are minimal, consisting primarily of ensuring that the pipes are not clogged and that water is flowing through the system. The treatment cost per thousand gallons is many times less than conventional wastewater treatment facilities. Life expectancy and function of the biological system is based on the life of the engineering aspects and not the wetland ecology.

Nelson, E.

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL confirmed the feasibility of the process. However, researchers at BCT were unable to develop equipment suitable for continuous operation and demonstration of the process in the field was not attempted. The significant achievements of the research area: Bench-scale batch results using carbon dioxide indicate >40% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor was converted to hydrate in a single pass; The batch results also indicate >23% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor (>50% of the hydrate formed) was converted to purified water of a quality suitable for discharge; Continuous discharge and collection of hydrates was achieved at atmospheric pressure. Continuous hydrate formation and collection at atmospheric conditions was the most significant achievement and preliminary economics indicate that if the unit could be made operable, it is potentially economic. However, the inability to continuously separate the hydrate melt fraction left the concept not ready for field demonstration and the project was terminated after Phase Two research.

BC Technologies

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerated treatment pond Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

process can potentially... to surface water Discharge to Publicly Owned Treatment Works Solid waste disposal Solid waste ... Source: Yucca Mountain Project, US EPA...

84

Effects of Surface Treatments on Mechanical Properties and Water Resistance of Kenaf Fiber-Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of surface treatments on the strength and water resistance of kenaf fiber-reinforced unsaturated polyester (UPE) composites were investigated. A new coupling agent that consists of 1,6-diisocyanato-hexane (DIH) and 2-hydroxylethyl acrylate (HEA) was investigated for surface treatments of kenaf fibers. The surface treatments were found to significantly enhance the tensile strength, modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and water resistance of the resulting kenaf UPE composites. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed that DIH-HEA was covalently bonded onto kenaf fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the composites revealed that chemical treatment of kenaf fibers with a combination of DIH and HEA improved the interfacial adhesion between kenaf fibers and UPE resin in the DIHHEA-treated kenafUPE composites. The mechanisms by which the chemical treatment of kenaf fiber surfaces improved strength and water resistance of the resulting kenaf UPE composites were discussed.

Ren, Xiaofeng; Qui, Renhui; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; li, Kaichang

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

Treatment of produced water using chemical and biological unit operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water generated along with oil and gas during coal bed methane and oil shale operations is commonly known as produced water, formation water, or oilfield (more)

Li, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Biologically Inspired Photocatalytically Active Membranes for Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater treatment systems include treatment of the influent by a series of stages: pretreatment, primary sedimentation, biological

Kinsinger, Nichola

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

John Rodgers; James Castle

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Desalination and Water Treatment 16 (2010) 354380 www.deswater.com April  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Desalination and Water Treatment 16 (2010) 354­380 www.deswater.com April 1944 and Water Treatment 16 (2010) 354­380 355 have important effects in system level design: density, specific in the development and design of desalination systems. Literature contain many data for the properties of sea- water

Lienhard V, John H.

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - active water management Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water management Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: active water management Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Regional Water Management:...

90

Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

Stevenson, Matthew M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline water treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and severity. Bogoria an alkaline saline, Rift Valley Lake at one time fresh water... rainwater was used in the dilution. Four treatments (100%vv lake water, 50%vv lake...

92

Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Oil removal for produced water treatment and micellar cleaning of ultrafiltration membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a research project that evaluated the treatment of brine generated in oil fields (produced water) with ultrafiltration membranes. The characteristics of various ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal from produced water were...

Beech, Scott Jay

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evaluation of innovative arsenic treatment technologies :the arsenic water technology partnership vendors forums summary report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lowering of the drinking water standard (MCL) for arsenic from 50 {micro}g/L to 10 {micro}g/L in January 2006 could lead to significant increases in the cost of water for many rural systems throughout the United States. The Arsenic Water Technology Partnership (AWTP), a collaborative effort of Sandia National Laboratories, the Awwa Research Foundation (AwwaRF) and WERC: A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development, was formed to address this problem by developing and testing novel treatment technologies that could potentially reduce the costs of arsenic treatment. As a member of the AWTP, Sandia National Laboratories evaluated cutting-edge commercial products in three annual Arsenic Treatment Technology Vendors Forums held during the annual New Mexico Environmental Health Conferences (NMEHC) in 2003, 2004 and 2005. The Forums were comprised of two parts. At the first session, open to all conference attendees, commercial developers of innovative treatment technologies gave 15-minute talks that described project histories demonstrating the effectiveness of their products. During the second part, these same technologies were evaluated and ranked in closed sessions by independent technical experts for possible use in pilot-scale field demonstrations being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. The results of the evaluations including numerical rankings of the products, links to company websites and copies of presentations made by the representatives of the companies are posted on the project website at http://www.sandia.gov/water/arsenic.htm. This report summarizes the contents of the website by providing brief descriptions of the technologies represented at the Forums and the results of the evaluations.

Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; McConnell, Paul E.; Kirby, Carolyn (Comforce Technical Services, Inc.)

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from reject water of municipal wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Reject water, the liquid fraction produced after dewatering of anaerobically digested activated sludge on a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP), contains from 750 to 1500 (more)

Guo, Chenghong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREATOR SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. An efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed to remove these constituents. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from March 2003 through September 2003. We have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Ten saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. The results suggest that BTEX sorption capacity is not lost after ten saturation/regeneration cycles. The composition of produced water from a site operated by Crystal Solutions Ltd. in Wyoming has been characterized and was used to identify key semi-volatile components. Isotherms with selected semi-volatile components have been initiated and preliminary results have been obtained. The experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and assembled to treat the off-gas from the SMZ regeneration process. These columns will be used both in the laboratory and in the proposed field testing to be conducted next year. Innocula for the columns that degrade all of the BTEX columns have been developed.

LYNN E. KATZ; KERRY A. KINNEY; R.S. BOWMAN; E.J. SULLIVAN

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - awwa water quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Relevant Coursework: Principles of Environmental Chemistry Water and Wastewater Treatment... EPA quality control mandates Worked with Operations department to help achieve...

100

Additional Reserve Recovery Using New Polymer Treatment on High Water Oil Ratio Wells in Alameda Field, Kingman County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Flooding process, like a polymer treatment, as a tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery process can be a very good solution based on the condition of this field and its low cost compared to the drilling of new wells. It is an improved water flooding method in which high molecular-weight (macro-size molecules) and water-soluble polymers are added to the injection water to improve the mobility ratio by enhancing the viscosity of the water and by reducing permeability in invaded zones during the process. In other words, it can improve the sweep efficiency by reducing the water mobility. This polymer treatment can be performed on the same active oil producer well rather than on an injector well in the existence of strong water drive in the formation. Some parameters must be considered before any polymer job is performed such as: formation temperature, permeability, oil gravity and viscosity, location and formation thickness of the well, amount of remaining recoverable oil, fluid levels, well productivity, water oil ratio (WOR) and existence of water drive. This improved oil recovery technique has been used widely and has significant potential to extend reservoir life by increasing the oil production and decreasing the water cut. This new technology has the greatest potential in reservoirs that are moderately heterogeneous, contain moderately viscous oils, and have adverse water-oil mobility ratios. For example, many wells in Kansas's Arbuckle formation had similar treatments and we have seen very effective results. In addition, there were previous polymer treatments conducted by Texaco in Alameda Field on a number of wells throughout the Viola-Simpson formation in the early 70's. Most of the treatments proved to be very successful.

James Spillane

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modification of water transfer properties on historical limestones induced by bio-calcification treatment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water within the stone which are the main vector of pollutants. Different surface treatmentsModification of water transfer properties on historical limestones induced by bio-calcification treatment. O. Rozenbaum, J.-L. Rouet June 28, 2013 Univ d'Orl´eans, ISTO, UMR 7327, 45071, Orl´eans, France

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

102

Application of Microbial Fuel Cell technology for a Waste Water Treatment Alternative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of Microbial Fuel Cell technology for a Waste Water Treatment Alternative Eric A. Zielke February 15, 2006 #12;Application of Microbial Fuel Cell technology for a Waste Water Treatment Alternative Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria to generate electricity from organic

103

Household water treatment and safe storage product development in Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial and/or chemical contaminants can infiltrate into piped water systems, especially when the system is intermittent. Ghana has been suffering from aged and intermittent piped water networks, and an added barrier of ...

Yang, Shengkun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Treatment of Produced Water Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced waters typically contain a high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component as well as chemicals added during the oil-production process. It has been estimated that a total of 14 billion barrels of produced water were generated in 2002 from onshore operations (Veil, 2004). Although much of this produced water is disposed via reinjection, environmental and cost considerations can make surface discharge of this water a more practical means of disposal. In addition, reinjection is not always a feasible option because of geographic, economic, or regulatory considerations. In these situations, it may be desirable, and often necessary from a regulatory viewpoint, to treat produced water before discharge. It may also be feasible to treat waters that slightly exceed regulatory limits for re-use in arid or drought-prone areas, rather than losing them to reinjection. A previous project conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99BC15221 demonstrated that surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) represents a potential treatment technology for produced water containing BTEX. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that: (1) sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to SMZ follows linear isotherms in which sorption increases with increasing solute hydrophobicity; (2) the presence of high salt concentrations substantially increases the capacity of the SMZ for BTEX; (3) competitive sorption among the BTEX compounds is negligible; and, (4) complete recovery of the SMZ sorption capacity for BTEX can be achieved by air sparging the SMZ. This report summarizes research for a follow on project to optimize the regeneration process for multiple sorption/regeneration cycles, and to develop and incorporate a vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) system for treatment of the off-gas generated during air sparging. To this end, we conducted batch and column laboratory SMZ and VPB experiments with synthetic and actual produced waters. Based on the results of the laboratory testing, a pilot scale study was designed and conducted to evaluate the combined SMZ/VPB process. An economic and regulatory feasibility analysis was also completed as part of the current study to assess the viability of the process for various water re-use options.

Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; Robert S. Bowman; Enid J. Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig R. Altare

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

THE TREATMENT OF FISH-CULTURAL WATERS FOR THE REMOVAL OF ALGiE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE TREATMENT OF FISH-CULTURAL WATERS FOR THE REMOVAL OF ALGiE ByM. C. Marsh and R. K. Robinson at Washington, U. S. A., September 22 to 26, 1908 #12;CONTENTS. Essential principles of the treatment- u u _ Susceptibility of fishes u u u h u u _ _ Method of administering the treatment- u _ u h u u _ Details

106

Modeling Treatment Decisions, Costs, and Risk Implications of Regulations for the US Water Supply Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Treatment Decisions, Costs, and Risk Implications of Regulations for the US Water Supply, Carnegie Mellon University ABSTRACT Assessments of the impacts of proposed drinking water standards have. In this research, a new modeling framework is described for evaluating the impacts of multiple drinking water

de Weck, Olivier L.

107

Desalination and Water Treatment 16 (2010) 339353 www.deswater.com April  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subsystems: (a) an air and/or the water heater, which can use the solar energy; (b) a humidifierDesalination and Water Treatment 16 (2010) 339­353 www.deswater.com April 1944 technology for small-scale water production applications. There are several embodiments of this technology

Lienhard V, John H.

108

Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results wetland. Plant Ecology 200:69-82. Literature Cited! Figure 1A: Aerial photo of the treatment flow cell, such as those associated with municipal wastewater treatment.! Constructed treatment wetlands perform important

Hall, Sharon J.

109

ILC Treatment of JLab Cavity Garners Exciting Result | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure link to2, IssueTreatment

110

Hydrogen Sulfide in Drinking Water: Causes and Treatment Alternatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If drinking water has a nuisance "rotten egg odor, it contains hydrogen sulfide. This leaflet discusses how hydrogen sulfide is formed and how the problem can be corrected....

McFarland, Mark L.; Provin, Tony

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

1.85 Water and Wastewater Treatment Engineering, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory and design of systems for treating industrial and municipal wastewater and potable water supplies. Methods for characterizing wastewater properties. Physical, chemical, and biological processes, including primary ...

Shanahan, Peter

112

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - asexual american water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: asexual american water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Evolutionary Ecology Research, 2000, 2: 841855 2000 Alistair J. Cullum Summary: and evaporative water loss...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic liquid water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

liquid water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acidic liquid water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Mallinckrodt Specialty Chemicals Co....

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - abrasive water jet Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water jet Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: abrasive water jet Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - air water interfaces Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water interfaces Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air water interfaces Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Determination of Methane...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic boiling water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

boiling water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automatic boiling water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Numerical Simulation of Boiling...

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity water intake Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water intake Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activity water intake Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Gestational and early postnatal...

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic surface water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atlantic surface water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL....

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced heavy water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heavy water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced heavy water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Copyright 2011, Journal of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying water quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: applying water quality Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Best Management Practices Water Quality Summary:...

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - apoplastic water flow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

apoplastic water flow Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: apoplastic water flow Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RESEARCH PAPER High...

123

Nanoparticle Doped Water -NeowaterTM The effects of the rf-treatments of water and aqueous solutions can be amplified and stabilized by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle Doped Water - NeowaterTM The effects of the rf-treatments of water and aqueous by the rf-treatment and cavitation is generated due to the injection of hot particles into water below solutions can be amplified and stabilized by doping the water with low density of insoluble nanoparticles [1

Jacob, Eshel Ben

124

Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) biodegradation in batchCometabolic degradation of MTBE by a cyclohexane-oxidizingof 49 Biological Treatment of MTBE Fortin, N. Y. , and M. A.

Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater Genera ted in Shale Oil Development 9 BattelleControl Technology for Shale Oil Wastewaters 9 11 inWaste Water from Oil Shale Processing" ACS Division of Fuel

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Treatment of arsenic-contaminated water using akaganeite adsorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention comprises a method and composition using akaganeite, an iron oxide, as an ion adsorption medium for the removal of arsenic from water and affixing it onto carrier media so that it can be used in filtration systems.

Cadena C., Fernando (Las Cruces, NM); Johnson, Michael D. (Las Cruces, NM)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29,000 mg/1 nil a Source of sludge: City of Richmond WaterYen assessed the activated sludge process for the treatmentstudies using a digested sludge seed from a municipal

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Characterizing Water Risks and Solutions Cross-Culturally: Results from the Global Ethnohydrology Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) & quantity (lack of water ) Solutions: individual behaviors, collective technologies & policies How doCharacterizing Water Risks and Solutions Cross-Culturally: Results from the Global Ethnohydrology State University Four Study Sites Classified by Water Scarcity & Development Levels Background

Hall, Sharon J.

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - area water supply Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water supply Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: area water supply Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A LARGE-SCALE WATER SUPPLY MODEL FOR THE...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuate water flow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water flow Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: attenuate water flow Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Water Quality and Sediment Behaviour of...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - areas water year Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water year Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: areas water year Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Guidance to Identify Waters Protected by...

132

A performance comparison of individual and combined treatment modules for water recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Advanced Water Recycling Demonstration Plant (AWRDP) was commissioned and constructed by the Queensland State Government in Australia. The AWRDP was used to study the effectiveness of a variety treatment processes in ...

Khan, Stuart; Wintgens, Thomas; Sherman, Paul; Zaricky, Jan; Schfer, Andrea

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Assessment of sludge management options in a waste water treatment plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Spanish water agengy, Cadagua, for advice on life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental impacts of Cadagua operated wastewater treatment ...

Lim, Jong hyun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Water/Wastewater Treatment Plant Field Device Wiring Method Decision Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The choice of field device wiring method for water and wastewater treatment plant design is extremely complex and contains many variables. The choice not only affects short-term startup and equipment costs, but also long-term operations...

Dicus, Scott C.

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluation of physical-chemical and biological treatment of shale oil retort water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench scale studies were conducted to evaluate conventional physical-chemical and biological treatment processes for removal of pollutants from retort water produced by in situ shale oil recovery methods. Prior to undertaking these studies, very little information had been reported on treatment of retort water. A treatment process train patterned after that generally used throughout the petroleum refining industry was envisioned for application to retort water. The treatment train would consist of processes for removing suspended matter, ammonia, biodegradable organics, and nonbiodegradable or refractory organics. The treatment processes evaluated include anaerobic digestion and activated sludge for removal of biodegradable organics and other oxidizable substances; activated carbon adsorption for removal of nonbiodegradable organics; steam stripping for ammonia removal; and chemical coagulation, sedimentation and filtration for removal of suspended matter. Preliminary cost estimates are provided.

Mercer, B.W.; Mason, M.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Wakamiya, W.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradleyBudget Water Power Program1 Water

137

Economies of size in municipal water treatment technologies: Texas lower Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIES OF SIZE IN MUNICIPAL WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES: TEXAS LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER NEIL BOYER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ECONOMIES OF SIZE IN MUNICIPAL WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES: TEXAS LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER NEIL BOYER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Boyer, Christopher Neil

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

Desalination and Water Treatment www.deswater.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the agricultural sectors of most countries in the Middle East and North Africa and of many areas around the world, Desalination for Clean Water and Energy Cooperation among Mediterranean Countries of Europe and the MENA Region of a solar-assisted pilot plant in the Arava Valley in Israel. It is argued that the proposed system would

Messalem, Rami

139

Analysis of micromixers and biocidal coatings on water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofouling, the unwanted growth of biofilms on a surface, of water-treatment membranes negatively impacts in desalination and water treatment. With biofouling there is a decrease in permeate production, degradation of permeate water quality, and an increase in energy expenditure due to increased cross-flow pressure needed. To date, a universal successful and cost-effect method for controlling biofouling has not been implemented. The overall goal of the work described in this report was to use high-performance computing to direct polymer, material, and biological research to create the next generation of water-treatment membranes. Both physical (micromixers - UV-curable epoxy traces printed on the surface of a water-treatment membrane that promote chaotic mixing) and chemical (quaternary ammonium groups) modifications of the membranes for the purpose of increasing resistance to biofouling were evaluated. Creation of low-cost, efficient water-treatment membranes helps assure the availability of fresh water for human use, a growing need in both the U. S. and the world.

Webb, Stephen W.; James, Darryl L. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Hibbs, Michael R.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Hart, William Eugene; Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Elimelech, Menachem (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Cornelius, Christopher James; Sanchez, Andres L. (LMATA Government Services LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Noek, Rachael M.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Kang, Seokatae (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Adout, Atar (Yale University, New Haven, CT); McGrath, Lucas K. (LMATA Government Services LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Cappelle, Malynda A.; Cook, Adam W.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Tube Waves in Ultra-deep Waters: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waves on borehole seismic data in ultra-deep waters. Finite-difference modeling technique was used for this study. Finite-difference modeling allowed us to model refractions, reflections, diffractions and scattering; actually all events in surface...

Singh, Satyan

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH _______ ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from wastewater treatment plant waste air. The biofilter volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and toxic air pollutants emitted from wastewater and solids handling

142

CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, ECOLOGICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK E-mail: fabrice.gouriveau@ed.ac.uk Summary: This research evaluates the treatment efficiency, ecological value and cost-effectiveness of two Scottish Constructed Farm Wetlands (CFW 1 & 2

143

Regular Articles Coalbed methane produced water screening tool for treatment technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regular Articles Coalbed methane produced water screening tool for treatment technology and publicly available coalbed methane produced water screening tool to two simulated case studies to determine the largest volume waste stream in the industry (GWI, 2011). For coalbed methane (CBM) (coalbed natural gas

144

Radioactive Water Treatment at a United States Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Site - 12322  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A water treatment system at a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Superfund site impacted by radiological contaminants is used to treat water entering the site. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is actively managing the remedial action for the USEPA using contracts to support the multiple activities on site. The site is where former gas mantle production facilities operated around the turn of the century. The manufacturing facilities used thorium ores to develop the mantles and disposed of off-specification mantles and ore residuals in the surrounding areas. During Site remedial actions, both groundwater and surface water comes into contact with contaminated soils and must be collected and treated at an on-site treatment facility. The radionuclides thorium and radium with associated progeny are the main concern for treatment. Suspended solids, volatile organic compounds, and select metals are also monitored during water treatment. The water treatment process begins were water is pumped to a collection tank where debris and grit settle out. Stored water is pumped to a coagulant tank containing poly-aluminum chloride to collect dissolved solids. The water passes into a reaction tube where aspirated air is added or reagent added to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC'S) by mass transfer and convert dissolved iron to a solid. The water enters the flocculent polymer tank to drop solids out. The flocculated water overflows to a fluidized bed contact chamber to increase precipitation. Flocculation is where colloids of material drop out of suspension and settle. The settled solids are periodically removed and disposed of as radioactive waste. The water is passed through filters and an ion exchange process to extract the radionuclides. Several million liters of water are processed each year from two water treatment plants servicing different areas of the remediation site. Ion exchange resin and filter material are periodically replaced and disposed of as radioactive waste. A total of 0.85 m{sup 3} of waste sludge per year requires disposal on average, in addition to another 6.6 m{sup 3} of waste cartridge filters. All water discharges are regulated by a state of New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit implemented by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Clean Water Act). Laboratory analyses are required to satisfy requirements of the state NPDES permit. Specific monitoring parameters and discharge rates will be provided. Use of the water treatment systems drastically reduces the amount of contaminated water requiring solidification and water disposal to near zero. Millions of liters of potentially contaminated water from excavation activities is treated and released within permit limits. A small volume of solid radioactive waste (21 cubic meters) is generated annually from water treatment process operations. Management of ground and surface water is effectively controlled in remediation areas by the use of sumps, erosion control measures and pumping of water to storage vessels. Continued excavations can be made as water impacting the site is effectively controlled. (authors)

Beckman, John C. [US Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - angeles water supply Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

eenveng@sbcglobal.net 1 REDUCING GREENHOUSE GAS IMPACTS IN Summary: SUPPLY WASTEWATER TREATMENT END-USERS tons-CO2yr 12 GHG Reductions from Santa Rosa's Urban Water Cycle... ,000...

147

The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of agricultural chemicals and the performance of hazardous waste land treatment facilities. This study used a bioassay directed chemical analysis protocol to monitor the environmental fate of mutagenic constituents from a simulated land treatment demonstration...THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAYOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Te xa s ASM Un i ver s i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Davol, Phebe

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

149

Water Supply Challenges in Cities as a Result of Urbanization: Analyzing the Hurdles of Achieving Universal Water Access in Kampala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Kampala and untreated sewage flows back into Lake Victoria, which is also the raw water source. This requires more extensive and energy intensive treatment to produce drinking water, indicating the interrelationship between sanitation facilities... to access physical distribution points, which is affected by several items. 4.1. Urbanization Immigrants come to Kampala across all income levels from both rural areas and other cities (UN-Habitat, 2010). Of 60 individuals asked, 75% were born outside...

Felter, Greg

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Langerhans Lab Protocols Water treatment & aging.docx revised 1/30/13 by JW Page 1 of 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

salinity) Marine Mix or Instant Ocean 2. Fill bucket with tap water, to brim. 3. Put air stone and heaterLangerhans Lab Protocols Water treatment & aging.docx revised 1/30/13 by JW Page 1 of 1 Water (if available) into bucket. 4. Let water stand at least 24 hours before use. When the water

Langerhans, Brian

152

Water Power Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradleyBudget Water Power Program Budget

153

2005 Borchardt Conference: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 1 Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 2 (sparging) to replenish oxygen: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings

Nerenberg, Robert

154

The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland in Phoenix, AZ, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland evapotranspiration and evaporation rates in a constructed treatment wetland in Phoenix during the summer, when both budget for the Tres Rios treatment wetland, and will improve our general knowledge of wetland water

Hall, Sharon J.

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - adsorbed water films Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adsorbed water films Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Water adsorption on lubricated a-CHx in humid...

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - african water resource Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water resource Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: african water resource Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 THE AFRICAN ECOSYSTEMS PROGRAM AT...

157

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced water cooled Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water cooled Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced water cooled Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Proceedings of the 18th Annual North...

158

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqp1 water permeability Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aqp1 water permeability Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Structure of the Aquaporin-1 Water...

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - african ground water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ground water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: african ground water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Differences between European and...

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plants water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aquatic plants water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NO LONGER HENRY'S HUDSON: EXOTIC SPECIES...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - annulus water pool Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water pool Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: annulus water pool Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING 1...

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual spring water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spring water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: annual spring water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Why Springs Are Valuable Natural...

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqp1 water channel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aqp1 water channel Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Structure of the Aquaporin-1 Water Channel: A...

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - airs water vapor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water vapor Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: airs water vapor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A laboratory experiment from the Little...

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced alkaline water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced alkaline water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Net alkalinity and net acidity...

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced boiling water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced boiling water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Boiling Radial Flow in Fractures of...

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - americas warm water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

warm water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: americas warm water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Ch.8 Weather Weather and Climate...

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonian river water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

river water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amazonian river water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CONTENTS OF AMAZONIA AND GLOBAL...

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic deep water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atlantic deep water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Atlantic Ocean Lynne D Talley Summary: for...

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - asia water resources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water resources Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: asia water resources Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 APRU FELLOWS PROGRAM 2012 in...

171

Chemical drinking water quality in Ghana: Water costs and scope for advanced treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To reduce child mortality and improve health in Ghana boreholes and wells are being installed across the country by the private sector, NGOs and the Ghanaian government. Water quality is not generally monitored once a ...

Rossiter, Helfrid M.A.; Owusu, Peter A; Awuah, Esi; MacDonald, Alan M; Schfer, Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Methods for attaching polymerizable ceragenins to water treatment membranes using silane linkages  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to methods for chemically grafting and attaching ceragenin molecules to polymer substrates; methods for synthesizing ceragenin-containing copolymers; methods for making ceragenin-modified water treatment membranes and spacers; and methods of treating contaminated water using ceragenin-modified treatment membranes and spacers. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. Alkene-functionalized ceragenins (e.g., acrylamide-functionalized ceragenins) can be attached to polyamide reverse osmosis membranes using amine-linking, amide-linking, UV-grafting, or silane-coating methods. In addition, silane-functionalized ceragenins can be directly attached to polymer surfaces that have free hydroxyls.

Hibbs, Michael; Altman, Susan J.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Savage, Paul B.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

173

Biofouling-resistant ceragenin-modified materials and structures for water treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to methods for chemically grafting and attaching ceragenin molecules to polymer substrates; methods for synthesizing ceragenin-containing copolymers; methods for making ceragenin-modified water treatment membranes and spacers; and methods of treating contaminated water using ceragenin-modified treatment membranes and spacers. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. Alkene-functionalized ceragenins (e.g., acrylamide-functionalized ceragenins) can be attached to polyamide reverse osmosis membranes using amine-linking, amide-linking, UV-grafting, or silane-coating methods. In addition, silane-functionalized ceragenins can be directly attached to polymer surfaces that have free hydroxyls.

Hibbs, Michael; Altman, Susan J.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Savage, Paul B.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

175

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Treatment of produced water by simultaneous removal of heavy metals and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a photoelectrochemical cell.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Early produced water treatment technologies were developed before carbon dioxide emissions and hazardous waste discharge were recognised as operational priority. These technologies are deficient in (more)

Igunnu, Ebenezer Temitope

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Determining the Viability of a Hybrid Experiential and Distance Learning Educational Model for Water Treatment Plant Operators in Kentucky.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Drinking water and wastewater industries are facing a nationwide workforce shortfall of qualified treatment plant operators due to factors including the en masse retirement (more)

Fattic, Jana R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian fresh water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: australian fresh water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy River, Victoria. Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy Summary:...

179

Economic costs of conventional surface-water treatment: A case study of the Mcallen northwest facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an operating surface-water treatment facility located in McAllen, Texas: the McAllen Northwest facility. This facility has a maximum-designed operating capacity of 8.25 million gallons per day (mgd), but due to required shutdown time and other limitations...

Rogers, Callie Sue

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Preliminary design report for the K basins integrated water treatment system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a revised concept for the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment Systems (IWTS). This PDR incorporates the 11 recommendations made in a May 1996 Value Engineering session into the Conceptual Design, and provides new flow diagrams, hazard category assessment, cost estimate, and schedule for the IWTS Subproject.

Pauly, T.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Author's personal copy Modelling and automation of water and wastewater treatment processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Jeppsson, 2006), including sewage systems and surrounding land use. From the methodological viewpoint on the applications of modelling and automation to water and wastewater treatment processes. The session, under sludge processes, to which unconventional and innovative control strategies were applied. But there were

182

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment P r o b of groundwater containing high levels of radium-226 activity (Objective 1) were regenerated with prescribed brine that the concentration of salt in the brine cleaning solution was the most influential factor in the resin regeneration

183

K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three bounding accidents postdated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing, and a hydrogen explosion. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

RITTMANN, P.D.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Contaminated Water Using a Dense  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-butyl ether (MTBE) in a dense medium plasma (DMP) reactor utilizing gas chromatog- raphy-massspectrometryandgaschromatography-thermal conductivity techniques. A rate law is developed for the removal of MTBE from an aqueous solution in the DMP. The oxidation products from the treatment of MTBE-contaminated water in the DMP reactor were found

Dandy, David

185

Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report: Final Results (Brochure)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, part 2 ContinuingYan Mei WangResults Prepared for

186

Steady-State Homogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Water Droplets: Extended Numerical Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The steady-state homogeneous vapor-to-liquid nucleation and the succeeding liquid droplet growth process are studied for water system by means of the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the mW-model suggested originally in [Molinero, V.; Moore, E. B. \\textit{J. Phys. Chem. B} \\textbf{2009}, \\textit{113}, 4008-4016]. The investigation covers the temperature range $273 \\leq T/K \\leq 363$ and the system's pressure $p\\simeq 1$ atm. The thermodynamic integration scheme and the extended mean first passage time method as a tool to find the nucleation and cluster growth characteristics are applied. The surface tension is numerically estimated and is compared with the experimental data for the considered temperature range. We extract the nucleation characteristics such as the steady-state nucleation rate, the critical cluster size, the nucleation barrier, the Zeldovich factor; perform the comparison with the other simulation results and test the treatment of the simulation results within the classical nucleation theory. We found that the liquid droplet growth is unsteady and follows the power law. At that, the growth laws exhibit the features unified for all the considered temperatures. The geometry of the nucleated droplets is also studied.

Anatolii V. Mokshin; Bulat N. Galimzyanov

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

Steady-State Homogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Water Droplets: Extended Numerical Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The steady-state homogeneous vapor-to-liquid nucleation and the succeeding liquid droplet growth process are studied for water system by means of the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the mW-model suggested originally in [Molinero, V.; Moore, E. B. \\textit{J. Phys. Chem. B} \\textbf{2009}, \\textit{113}, 4008-4016]. The investigation covers the temperature range $273 \\leq T/K \\leq 363$ and the system's pressure $p\\simeq 1$ atm. The thermodynamic integration scheme and the extended mean first passage time method as a tool to find the nucleation and cluster growth characteristics are applied. The surface tension is numerically estimated and is compared with the experimental data for the considered temperature range. We extract the nucleation characteristics such as the steady-state nucleation rate, the critical cluster size, the nucleation barrier, the Zeldovich factor; perform the comparison with the other simulation results and test the treatment of the simulation results within the classical n...

Mokshin, Anatolii V; 10.1021/jp304830e

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A site-wide approach to water conservation: Procedures, results and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to Executive Order 12902, {open_quotes}Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation at Federal Facilities,{close_quotes} the U.S. Army Forces Command commissioned Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a sitewide water efficiency assessment at Fort Dix, located in Fort Dix, New Jersey. This analysis assessed more than 900 base and family housing buildings for cost-effective water resource opportunities (WROs). The analysis proved challenging due to variations in building age, size, occupancy (seasonally varying), and fixture use. Furthermore, metered water consumption data were available only at the point of treatment, prior to distribution. The approach used by PNNL included site visits to audit base buildings for fixture counts and types. Where possible flow measurements were performed on existing fixtures. Aggregations of base buildings into representative building sets were completed based on building and water-fixture type, age, and use. A spreadsheet model was developed to evaluate baseline water use and to calculate savings potential and life-cycle cost economics. This model includes a number of exogenous parameters to facilitate input changes and allow for sensitivity analysis on variables such as water cost, occupancy, and fixture densities. This paper discusses the methodology used to evaluate water use and savings at large federal facilities. It also presents the cost-effective WROs and accompanying economics. At Fort Dix, the cost-effective WROs are estimated to save 36.3 million gallons per year, or about 23% of the water use analyzed. Lessons learned included the need for an initial screening to prioritize water use, the need to develop accurate age-based water fixture characteristics and densities by building type, and the importance of the marginal cost of water for facilities producing their own water.

Sullivan, G.P.; Elliott, D.B.; Hostick, D.J.; Lamb, J.F.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano-engineered Silica Aerogels a Proven Method for Water Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid deployment and the use of objective force aggressively reduce logistic footprints and replenishment demands. Maneuver Sustainment requires that Future Combat Systems be equipped with water systems that are lightweight, have small footprints, and are highly adaptable to a variety of environments. Technologies employed in these settings must be able to meet these demands. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed and previously field tested nano-engineered materials for the treatment of water. These materials have been either based on silica aerogel materials or consist of composites of these aerogels with granular activated carbon (GAC). Recent tests have proven successful for the removal of contaminants including uranium, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Silica aerogels were evaluated for their ability to purify water that had been spiked with the nerve agent VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate). These results demonstrated that silica aerogels were able to remove the VX from the supply water and were nearly 30 times more adsorbent than GAC. This performance could result in REDUCING CHANGEOUT FREQUENCY BY A FACTOR OF 30 or DECREASING the VOLUME of adsorbent BY A FACTOR OF 30; thereby significantly reducing logistic footprints and replenishment demands. The use of the nano-engineered Silica Aerogel/GAC composites would provide a water purification technology that meets the needs of Future Combat Systems.

Daily, W; Coleman, S; Love, A; Reynolds, J; O'Brien, K; Gammon, S

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

190

Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-322 2008 Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College... Station Guy Fipps Texas AgriLife Extension Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station March 20, 2007 Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation...

Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

191

Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

Hwang, In-Hee, E-mail: hwang@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan); Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Economies of Size in Municipal Water-Treatment Technologies: A Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-367 2010 Economies of Size in Municipal Water-Treatment Technologies: A Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley Case Study By: Christopher N. Boyer1, M. Edward Rister2... Resources Institute Technical Report No. 367 Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 July 2010 Economies of Size in Municipal Water-Treatment Technologies: A Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley Case Study July 2010 Texas Water...

Boyer, Christopher N.; Rister, M. Edward; Rogers, Callie S.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Browning, Charles Jr.; Elium III, James R.; Seawright, Emily K.

193

Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 Recycled Water Rules and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Qualitys Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

Mike Lewis

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Documentation of toxicity testing results on increased supernate treatment rate of 2700 gallons/batch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1991, Reactor Materials increased the rate of supernate treatment in the M-Area Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility (DETF) from 1800 gallons to [approximately]2700 gallons of supernate per 36,000 gallon dilute wastewater batch. The first release of the treated effluent began on March 3, 1991. A series of whole effluent toxicity tests was conducted on the DETF effluent to determine if the increased supernate concentration would result in any chronic toxicity affects in the receiving stream (Tims Branch). The toxicity tests were conducted at instream concentrations equivalent to DETF release rates of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 gallons/min. The test results, based on 7-day Ceriodaphnia dubia chronic toxicity, indicated no toxicity effects at any concentration tested. Supernate treatment in DETF continued at the higher concentration.

Pickett, J.B.

1992-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nutritional value of sorghum grain after treatment with water and enzymes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Addition of enzymes to this autoclaved blend gave a highly significant response in. chick growth. They concluded that the better nutritional value of Eastern barleys was caused by the presence in the grain of a heat labile factor (probably enzymes... had no effect on growth or feed efficiency, regardless of grain used. Enzyme supplementa- tion decreased the wet litter condition normally encounter- ed when barley was fed to the birds. The effects of water and enzyme treatments of the husk...

Silva, Paulo Carlos

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Characterization of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic powders produced by water atomization and powder heat treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic shows its importance in industrial applications, the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic-containing powders, produced by a powder processing route with a high production rate, were characterized. The route consisted of water atomization of an alloy melt (Cu61 wt.% Sn) and subsequent heat treatment of the water-atomized powders. Characterization of the water-atomized powders and their heated forms was conducted by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Fine water-atomized powder microstructures consisted of primary hexagonal ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} dendrites coexisting with interdendritic ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} + ?-Sn eutectic. Solidification of fine melt droplets was governed by surface nucleation and growth of the primary hexagonal ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} dendrites followed by ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} + ?-Sn eutectic solidification of the remnant liquid. In coarse melt droplets, nucleation and growth of primary ?-Cu{sub 3}Sn dendrites were followed by peritectic reaction (?-Cu{sub 3}Sn + liquid ? ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5}) or direct crystallization of ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} phase from the undercooled melt. Finally, the ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} + ?-Sn eutectic solidification of the remnant liquid occurred. Heating of the water-atomized powders at different temperatures resulted in microstructural homogenization. The water-atomized powders with mixed phases were transformed to powders with single monoclinic ?-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} phase. - Highlights: The Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic powder production route was proposed. Single phase Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} powders could be by water atomization and heating. Water-atomized CuSn powders contained mixed CuSn phases. Solidification and heat treatment of water-atomized CuSn powders are explained.

Tongsri, Ruangdaj, E-mail: ruangdt@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Yotkaew, Thanyaporn, E-mail: thanyy@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Krataitong, Rungtip, E-mail: rungtipk@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Wila, Pongsak, E-mail: pongsakw@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Sir-on, Autcharaporn, E-mail: autchars@mtec.or.th [Materials Characterization Research Unit (MCRU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Muthitamongkol, Pennapa, E-mail: pennapm@mtec.or.th [Materials Characterization Research Unit (MCRU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Tosangthum, Nattaya, E-mail: nattayt@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1 Xixi Wang, Assefa M. Melesse, Michael E. McClain, and Wanhong Yang2 ABSTRACT: Coalbed methane (CBM the Powder River. (KEY TERMS: coalbed methane, produced water; Montana; natural gas; pattern analysis

McClain, Michael

198

Feasibility and Treatment of Oil and Gas Produced Water as a Medium for Nannochloropsis Salina cultivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this paper are: (1) How much PW is available - (a) Lots, but probably not enough to support the largest estimates of algae production needed, (b) Diluent water is likely needed to support cultivation in some cases, (c) An assessment of how much PW is really available for use is needed; (2) Where is it available - (a) In many places near other resources (land, CO{sub 2}, sunlight, nutrients) and infrastructure (pipelines, refineries, disposal operations/wells); (3) Is the water chemistry acceptable for use - (a) Yes, in many cases with minimal treatment, (b) Additional constituents of value exist in PW for media; (4) Does it need treatment prior to use - (a) Yes, it may often need treatment for organics, some metals, and biological contaminants, (b) Source control and monitoring can reduce need for treatment; (5) How much does it cost to treat it - (a) If desalination is not needed, from <$0.01-$0.60 per m3 is a starting estimate; and (6) Can you grow algae in it - (a) Yes, but we need more experimentation to optimize field conditions, media mixing, and algae types.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoshida, Thomas M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laur, Paul A. [Eldorado Biofuels; Visolay, Alfonz [VM Technologies

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

199

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for protecting public drinking water (CALFED 2000), are alsobest management options for drinking water sourced from theDelta Authority. 2004. Drinking water quality program multi-

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-water cross flow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-water cross flow Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 326...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-water interactions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-water interactions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Earth's ...as conduit Summary: , and...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient water quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ambient water quality Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Episodic Toxicity in the San Francisco Bay System...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - air water two-phase Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air water two-phase Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Proceedings of FEDSM2005 2005 ASME Fluids...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying water cooled Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: applying water cooled Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Proceedings of the 18th Annual North American...

205

Cs-137 in the Savannah River and the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water-treatment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium-137 concentration measurements made in 1965 are reported for the Savannah River above and below the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants down river. These concentrations, measured when four SRP reactors (C, K, L, and P) were operating, were used to estimate Cs-137 reduction ratios for transport in the Savannah River and across each water treatment plant. In 1965 there was a 48% reduction in the Cs-137 concentration in the Savannah River between Highway 301 and the water treatment plant inlet points. Measured Cs-137 values in the finished water from Port Wentworth and the Beaufort-Jasper water treatment plants showed an 80% and 98% reduction in concentration level, respectively, when compared to Cs-137 concentration at Highway 301. The lower Cs-137 concentration (0.04 pCi/l) in the Beaufort-Jasper finished water is attributed to dilution in the canal from inflow of surface water (40%) and sediment cleanup processes that take place in the open portions of the canal (about 17 to 18 miles). Using the 1965 data, maximum Cs-137 concentrations expected in finished water in the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants following L-Reactor startup were recalculated. The recalculated values are 0.01 and 0.09 pCi/l for Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth, respectively, compared to the 1.05 pCi/l value in the Environmental Assessment.

Hayes, D.W.; Boni, A.L.

1983-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

Soil chemical changes resulting from irrigation with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land application of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) co-produced water is a popular management option within northwestern Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. This study evaluated the impacts of land application of CBNG waters on soil chemical properties at five sites. Soil samples were collected from different depths (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60, 60-90, and 90-120 cm) from sites that were irrigated with CBNG water for 2 to 3 yr and control sites. Chemical properties of CBNG water used for irrigation on the study sites indicate that electrical conductivity of CBNG water (EC{sub w}) and sodium adsorption ratio of CBNG water (SAR{sub w}) values were greater than those recommended for irrigation use on the soils at the study sites. Soil chemical analyses indicated that electrical conductivity of soil saturated paste extracts (ECe) and sodium adsorption ratio of soil saturated paste extracts (SAR(e)) values for irrigated sites were significantly greater (P < 0.05) than control plots in the upper 30-cm soil depths. Mass balance calculations suggested that there has been significant buildup of Na in irrigated soils due to CBNG irrigation water as well as Na mobilization within the soil profiles. Results indicate that irrigation with CBNG water significantly impacts certain soil properties, particularly if amendments are not properly utilized. This study provides information for better understanding changes in soil properties due to land application of CBNG water.

Ganjegunte, G.K.; Vance, G.F.; King, L.A. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Renewable Resources

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Zinc Treatment Effects on Corrosion Behavior of 304 Stainless Steel in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace levels of soluble zinc(II) ions (30 ppb) maintained in mildly alkaline, hydrogenated water at 260 C were found to lower the corrosion rate of austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400) by about a factor of five, relative to a non-zinc baseline test after 10,000 hr. Characterizations of the corrosion oxide layer via grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with argon ion milling and target factor analysis, confirmed the presence of two spinel oxide phases and minor amounts of recrystallized nickel. Based on the distribution of the three oxidized alloying constituents (Fe, Cr, Ni) with respect to depth and oxidation state, it was concluded that: (a) corrosion occurs in a non-selective manner, but approximately 30% of the oxidized iron is released to the water, and (b) the two spinel oxides exist as a ferrite-based outer layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.95}Cr{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 4} on top of a chromite-based inner layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.7})(Fe{sub 0.4}Cr{sub 0.6}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. These results suggest that immiscibility in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} binary may play a role in controlling the zinc content of the outer layer. On the other hand, the lower corrosion rate caused by zinc additions is believed to be a consequence of corrosion oxide film stabilization due to the substitution reaction equilibrium: z Zn{sup 2+}(aq) + FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) {approx} z Fe{sup 2+}(aq) + (Zn{sub z}Fe{sub 1-z})Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s). The liquid-solid distribution coefficient for the reaction, defined by the ratio of total zinc to iron ion concentrations in solution divided by the Zn(II)/Fe(II) ratio in the solid, z/(1-z), was found to be 0.184. This interpretation is consistent with the benefits of zinc treatment being concentration dependent.

S.E. Ziemniak; M. Hanson

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

208

Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation. - Graphical abstract: Advanced ozone membrane reactor synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone, membrane contactor for sorption and reaction and membrane separator for clean water production to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement in treatment performance compared to traditional ozone reactor. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reactor using membranes for ozone distributor, reaction contactor and water separator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Designed to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement over traditional reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrotalcite coatings capture and trap pollutants giving additional 30% TOC removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High surface area coating prevents polarization and improves membrane separation and life.

Chan, Wai Kit, E-mail: kekyeung@ust.hk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Joueet, Justine; Heng, Samuel; Yeung, King Lun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Schrotter, Jean-Christophe [Water Research Center of Veolia, Anjou Recherche, Chemin de la Digue, BP 76. 78603, Maisons Laffitte, Cedex (France)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Optimizing the air flotation water treatment process. Final report, May 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection water for the Nelson Project is a combination of produced and make-up water, typical of many Eastern Kansas operations. The make-up water is a low-salinity salt water from the Arbuckle Formation and contains dissolved minerals and sulfides. The produced water contains suspended oil, suspended clay and silt particles, along with a combination of other dissolved minerals. The combination of the two waters causes several undesirable reactions. The suspended solids load contained in the combined waters would plug a 75-micron plant bag filter within one day. Wellhead filters of 75-micron size were also being used on the injection wells. The poor water quality resulted in severe loss of injectivity and frequent wellbore cleaning of the injection wells. Various mechanical and graded-bed filtration methods were considered for cleaning the water. These methods were rejected due to the lack of field equipment and service availability. A number of vendors did not even respond to the author`s request. The air flotation process was selected as offering the best hope for a long-term solution. The objective of this work is to: increase the cost effectiveness of the process through optimizing process design factors and operational parameters. A vastly modified air flotation system is the principal tool for accomplishing the project objective. The air flotation unit, as received from manufacturer Separation Specialist, was primarily designed to remove oil from produced water. The additional requirement for solids removal necessitated major physical changes in the unit. Problems encountered with the air flotation unit and specific modifications are detailed in the body of the report.

Barnett, B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development: Results of FY 1993 studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes experimental results from work conducted in FY 1993 under the Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development Task of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Technology Development Project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Experiments were conducted in the following six general areas: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge leaching, (3) sludge dissolution, (4) actinide separation by solvent extraction and extraction chromatography, (5) Sr separation by solvent extraction, and (6) extraction of Cs from acidic solution.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Barrington, R.J.; Rapko, B.M.; Carlson, C.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Recovery: A Modular Water Treatment System Deployed in Seven Weeks - 12489  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, the magnitude 9.0 Great East Japan earthquake, Tohoku, hit off the Fukushima coast of Japan. This was one of the most powerful earthquakes in recorded history and the most powerful one known to have hit Japan. The ensuing tsunami devastated a huge area resulting in some 25,000 persons confirmed dead or missing. The perfect storm was complete when the tsunami then found the four reactor, Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Station directly in its destructive path. While recovery systems admirably survived the powerful earthquake, the seawater from the tsunami knocked the emergency cooling systems out and did extensive damage to the plant and site. Subsequent hydrogen generation caused explosions which extended this damage to a new level and further flooded the buildings with highly contaminated water. Some 2 million people were evacuated from a fifty mile radius of the area and evaluation and cleanup began. Teams were assembled in Tokyo the first week of April to lay out potential plans for the immediate treatment of some 63 million gallons (a number which later exceeded 110 million gallons) of highly contaminated water to avoid overflow from the buildings as well as supply the desperately needed clean cooling water for the reactors. A system had to be deployed with a very brief cold shake down and hot startup before the rainy season started in early June. Joined by team members Toshiba (oil removal system), AREVA (chemical precipitation system) and Hitachi-GE (RO system), Kurion (cesium removal system following the oil separator) proposed, designed, fabricated, delivered and started up a one of a kind treatment skid and over 100 metric tons of specially engineered and modified Ion Specific Media (ISM) customized for this very challenging seawater/oil application, all in seven weeks. After a very short cold shake down, the system went into operation on June 17, 2011 on actual waste waters far exceeding 1 million Bq/mL in cesium and many other isotopes. One must remember that, in addition to attempting to do isotope removal in the competition of seawater (as high as 18,000 ppm sodium due to concentration), some 350,000 gallons of turbine oil was dispersed into the flooded buildings as well. The proposed system consisted of a 4 guard vessel skid for the oil and debris, 4 skids containing 16 cesium towers in a lead-lag layout with removable vessels (sent to an interim storage facility), and a 4 polishing vessel skid for iodine removal and trace cesium levels. At a flow rate of at least 220 gallons per minute, the system has routinely removed over 99% of the cesium, the main component of the activity, since going on line. To date, some 50% of the original activity has been removed and stabilized and cold shutdown of the plant was announced on December 10, 2011. In March and April alone, 10 cubic feet of Engineered Herschelite was shipped to Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, NPP, to support the April 1, 2011 outage cleanup; 400 cubic feet was shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for strontium (Sr-90) ground water remediation; and 6000 cubic feet (100 metric tons, MT, or 220,400 pounds) was readied for the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station with an additional 100 MT on standby for replacement vessels. This experience and accelerated media production in the U.S. bore direct application to what was to soon be used in Fukushima. How such a sophisticated and totally unique system and huge amount of media could be deployable in such a challenging and changing matrix, and in only seven weeks, is outlined in this paper as well as the system and operation itself. As demonstrated herein, all ten major steps leading up to the readiness and acceptance of a modular emergency technology recovery system were met and in a very short period of time, thus utilizing three decades of experience to produce and deliver such a system literally in seven weeks: - EPRI - U.S. Testing and Experience Leading to Introduction to EPRI - Japan and Subsequently TEPCO Emergency Meetings - Three Mile Island (TMI) Media and Vitrification Experience

Denton, Mark S.; Mertz, Joshua L. [Kurion, Inc., P.O. Box 5901, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Bostick, William D. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCL) ETTP, Building K-1006, 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Endovenous Laser Treatment of Saphenous Vein Reflux: Long-Term Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PURPOSE: To report long-term follow-up results of endovenous laser treatment for great saphenous vein (GSV) reflux caused by saphenofemoral junction (SFJ) incompetence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four hundred ninety-nine GSVs in 423 subjects with varicose veins were treated over a 3-year period with 810-nm diode laser energy delivered percutaneously into the GSV via a 600-m fiber. Tumescent anesthesia (100200 mL of 0.2 % lidocaine) was delivered perivenously under ultrasound (US) guidance. Patients were evaluated clinically and with duplex US at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and yearly thereafter to assess treatment efficacy and adverse reactions. Compression sclerotherapy was performed in nearly all patients at follow-up for treatment of associated tributary varicose veins and secondary telangiectasia. RESULTS: Successful occlusion of the GSV, defined as absence of flow on color Doppler imaging, was noted in 490 of 499 GSVs (98.2%) after initial treatment. One hundred thirteen of 121 limbs (93.4%) followed for 2 years have remained closed, with the treated portions of the GSVs not visible on duplex imaging. Of note, all recurrences have occurred before 9 months, with the majority noted before 3 months. Bruising was noted in 24 % of patients and tightness along the course of the treated vein was present in 90 % of limbs. There have been no skin burns, paresthesias, or cases of deep vein thrombosis. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term results available in 499 limbs treated with endovenous laser demonstrate a recurrence

Robert J. Min; Neil Khilnani; Steven E. Zimmet

213

THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 094304 (2011) "Adiabatic-hindered-rotor" treatment of the parahydrogen-water complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 094304 (2011) "Adiabatic-hindered-rotor" treatment of the parahydrogen-water complex Tao Zeng,1 Hui Li,2 Robert J. Le Roy,1 and Pierre-Nicholas Roy1,a) 1 Department 1 September 2011) Inspired by a recent successful adiabatic-hindered-rotor treatment

Le Roy, Robert J.

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - area effluent treatment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Nature and Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter in Summary: . As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment wetlands, the DOM undergoes...

215

Water quality changes as a result of coalbed methane development in a Rocky mountain watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) development raises serious environmental concerns. In response, concerted efforts have been made to collect chemistry, salinity, and sodicity data on CBM produced water. However, little information on changes of stream water quality resulting from directly and/or indirectly received CBM produced water is available in the literature. The objective of this study was to examine changes in stream water quality, particularly sodicity and salinity, due to CBM development in the Powder River watershed, which is located in the Rocky Mountain Region and traverses the states of Wyoming and Montana. To this end, a retrospective analysis of water quality trends and patterns was conducted using data collected from as early as 1946 up to and including 2002 at four U.S. Geological Survey gauging stations along the Powder River. Trend analysis was conducted using linear regression and Seasonal Kendall tests, whereas, Tukey's test for multiple comparisons was used to detect changes in the spatial pattern. The results indicated that the CBM development adversely affected the water quality in the Powder River. First, the development elevated the stream sodicity, as indicated by a significant increase trend of the sodium adsorption ratio. Second, the development tended to shrink the water quality differences among the three downstream stations but to widen the differences between these stations and the farthest upstream station. In contrast, the development had only a minor influence on stream salinity. Hence, the CBM development is likely an important factor that can be managed to lower the stream sodicity. The management may need to take into account that the effects of the CBMdevelopment were different from one location to another along the Powder River.

Wang, X.; Melesse, A.M.; McClain, M.E.; Yang, W. [Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX (USA)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Meeting the Need for Safe Drinking Water in Rural Mexico through Point-of-Use Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar disinfection of drinking water and diarrhoea in Maasai2001. Solar disinfection of drinking water protects againstdisinfection of drinking water contained in transparent

Lang, Micah; Kaser, Forrest; Reygadas, Fermin; Nelson, Kara; Kammen, Daniel M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Results of scoping tests in corium-water thermal interactions in ex-vessel geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of scoping tests are reported which were performed in the ANL/EPRI Corium Ex-vessel interactions (COREXIT) Facility located at ANL. These tests are examining issues related to containment loading (i.e., steam generation, H/sub 2/ production, and debris dispersal) for hypothetical LWR accidents that are postulated to progress to the point of molten corium breaching the vessel bottom head and entering the reactor cavity. The geometry selected for these tests is a 1 : 30 linear scale of the Zion PWR containment design in which the cavity is connected to the containment volume by an open tunnel through which pass the in-core detector guide tubes. The effects of the corium-water mixing modes were investigated in the first two tests in the series. In test CWTI-1 the molten corium was ejected into water which filled the cavity mockup volume to one-half the passageway height. In CWTI-2, the molten corium was dropped atop the refractory base in the cavity mockup without the presence of water, and water was injected atop the corium melt immediately afterward as per accumulator discharge. These tests have shown significant differences in fuel fragmentation, steam generation rate, hydrogen production, and fuel dispersal. Particularly noteworthy was the significant amount of dispersal of both water and corium debris from the cavity mockup due to the initially rapid steam generation rate in CWTI-1.

Spencer, B.W.; McUmber, L.; Sehgal, B.R.; Sienicki, J.J.; Squarer, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - abuse treatment gap Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Summary: .1 Prevalence and Treatment of Mental Health and Substance Abuse in New Hampshire 2 1.2 Cost of Mental Health... Treatment Declined 12 3.1.3 Access to...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient water toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The most Summary: waters of the toxicity test beakers. Immediate collection and analysis of interstitial water... was necessary. Others have recommended interstitial waters...

220

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Arsenic-Free, Safe Drinking Water in Bangladesh. Worldburden from arsenic in drinking water in Bangladesh. Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - army field water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Progress Summary: efforts in water and related land resources management. U.S. Army Engineer Institute for Water... : System-Wide Water Resources Programs Partners: U.S....

222

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Treatment of Different Sources of Drinking Water." Dr. Craver went on to publish a rigorous assessment of the success of nanosilver used in ceramic water filters for point-of-use treatment for drinking water in a previously funded project in addition to applying the results of this research to water treatment

223

Monte Carlo electron-photon transport using GPUs as an accelerator: Results for a water-aluminum-water phantom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous Environments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. In this paper, the preliminary results of code development and testing are presented. The electron transport in media was modeled using the class-II condensed history method. The electron energy considered ranges from a few hundred keV to 30 MeV. Moller scattering and bremsstrahlung processes above a preset energy were explicitly modeled. Energy loss below that threshold was accounted for using the Continuously Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA). Photon transport was dealt with using the delta tracking method. Photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelised geometry was supported. A serial ARHCHER-CPU was first written in C++. The code was then ported to the GPU platform using CUDA C. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. ARHCHER was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and lateral dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x10{sup 6} histories of electrons were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively, on a CPU with a single core used. (authors)

Su, L.; Du, X.; Liu, T.; Xu, X. G. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Surfactants containing radioactive run-offs: Ozone treatment, influence on nuclear power plants water waste special treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors discuss the problems encountered in the efficiency of radioactive waste treatment in nuclear power plants in Kursk. The ozonization of aqueous solutions of surfactants was carried out in the laboratory`s ozonization system. The surfactants which are discharged to the ion exchangers deteriorate resins, clog up the ion exchangers, and decrease filtration velocity. Therefore, this investigation focused on finding a method to increase the efficiency of this treatment process.

Prokudina, S.A.; Grachok, M.A. [Belarussian State Economic Univ., Minsk (Belarus)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual water storage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Partnerships Summary: and logistics Better Place, Fiskar Automotive, Mission Motors, Tesla Motors WATER Filtration, purification... , water conservation, irrigation and...

226

Reinforcing of QA/QC programs in radiotherapy departments in Croatia: Results of treatment planning system verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation of advanced techniques in clinical practice can greatly improve the outcome of radiation therapy, but it also makes the process much more complex with a lot of room for errors. An important part of the quality assurance program is verification of treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric verifications in anthropomorphic phantom were performed in 4 centers where new systems were installed. A total of 14 tests for 2 photon energies and multigrid superposition algorithms were conducted using the CMS XiO TPS. Evaluation criteria as specified in the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Reports Series (IAEA TRS) 430 were employed. Results of measurements are grouped according to the placement of the measuring point and the beam energy. The majority of differences between calculated and measured doses in the water-equivalent part of the phantom were in tolerance. Significantly more out-of-tolerance values were observed in nonwater-equivalent parts of the phantom, especially for higher-energy photon beams. This survey was done as a part of continuous effort to build up awareness of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) importance in the Croatian radiotherapy community. Understanding the limitations of different parts of the various systems used in radiation therapy can systematically improve quality as well.

Jurkovi?, Slaven; vabi?, Manda; Dikli?, Ana; Smilovi? Radoj?i?, ?eni; Dundara, Dea [Clinic for Radiotherapy and Oncology, Physics Division, University Hospital Rijeka, Rijeka (Croatia); Kasabai?, Mladen; Ivkovi?, Ana [Department for Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Faj, Dario, E-mail: dariofaj@mefos.hr [Department of Physics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Evaluation of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) alternatives in Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ghana's water quality and sanitation condition are very poor. Pure Home Water (PHW), a local non-profit organization has been successfully improving the supply of safe drinking water in the northern region by producing and ...

Wong, TengKe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Video-rate optical dosimetry and dynamic visualization of IMRT and VMAT treatment plans in water using Cherenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A novel technique for optical dosimetry of dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cherenkov radiation in water. Methods: A high-sensitivity, intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was configured to acquire a two-dimensional (2D) projection image of the Cherenkov radiation induced by IMRT and VMAT plans, based on the Task Group 119 (TG-119) C-Shape geometry. Plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using 6 MV x-rays from a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator (Linac) incident on a water tank doped with the fluorophore quinine sulfate. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the Linac target trigger pulse to reduce background light artifacts, read out for a single radiation pulse, and binned to a resolution of 512 512 pixels. The resulting videos were analyzed temporally for various regions of interest (ROI) covering the planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR), and summed to obtain an overall light intensity distribution, which was compared to the expected dose distribution from the TPS using a gamma-index analysis. Results: The chosen camera settings resulted in 23.5 frames per second dosimetry videos. Temporal intensity plots of the PTV and OAR ROIs confirmed the preferential delivery of dose to the PTV versus the OAR, and the gamma analysis yielded 95.9% and 96.2% agreement between the experimentally captured Cherenkov light distribution and expected TPS dose distribution based upon a 3%/3 mm dose difference and distance-to-agreement criterion for the IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. Conclusions: The results from this initial study demonstrate the first documented use of Cherenkov radiation for video-rate optical dosimetry of dynamic IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. The proposed modality has several potential advantages over alternative methods including the real-time nature of the acquisition, and upon future refinement may prove to be a robust and novel dosimetry method with both research and clinical applications.

Glaser, Adam K., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Davis, Scott C. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Pogue, Brian W., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Fox, Colleen J.; Gladstone, David J. [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States)] [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Selection of water treatment processes special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. The restoration of contaminated aquifers is to be undertaken in Phase II of the UMTRA Project. To begin implementation of Phase II, DOE requested that groundwater restoration methods and technologies be investigated by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). and that the results of the TAC investigations be documented in special study reports. Many active and passive methods are available to clean up contaminated groundwater. Passive groundwater treatment includes natural flushing, geochemical barriers, and gradient manipulation by stream diversion or slurry walls. Active groundwater.cleanup techniques include gradient manipulation by well extraction or injection. in-situ biological or chemical reclamation, and extraction and treatment. Although some or all of the methods listed above may play a role in the groundwater cleanup phase of the UMTRA Project, the extraction and treatment (pump and treat) option is the only restoration alternative discussed in this report. Hence, all sections of this report relate either directly or indirectly to the technical discipline of process engineering.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Collection and representation of GIS data to aid household water treatment and safe storage technology implementation in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2005, a start-up social business called Pure Home Water (PHW) was begun in Ghana to promote and sell household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) technologies. The original aim of the company was to offer a variety ...

VanCalcar, Jenny E. (Jenny Elizabeth)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal waste treatment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and economic analyses for new thermal waste treatment technologies and examined data... , Columbia University New York, NY Research Associate September 2009 - Present...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid treatment inhibits Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ation by inhibiting the action of the enzyme that links... oxygen with red blood cells. POISON SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT Prussic acid poisoning can occur within a few... , prompt...

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-01 wetland treatment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering... Design; CEE 751: Biological Unit Operations; CEE 771: Wastewater Treatment in Small Rural Communities Source: Marchand, Eric A. - Department of Civil and...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult treatment panel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

non-commercial research Summary: antidepressant treatment. Given the key role of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in adult neurogenesis, we examined whether... of the Diagonal Band...

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging heat treatment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DISORDER CAUSE SIGNS & SYMPTOMS TREATMENT Heat Cramps Heavy sweating Loss of salt -Painful spasms of arms... UFEHS-SAFE-040401 1 Heat Stress Policy UFEHS-SAFE-040401...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal manure treatment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 31 Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems Summary: anaerobic lagoons used in the treatment and storage of these...

237

Oil removal for produced water treatment and micellar cleaning of ultrafiltration membranes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Produced water is a major waste produced from oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source (more)

Beech, Scott Jay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants: Evaluation of the combined cost of makeup water treatment and increased condenser fouling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology is presented to calculate the total combined cost (TCC) of water sourcing, water treatment and condenser fouling in the recirculating cooling systems of thermoelectric power plants. The methodology is employed to evaluate the economic viability of using treated municipal wastewater (MWW) to replace the use of freshwater as makeup water to power plant cooling systems. Cost analyses are presented for a reference power plant and five different tertiary treatment scenarios to reduce the scaling tendencies of MWW. Results indicate that a 550 MW sub-critical coal fired power plant with a makeup water requirement of 29.3 ML/day has a TCC of $3.0 - 3.2 million/yr associated with the use of treated MWW for cooling. (All costs USD 2009). This translates to a freshwater conservation cost of $0.29/kL, which is considerably lower than that of dry air cooling technology, $1.5/kL, as well as the 2020 conservation cost target set by the U.S. Department of Energy, $0.74/kL. Results also show that if the available price of freshwater exceeds that of secondarytreated MWW by more than $0.13-0.14/kL, it can be economically advantageous to purchase secondary MWW and treat it for utilization in the recirculating cooling system of a thermoelectric power plant.

Walker, Michael E.; Theregowda, Ranjani B.; Safari, Iman; Abbasian, Javad; Arastoopour, Hamid; Dzombak, David A.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Miller, David C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The sweet spot of forward osmosis: Treatment of produced water, drilling wastewater, and other complex and difficult liquid streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and especially oil and gas (O&G) exploration and production wastewaters. High salt concentrations, decentralized generated during exploration and production (E&P) (e.g., drilling muds, hydraulic fracturing flowback water processes, have identified its sweet spot: treatment and desalination of complex industrial streams

240

1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important when  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important = CL (CL + HcVG) (6) where CL = liquid phase concentration, VL = liquid volume, CG = gas phase concentration, VG = gas volume, Hc = dimensionless Henry's law coefficient and M = mass of gas. Now use two

Stenstrom, Michael K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Prostatic Artery Embolization as a Primary Treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Preliminary Results in Two Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) typically occurs in the sixth and seventh decades, and the most frequent obstructive urinary symptoms are hesitancy, decreased urinary stream, sensation of incomplete emptying, nocturia, frequency, and urgency. Various medications, specifically 5-{alpha}-reductase inhibitors and selective {alpha}-blockers, can decrease the severity of the symptoms secondary to BPH, but prostatectomy is still considered to be the traditional method of management. We report the preliminary results for two patients with acute urinary retention due to BPH, successfully treated by prostate artery embolization (PAE). The patients were investigated using the International Prostate Symptom Score, by digital rectal examination, urodynamic testing, prostate biopsy, transrectal ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Uroflowmetry and postvoid residual urine volume complemented the investigation at 30, 90, and 180 days after PAE. The procedure was performed under local anesthesia; embolization of the prostate arteries was performed with a microcatheter and 300- to 500-{mu}m microspheres using complete stasis as the end point. One patient was subjected to bilateral PAE and the other to unilateral PAE; they urinated spontaneously after removal of the urethral catheter, 15 and 10 days after the procedure, respectively. At 6-month follow-up, US and MRI revealed a prostate reduction of 39.7% and 47.8%, respectively, for the bilateral PAE and 25.5 and 27.8%, respectively, for the patient submitted to unilateral PAE. The early results, at 6-month follow-up, for the two patients with BPH show a promising potential alternative for treatment with PAE.

Carnevale, Francisco Cesar, E-mail: fcarnevale@uol.com.b [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Interventional Radiology Unit, Radiology Institute, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil); Antunes, Alberto Azoubel [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Urology Department, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil); Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Mauricio da [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Interventional Radiology Unit, Radiology Institute, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil); Oliveira Cerri, Luciana Mendes de [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Ultrasound Unit, Radiology Institute, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil); Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Radiology Institute, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil); Marcelino, Antonio Sergio Zafred [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Ultrasound Unit, Radiology Institute, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil); Freire, Geraldo Campos [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Urology Department, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil); Moreira, Airton Mota [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Interventional Radiology Unit, Radiology Institute, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil); Srougi, Miguel [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Urology Department, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil); Cerri, Giovanni Guido [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Radiology Department, Radiology Institute, Hospital das Clinicas (Brazil)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - air soil water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

iii. Soil-Plant Relationships iv. Cation exchange IV. Pollution of Water, Soil, and Air: (Lecture... unsaturated unsteady water flow X. Gaseous Phase of Soils (Hillel pages...

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - air water soil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

iii. Soil-Plant Relationships iv. Cation exchange IV. Pollution of Water, Soil, and Air: (Lecture... unsaturated unsteady water flow X. Gaseous Phase of Soils (Hillel pages...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual bathing water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The maxi- mum increase of demand for potable water as opposed... The maximum rainwater that can be harvested given by the rain- water ... Source: Papadopoulos,...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric water cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle power plant's water demand is to meet... cooling water makeup requirements. Cooling towers reject heat from a power ... Source: California Energy Commission Collection:...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - american water flea Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

earth at reducing populations Summary: affected than those that must metabolize water from their food sources. Both fleas and blow flies... lost water faster and more...

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - anechoic water tank Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1, 2, and 3 including steam drums, water drums, firebox, and exhaust stack. All tanks including... Side of Surface Condenser < Fuel Oil Storage Tanks < Chilled Water...

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic waste water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovery Jun Wei LIM... waste. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; food waste; brown water; biogas; co-digestion INTRODUCTION... of brown water and food ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

249

Results of a baseflow tritium survey of surface water in Georgia across from the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1991 the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR) issued a press release notifying the public that tritium had been measured in elevated levels (1,200 - 1,500 pCi/1) in water samples collected from drinking water wells in Georgia across from the Savannah River Site in Aiken Co. South Carolina. None of the elevated results were above the Primary Drinking Water Standard for tritium of 20,000 pCi/l. The GDNR initiated 2 surveys to determine the source and extent of elevated tritium: (1) baseflow survey of surface water quality, and (2) well evaluation program. Results from the 2 surveys indicate that the tritium measured in groundwater wells in Georgia is not the result of a groundwater flow from South Carolina under the Savannah River and into Georgia. Atmospheric transport and consequent rainout and infiltration has resulted in an increase of tritium in the water-table aquifer in the vicinity. Water samples collected from drinking water wells believed to have been installed in the aquifer beneath the water-table aquifer were actually from the shallower water-table aquifer. Water samples collected from the wells contain the amount of tritium expected for the water-table aquifer in the sample area. The measured tritium levels in the well samples and baseflow samples do not exceed Primary Drinking Water Standards. Tritium levels in the water-table in Georgia will decline as the atmospheric releases from SRS decline, tritium undergoes natural decay, and infiltration water with less tritium flushes through the subsurface.

Nichols, R.L.

1993-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

250

Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level fish, as a surrogate for all of the underlying transport and transformation processes in a complex ecosystem, has declined as a direct result of the elimination of inorganic mercury inputs. Inorganic tin released to the ecosystem has been found in compartments where particles accumulate with notable levels measured in biofilms.

Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Review of potential technologies for the treatment of Methyl tertiary butyl Ether (MtBE) in drinking water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present, the state of knowledge on effective treatment technologies for MtBE in drinking water, and groundwater in general, is limited. Research by others is focusing on the remediation of MtBE close to the point of release. The City of Santa Monica, MWD, Komex and USC are currently conducting research into different technologies that could be used to remove MtBE from drinking water supplies. The objectives of the research are to evaluate different treatment technologies to identify cost-effective and technically feasible alternatives for the removal of MtBE from drinking water. The evaluation is considering moderate to high water flow rates (100 to 2,000+ gpm) and low to moderate MtBE concentrations (<2,000 {mu}g/l). The research program includes four phases: (1) Literature Review; (2) Bench Scale Study; (3) Field Scale Pre-pilot Study; and (4) Summary Evaluation. This paper presents some preliminary information and findings from the first phase of this research - the literature review. The review discusses the chemical properties of MtBE and how they affect remediation and thus, an evaluation of alternative treatment technologies. The review of available literature, and the applicability and limitations of the following technologies are presented in detail.

Brown, A.; Browne, T.E. [Komex H2O Science, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Devinny, J.S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Water Use in Parabolic Trough Power Plants: Summary Results from WorleyParsons' Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) contracted with WorleyParsons Group, Inc. to examine the effect of switching from evaporative cooling to alternative cooling systems on a nominal 100-MW parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) plant. WorleyParsons analyzed 13 different cases spanning three different geographic locations (Daggett, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Alamosa, Colorado) to assess the performance, cost, and water use impacts of switching from wet to dry or hybrid cooling systems. NREL developed matching cases in its Solar Advisor Model (SAM) for each scenario to allow for hourly modeling and provide a comparison to the WorleyParsons results.Our findings indicate that switching from 100% wet to 100% dry cooling will result in levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) increases of approximately 3% to 8% for parabolic trough plants throughout most of the southwestern United States. In cooler, high-altitude areas like Colorado's San Luis Valley, WorleyParsons estimated the increase at only 2.5%, while SAM predicted a 4.4% difference. In all cases, the transition to dry cooling will reduce water consumption by over 90%. Utility time-of-delivery (TOD) schedules had similar impacts for wet- and dry-cooled plants, suggesting that TOD schedules have a relatively minor effect on the dry-cooling penalty.

Turchi, C. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C. F.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A novel, integrated treatment system for coal waste waters. Quarterly report, March 2, 1994--June 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aims of this study are to develop, characterize and optimize a novel treatment scheme that would be effective simultaneously against the toxic organics and the heavy metals present in coal conversion waste waters. A specific goal of the study is to remove and recover cationic and anionic heavy metals from aqueous solutions and coal conversion waste waters using modified-clay adsorbents developed in this study. To this end, a multi-step adsorption/desorption process has been carried out with hectorite-CBDA-DT (HCDT) as the adsorbent and Cr(VI) as the adsorbate. Adsorption was carried out at pH 4.0 in 0.02 M buffer, while desorption was effected at the same pH and in the same buffer with either 0.5 M NaCl or 0.02 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as the desorbates. Multi-step involves cycling the same adsorbent through these two sets of operating conditions with a washing step after each adsorption/desorption sequence. The authors results indicate that, during the first two cycles, the potency of the adsorbent remains unchanged, but it diminishes after the third and the fourth cycles. The total decrease in potency is, however, only 15% even after 4 cycles of adsorption/desorption. Addition of 20% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) to the reaction medium, however, diminishes the potency even more after 4 cycles of adsorption and desorption. Both the desorbates yielded identical results, and the overall mass balance on Cr(VI) was between 95 and 102%. Continuous leaching experiments on HCDT revealed that DT bound to HCDT is mobilized to the extent of only 10% after 44 hrs in aqueous medium while in 20% IPA-water mixtures the extent of dissolution of DT from the surface is close to 16%. Thus, the loss of potency of HCDT is attributed partly to the loss of DT from the surface and partly to the incomplete washing of the adsorbent between each adsorption/desorption step.

Wang, H.Y. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wang, H.Y.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Appropriate technology water treatment processes for MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis recommends the use of horizontal-flow roughing filters to treat spring water of variable annual quality in MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand. The public drinking water system for 45,000 refugees is overseen by ...

Vater, Katherine Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A novel, integrated treatment system for coal waste waters. Quarterly report, September 2, 1993--December 1, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aims of this study are to develop, characterize and optimize a novel treatment scheme that would be effective simultaneously against the toxic organics and the heavy metals present in coal conversion waste waters. In this report, the following findings have been reported and discussed. Adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) onto hectorite-CBDA containing different amounts of adsorbed CBDA is pH dependent, stronger at pH 4.5 and much weaker at pH 8.6. Partitioning into the hydrophobic patches of hectorite-CBDA and binding as counter ion to CBDA bilayers appear to be the dominant mechanisms of adsorption of NA to hectorite-CBDA. Anionic CR(VI) adsorbs very weakly to MONT-DT at pH 8.5 and this result verifies our earlier finding that the positive surface charge on MONT-DT decreases with increasing pH above pH 7.0. Potentiometric titrations of DT in water-isopropyl alcohol (EPA) binary solutions containing different volume fractions of IPA reveal that the pKa of DT is 7.6 {+-} 0.1 independent of EPA volume fraction. It is also shown that DT forms emulsions at pH lower than 4.0 and these emulsions tend to break up as pH is raised above 6.5. The formation of DT emulsions is reversible with respect to pH, but the process appears to be slow with a time constant of about 30 minutes.

Wang, H.Y.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

An evaluation of household drinking water treatment systems in Peru : the table filter and the safe water system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) storage, and education. Tests on the SWSs in Peru demonstrated 99.6% E.coli removal and 95% total coliform removal. Only 30% of the SWSs tested contained water at or above the WHO-recommended concentration of free ...

Coulbert, Brittany, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - air conditioners water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Moving the Market toward High Efficiency Summary: and water source air conditioners and heat pumps <135,000 Btuh and for large commercial packaged water... h and <135,000 Btuh...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic slope waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Greenland continental slope down to a depth... , in the formation of new deep water in the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. Large volumes of cold polar water... ....

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-to-water heat pump Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuels 20 piwf AFR ( )piwttp AkR Summary: for simulating refrigeration and air conditioning equipment of all types: air-to-air, air-to-water, water... flow is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ultraviolet-B Radiation Harms Aquatic Life -Current Results http://www.currentresults.com/Water/Water-Pollution/ultraviolet.php 1 of 2 8/7/2007 1:45 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultraviolet-B Radiation Harms Aquatic Life - Current Results http://www.currentresults.com/Water/Water-Pollution Water E Coli UVB Sunscreen #12;Ultraviolet-B Radiation Harms Aquatic Life - Current Results http://www.currentresults.com/Water/Water-Pollution/ultraviolet.php 2 of 2 8/7/2007 1:45 PM Home | About | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise on This Site

Blaustein, Andrew R.

262

Documentation of toxicity testing results on increased supernate treatment rate of 2700 gallons/batch. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1991, Reactor Materials increased the rate of supernate treatment in the M-Area Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility (DETF) from 1800 gallons to {approximately}2700 gallons of supernate per 36,000 gallon dilute wastewater batch. The first release of the treated effluent began on March 3, 1991. A series of whole effluent toxicity tests was conducted on the DETF effluent to determine if the increased supernate concentration would result in any chronic toxicity affects in the receiving stream (Tims Branch). The toxicity tests were conducted at instream concentrations equivalent to DETF release rates of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 gallons/min. The test results, based on 7-day Ceriodaphnia dubia chronic toxicity, indicated no toxicity effects at any concentration tested. Supernate treatment in DETF continued at the higher concentration.

Pickett, J.B.

1992-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations for K West Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to develop the rational for the material balances that are documented in the KW Basin water system Level 1 process flow diagrams.

REED, A.V.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Integrating Renewable Energy Resources: a microgrid case study of a Dutch drink water treatment plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the Netherlands 1.2 billion cubic meters of drinking water are produced each year, which uses about 480 GWh of electricity per year as an (more)

Soshinskaya, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A novel, integrated treatment system for coal waste waters. Quarterly report, June 2, 1993--September 1, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aims of this study are to develop, characterize and optimize a novel treatment scheme that would be effective simultaneously against the toxic organics and the heavy metals present in coal conversion waste waters. In this report, the following findings have been reported and discussed. Acid-base titration of Duomeen-T (DT), a diamine surfactant, that has been used in this study to modify smectite surfaces to form smectite-DT complexes has been undertaken. In aqueous medium containing 5% by volume iso propyl alcohol (IPA), DT shows a broad distribution of pKa with a mean value of 7.55. This finding suggests that DT is a much weaker base than a typical diamine and helps explain the fact that Cu(II) adsorbs specifically onto DT with maximal affinity in the pH range 7.2--7.5. Electrokinetic sonic amplitude (ESA) measurements on DT-smectite complexes also reveal that the mean pKa of the adsorbed DT is around 7.0. This finding supports our earlier observations that Cu(II) and Cd(II) cations bind strongly through specific interaction to DT-smectite surface in the pH range 7.0--8.0. Our results also show that DT is fully protonated at pH 4.5, and it is at this pH that Cr(VI) is maximally adsorbed as counterions to the DT-smectite surface. These and our earlier results provide a firm basis to conclude that a heterogeneous mixture of diamine surfactants can be used to adsorb and desorb cationic and anionic heavy metals from their respective aqueous solutions as a function of the solution pH.

Wang, H.Y.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sustainable Use of Resources Recycling of Sewage Treatment Plant Water in Concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The concrete industry is a significant contributor to air pollution and also a consumer of vast quantities widely used construction material in the world. Production of portland cement used in concrete produces is one of the largest water consuming industries. Approximately 150 liters of water is required per cu. m

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

267

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 gallons), such an approach can be wasteful, increasing energy costs for the well pump to refill the tank Chlorine Amounts To sanitize water properly, enough chlorine needs to be added to a storage tank to reach bacteria have been properly destroyed by the sanitation process, submit water samples from a faucet served

268

Results of the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment investigated the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered reactor accident. This experiment, which was carried out in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories, was performed under the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program. The DF-4 test is described herein and results from the experiment are presented. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B{sub 4}C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. Hydrogen generation was found to continue throughout the experiment, diminishing slightly following the relocation of molten oxidizing zircaloy to the lower extreme of the test bundle. A large blockage which was formed from this material continued to oxidize while steam was being fed into the the test bundle. The results of this test have provided information on the initial stages of core melt progression in BWR geometry involving the heatup and cladding oxidation stages of a severe accident and terminating at the point of melting and relocation of the metallic core components. The information is useful in modeling melt progression in BWR core geometry, and provides engineering insight into the key phenomena controlling these processes. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - austrian mineral water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mines may affect air quality. As with water pollution, mines can contribute to air pollution... Chapter 15 Mineral Resources and the Environment 12;Minerals ... Source: Pan,...

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-water bubbly flow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Chemistry 6 Hydrodynamic and statistical parameters of slug flow Lev Shemer * Summary: identification from dynamic void fraction measurements in vertical air-water flows. Int....

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancient river water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modern Demands published by the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum... Cruz River Channel, Pima County, Arizona. Water Resources Investigations Reports; 96-4021, 1996. Pima... , Preserve...

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced water reactor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water... it can be built on time and budget. Reactors currently under construction in Finland and France... are indeed well behind schedule. But there are several reactors that...

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - area modulate water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-steps. The hydrological module is designed to ac- count for: water availability in terms of river runo , reservoir storage... -arid hydroclimatological conditions. This...

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - abb-ce light water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supplier Beginning in 1999... , community water supply systems must provide an annual report describ- ing the quality of their drinking Source: Fernndez-Juricic, Esteban -...

275

NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES MEASUREMENTS IN DRINKING WATER BY LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING. METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedure, standardized by International Standard Organization.4 On the contrary, total indicative dose in view of a large scale monitoring program. World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent coastal waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wetland Forests Summary: of coastal Louisiana is presently experiencing an apparent water level rise of about 3.3 feet per century... infrastructure that have also altered and...

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent marine waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEMINAR Diatom Based Quantitative Reconstructions of Summary: . The bay ecosystem is affected by changes in water quality and quantity in the adjacent marine... and freshwater...

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - aegean sea waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aegean Sea water masses in a dense grid of stations-winter 1988, VINITI, B89, 1201, Sebastopol, 1989... ., and Y. N. Krestenitis, Modelling the ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid water environments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provides some chemicals which are incompatible with other compounds. Summary: Potassium carbon tetrachloride, carbon dioxide, water Potassium chlorate sulfuric and other acids...

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazon state waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are linked... . Aparicio, and C. A. Llerena CA. 2001, Water use and protection in rural communities of the Peruvian Amazon... Policies and Management for Rivers: Lessons from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous solid water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron and Aluminum in Phosphorus Retention in Sandy Soils of the Suwannee... P against leaching is critical to maintaining water quality in this area. Some of the most...

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline ground waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water from the Lake Calumet... , and ground ... Source: Bethke, Craig - Department of Geology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

283

Analysis of 129I in Groundwater Samples: Direct and Quantitative Results below the Drinking Water Standard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its long half-life (15.7 million years) and relatively unencumbered migration in subsurface environments, 129I has been recognized as a contaminant of concern at numerous federal, private, and international facilities. In order to understand the long-term risk associated with 129I at these locations, quantitative analysis of groundwater samples must be performed. However, the ability to quantitatively assess the 129I content in groundwater samples requires specialized extraction and sophisticated analytical techniques, which are complicated and not always available to the general scientific community. This paper highlights an analytical method capable of directly quantifying 129I in groundwater samples at concentrations below the MCL without the need for sample pre-concentration. Samples were analyzed on a Perkin Elmer ELAN DRC II ICP-MS after minimal dilution using O2 as the reaction gas. Analysis of continuing calibration verification standards indicated that the DRC mode could be used for quantitative analysis of 129I in samples below the drinking water standard (0.0057 ng/ml or 1 pCi/L). The low analytical detection limit of 129I analysis in the DRC mode coupled with minimal sample dilution (1.02x) resulted in a final sample limit of quantification of 0.0051 ng/ml. Subsequent analysis of three groundwater samples containing 129I resulted in fully quantitative results in the DRC mode, and spike recovery analyses performed on all three samples confirmed that the groundwater matrix did not adversely impact the analysis of 129I in the DRC mode. This analytical approach has been proven to be a cost-effective, high-throughput technique for the direct, quantitative analysis of 129I in groundwater samples at concentrations below the current MCL.

Brown, Christopher F.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2007-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

284

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking Water/Wastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Learn how to track the progress of energy efficiency efforts and compare the energy use of wastewater treatment plants to other peer facilities across the country. Attendees will learn how to...

285

UK Innovation Potential in Advanced Water Treatment: Future Directions & Strategy I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The below response to the twelve questions discussed by eight interdisciplinary groups during the water innovation workshop includes the breath of responses with some editorial comments (in italics). From those discussions ...

Schfer, Andrea; Walker, Mike; Bower, Matt; Ponton, George

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Sorption of micropollutant estrone to a water treatment ion exchange resin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micropollutants occur in natural waters from a range of sources. Estrogenic compounds are naturally excreted by humans and hence stem predominantly from wastewater effluents. Due to the small size and concentration of ...

Neale, Peta A.; Mastrup, Maibritt; Borgmann, Thomas; Schfer, Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Adsorption of Estrone on nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes in water and wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adsorption of the trace contaminant estrone, a natural hormone and commonly abundant in surface waters and in treated as well as untreated wastewaters, to eight commercial nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) ...

Nghiem, D.L.; Schfer, Andrea; Waite, T.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Spirasol : improvements to semi-continuous solar disinfection water treatment systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was carried out to determine the feasibility of an original point of use solar water disinfection system created by the author and named "Spirasol." The study primarily focused on the comparison of ...

Loux, Brian Michael, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

Krauter, Paula A. W. (Livermore, CA); Krauter, Gordon W. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

System Description for the KW Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) (70.3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a description of the system that collects and processes the sludge and radioactive ions released by the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) processing operations conducted in the 105 KW Basin. The system screens, settles, filters, and conditions the basin water for reuse. Sludge and most radioactive ions are removed before the water is distributed back to the basin pool. This system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP).

DERUSSEAU, R.R.

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

291

Side-by-Side Testing of Water Heating Systems: Results from the 2009-2010 Evaluation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The performance of seven differing types of residential water heating systems was compared in a side-by-side test configuration over a full year period. The Hot Water System Laboratory (HWS Lab) test facility at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) in Cocoa, FL was used for the tests.

292

Evaluation of the CRITERIA Irrigation Scheme Soil Water Balance Model in Texas Initial Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CRITERIA model was created in the 1990s in Italy, and is based on the soil water balance computation procedures developed at the Wageningen University in the Netherlands in the 1980s. CRITERIA has been used as an analysis and regional water...

Bonaiti, G.; Fipps, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial sea water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: artificial sea water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED ,STATES FISH COMJISLIOM.465 V d . JIV, No. 30. Washington, D.C. Oct. 1, 1884. Summary: in...

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced waste water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the Swedish report "Frbrnning av avfall en Summary: in the plants, 90-95% of the dioxins in the waste are broken down into carbon dioxide, water and hydrogen... RVF - The...

299

Characterization of forest crops with a range of nutrient and water treatments using AISA Hyperspectral Imagery.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research examined the utility of Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications (AISA) hyperspectral imagery for estimating the biomass of three forest crops---sycamore, sweetgum and loblolly pine--planted in experimental plots with a range of fertilization and irrigation treatments on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

Gong, Binglei; Im, Jungho; Jensen, John, R.; Coleman, Mark; Rhee, Jinyoung; Nelson, Eric

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

difference between plants receiving different treatments. Furthermore, if any difference is detected, one cannot say for sure whether the difference is due to the water gradient or due  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

difference between plants receiving different treatments. Furthermore, if any difference is detected, one cannot say for sure whether the difference is due to the water gradient or due to the differences between treatment. Obviously, any conclusions reached from analyzing the data will be meaningless

Oyet, Alwell

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Proceedings ASCE EWRI World Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2005 May 15-19, 2005 Modeling and evaluating temperature dynamics in wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling and evaluating temperature dynamics in wastewater treatment plants Scott A. Wells1 , Dmitriy into receiving waters, there is much interest in providing a model of temperature dynamics in wastewater using detailed temperature data from a Washington County, Oregon, USA wastewater treatment facility

Wells, Scott A.

302

Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

Mizandari, Malkhaz [Tbilisi State Medical University, Department of Radiology (Georgia); Pai, Madhava, E-mail: madhava.pai@imperial.ac.uk; Xi Feng [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina [University Hospital Brno Bohunice, Department of Radiology (Czech Republic); Quaretti, Pietro [IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Department of Radiology (Italy); Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina [University of Bologna, Department of Radiology, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi (Italy); Ao Guokun [The 309 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Department of Radiology (China); Kyriakides, Charis [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Robert [Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering (United Kingdom); Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy, E-mail: nagy.habib@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Response of water vapor to interannual variations of SST: Results from NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper very briefly documents the response of water vapor to interannual changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in two of the most frequently used climate models: the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM2) and the GFDL spectral model (R30). The corresponding results from radiosonde data are also presented for reference. A simple linear regression model is used to quantify the response of water vapor to changes in SST in the two simulations. Except for the negative response of water vapor over Australia, CCM2 simulates the major characteristics in the horizontal structure of the water vapor response shown in the radiosonde data. The negative response of water over Australia is also not well simulated by GFDL R30. In addition, GFDL R30 significantly underestimates the positive response over the Indian Ocean. The horizontal contrasts between the negative response over the western Pacific and the positive response over the central and eastern Pacific in the model simulations are larger than in the radiosonde data. The negative response in the subtropical region in CCM2 is more pronounced than in R30. Averaged over the tropics, CCM2 has a larger water vapor response in both the boundary layer and the upper troposphere than R30. The correlations between variations of water vapor in the upper troposphere and those at the surface level are also stronger in CCM2 than in R30. 2 refs., 5 figs.

Sun, De-Zheng [National Center For Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restricti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restrictions or loss of the water supply is not likely

Lin, Zhiqun

305

An Investigation of Hydrological Aspects of Water Harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water harvesting is a potential source of water for arid and semiarid lands. The objectives of this study were to determine combinations of land surface treatments and land forming which result in efficient but inexpensive water harvesting...

Wilke, O.; Runkles, J.; Wendt, C.

306

Biological treatments and uses of geothermal water as alternatives to injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using geothermal fluids to support various biological systems prior to, or as an alternative to, direct injection at the DOE's Raft River goethermal site is discussed. Researchers at the Raft River site studied the feasibility of using geothermal fluid for establishign methods and for irrigating trees and agricultural crops. The emphasis of these studies has been on the bioaccumulative potential of the plants, their survivability, production rates, and water-purification potential. The possible adverse impacts associated with not injecting the fluid back into the geothermal reservoir have not been addressed. (MJF)

Breckenridge, R.P.; Cahn, L.S.; Thurow, T.L.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Properties and potential uses of water treatment sludge from the Neches River of southeast Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sludge due to its huge amount and increasing public concern. However, only a few studies were focused on potential use of WTP sludge. The characteristics and potential use of WTP sludge are still not well understood. Previous studies of WTP alum sludge... plants that coagulate, filter, and oxidize a surface water for removal of turbidity, color, bacteria, algae, organic compounds, and iron or manganese. These plants generally use alum Al~(SO4) or iron FeC13 salts for coagulation and produce alum or iron...

Kan, Weiqun

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Water Loss Test Results: West Main Canal United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IRRIGATION TECHNOLOGY CENTER Texas Cooperative Extension ? Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Texas A&M University System 1 Extension Associate, and Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer... Table 3. Data for Test UN1: West Main District: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County Test ID: UN1 Canal: West Main Lining Type: Lined Starting Water Span Widths: SG1: 11.21 ft, SG3: 11.24 ft, SG5: 11.26 ft Date...

Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

309

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions from Residential Water Heaters Table of Contents46 Table 10. Storage water heaters evaluated experimentally50 Table 11. Published information for water heater

Rapp, VH

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 Table 10. Storage water heaters evaluated experimentallyfor interchangeability experiments for storage water heaterfor experiments with storage water heater AW01. 53

Rapp, VH

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

As was hypothesized, annual ET water losses appears to be driven by seasonal variations in the total aboveground biomass of the treatment wetland. We found that only air temperature and PAR were significant climatic drivers of ET. However, unlike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shore-to-open-water transects were distributed proportionally across a treatment flow cell based.T.A. 2003. Water and mass budgets of a vertical=-flow constructed wetland used for wastewater treatment· As was hypothesized, annual ET water losses appears to be driven by seasonal variations

Hall, Sharon J.

312

Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Analysis of long-term flows resulting from large-scale sodium-water reactions in an LMFBR secondary system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leaks in LMFBR steam generators cannot entirely be prevented; thus the steam generators and the intermediate heat transport system (IHTS) of an LMFBR must be designed to withstand the effects of the leaks. A large-scale leak which might result from a sudden break of a steam generator tube, and the resulting sodium-water reaction (SWR) can generate large pressure pulses that propagate through the IHTS and exert large forces on the piping supports. This paper discusses computer programs for analyzing long-term flow and thermal effects in an LMFBR secondary system resulting from large-scale steam generator leaks, and the status of the development of the codes.

Shin, Y.W.; Chung, H.; Choi, U.S.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 5 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 21, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference, are tabulated. All DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

none,

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

315

Water Loss Test Results Main 'J' Canal Delta Lake Irrigation District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program and Discussion Table 2. Additional Test Result Information for the Main ?J? Canal Figure 3. Photo showing the GPS survey and a staff gage Figure 4. Small earthen dam upstream of the lateral head-gate Appendix Detailed Test Results... (Figure 1), the concrete lined section of the main supply canal that feeds the City of Raymondville, flows west to east in the northeastern sector of the district (see figure 2); located approximately four miles west of US Hwy 77 and a mile north of FM...

Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

316

Effective water treatment for rural communities in Suriname : a comparison of point-of-use ceramic filters and centralized treatment with sand filters.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? For countless communities around the world, acquiring access to safe drinking water is a daily challenge which many organizations endeavor to meet. The villages (more)

Vincent, Ashlee K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 4 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUELS SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on June 12, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ≤ 3 indicates at a 99% confidence interval that split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report specifies 95% confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0014 was the exception. The ORAU gross beta result of 6.30 ? 0.65 pCi/L from location NRD is well above NFS?s non-detected result of 1.56 ? 0.59 pCi/L. NFS?s data package includes no detected result for any radionuclide at location NRD. At NRC?s request, ORAU performed gamma spectroscopic analysis of sample 5198W0014 to identify analytes contributing to the relatively elevated gross beta results. This analysis identified detected amounts of naturally-occurring constituents, most notably Ac-228 from the thorium decay series, and does not suggest the presence of site-related contamination.

none,

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Point-of-use water treatment and diarrhoea reduction in the emergency context: an effectiveness trial in Liberia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water storage have been shown to reduce diarrhoea in populations with poor hygiene and sanitation the provision of adequate water and sanitation can be fraught with challenges. Diarrhoea is widely considered of adequate sanitation and water supply, including both water quantity and quality, and hygiene education

Scharfstein, Daniel

319

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 1 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 22, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses. The comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ? 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty. The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties. Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. A comparison of split sample results, using the DER equation, indicates one set with a DER greater than 3. A DER of 3.1 is calculated for gross alpha results from ORAU sample 5198W0003 and NFS sample MCU-310212003. The ORAU result is 0.98 0.30 pCi/L (value 2 sigma) compared to the NFS result of -0.08 0.60 pCi/L. Relatively high DER values are not unexpected for low (e.g., background) analyte concentrations analyzed by separate laboratories, as is the case here. It is noted, however, NFS uncertainties are at least twice the ORAU uncertainties, which contributes to the elevated DER value. Differences in ORAU and NFS minimum detectable activities are even more pronounced. comparison of ORAU and NFS split samples produces reasonably consistent results for low (e.g., background) concentrations.

David A. King, CHP, PMP

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Wastewater and Wastewater Treatment Systems (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality administers regulations for waste water and waste water treatment systems. Construction of a municipal treatment work, non-industrial waste water...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

Water_Treatment.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March 20,Since dewatering at the

323

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

none,

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ponding Test Results Seepage Losses Laterals 8E and 2A-C, Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-336 2008 Ponding Test Results Seepage Losses Laterals 8E and 2A-C Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 By: Eric Leigh, Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural... Engineering Guy Fipps, Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report November 2008 PONDING TEST RESULTS SEEPAGE LOSSES LATERALS 8E AND 2A...

Leigh, Eric; Fipps, Guy

325

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Heaters 7.0 Glossary of Abbreviations AGA American Gas Association ANSI American National Standards

Rapp, VH

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Results and phenomena observed from the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment, one of a series of tests performed as part of the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program, and carried out at Sandia National Laboratories, addressed the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered loss of coolant accident. The DF-4 test is described in some detail herein and results from the experiment are presented. Significant results from prior experiments in the series are also summarized. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B/sub 4/C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. This early melt and relocation phenomena could significantly influence the progression of meltdown in BWRs and should be considered in SFD accident analyses. 14 refs., 9 figs.

Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.; Fryer, C.P.; Walker, J.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 3 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on March 20, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0012 was the exception. The ORAU result of 9.23 {+-} 0.73 pCi/L from location MCD is well above NFS?s result of -0.567 {+-} 0.63 pCi/L (non-detected). NFS?s data package included a detected result for U-233/234, but no other uranium or plutonium detection, and nothing that would suggest the presence of beta-emitting radionuclides. The ORAU laboratory reanalyzed sample 5198W0012 using the remaining portion of the sample volume and a result of 11.3 {+-} 1.1 pCi/L was determined. As directed, the laboratory also counted the filtrate using gamma spectrometry analysis and identified only naturally occurring or ubiquitous man-made constituents, including beta emitters that are presumably responsible for the elevated gross beta values.

none,

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Single-crystal-like NiO colloidal nanocrystal-aggregated microspheres with mesoporous structure: Synthesis and enhanced electrochemistry, photocatalysis and water treatment properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthetic route based on the self-assembly and subsequently controlled thermal decomposition process is proposed to fabricate nickel oxide colloidal nanocrystal aggregated microspheres (CNAMs) with mesoporous structure. XRD, EDS, SEM, TEM. FTIR, and N{sub 2} adsorption and desorption isotherm techniques are employed for morphology and structure characterizations. The as-prepared nickel oxide CNAMs, which has a high surface area (234 m{sup 2}/g) with narrow pore distribution at around 3.25 nm, are composed of numerous hexagonal mesoporous nanocrystals of approximately 5060 nm in size, and present a single-crystal-like characteristic. The experimental results also demonstrated that the CNAMs showed outstanding performance in electrochemistry, photocatalysis and waste water treatment due to their special hierarchical and mesoporous structure, presenting the promising candidate for catalysis and catalysis support materials. - Graphical abstract: CNAMs with mesoporous structure synthesized via a simple microwave-assisted hydrothermal method was applied in electrochemistry and catalysis and exhibited enhanced performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: CNAMs with mesoporous structure are achieved via a simple microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. Morphology, structure and pore distribution of sample particles is specifically controlled. The samples show enhanced properties in electrochemistry and catalysis due to hierarchical structure.

Suo, Zhirong [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Dong, Xiaonan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Liu, Hui, E-mail: liuhui@sust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Xian 710021 (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., < 0.3 {mu}g/g fillet) is considered to be a more consistent indicator of exposure and risk (EPA, 2001). Effective mercury remediation at point-source contaminated sites requires an understanding of the nature and magnitude of mercury inputs, and also knowledge of how these inputs must be controlled in order to achieve the desired reduction of mercury contamination in biota necessary for compliance with AWQC targets. One of the challenges to remediation is that mercury body burdens in fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Pool boiling heat transfer enhancement over cylindrical tubes with water at atmospheric pressure, Part I: Experimental results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pool boiling heat transfer enhancement over cylindrical tubes with water at atmospheric pressure online 4 May 2013 Keywords: Pool boiling Heat transfer enhancement Open microchannels Cylindrical tube boiling heat transfer over enhanced cylindrical microchannel test surfaces with water at atmospheric

Kandlikar, Satish

331

Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

332

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

Evans, S. K.

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

Biologically active filtration for treatment of produced water and fracturing flowback wastewater in the O&G industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Sustainable development of unconventional oil and gas reserves, particularly tight oil, tight gas, and shale gas, requires prudent management of water resources used during drilling, (more)

Freedman, Daniel E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Remediation of Risks in Natural Gas Storage Produced Waters: The Potential Use of Constructed Wetland Treatment Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas storage produced waters (NGSPWs) are generated in large volumes, vary in composition, and often contain constituents in concentrations and forms that are toxic (more)

Johnson, Brenda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Strategies for Compliance with Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule for Surface Water Treatment Facilities in Northeastern Oklahoma.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently created new regulations that better protect human health but that also make achieving compliance more difficult for existing water (more)

Wintle, Brian N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and efficiency in the region 2. Evaluate methods and technologies for reducing the impacts of energy and water development and use on the environment.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and it conducted an extensive program of research on water and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues on encouraging and supporting research in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes of nutrient stream pollution resulting from on-site wastewater treatment units. Three projects were not yet

338

Status of household water treatment and safe storage in 45 countries and a case study in Northern India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the present of the status of HWTS technologies across the world, and in one location Lucknow, India. The data for the global status of HWTS was collected by contacting the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene ...

Jain, Mehul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improperly managed manure can contaminate both ground and surface water. Storing manure allows producers to spread it when crops can best use the nutrients. This publication explains safe methods of manure storage, as well as specifics about safe...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

340

Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater treatment systems on water quality, optimal irrigation scheduling, household conservation patterns, the effects of wastewater reuse on turfgrass, the economics of water transfers, or historical and optimal of Reclamation asked us to help stage a workshop on produced waters those waters resulting from the extraction

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Physico-chemical fracturing and cleaning of coal. [Treatment with CO/sub 2/ in water at high pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method of producing a crushable coal and reducing the metallic values in coal represented by Si, Al, Ca, Na, K, and Mg, which comprises contacting a coal/water mix in a weight ratio of from about 4:1 to 1:6 in the presence of CO/sub 2/ at pressures of about 100 to 1400 psi and a minimum temperature of about 15/sup 0/C for a period of about one or more hours to produce a treated coal/water mix. In the process the treated coal/water mix has reduced values for Ca and Mg of up to 78% over the starting mix and the advantageous CO/sub 2/ concentration is in the range of about 3 to 30 g/L. Below 5 g/L CO/sub 2/ only small effects are observed and above 30 g/L no further special advantages are achieved. The coal/water ratios in the range 1:2 to 2:1 are particularly desirable and such ratios are compatible with coal water slurry applications.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

1983-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Polymer treatments for D Sand water injection wells: Sooner D Sand Unit Weld County, Colorado. Final report, April 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymer-gel treatments in injection wells were evaluated for improving sweep efficiency in the D Sandstone reservoir at the Sooner Unit, Weld County, Colorado. Polymer treatments of injection wells at the Sooner Unit were expected to improve ultimate recovery by 1.0 percent of original-oil-in-place of 70,000 bbl of oil. The Sooner D Sand Unit was a demonstration project under the US Department of Energy Class I Oil Program from which extensive reservoir data and characterization were obtained. Thus, successful application of polymer-gel treatments at the Sooner Unit would be a good case-history example for other operators of waterfloods in Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs in the Denver Basin.

Cannon, T.J.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in water heater. Scale buildup in pipes and re duced water flow. Hard water due to calcium and magnesiumHousehold Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension Many areas have water containing impurities from natural or artificial sources. These impurities may

Liskiewicz, Maciej

344

The influence of phosphorus nutrition and water stress on the osmotic adjustment and growth of loblolly pine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE REVIEW Water Stress Osmotic Adjustment Phosphorus MATERIALS AND METHODS Experimental Design Sowing Preparation Sowing and Seedling Cultivation Treatments . . . . . . . ~ Measurements . . . . . . - ~ ~ ~ Statistical Analysis RESULTS... three days. Fertilizer was applied every other time the seedlings received water. Treatments were initiated to provide three levels of phos- phorus nutrition (10, 100, 200 ppm) and three levels of water stress. Water stress was imposed...

Wilson, Alan Byron

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOLOGICAL TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF WASTE AND WASTE WATER's naturally pure water #12;Wetland Ecology Our treatment systems incorporate a wide variety of wetland plants for on-site management and treatment of effluent and solid waste 3. Provide for surface water attenuation

Heal, Kate

346

Treatment of methyl t-butyl ether contaminated water using a dense medium plasma reactor, a mechanistic and kinetic investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and oxidation mechanisms of methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) in a dense medium plasma (DMP) reactor utilizing gas for the removal of MTBE from an aqueous solution in the DMP reactor. Rate constants are also derived for three reactor configurations and two pin array spin rates. The oxidation products from the treatment of MTBE

Dandy, David

347

Humidification Steam vs. Water-Spray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study was done at GSFC to evaluate alternate methods of humidification. The result of this study is that the most economical system for humidification is atomization with deionization for water treatment....

Gidwani, B. N.; Weston, R. F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Treatment of Visceral Aneurysm Using Multilayer Stent: Two-Year Follow-Up Results in Five Consecutive Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The present study was performed to analyze the midterm results (five consecutive patients, 2-year follow-up) of the endovascular management of visceral artery aneurysms using the Cardiatis Multilayer Flow Modulator (CMFM) (Cardiatis, Isnes, Belgium), a self-expandable stent. Materials and Methods: From August 2009 to January 2011, we implanted five CMFMs in five patients (all men; mean age 73 years) to treat two common hepatic artery aneurysms, one celiac trunk aneurysm, one splenic artery aneurysm, and one superior mesenteric artery aneurysm (diameter 25-81 mm). The primary end point was technical success. The secondary end point was stent patency, absence of aneurysm rupture or reperfusion, and shrinking of the sac at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up using computed tomography angiography. Follow-up ranged from 24 to 48 months (mean 31.2). Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients. Complete exclusion of the aneurysm with sac shrinking was achieved in two patients. Two stents became occluded at 6- and 24-month follow-up, respectively; both patients were asymptomatic and were not retreated. One patient developed sac reperfusion due to incomplete aneurysm exclusion. Conclusion: Long-term results in a wider population are needed to validate the effectiveness of the CMFM.

Balderi, Alberto, E-mail: balders@libero.it; Antonietti, Alberto, E-mail: antonietti.a@ospedale.cuneo.it; Pedrazzini, Fulvio, E-mail: pedrazzini.f@ospedale.cuneo.it; Sortino, Davide, E-mail: davide.sortino@hotmail.it; Vinay, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.vinay@gmail.com; Grosso, Maurizio, E-mail: grosso.m@ospedale.cuneo.it [AO Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Department of Radiology (Italy)] [AO Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Department of Radiology (Italy)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with ultra low-NO{sub X} burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Milking Center Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be affected by manure, milk solids, ammonia, phosphorus, and detergents. Wastewater from the dairy milking center is made up of waste from the milking parlor (manure, feed solids, hoof dirt, bulk tank rinse water and detergent used in cleaning), and should... topics: 1. Combining wastes 2. Application methods 3. Slow surface infiltration Combining Wastes When milking center wastes are combined with manure a common disposal system can be used for both types of waste. A liquid manure storage facility, properly...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

Rig-site system allows water reuse, cuts cleanup costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new well-site treatment system is described which extends the use of solids control equipment to help solve the common drilling problems of water supply and/or wastewater disposal. The new closed-loop system combines water treatment with more conventional solids handling to continuously create clean water. The results include: re-use of water for rig cleaning, mud, and even cement makeup with no need to eject liquid to the environment; greatly reduced water-input requirements; and division of the conventional wastewater pit into an active treatment operations pit and an overflow reserve pit for emergency storage.

Neidhardt, D.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

Introduction Counterpropagating interactions Numerical methods Co-propagating interactions A result on energy transfer Solitary water wave interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy transfer Solitary water wave interactions Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics (energy loss) and S (amplitude change). Walter Craig McMaster University Solitary wave interactions #12 (energy loss) and S (amplitude change). Walter Craig McMaster University Solitary wave interactions #12

Craig, Walter

353

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 2070 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4% of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W L; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L

2004-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 1970 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4 % of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W; Stone, E; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

Preliminary Results of Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Concurrent Trastuzumab for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the use of trastuzumab concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2001 and April 2007, 31 patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer were referred for WBRT with concurrent trastuzumab. At brain progression, the median age was 55 years (range, 38-73), and all patients had a performance status of 0-2. The patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly (n = 17) or 6 mg/kg repeated every 21 days (n = 14). In 26 patients, concurrent WBRT delivered 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. In 6 patients, other fractionations were chosen because of either poor performance status or patient convenience. Results: After WBRT, radiologic responses were observed in 23 patients (74.2%), including 6 (19.4%) with a complete radiologic response and 17 (54.8%) with a partial radiologic response. Clinical responses were observed in 27 patients (87.1%). The median survival time from the start of WBRT was 18 months (range, 2-65). The median interval to brain progression was 10.5 months (range, 2-27). No Grade 2 or greater acute toxicity was observed. Conclusion: The low toxicity of trastuzumab concurrently with WBRT should probably not justify delays. Although promising, these preliminary data warrant additional validation of trastuzumab as a potential radiosensitizer for WBRT in brain metastases from breast cancer in the setting of a clinical trial.

Chargari, Cyrus; Idrissi, Hind Riahi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Pierga, Jean-Yves [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Bollet, Marc A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Dieras, Veronique [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Campana, Francois [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Cottu, Paul [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fourquet, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Kirova, Youlia M., E-mail: youlia.kirova@curie.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants, although additional study is required to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment. A larger scale treatment system was constructed to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for characterization and US Environmental protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system is designed to simulate the operation of the ORNL process waste treatment facilities and to treat a mixture of ORNL process wastewater and WAG 6 wastewater at a combined flow rate of 0.5 L/min. The system is designed to produce the necessary quantities of waste sludges and spent carbon for characterization studies and TCLP testing.

Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Treatment of primary tailings and middlings from the hot water extraction process for recovering bitumen from tar sand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary tailings and middlings are combined and fed to a vessel having the general form of a deep cone thickener. The feed is deflected outwardly and generally horizontally by a baffle, as it is delivered to the vessel. Simultaneously, the outwardly radiating layer of newly added feed is contacted from below by an upwelling stream of aerated middlings, which stream moves in parallel with the aforesaid layer. Bitumen froth is formed and recovered. The upwelling stream is provided by circulating middlings through eductor/aerator assemblies and a plenum chamber mounted centrally in the body of middlings in the vessel. A generally circular circulation of middlings is generated. In this manner, the newly added bitumen is quickly and efficiently recovered. Recirculation of middlings to the aeration zone yields an additional recovery of bitumen. Use of the deep cone ensures that the tailings from the vessel are relatively low in water and bitumen content.

Cymbalisty, L. M. O.; Cymerman, J.

1995-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

358

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities The average baseline demand at the Southeast facility was approximately 4 MW. During the rainy season (October-March) the facility treated 40% more wastewater than the dry season, but demand only increased by 4%. Submetering of the facility's lift pumps and centrifuges predicted load shifts capabilities of 154 kW and 86 kW, respectively, with large lift pump shifts in the rainy season. Analysis of demand data during maintenance events confirmed the magnitude of these possible load shifts, and indicated other areas of the facility with demand response potential. Load sheds were seen to be possible by shutting down a portion of the facility's aeration trains (average shed of 132 kW). Load shifts were seen to be possible by shifting operation of centrifuges, the gravity belt thickener, lift pumps, and external pump stations These load shifts were made possible by the storage capabilities of the facility and of the city's sewer system. Large load reductions (an average of 2,065 kW) were seen from operating the cogeneration unit, but normal practice is continuous operation, precluding its use for demand response. The study also identified potential demand response opportunities that warrant further study: modulating variable-demand aeration loads, shifting operation of sludge-processing equipment besides centrifuges, and utilizing schedulable self-generation.

Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

NORDIC WASTE WATER TREATMENT SLUDGE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biogas, electricity and fertilizer from 30 000 tons of annually waste. The plant was opened in March 2008 together it an- nually produces 18,9 GWh biogas and around 10 GWh of elec- tricity. The Cambi THP ­process

360

Exploiting interfacial water properties for desalination and purification applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A molecular-scale interpretation of interfacial processes is often downplayed in the analysis of traditional water treatment methods. However, such an approach is critical for the development of enhanced performance in traditional desalination and water treatments. Water confined between surfaces, within channels, or in pores is ubiquitous in technology and nature. Its physical and chemical properties in such environments are unpredictably different from bulk water. As a result, advances in water desalination and purification methods may be accomplished through an improved analysis of water behavior in these challenging environments using state-of-the-art microscopy, spectroscopy, experimental, and computational methods.

Xu, Hongwu (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Varma, Sameer; Nyman, May Devan; Alam, Todd Michael; Thuermer, Konrad; Holland, Gregory P.; Leung, Kevin; Liu, Nanguo (University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM); Xomeritakis, George K. (University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM); Frankamp, Benjamin L.; Siepmann, J. Ilja (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Cygan, Randall Timothy; Hartl, Monika A. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Travesset, Alex (Iowa State University, Ames, IA); Anderson, Joshua A. (Iowa State University, Ames, IA); Huber, Dale L.; Kissel, David J. (University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM); Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Lorenz, Christian Douglas; Major, Ryan C. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); McGrath, Matthew J. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Farrow, Darcie; Cecchi, Joseph L. (University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM); van Swol, Frank B.; Singh, Seema; Rempe, Susan B.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Clawson, Jacalyn S.; Feibelman, Peter Julian; Houston, Jack E.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Chen, Zhu (University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM); Zhu, Xiaoyang (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Dunphy, Darren Robert (University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM); Orendorff, Christopher J.; Pless, Jason D.; Daemen, Luke L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Gerung, Henry (University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM); Ockwig, Nathan W.; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Stevens, Mark Jackson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A better cooling water system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To prepare their newly constructed reduced crude conversion (RCC) open recirculating cooling water system for the implementation of a corrosion and deposit control water treatment program, Ashland Petroleum, Catlettsburg, Ky., made plans for and carried out precleaning and passivation procedures. Here, the authors share the results, and some potential guidelines for one's own operations. Inspection of equipment after precleaning showed that the precleaning procedures was very effective in removing undesirable matter. After precleaning and passivation of the system, the recommended cooling water treatment program was started. Corrosion rates for mild steel specimens ranged from 0.5 to 1.5 mils per year (mpy), with an average of 1.0 mpy. The corrosion rates for admiralty specimens ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 mpy. Benefits of the precleaning and passivating programs greatly outweigh the costs, since the normal cooling water treatment program for corrosion and deposit control can then operate more effectively.

Gale, T.E.; Beecher, J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Decision Support for IntegratedDecision Support for Integrated WaterWater--Energy PlanningEnergy Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courtesy of Energy-Water Nexus Energy for Water · Pumping · Treatment · Distribution Water for Energy

Keller, Arturo A.

363

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14 Water Pollution #12;Factory-style hog farms in North Carolina Each pig produces, September 1999. #12;Hogs killed by flooding #12; Water pollution Common water pollutants Treating water pollution Wastewater treatment and renovation Learning Objectives #12; Water pollution refers

Soerens, Thomas

364

Ground-water hydrologic effects resulting from underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek Site near Gillette, Wyoming. Interim report, October 1979-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical note summarizes our activities, to date, on the research project: Ground-Water Hydrologic Effects Resulting from Underground Coal Gasification Experiments (EPA-IAG-79-D-X0795). The gasified coal seam (Felix No. 2 coal) and two overlying aquifers (Felix No. 1 coal and overlying sand) appear to have become interconnected as a result of roof collapse and subsidence at both Hoe Creek Sites II and III near Gillette, Wyoming. To evaluate changes in the ground-water flow regime at the two sites, completion of supplementary wells was necessary to define the distance versus head drawdown relationships in each of the three aquifers. Hydraulic head potentials have been measured at Site III since gasification ended on October 10, 1979. These data are presented in graphic format. Although hydraulic head measurements at Site II seemed to be approaching a steady-state condition 1.5 years after gasification, the subsequent gasification at Site III temporarily altered the ground-water flow patterns. These changes will have a definite effect on contaminant dispersal and will need to be taken into consideration.

Raber, E.; Stone, R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Response of the water balance to climate change in the United States over the 20th and 21st centuries: Results from the VEMAP Phase 2 model intercomparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution: The role of the water balance, Am. Nat. , 135,NPP): The importance of water avail- ability, Global Change1982a), Ecological optimality in water-limited natural soil-

Gordon, W. S; Famiglietti, J. S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

OECD MCCI project Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 test data report : thermal hydraulic results. Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-3 test data report : thermal Hydraulic results, Rev. 0 February 19, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the third water ingression test, designated SSWICS-3. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 8 wt% limestone/common sand concrete at a system pressure of 4 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

OECD MMCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-2 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the second water ingression test, designated SSWICS-2. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pain and Return to Daily Activities after Uterine Artery Embolization and Hysterectomy in the Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: Results from the Randomized EMMY Trial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of uterine artery embolization (UAE) and hysterectomy for symptomatic uterine fibroids by means of a randomized controlled trial. The present paper analyses short-term outcomes, i.e., pain and return to daily activities. Methods. Patients were randomized (1:1) to UAE or hysterectomy. Pain was assessed during admission and after discharge, both quantitatively and qualitatively, using a numerical rating scale and questionnaires. Time to return to daily activities was assessed by questionnaire. Results. Seventy-five patients underwent hysterectomy and 81 patients underwent UAE. UAE patients experienced significantly less pain during the first 24 hr after treatment (p = 0.012). Non-white patients had significantly higher pain scores. UAE patients returned significantly sooner to daily activities than hysterectomy patients (for paid work: 28.1 versus 63.4 days; p < 0.001). In conclusion, pain appears to be less after UAE during hospital stay. Return to several daily activities was in favor of UAE in comparison with hysterectomy.

Hehenkamp, Wouter J.K. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Gynaecology (Netherlands)], E-mail: w.j.k.hehenkamp@amc.nl; Volkers, Nicole A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Birnie, Erwin [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Public Health Epidemiology (Netherlands); Reekers, Jim A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Ankum, Willem M. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Gynaecology (Netherlands)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

BULKING SLUDGE TREATMENT BY MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATION AND MECHANICAL TREATMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the operation of the biological stage of waste water treatment plants. If the threatening extensive growth of wastewater treatment plants often need a complex control for the optimal processing. The measurement status and for the regulation of biological parts in waste water treatment plants. Furthermore, e

371

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Title: Development of a Kenaf-Based Biosorptive Water Treatment Process Project Number: B-20 Start surface waters and groundwaters currently undergoing treatment or scheduled for treatment contain organic contain contamination levels requiring treatment. The treatment of these waters pose both technical

372

Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perchlorate is a potential contaminate of well water that can have harmful effects on human health. Methods of removing perchlorate from water are described and illustrated. There is information to help well owners select and maintain treatment...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

Robert A. Liske

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Search results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

BusinessIndustry Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Page Hydropower Basics How does water power energy work? Water turbine http:...

375

Search results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Electrolysis of Water Students observe the electrolysis of water using either photovoltaics...

376

Search results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Electrolysis of Water Students observe the electrolysis of water using either...

377

Long-term results of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the primary treatment of medically inoperable stage I-II endometrial carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Total-abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) is the gold-standard therapy for patients with endometrial carcinoma. However, patients with high operative risks are usually treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone. The goal of this study was to update our experience of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with or without external-beam irradiation (EBRT), for such patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 38 patients with Stage I and Stage II adenocarcinoma of the endometrium considered high operative risk received RT as the primary treatment. The median age was 74.1 years. Before 1996, the local extent of the disease was assessed by an examination under anesthesia (EUA) and by EUA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thereafter. Eight patients (21%) were treated with combined HDRB and EBRT, and 30 patients (79%) were treated with with HDRB alone. The median HDRB dose was 23.9 Gy, typically delivered in 3 fractions in a weekly schedule. The median EBRT dose was 42 Gy. Results: At a median follow-up of 57.5 months for patients at risk, 11 patients (29%) have failed: 6 patients (16%) locally, 4 patients (10.5%) distantly, and 1 patient (3%) locally and distantly. Local failure was established by biopsy, and 4 patients were salvaged by TAHBSO. Higher stage and higher grade were both associated with increased failure rate. The 15-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 78% for all stages, 90% for Stage I, and 42% for Stage II (p < 0.0001). The 15-year DSS was 91% for Grade I and 67% for Grade II and III combined (p = 0.0254). Patients with Stage I disease established by MRI (11 patients) and who received a total HDRB dose of 30 Gy had a DSS rate of 100% at 10 years. Four patients experienced late toxicities: 1 Grade II and 3 Grade III or IV. Conclusion: Medically inoperable Stage I endometrial carcinoma may be safely and effectively treated with HDRB as the primary therapy. In selected Stage I patients, our results are equivalent to that of surgery. We believe that the alternative option of HDRB as the primary therapy for selected Stage I endometrial carcinoma, even in patients with low operative risks, needs further evaluation.

Niazi, Tamim M. [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Portelance, Lorraine [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahoric, Boris [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gilbert, Lucy [Department of Oncology, Division of Gynecology Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Stanimir, Gerald [Department of Oncology, Division of Gynecology Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Treatment Descriptors: Water QuaArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Statewide Mission: The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) has a statewide mission to plan and conduct water resource research

380

Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Water Quality Measurement in Polishing Ponds of AMD Treatment Plants for Selection of Commercial District: WV 1 Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Waste Water, Treatment, Recreation Associated's Tygart River Mine. #12;1 Water Quality Measurement in Polishing Ponds of AMD Treatment Plants

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III, "Method of Breaking Shale Oil-Water Emulsion," U. S.and Biological Treatment of Shale Oil Retort Water, DraftPA (1979). H. H. Peters, Shale Oil Waste Water Recovery by

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Drinking Water Systems, Hydrology, and Childhood GastrointestinalIllnessinCentralandNorthernWisconsin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water monitoring and surface water treatment. Com- munity municipal water systems without water treatment tend to have higher rates of water- borne disease.4,5 Water treatment refers to multiple methods, pathogens that survive treatment or infiltrate finished water distribution systems cause a sizeable GI

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

383

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hydrogen and Water: An Engineering, Economic and Environmental Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-year program plan for the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technology Program (USDOE, 2007a) calls for the development of system models to determine economic, environmental and cross-cutting impacts of the transition to a hydrogen economy. One component of the hydrogen production and delivery chain is water; water's use and disposal can incur costs and environmental consequences for almost any industrial product. It has become increasingly clear that due to factors such as competing water demands and climate change, the potential for a water-constrained world is real. Thus, any future hydrogen economy will need to be constructed so that any associated water impacts are minimized. This, in turn, requires the analysis and comparison of specific hydrogen production schemes in terms of their water use. Broadly speaking, two types of water are used in hydrogen production: process water and cooling water. In the production plant, process water is used as a direct input for the conversion processes (e.g. steam for Steam Methane Reforming {l_brace}SMR{r_brace}, water for electrolysis). Cooling water, by distinction, is used indirectly to cool related fluids or equipment, and is an important factor in making plant processes efficient and reliable. Hydrogen production further relies on water used indirectly to generate other feedstocks required by a hydrogen plant. This second order indirect water is referred to here as 'embedded' water. For example, electricity production uses significant quantities of water; this 'thermoelectric cooling' contributes significantly to the total water footprint of the hydrogen production chain. A comprehensive systems analysis of the hydrogen economy includes the aggregate of the water intensities from every step in the production chain including direct, indirect, and embedded water. Process and cooling waters have distinct technical quality requirements. Process water, which is typically high purity (limited dissolved solids) is used inside boilers, reactors or electrolyzers because as it changes phase or is consumed, it leaves very little residue behind. Pre-treatment of 'raw' source water to remove impurities not only enables efficient hydrogen production, but also reduces maintenance costs associated with component degradation due to those impurities. Cooling water has lower overall quality specifications, though it is required in larger volumes. Cooling water has distinct quality requirements aimed at preserving the cooling equipment by reducing scaling and fouling from untreated water. At least as important as the quantity, quality and cost of water inputs to a process are the quantity, quality and cost of water discharge. In many parts of the world, contamination from wastewater streams is a far greater threat to water supply than scarcity or drought (Brooks, 2002). Wastewater can be produced during the pre-treatment processes for process and cooling water, and is also sometimes generated during the hydrogen production and cooling operations themselves. Wastewater is, by definition, lower quality than supply water. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities can handle some industrial wastewaters; others must be treated on-site or recycled. Any of these options can incur additional cost and/or complexity. DOE's 'H2A' studies have developed cost and energy intensity estimates for a variety of hydrogen production pathways. These assessments, however, have not focused on the details of water use, treatment and disposal. As a result, relatively coarse consumption numbers have been used to estimate water intensities. The water intensity for hydrogen production ranges between 1.5-40 gallons per kilogram of hydrogen, including the embedded water due to electricity consumption and considering the wide variety of hydrogen production, water treatment, and cooling options. Understanding the consequences of water management choices enables stakeholders to make informed decisions regarding water use. Water is a fundamentally regional commodity. Water resources vary in quality and qu

Simon, A J; Daily, W; White, R G

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Map of Arizona. Source: Arizona Water Map Poster, 2002, Water Resources Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Treatment Options Authors: Janick F. Artiola, Ph.D., Department of Soil, Water and Environmental. · Adetaileddiscussionofacceptedhomewatertreatmenttechnologies and home water treatment selection guidelines, based on water quality and user preferences Water Testing Chapter to help determine appropriate water treatment options for home use. © 2004, 2006

Cushing, Jim. M.

386

Cerro Grande Fire Impact to Water Quality and Stream Flow near Los Alamos National Laboratory: Results of Four Years of Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 2000, the Cerro Grande fire burned about 7400 acres of mixed conifer forest on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and much of the 10,000 acres of mountainside draining onto LANL was severely burned. The resulting burned landscapes raised concerns of increased storm runoff and transport of contaminants by runoff in the canyons traversing LANL. The first storms after the fire produced runoff peaks that were more than 200 times greater than prefire levels. Total runoff volume for the year 2000 increased 50% over prefire years, despite a decline in total precipitation of 13% below normal and a general decrease in the number of monsoonal thunderstorms. The majority of runoff in 2000 occurred in the canyons at LANL south of Pueblo Canyon (70%), where the highest runoff volume occurred in Water Canyon and the peak discharge occurred in Pajarito Canyon. This report describes the observed effects of the Cerro Grande fire and related environmental impacts to watersheds at and near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the first four runoff seasons after the fire, from 2000 through 2003. Spatial and temporal trends in radiological and chemical constituents that were identified as being associated with the Cerro Grande fire and those that were identified as being associated with historic LANL discharges are evaluated with regard to impacts to the Rio Grande and area reservoirs downstream of LANL. The results of environmental sampling performed by LANL, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) after the Cerro Grande fire are included in the evaluation. Effects are described for storm runoff, baseflow, stream sediments, and area regional reservoir sediment.

B.M. Gallaher; R.J. Koch

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Bruce Logan Penn State University #12;Energy Costs? 5-7% of electricity used in USA is for water &wastewater #12;Global Energy & Health Issues 1 Billion people lack #12;Energy content of Wastewaters · Electricity "lost" to water and wastewater treatment= 0.6 quad

388

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include: evaluation of water treatment technology, source water protection planning, mitigation of nitrateIllinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Illinois Water of Illinois water resources. In 2004, IWRC hosted Illinois Water, a biennial conference on water issues

389

Biorefinery Grey Water Analysis | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

options for grey water generated from a biorefinery with fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating Wastewater treatment options for grey water generated from a biorefinery...

390

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; integrated water management for multiple users; wetland processes; and emerging issues, including other began funding four new projects in 2003. These projects include: evaluation of water treatment

391

Water, Power, and Development in Twenty-First Century China: The Case of the South-North Water Transfer Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

north every province lacks water (personal communicationsectors and uses lack adequate water resources. Agriculturesewage discharge due to a lack of adequate water treatment

Crow-Miller, Brittany Leigh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Water driven : New Orleans City Hall as a sustainable civic center for 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The devastating struck of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in late summer of 2005 was deadly and immense. The storm destroyed over 170 drinking water facilities and 47 wastewater treatments around the city, and resulted ...

Sangthong, Pholkrit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

," and "Utilization of Silver Nanoparticles as Chlorine-free Biocide for Water Treatment". The information transfer understanding of the impacts of population on water quality to enhance planning or a novel treatment investigated a novel treatment method to reclaim contaminated water. Meyerson's project investigated the links

394

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Increasing Sources of Water Supply: Advanced Treatment of Stormwater Runoff." Dr. Craver went on to publish entitled "Stimuli-Responsive nanocomposite Coatings for Mitigating Fouling of Water Treatment Membranes Introduction 1 #12;Stimuli-Responsive Nanocomposite Coatings for Mitigating Fouling of Water Treatment

395

Search results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

search Search found 1 item Water Remove Water filter Science Education Remove Science Education filter Electricity Remove Electricity filter Filter by Resource Type All Results...

396

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

); economics of water use (1); water treatment (1) and water quality (5). Note that several projects includeTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Mission of the Texas Water Resources Institute is to: (1) Serve as the designated Water Resources Research Institute

397

Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A, and I-22 Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................... ..9 Acknowledgements........................................................................................................................................... 13 List of Figures Figure 1. Photo of leaking pipeline control structure... I-19/I-18 52080 63653 58.4 71.3 SJ17 I-7A 50193 61347 56.2 68.7 J18 I-22 36490 44599 40.9 50.0 * Water loss rates given are based on an in-service use of 24 hours/day and 365 days/year. Figure 1 shows a leaking pipeline control structure...

Fipps, G.; Leigh, E.

398

Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants, although additional study is required to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment. A larger scale treatment system was constructed to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for characterization and US Environmental protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system is designed to simulate the operation of the ORNL process waste treatment facilities and to treat a mixture of ORNL process wastewater and WAG 6 wastewater at a combined flow rate of 0.5 L/min. The system is designed to produce the necessary quantities of waste sludges and spent carbon for characterization studies and TCLP testing.

Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

UV water disinfector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system, and an air-suspended bare UV lamp. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA); Garud, Vikas (Bombay, IN)

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

UV water disinfector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system and an air-suspended bare UV lamp are disclosed. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir. 7 figs.

Gadgil, A.; Garud, V.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes five wells dedicated to pumping drinking water and the Water Treatment Facility in Bldg. 624 (see-step process to remove iron at the Water Treatment Facil- ity (see photo essay on page 4). While being2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report This special edition of the Brookhaven Bulletin

402

Emergency Factsheet for Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an alternate water source during the treatment period. Most water treatment equipment (such as water heaters, release the air to allow the tank to be filled with chlorinated water. Drain all hot water heatersEmergency Factsheet for Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination Mark L. McFarland, Associate

403

Search results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Parents Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Page Hydropower Basics How does water power energy work? Water turbine http:energy.gov...

404

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedingsin the Treatment of Oil Shale Retort Waters," in Proceedings

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

MONITORING A TOXIC CYANOBACTERIA BLOOM IN LAKE BOURGET (FRANCE) AND ITS CONSEQUENCES FOR WATER QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the turbidity of the water in treatment units providing drinking water. These central supplies obtain their lake of Feuillade et al. [3]. The samples were taken in the water treatment units, before (water intake in treatment unit) and at the end of the treatment steps (in water reaching the consumers). Intracellular

Jacquet, Stéphan

406

Recycling produced water for algal cultivation for biofuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Algal growth demands a continuous source of water of appropriate salinity and nutritional content. Fresh water sources are scarce in the deserts of the Southwestern United States, hence, salt water algae species are being investigated as a renewable biofuel source. The use of produced water from oil wells (PW) could offset the demand for fresh water in cultivation. Produced water can contain various concentrations of dissolved solids, metals and organic contaminants and often requires treatment beyond oil/water separation to make it suitable for algae cultivation. The produced water used in this study was taken from an oil well in Jal, New Mexico. An F/2-Si (minus silica) growth media commonly used to cultivate Nannochloropsis salina 1776 (NS 1776) was prepared using the produced water (F/2-Si PW) taking into account the metals and salts already present in the water. NS 1776 was seeded into a bioreactor containing 5L of the (F/2-Si PW) media. After eleven days the optical density at 750 nm (an indicator of algal growth) increased from 0 to 2.52. These results indicate algae are able to grow, though inhibited when compared with non-PW media, in the complex chemical conditions found in produced water. Savings from using nutrients present in the PW, such as P, K, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, results in a 44.38% cost savings over fresh water to mix the F/2-Si media.

Neal, Justin N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

Drinking Water Problems: MTBE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This compound belongs to a chemical family of fuel oxygenates that enhance gaso- line combustion by increasing oxygen available for the process. Added to gasoline, MTBE has reduced carbon monoxide and ozone emissions by promoting more complete burning.... Texas follows the EPA drinking water advisory of 20 to 40 micrograms per liter. How can MTBE be Removed from Well Water? MTBE requires a specific treatment process for removal from water. Well owners can use granular activated carbon or charcoal...

Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

David B. Burnett

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

409

Search results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Elementary (K-5) Teachers Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy,...

410

Increased Oil Recovery from Mature Oil Fields Using Gelled Polymer Treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelled polymer treatments were applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report is aimed at reducing barriers to the widespread use of these treatments by developing methods to predict gel behavior during placement in matrix rock and fractures, determining the persistence of permeability reduction after gel placement, and by developing methods to design production well treatments to control water production. Procedures were developed to determine the weight-average molecular weight and average size of polyacrylamide samples in aqueous solutions. Sample preparation techniques were key to achieving reproducible results.

Willhite, G.P.; Green, D.W.; McCool, S.

2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

Flexible hybrid membrane treatment systems for tailored nutrient management: A new paradigm in urban wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in urban wastewater treatment D. Vuono a , J. Henkel a , J. Benecke a , T.Y. Cath a , T. Reid b , L: Sequencing batch reactor Membrane bioreactor Water reclamation Distributed wastewater treatment Tailored, decentralized, and satellite wastewater treatment systems into existing urban water infrastructure

412

Water footprint of electric power generation : modeling its use and analyzing options for a water-scarce future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interdependency between water and energy, sometimes called the water-energy nexus, is growing in importance as demand for both water and energy increases. Energy is required for water treatment and supply, while virtually ...

Delgado Martn, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Short Outline of Readings for Geog. 549 Chapter 1. Introduction -Watersheds and Water: Essential Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8. Ground-Water Hydrology (omitted) Section II. Water Quality and Treatment Chapter 9. Principles 12. Water Treatment (omitted except definitions of aquatic restoration) Chapter 13. Aquatic Restoration and Natural Water Treatment PART TWO -HUMAN ASPECTS OF WATER RESOURCES Section III. Water

James, L. Allan

414

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Bruce Logan Penn State University #12;Energy Costs? 5-7% of electricity used in USA is for water &wastewater #12;Global Energy & Health IssuesGlobal Energy & Health content of WastewatersEnergy content of Wastewaters ·· ElectricityElectricity ""lostlost"" to water

415

The Energy-Water Nexus: Implications for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ENERGY-WATER NEXUS: IMPLICATIONS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY Michael R. Muller Center for Advanced Energy Systems, Rutgers University Piscataway, NJ John F. Gardner Director, CAES Energy Efficiency Research Institute Boise State University... cooling towers!!!! High cost of treatment added to water costs Result = dry cooling towers Reduction in energy efficiency accepted ESL-IE-14-05-21 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20...

Muller, M. R.; Gardiner, J.; Muller, M. B.; Shrestha, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Characterization of oil and gas waste disposal practices and assessment of treatment costs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines wastes associated with the onshore exploration and production of crude oil and natural gas in the US. The objective of this study was to update and enhance the current state of knowledge with regard to oil and gas waste quantities, the potential environmental impact of these wastes, potential methods of treatment, and the costs associated with meeting various degrees of treatment. To meet this objective, the study consisted of three tasks: (1) the development of a production Environmental Database (PED) for the purpose of assessing current oil and gas waste volumes by state and for investigating the potential environmental impacts associated with current waste disposal practices on a local scale; (2) the evaluation of available and developing technologies for treating produced water waste streams and the identification of unit process configurations; and (3) the evaluation of the costs associated with various degrees of treatment achievable by different treatment configurations. The evaluation of feasible technologies for the treatment of produced water waste streams was handled in the context of comparing the level of treatment achievable with the associated cost of treatment. Treatment processes were evaluated for the removal of four categories of produced water contaminants: particulate material, volatile organic compounds, adsorbable organic compounds, and dissolved inorganic species. Results showed dissolved inorganic species to be the most costly to remove. The potential cost of treating all 18.3 billion barrels of produced water generated in a year amounts to some 15 billion dollars annually.

Bedient, P.B.

1995-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

417

Application of chlorine dioxide as an oilfield facilities treatment fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both mechanical and chemical treatments are used to clean water flood injection distribution systems whose efficiency has been reduced as a result of plugging material such as iron sulfide sludge. Most mechanical treatments rely on uniform line diameter to be effective, while chemical treatments require good contact with the plugging material for efficient removal. This paper describes the design and operation of a new innovative application using chlorine dioxide for the removal of iron sulfide sludge from water flood injection distribution systems. This technology has evolved from the use of chlorine dioxide in well stimulation applications. The use of chlorine dioxide for continuous treatment of injection brines will also be discussed. Exxon USA`s Hartzog Draw facility in Gillette, Wyoming was the site for the application described. 4,500 barrels of chlorine dioxide was pumped in three phases to clean sixty-six miles of the water flood distribution system. Results indicate that chlorine dioxide was effective in cleaning the well guard screens, the injection lines, frac tanks used to collect the treatment fluids and the injection wells.

Romaine, J.; Strawser, T.G.; Knippers, M.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh:Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water, Dhaka, Bangladesh, Maytechnologies for drinking water treatment. Rev. Environ.

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College of Engineering and Elimelech 1996). Colloidal interactions are also important in water and wastewater treatment

420

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College of Engineering Photocatalytic Films for Water Treatment, University of Cinncinatti. 1. Yongjun Chen, Suzanne Lunsford

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the area of physical,chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission on water and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College, chemical engineering, environmental science, biology and other water related fields were supported

422

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

423

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

South Dakota Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with mining, extraction, and processing of uranium (U) for nuclear fuel and weapons have generated substantial quality, drinking water quality, bio treatment for the removal of uranium from water, vegetative treatment

425

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-compartment septic tank Soil absorption field Constructed wetland Onsite wastewater treatment systems Constructed wetlands Natural wetlands generally have visible water in the system. However, for those at homes, the water flows beneath... the media surface, which limits contact between residents and wastewater. The constructed wetland waste- water treatment system has three main components that work together to purify wastewater: ? A septic tank, which is an en- closed watertight...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

426

Oxidative particle mixtures for groundwater treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method and a composition of a mixture for degradation and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater. The oxidative particle mixture and method includes providing a material having a minimal volume of free water, mixing at least one inorganic oxidative chemical in a granular form with a carrier fluid containing a fine grained inorganic hydrophilic compound and injecting the resulting mixture into the subsurface. The granular form of the inorganic oxidative chemical dissolves within the areas of injection, and the oxidative ions move by diffusion and/or advection, therefore extending the treatment zone over a wider area than the injection area. The organic contaminants in the soil and groundwater are degraded by the oxidative ions, which form solid byproducts that can sorb significant amounts of inorganic contaminants, metals, and radionuclides for in situ treatment and immobilization of contaminants. The method and composition of the oxidative particle mixture for long-term treatment and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater provides for a reduction in toxicity of contaminants in a subsurface area of contamination without the need for continued injection of treatment material, or for movement of the contaminants, or without the need for continuous pumping of groundwater through the treatment zone, or removal of groundwater from the subsurface area of contamination.

Siegrist, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Murdoch, Lawrence C. (Clemson, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Effects of Ion-Exchange Treatment on Bromate Formation and Oxidation Efficiency during Ozonation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water treatment. In this study, we applied several different ion exchangers (i.e., anion exchange resins technologies in advanced drinking water treatment processes along with activated carbon treatment. Ozonation), chlorine-resistant pathogenic organisms, and various micropollutants in drinking water treatment. In Japan

Takada, Shoji

428

Pollution prevention and water conservation in metals finishing operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attleboro, Massachusetts is the headquarters of the Materials and Controls Group of Texas Instruments Incorporated (Texas Instruments). In support of their activities, Texas Instruments operates a number of metal finishing and electroplating processes. The water supply and the wastewater treatment requirements are supplied throughout the facility from a central location. Water supply quality requirements varies with each manufacturing operation. As a result, manufacturing operations are classified as either high level or a lower water quality. The facility has two methods of wastewater treatment and disposal. The first method involves hydroxide and sulfide metals precipitation prior to discharge to a surface water. The second method involves metals precipitation, filtration, and discharge via sewer to the Attleboro WTF. The facility is limited to a maximum wastewater discharge of 460,000 gallons per day to surface water under the existing National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. There is also a hydraulic flow restriction on pretreated wastewater that is discharged to the Attleboro WTF. Both of these restrictions combined with increased production could cause the facility to reach the treatment capacity. The net effect is that wastewater discharge problems are becoming restrictive to the company`s growth. This paper reviews Texas Instruments efforts to overcome these restrictions through pollution prevention and reuse practices rather than expansion of end of pipe treatment methods.

O`Shaughnessy, J.; Clark, W. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States); Lizotte, R.P. Jr.; Mikutel, D. [Texas Instruments Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John [Stoller LMS Team, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)] [Stoller LMS Team, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

IntegratedScienceWorkingforYou Air, Water,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IntegratedScienceWorkingforYou Air, Water, and Aquatic Environments Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Montana ecosystem restoration treatments . . . . .4 RPA Assessment: U .S . water supply shortage . . .4 Aviationpersonnelexposuretowildfirerisk . . . .5

431

Application of Artificially Immobilized Microorganisms to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water By Sean X. Liu andFor biological treatment of drinking water, several crucialalginate gel beads to drinking water treatment has proved to

Liu, Sean X; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Focus Category #2 Water Quality Focus Category #3 Treatment Lead Institution University of Kansas reservoirs, as well as the effectiveness of drinking water treatment processes when extremely high levels managers of water supply reservoirs, treatment plant superintendents, and others to control geosmin

433

Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and maintenance savings and avoided water treatment costs, and improved recreation and fish and wildlife conditions due to higher reservoir levels. Oklahoma-Texas Area Office...

434

Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Center. After investigating and discovering his facility was drastically overpaying for water treatment, Mr. Hernbloom convinced management to invest 1,500 for a one-time purchase...

435

WATER POLLUTION CONTROL GENERAL PERMIT GNEV93001  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and permeability limit in force at that time. I.F.3. No waste waters containing petroleum products will be discharged into treatment works without first being processed...

436

Solving Water Quality Problems in the Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If your drinking water comes from a private water well, there are certain procedures you can follow to make sure the water is safe. This publication explains how to get your water tested and, if treatment is necessary, to select the correct...

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Course Information and Syllabus Water Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 26 The Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Water Systems October 28 Water Policy Responses to Climate Change November 2 Stormwater Management and Rainwater Harvesting November 4 Desalination November 9 Water Quality, Wastewater Treatment, and Water Recycling November 11 UCSB HOLIDAY November 16

California at Santa Barbara, University of

438

Course Information and Syllabus Water Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Water Systems October 27 NO CLASS MEETING November 1 Water Policy Responses to Climate Change November 3 Stormwater Management and Rainwater Harvesting November 8 Desalination November 10 Water Quality, Wastewater Treatment, and Water Recycling November 15 Economics

California at Santa Barbara, University of

439

Geosynthetic Filters for Water Quality Improvement of Urban Storm Water Runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water treatment are retention ponds, detention basins, wetland ponds, and grass swales (Strecker et al are common subsurface storm water runoff treatment systems used in urban areas. Large subsurface fil- ters the treatment system (SEMCOG 2008). Removal of filtration media such as sand is highly labor

Aydilek, Ahmet

440

New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including water supply and wastewater treatment facilities, distribution networks, decentralized treatment to treatment at point of delivery. Projects were evaluated by a panel consisting of representatives of the US

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification are applicable to all projects that will require a water treatment site. Everyone who plans to operate a wastewater or water...

442

Thermodynamic and transport property modeling in super critical water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a thermally-based, remediation and waste-treatment process that relies on unique property changes of water when water is heated and pressurized above its critical point. Above its ...

Kutney, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environment Impacts of Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clemson University with Chevron as an industry partner developed and applied treatment technology using constructed wetland systems to decrease targeted constituents in simulated and actual produced waters to achieve reuse criteria and discharge limits. Pilot-scale and demonstration constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) experiments led to design strategies for treating a variety of constituents of concern (COCs) in produced waters including divalent metals, metalloids, oil and grease, and ammonia. Targeted biogeochemical pathways for treatment of COCs in pilot-scale CWTS experiments included divalent metal sulfide precipitation through dissimilatory sulfate reduction, metal precipitation through oxidation, reduction of selenite to insoluble elemental selenium, aerobic biodegradation of oil, nitrification of ammonia to nitrate, denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, separation of oil using an oilwater separator, and sorption of ammonia to zeolite. Treatment performance results indicated that CWTSs can be designed and built to promote specific environmental and geochemical conditions in order for targeted biogeochemical pathways to operate. The demonstration system successfully achieved consistent removal extents even while inflow concentrations of COCs in the produced water differed by orders of magnitude. Design strategies used in the pilot-scale and demonstration CWTSs to promote specific conditions that can be applied to designing full-scale CWTSs include plant and soil selection, water-depth selection, addition of amendments, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). These strategies allow conditions within a CWTS to be modified to achieve ranges necessary for the preferred biogeochemical treatment pathways. In the case of renovating a produced water containing COCs that require different biogeochemical pathways for treatment, a CWTS can be designed with sequential cells that promote different conditions. For example, the pilot-scale CWTS for post-reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or ?footprint? of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environmental Impacts of Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clemson University with Chevron as an industry partner developed and applied treatment technology using constructed wetland systems to decrease targeted constituents in simulated and actual produced waters to achieve reuse criteria and discharge limits. Pilot-scale and demonstration constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) experiments led to design strategies for treating a variety of constituents of concern (COCs) in produced waters including divalent metals, metalloids, oil and grease, and ammonia. Targeted biogeochemical pathways for treatment of COCs in pilot-scale CWTS experiments included divalent metal sulfide precipitation through dissimilatory sulfate reduction, metal precipitation through oxidation, reduction of selenite to insoluble elemental selenium, aerobic biodegradation of oil, nitrification of ammonia to nitrate, denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, separation of oil using an oilwater separator, and sorption of ammonia to zeolite. Treatment performance results indicated that CWTSs can be designed and built to promote specific environmental and geochemical conditions in order for targeted biogeochemical pathways to operate. The demonstration system successfully achieved consistent removal extents even while inflow concentrations of COCs in the produced water differed by orders of magnitude. Design strategies used in the pilot-scale and demonstration CWTSs to promote specific conditions that can be applied to designing full-scale CWTSs include plant and soil selection, water-depth selection, addition of amendments, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). These strategies allow conditions within a CWTS to be modified to achieve ranges necessary for the preferred biogeochemical treatment pathways. In the case of renovating a produced water containing COCs that require different biogeochemical pathways for treatment, a CWTS can be designed with sequential cells that promote different conditions. For example, the pilot-scale CWTS for post-reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or ?footprint? of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Beebe, Alex; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

HIV and Its Treatment Is My Treatment Regimen Working? Is My Treatment Regimen Working?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

viral load, it's important to closely follow your treatment regimen. Poor treatment adherence can also blood tests to monitor your HIV treatment: CD4 count and viral load test. The results of the tests need a CD4 count only once every 6 to 12 months. What is a viral load test? Preventing HIV from

Levin, Judith G.

446

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of desalination research. The primary technological method of generating additional water supplies is through desalination and enhanced water reuse and recycling technologies....

448

FEBRUARY 2013 WATER technical features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced and distributed drinking water while sewers collected wastewater for treatment at remote plants, solutions to wastewater infrastructure need to be effective in protecting public health and preserving water the potential to achieve these goals in rural areas, peri- urban developments, small towns and urban centres

449

Evaluation of charred porous polymers as a method of storm water pollution prevention for shipyards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most shipyards have viable Best Management Practices (BMPs) in place to mitigate the transport of heavy metals to surface waters by storm water. Despite aggressive efforts to control storm water, shipyards have come under increased regulatory pressure to further reduce concentrations of heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, in storm water discharges. The tightening of regulatory requirements warrants research into additional BMPs. The objectives of this research project were to: (1) determine the feasibility of placing a replaceable cartridge of adsorbent material within a storm water collection system; and (2) evaluate two commercially available charred porous polymer adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from storm water. The results indicated that there are commercially available storm water treatment components which could be adapted to house a cartridge of porous adsorbent material.

Clark, G.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Search results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results. Video Energy 101: Geothermal Energy See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources...

451

E-Print Network 3.0 - area tucson arizona Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power and Growth in Southern Arizona Summary: 12;Water Distribution 12;Wastewater Treatment Weighted Average for three major Tucson area... : Arizona Water Institute Data...

452

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter ($15 to $60 per 1000 gallons), with treatment costs accounting for 13 ?? 23% of the overall cost. Results from this project suggest that produced water is a potential large source of cooling water, but treatment and transportation costs for this water are large.

Chad Knutson; Seyed Dastgheib; Yaning Yang; Ali Ashraf; Cole Duckworth; Priscilla Sinata; Ivan Sugiyono; Mark Shannon; Charles Werth

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

TEXAS A&M ARSENIC WATER FOLLOW UP STUDY Arsenic Follow Up Study Codebook 2/19/07  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use a water treatment device in your home? 1 Yes 2 No (SKIP TO A13) A10 What type of water treatment device? (READ IF NEEDED: Also - examples of water treatment devices are shown in the brochure.) For A10/19/07 Page 3 A11 Why do you use a water treatment device in your home? (DO NOT READ; SELECT ALL

Shaw, W. Douglass

454

Water Quality and Hydrologic Performance of a Porous Asphalt Pavement as a Storm-Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examined the functionality of a porous pavement storm-water management system in coastal New Hampshire headings: Stormwater management; Runoff; Porous media; Pavements; Cold regions; Best Management Practice; Water quality; Water treatment. Author keywords: Storm-water management; Runoff; Porous pavements; Cold

455

Life Cycle Assessment of Three Water Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards Organization, SETAC, US EPA · Inventory of material and energy required for a product or process on portion of total water received (3%) #12;Reclamation: Scottsdale Reclaims wastewater for use (Reclaimed Plant) Wastewater treatment, advanced water treatment, and groundwater recharge and extraction

Keller, Arturo A.

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - activities improved water Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 5 > >> 1 Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment Summary: to the states for rural water supply and sanitation activities. Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) is involved......

457

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

458

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

459

Embedded NICT* tools and traceability to control phytochemical treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Embedded NICT* tools and traceability to control phytochemical treatments Vincent de RUDNICKI the possible tracks allowing the management of news methods of treatment. 1. Introduction Water pollution how environmental pollution could be mitigated through: the optimisation of pesticide application

Boyer, Edmond

460

Marketing water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management, water conservation programs Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 17 public information programs and materials that increase awareness about regional water issues. The company recently opened the TecH2O, a water resource learning center...tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water treatment result" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NCEH Pub. No. 04-0161 April 2004 WATER-RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Challenges to the healthfulness of U.S. water include (1) pathogens resistant to standard water treatment associated with red tides, and Pfiesteria piscicida, on health · Water Treatment: studying the effectiveness of household water treatment devices in homes with private wells For more information, please contact: CDC

462

Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is providing input to the Committee on issues addressing water quality, wastewater treatment, and NPS pollution water resources, NPS pollution, and projected water needs. Future water-related issues assist the StateCenter for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Abstract In FY 99

463

Portable treatment systems study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In developing their Site Treatment Plans (STPs), many of the Department of Energy installations identified some form of portable treatment, to facilitate compliant disposition of select mixed low-level wastestreams. The Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology requested that a systems study be performed to better define the potential role of portable treatment with respect to mixed low-level waste, highlight obstacles to implementation, and identify opportunities for future research and development emphasis. The study was performed by first establishing a representative set of mixed waste, then formulating portable treatment system concepts to meet the required processing needs for these wastes. The portable systems that were conceptualized were evaluated and compared to a fixed centralized treatment alternative. The system evaluations include a life-cycle cost analysis and an assessment of regulatory, institutional, and technical issues associated with the potential use of portable systems. The results of this study show that when all costs are included, there are no significant cost differences between portable systems and fixed systems. However, it is also emphasized that many uncertainties exist that could impact the cost of implementing portable treatment systems. Portable treatment could be made more attractive through private sector implementation, although there is little economic incentive for a commercial vendor to develop small, specialized treatment capabilities with limited applicability. Alternatively, there may also be valid reasons why fixed units cannot be used for some problematic wastestreams. In any event, there are some site-specific problems that still need to be addressed, and there may be some opportunity for research and development to make a positive impact in these areas.

Sherick, M.J.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Bechtold, T.E.; Cole, L.T.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Seismic Fragility of the LANL Fire Water Distribution System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present the results of a site-wide system fragility assessment. This assessment focuses solely on the performance of the water distribution systems that supply Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR), Weapons Engineering and Tritium Facility (WETF), Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), Waste Characterization, Reduction, Repackaging Facility (WCRRF), and Transuranic Waste Inspectable Storage Project (TWISP). The analysis methodology is based on the American Lifelines Alliance seismic fragility formulations for water systems. System fragilities are convolved with the 1995 LANL seismic hazards to develop failure frequencies. Acceptance is determined by comparing the failure frequencies to the DOE-1020 Performance Goals. This study concludes that: (1) If a significant number of existing isolation valves in the water distribution system are closed to dedicate the entire water system to fighting fires in specific nuclear facilities; (2) Then, the water distribution systems for WETF, RLWTF, WCRRF, and TWISP meet the PC-2 performance goal and the water distribution system for CMR is capable of surviving a 0.06g earthquake. A parametric study of the WETF water distribution system demonstrates that: (1) If a significant number of valves in the water distribution system are NOT closed to dedicate the entire water system to fighting fires in WETF; (2) Then, the water distribution system for WETF has an annual probability of failure on the order of 4 x 10{sup -3} that does not meet the PC-2 performance goal. Similar conclusions are expected for CMR, RLWTF, WCRRF, and TWISP. It is important to note that some of the assumptions made in deriving the results should be verified by personnel in the safety-basis office and may need to be incorporated in technical surveillance requirements in the existing authorization basis documentation if credit for availability of fire protection water is taken at the PC-2 level earthquake levels. Assumptions are presented in Section 2.2 of this report.

Greg Mertz

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

E-Print Network 3.0 - air handling systems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

467

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

468

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

DOE Annual Progress Report: Water Needs and Constraints for Hydrogen Pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water is a critical feedstock in the production of hydrogen. In fact, water and many of the energy transformations upon which society depends are inextricably linked. Approximately 39% of freshwater withdrawals are used for cooling of power plants, and another 8% are used in industry and mining (including oil and gas extraction and refining). Major changes in the energy infrastructure (as envisioned in a transformation to a hydrogen economy) will necessarily result in changes to the water infrastructure. Depending on the manner in which a hydrogen economy evolves, these changes could be large or small, detrimental or benign. Water is used as a chemical feedstock for hydrogen production and as a coolant for the production process. Process and cooling water must meet minimum quality specifications (limits on mineral and organic contaminants) at both the inlet to the process and at the point of discharge. If these specifications are not met, then the water must be treated, which involves extra expenditure on equipment and energy. There are multiple options for water treatment and cooling systems, each of which has a different profile of equipment cost and operational requirements. The engineering decisions that are made when building out the hydrogen infrastructure will play an important role in the cost of producing hydrogen, and those decisions will be influenced by the regional and national policies that help to manage water resources. In order to evaluate the impacts of water on hydrogen production and of a hydrogen economy on water resources, this project takes a narrowly-scoped lifecycle analysis approach. We begin with a process model of hydrogen production and calculate the process water, cooling, electricity and energy feedstock demands. We expand beyond the production process itself by analyzing the details of the cooling system and water treatment system. At a regional scale, we also consider the water use associated with the electricity and fuel that feed hydrogen production and distribution. The narrow scope of the lifecycle analysis enables economic optimization at the plant level with respect to cooling and water treatment technologies. As water withdrawal and disposal costs increase, more expensive, but more water-efficient technologies become more attractive. Some of the benefits of these technologies are offset by their increased energy usage. We use the H2A hydrogen production model to determine the overall cost of hydrogen under a range of water cost and technology scenarios. At the regional level, we are planning on following the hydrogen roll-out scenarios envisioned by Greene and Leiby (2008) to determine the impact of hydrogen market penetration on various watersheds. The economics of various water technologies will eventually be incorporated into the temporal and geographic Macro System Model via a water module that automates the spreadsheet models described. At the time of this progress report, the major achievement for FY2009 has been the completion of the framework and analytical results of the economic optimization of water technology for hydrogen production. This accomplishment required the collection of cost and performance data for multiple cooling and water treatment technologies, as well as the integration of a water and energy balance model with the H2A framework. 22 (twenty-two) different combinations of production method (SMR, electrolysis), scale (centralized, forecourt), cooling (evaporative tower, dry) and water treatment (reverse osmosis, ion exchange) were evaluated. The following data were collected: water withdrawal, water discharge, electricity consumption, equipment footprint, equipment cost, installation cost, annual equipment and material costs and annual labor costs. These data, when consolidated, fit into a small number of input cells in H2A. Items such as capital cost end up as line-items for which there is space in the existing H2A spreadsheets. Items such as electricity use are added to the values that already exist in H2A. Table 1 lists eight potential technology combina

Simon, A; Daily, W

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

470

Dawdon Mine Water Heat Pump Trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

14-Dec-12 Dawdon Mine Water Heat Pump Trial #12;14 December 2012 2 Potential for Mine Water sourced heating Dawdon heat pump trial A demonstration project Contents #12;Friday, 14 December 2012 3 The UK salinity High Iron (removed by lime treatment) Offices , 8 rooms #12;Dawdon heat pump Warm mine water

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

471

WATER REUSE AN INTEGRAL ASPECT OF SUSTAINABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for life and a healthy Planet ­ The most important issue is the safety of water! ­ Global climate change the water and wastewater industry ­ My guess - that will be hard to reduce significantly ­ We must try in water treatment (in it's broadest sense) based on free radical chemistry · Series of coupled

Keller, Arturo A.

472

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality, Microbial Methods · Wastewater Treatment Technology · Wastewater Reuse/Disposal · Watershed. Subjects cover, in general, water resources sustainability, climate and climate change influence on water/Non-Point/Runoff · Ocean Outfall Biomonitoring · General Marine Water Quality · Economics/Policy/Law · Climate

473

What's In My Water?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.The salts in conductivity levels are conductivity levels. allow for too much water to evaporate water are not just table high, evaluate other from the surface, or where soils are salt, but are often a individual characteristics naturally high in salts...- tive safety margin. You can have your water analyzed by a government agency or a private company. 13 Salt: an organic or inorganic com- pound that is subject to dissociation when water is added, resulting in a dis- tinct increase in specific anions...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

474

Cyanide treatment options in coke plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the formation of cyanides in coke oven gas and describes and compares waste processing options. These include desulfurization by aqueous ammonia solution, desulfurization using potash solution, desulfurization in oxide boxes, decomposition of NH{sub 3} and HCN for gas scrubbing. Waste water treatment methods include chemical oxidation, precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and biological treatment. It is concluded that biological treatment is the most economical process, safe in operation and requires a minimum of manpower.

Minak, H.P.; Lepke, P. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

475