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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

CDIAC Temperature Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Temperature Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data TypeFormat Period of Record NASA GISS Surface Temperature...

2

The Russian Surface Temperature Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Russian group, under the initial leadership of M. I. Budyko, has produced the first comprehensive analysis of monthly average surface temperature (January 1891 through May 1980) for the Northern Hemisphere on a 5°×10° latitude-longitude grid. ...

Alan Robock

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Addthis Project Level Easy Energy Savings $12-$30 annually for each 10ºF reduction Time to Complete 2 hours Overall Cost $0 Turning down your water heater temperature can save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/BanksPhotos Turning down your water heater temperature can save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/BanksPhotos Although some manufacturers set water heater thermostats at 140ºF, most households usually only require them to be set at 120ºF, which also slows mineral buildup and corrosion in your water heater and pipes. Water heated at 140ºF also poses a safety hazard-scalding. Savings resulting from turning down your water heater temperature are based

4

Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lower Water Heating Temperature Lower Water Heating Temperature Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Addthis Project Level Easy Energy Savings $12-$30 annually for each 10ºF reduction Time to Complete 2 hours Overall Cost $0 Turning down your water heater temperature can save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/BanksPhotos Turning down your water heater temperature can save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/BanksPhotos Although some manufacturers set water heater thermostats at 140ºF, most households usually only require them to be set at 120ºF, which also slows mineral buildup and corrosion in your water heater and pipes. Water heated at 140ºF also poses a safety hazard-scalding. Savings resulting from turning down your water heater temperature are based

5

A New Global Set of Downscaled Temperature Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new set of empirical–statistical downscaled seasonal mean temperature scenarios is presented for locations spread across all continents. These results are based on the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) simulations, the ...

Rasmus E. Benestad

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Although some manufacturers set water heater thermostats at 140F, most households usually only require them to be set at 120F, which also slows mineral buildup and...

7

Water Volume as Function of Temperature (Cold)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Volume as Function of Temperature (Cold) Name: Hank Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: MA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: At normal atmospheric pressure, and...

8

Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

9

At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Summer? | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Summer? At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Summer? At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Summer? June 25, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis You can save 5%-15% on your cooling bills by raising the temperature setting on your thermostat when you are away and don't need cooling. Only lower the setting to 78°F when you are home and need cooling. A programmable thermostat can make it easy to adjust the temperature on a regular schedule. At what temperature do you set your thermostat when you are home and awake in the summer? How about when you're asleep or away? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a topic related to energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments.

10

On the Linkage between Antarctic Surface Water Stratification and Global Deep-Water Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The suggestion is advanced that the remarkably low static stability of Antarctic surface waters may arise from a feedback loop involving global deep-water temperatures. If deep-water temperatures are too warm, this promotes Antarctic convection, ...

Ralph F. Keeling; Martin Visbeck

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

An analysis of the differences between monitored indoor temperatures and reported thermostat settings  

SciTech Connect

We examined differences in reported winter thermostat settings and monitored temperatures, and contrasted those households with little difference, and those with a substantial difference. This analysis was conducted on households participating in Bonneville Power Administration's Residential Standards Demonstration Program (RSDP) in the Pacific Northwest. The reported thermostat settings were obtained from a survey of RSDP participants, and indoor temperatures were read from special recorders inside the house. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Vine, E.; Barnes, B.K.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A new soil water content sensor with temperature compensation design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and construction of a soil water content sensor with temperature compensation using the piecewise linear interpolation method was presented in this paper. The sensor out put often influenced by temperature, so temperature compensation must ... Keywords: circuitry system, geological disaster, interpolation method, piecewise linear, soil water content sensor, temperature compensation

Shi Ge; Li Qing

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Question of the Week: At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Question of the Week: At What Temperature Do You Set Your Question of the Week: At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Winter? Question of the Week: At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Winter? December 11, 2008 - 8:45am Addthis Did you know that you can save energy in the winter by setting the thermostat to 68°F while you're awake and setting it lower while you're asleep or away from home? By turning your thermostat back 10°-15° for 8 hours, you can save about 5%-15% a year on your heating bill-a savings of as much as 1% for each degree if the setback period is eight hours long. At what temperature do you set your thermostat when you are home and awake in the winter? How about when you're asleep or away? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov.

14

Temperature impacts on the set pressure of soft seated pressure relief valves  

SciTech Connect

From a safety standpoint, regardless of plant or facility type, the most important pieces of equipment are the pressure relief devices. The most critical characteristics of a pressure relief device are its set pressure and the related relieving capacity. The Set Pressure of a pressure relief device is defined as that value of increasing inlet static pressure at which the discharge becomes continuous (ASME PTC 25-1994, Performance Test Codes). To preclude an unsafe overpressure situation, the set pressure of the pressure relief device must not exceed the maximum allowable working pressure of the equipment or system being protected. Because of testing facility limitations, size or pressure, pressure relief valves intended for elevated temperature service are often set using ambient temperature air. Adjustments are made to the ambient valve opening pressures to compensate for the temperature differences. The extent of the adjustments to the pressure relief valve set pressure is important to ensure the valve will provide the required overpressure protection at the elevated in-service temperature.

Engel, J.J.; Zirps, G.T.; Gleason, R.B. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperatures,...

16

Carbon promoted water electrolysis to produce hydrogen at room temperature.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the work was to conduct water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production. The electrochemical gasification of carbons… (more)

Ranganathan, Sukanya.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fast Spherical Harmonic Transform Routine FLTSS Applied to the Shallow Water Test Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast spherical harmonic transform algorithm proposed by Suda and Takami is evaluated in the solutions of the shallow water equation test set defined by Williamson et al. through replacing the Legendre transforms of the NCAR spectral transform ...

Reiji Suda

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Low temperature barrier wellbores formed using water flushing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming an opening for a low temperature well is described. The method includes drilling an opening in a formation. Water is introduced into the opening to displace drilling fluid or indigenous gas in the formation adjacent to a portion of the opening. Water is produced from the opening. A low temperature fluid is applied to the opening.

McKinzie, II; John, Billy [Houston, TX; Keltner, Thomas Joseph [Spring, TX

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Sounding the Skin of Water: Sensing Air–Water Interface Temperature Gradients with Interferometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence for the radiometric determination of air–water interface temperature gradients is presented. Inherent radiometric characteristics in the water molecule cause variations in the absorption coefficient that allow radiation at near-infrared ...

W. McKeown; F. Bretherton; H. L. Huang; W. L. Smith; H. L. Revercomb

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ener-Gee Whiz Answers Your Questions: Thermostat Settings and Solar Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ener-Gee Whiz Answers Your Questions: Thermostat Settings and Solar Ener-Gee Whiz Answers Your Questions: Thermostat Settings and Solar Water Heaters Ener-Gee Whiz Answers Your Questions: Thermostat Settings and Solar Water Heaters June 23, 2009 - 12:54pm Addthis Amy Foster Parish Ener-Gee Whiz would like to offer a hearty thanks to all of you who've written in for your great efficiency and renewables related questions. Now, on to some answers! Patti writes: Is it efficient to raise the thermostat in a business when the business is closed during air conditioning season? Ener-Gee Whiz: Your business might be able to save energy-and money-by turning your thermostat up during the cooling season. But how much energy and money you save are largely dependent on how much you set your thermostat back and for how long. The Energy Savers website suggests that

22

Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

Rana B. Gupta

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs Water District District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warm Springs Water District Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002°, -116.2034505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

24

Level-set RANS method for sloshing and green water simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An interface-preserving level set method is incorporated into the Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) numerical method for the time-domain simulation of green water effects. This generalized method can be used to evaluate two- and three-dimensional, laminar and turbulent, free surface flows in moving non-orthogonal grids. In the method, free surface flows are modeled as immiscible two-phase (air and water) flows. A level set function is used to mark the individual fluids and the free surface itself is represented by the zero level set function. The level set evolution equation is coupled with the conservation equations for mass and momentum, and solved in the transformed plane. Chimera domain decomposition technique is employed to handle embedding, overlapping, or matching grids. To demonstrate the feasibility of the method, calculations are performed in several bench mark free surface flows including dam break flows, free jets, solitary wave propagations and the impingement of dam break flow on a fixed structure. The comparisons between the simulations and the experimental data provide a thorough validation of the present method. The results also show the potential capability of level-set RANS method in much more complicated free surface flow simulations. After validations, the method is applied to simulate sloshing flows in LNG tank and green water over the platform. In sloshing flows, the level-set RANS method captures the large impact pressure accurately on LNG tank walls. It also generates a plunging breaker successfully in front of a platform in the numerical wave tank. The good agreements between numerical and experimental results prove the level set RANS method is a powerful and accurate CFD methodology in free surface flow simulations.

Yu, Kai

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Optimum hot water temperature for absorption solar cooling  

SciTech Connect

The hot water temperature that maximizes the overall instantaneous efficiency of a solar cooling facility is determined. A modified characteristic equation model is used and applied to single-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chillers. This model is based on the characteristic temperature difference and serves to empirically calculate the performance of real chillers. This paper provides an explicit equation for the optimum temperature of vapor generation, in terms of only the external temperatures of the chiller. The additional data required are the four performance parameters of the chiller and essentially a modified stagnation temperature from the detailed model of the thermal collector operation. This paper presents and discusses the results for small capacity machines for air conditioning of homes and small buildings. The discussion highlights the influence of the relevant parameters. (author)

Lecuona, A.; Ventas, R.; Venegas, M.; Salgado, R. [Dpto. Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Zacarias, A. [ESIME UPA, IPN, Av. de las Granjas 682, Col. Santa Catarina, 02550, D.F. Mexico (Mexico)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1975 - 1976  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.Thermograph record of intake water at Pacific Gas andtakes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to their

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more comfortable. First, the authors devised an experimental scheme and set up the laboratory. Second, we collected a great deal of data on the system in different situations. Finally, we conclude that such heating system is feasible and one of the best heating methods.

Wu, Z.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with ARM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with ARM Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with ARM Observations Cady-Pereira, Karen Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Shephard, Mark Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research Mlawer, Eli Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Atmospheric State and Surface The primary objective of the TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) instrument on the Aura spacecraft is the retrieval of trace gases, especially water vapor and ozone. The TES retrievals extremely useful for global monitoring of the atmospheric state, but they must be validated. The ARM sites are well instrumented and provide continuous measurements, which

29

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a greater number were thought to be related to faulting. Measured water temperatures at the 124 wells and springs inventoried ranged from 12/sup 0/ to 93/sup 0/C (degrees Celsius) and averaged 50/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures, calculated using the silica and the sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, range from 5/sup 0/ to 370/sup 0/C and averaged 110/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures in excess of 140/sup 0/C were found at 42 sites. No areal patterns to the distribution of temperatures either at the surface or subsurface were found. Generally, the quality of the waters sampled was good. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 14 to 13,700 mg/l (milligrams per liter) and averaged 812 mg/l, with higher values occurring in the southeastern part of the State. Twenty-five areas were selected for future study. Of these areas, 23 were selected on the basis of estimated aquifer temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher and two on the basis of geologic considerations.

Young, H.W.; Mitchell, J.C.

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Technologies for Upgrading Light Water Reactor Outlet Temperature  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy could potentially be utilized in hybrid energy systems to produce synthetic fuels and feedstocks from indigenous carbon sources such as coal and biomass. First generation nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) technology will most likely be based on conventional light water reactors (LWRs). However, these LWRs provide thermal energy at temperatures of approximately 300°C, while the desired temperatures for many chemical processes are much higher. In order to realize the benefits of nuclear hybrid energy systems with the current LWR reactor fleets, selection and development of a complimentary temperature upgrading technology is necessary. This paper provides an initial assessment of technologies that may be well suited toward LWR outlet temperature upgrading for powering elevated temperature industrial and chemical processes during periods of off-peak power demand. Chemical heat transformers (CHTs) are a technology with the potential to meet LWR temperature upgrading requirements for NHESs. CHTs utilize chemical heat of reaction to change the temperature at which selected heat sources supply or consume thermal energy. CHTs could directly utilize LWR heat output without intermediate mechanical or electrical power conversion operations and the associated thermodynamic losses. CHT thermal characteristics are determined by selection of the chemical working pair and operating conditions. This paper discusses the chemical working pairs applicable to LWR outlet temperature upgrading and the CHT operating conditions required for providing process heat in NHES applications.

Daniel S. Wendt; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nuclide Composition Benchmark Data Set for Verifying Burnup Codes on Spent Light Water Reactor Fuels  

SciTech Connect

To establish a nuclide composition benchmark data set for the verification of burnup codes, destructive analyses of light water reactor spent-fuel samples, which were cut out from several heights of spent-fuel rods, were carried out at the analytical laboratory at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The 16 samples from three kinds of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods and the 18 samples from two boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rods were examined. Their initial {sup 235}U enrichments and burnups were from 2.6 to 4.1% and from 4 to 50 GWd/t, respectively. One PWR fuel rod and one BWR fuel rod contained gadolinia as a burnable poison. The measurements for more than 40 nuclides of uranium, transuranium, and fission product elements were performed by destructive analysis using mass spectrometry, and alpha-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry. Burnup for each sample was determined by the {sup 148}Nd method. The analytical methods and the results as well as the related irradiation condition data are compiled as a complete benchmark data set.

Nakahara, Yoshinori; Suyama, Kenya; Inagawa, Jun; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Kurosawa, Setsumi; Kohno, Nobuaki; Onuki, Mamoru; Mochizuki, Hiroki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

High temperature water adsorption on The Geysers rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to measure water retention by geothermal reservoir rocks at the actual reservoir temperature, the ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quality of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers geothermal reservoir was measured at 150{sup degree}C, 200{sup degree}C, and 250{sup degree}C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {<=}p/p{sub degree} {<=} 0.98, where p{sub degree} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A correlation is sought between water adsorption, the surface properties, and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1974  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.takes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to theirof hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.takes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to theirof hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Diagnosis of Solar Water Heaters Using Solar Storage Tank Surface Temperature Data: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study of solar water heaters by using surface temperature data of solar storage tanks to diagnose proper operations.

Burch, J.; Magnuson, L.; Barker, G.; Bullwinkel, M.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Impacts of operation of CVP regulating reservoirs on water temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets and transmits electric power throughout 15 western states. Western's Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region (Sierra Nevada Region) markets approximately 1,480 megawatts (MW) of firm power (and 100 MW of seasonal peaking capacity) from the Central Valley Project (CVP) and other sources and markets available nonfirm power from the Washoe Project. Western's mission is to sell and deliver electricity generated from CVP powerplants. The hydroelectric facilities of the CVP are operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation). Reclamation manages and releases water in accordance with the various acts authorizing specific projects and with enabling legislation. Western's capacity and energy sales must be in conformance with the laws that govern its sale of electrical power. Further, Western's hydropower operations at each facility must comply with minimum and maximum flows and other constraints set by Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, or other agencies, acting in accord with law or policy.

Vail, L.W.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1991  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off tlw rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen- erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen­ erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1993  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Simulations of the Effects of Water Vapor, Cloud Liquid Water, and Ice on AMSU Moisture Channel Brightness Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer simulations are performed to determine how water vapor and nonprecipitating cloud liquid water and ice particles within typical midlatitude atmospheres affect brightness temperatures TB's of moisture sounding channels used in ...

Bradley M. Muller; Henry E. Fuelberg; Xuwu Xiang

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Influence of Operating Modes, Room Temperature Set Point and Curtain Styles on Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A field investigation was carried out in an office building of Changsha city in winter and summer, the influence of different running modes, curtain styles and room temperature set point on energy consumption of room air conditioner (RAC) was studied. The results show that: In summer automatic speed mode consumes the least refrigerating energy in different running modes, compared with low speed and high speed modes, it can conserve energy for 27.3% and 15.8%, respectively. In the same running mode, setting outer curtain can conserve energy for 40.9% and 20.4% compared with no curtain and inner curtain states, respectively. In winter high speed mode is the most efficient for saving energy which can decrease 40.3% and 30.9% compared with low speed and automatic speed modes. In the same running mode, setting inner curtain state makes the least heating energy consumption in cloudy day, about 10.8% and 2.7% less than no curtain and outer curtain states. However, it is not obvious when the day is fine. The heating energy consumption decreases as room temperature set point falls, compared with the energy consumption at 20.5 C and 19.5 C, it is decreases for 34.1% and17.0 % at 18.5 C, respectively. All the results will be the reference of environment design and control for air conditioning room.

Yu, J.; Yang, C.; Guo, R.; Wu, D.; Chen, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

On the Relationship between Water Vapor over the Oceans and Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry (SMMR) are correlated with NMC-blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Temperature Dependence of Evaporation Coefficient for Water Measured in Droplets in Nitrogen under Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaporation and the thermal accommodation coefficients for water in nitrogen were investigated by means of the analysis of evaporation of pure water droplet as a function of temperature. The droplet was levitated in an electrodynamic trap ...

D. Jakubczyk; M. Zientara; K. Kolwas; M. Kolwas

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Numerical Modeling of Coupled Groundwater and Surface Water Interactions in an Urban Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dominguez Channel Watershed (DCW), located in the southern portion of Los Angeles County (Figure A.1), drains about 345 square miles into the Los Angeles Harbor. The cities and jurisdictions in DCW are shown in Figure A.2. The largest of these include the cities of Los Angeles, Carson, and Torrance. This watershed is unique in that 93% of its land area is highly developed (i.e. urbanized). The watershed boundaries are defined by a complex network of storm drains and flood control channels, rather than being defined by natural topography. Table (1) shows a summary of different land uses in the Dominguez Channel Watershed (MEC, 2004). The Dominguez Watershed has the highest impervious area of all watersheds in the Los Angeles region. The more impervious the surface, the more runoff is generated during a storm. Storm water runoff can carry previously accumulated contaminants and transport them into receiving water systems. Point sources such as industrial wastewater and municipal sewage as well as urban runoff from commercial, residential, and industrial areas are all recognized as contributors to water quality degradation at DWC. Section 303(d) of the 1972 Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) requires states to identify and report all waters not meeting water quality standards and to develop action plans to pursue the water quality objectives. These plans specify the maximum amount of a given pollutant that the water body of concern can receive and still meet water quality standards. Such plans are called Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). TMDLs also specify allocations of pollutant loadings to point and non-point sources taking into account natural background pollutant levels. This demonstrates the importance of utilizing scientific tools, such as flow and transport models, to identify contaminant sources, understand integrated flow paths, and assess the effectiveness of water quality management strategies. Since overland flow is a very important component of the water balance and hydrology of DCW, a parallel, distributed watershed model that treats flow in groundwater and surface water in a dynamically coupled manner will be used to build a flow model of the watershed. This coupled model forms the basis for modeling and understanding the transport of contaminants through the Dominguez Channel Watershed, which can be used in designing and implementing TMDLs to manage the water quality in this basin. In this report, the coupled surface water-groundwater flow model of DCW will be presented. This flow model was calibrated against a storm that occurred in February 21st, 2004. The model and approach are explained further in the following sections.

Rihani, J F; Maxwell, R M

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

Evaluation and Recommendations for Improving the Accuracy of an Inexpensive Water Temperature Logger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Onset's HOBO U22 Water Temp Pros are small, reliable, relatively inexpensive, self-contained temperature loggers that are widely used in studies of oceans, lakes, and streams. An in-house temperature bath calibration of 158 Temp Pros indicated ...

S. J. Lentz; J. H. Churchill; C. Marquette; J. Smith

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Numerical Analysis of Water Temperature Distribution in the Tank of ASHPWH it ha Cylindrical Condenser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air source heat pump water heaters (ASHPWH) are becoming increasingly popular for saving energy, protecting the environment and security purposes. The water temperature distribution in the tank is an important parameter for an ASHPWH. This paper presented a mathematic model for a cylindrical water tank with a cylindrical condenser as its heat source. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package, FLUENT, was used to study hot water temperature distribution in the tank of the ASHPWH. In addition, the effects of tank dimension and the type of condenser coil on water temperature distribution were discussed. The work of this paper could be used for the optimization of tank and condenser coil designs.

Wang, D.; Shan, S.; Wang, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Effect of Temperature on the Absolute Permeability to Distilled Water of Unconsolidated Sand Cores  

SciTech Connect

The work presented herein is a study of the effect of temperature on the absolute permeability to distilled water of unconsolidated sandstones at one confining pressure. The absolute permeability to distilled water of Ottawa silica sand was not dependent on the temperature level.

Sageev, A.; Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Is the Water Temperature of the Danube River at Bratislava, Slovakia, Rising?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to reveal the annual regime, time series, and long-term water temperature trends of the Danube River at Bratislava, Slovakia, between the years 1926 and 2005. First, the main factors affecting the river’s water temperature were ...

Pavla Pekarova; Dana Halmova; Pavol Miklanek; Milan Onderka; Jan Pekar; Peter Skoda

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Design and Application of the Water Temperature Control System for Large Aquaculture Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the traditional cooling methods such as ice cooling and natural convection cooling can not meet the special requirements of ornamental fish breeding, the way based on mechanical refrigeration, heat exchange system, water supply system and automatic ... Keywords: aquaculture pond for ornamental fish, water temperature automatic control, mechanical refrigeration, plate exchanger, water supply system

Chen Shuai; Zhong Ke; Cai Yingling

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

STUDIES OF METAL-WATER REACTIONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES. III. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THE ZIRCONIUM-WATER REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Further studies of the Zr-water reaction by the condenser-discharge method are reported. The reaction was studied with initial metal temperatures from 1100 to 4000 deg C with 30- and 60-mil wires in water from room temperature to 315 deg C (1500-psi vapor pressure). Runs in heated water showed markedly greater reactions. This was explained in terms of a 2-step reaction scheme in which the reaction rate is initially controlled by the rate of gaseous diffusion of water vapor toward the hot metal particles and of hydrogen, generated by reaction, away from the particles. At a later time, the reaction becomes controlled by the parabolic rate law, resulting in rapid cooling of the particles. A mathematical model of the reaction of molten metal spheres with water was proposed. Explosive reactions were found to occur with particles smaller than about 1 mm in heated water and 0.5 mm in room-temperature water. The explosive reactions were caused by the ability of the evolving H/sub 2/ to propel the particles through water at high speed. The high-speed motion was detected on motion picture film and had the effect of removing the gaseous diffusion barrier (increasing the Nusselt number), resulting in very rapid reaction. Computed results compared favorably with experimental results obtained by the condenser- discharge experiment and with the results of previous investigators. Computations indicated that the extent and rate of reaction depended on the particle diameter and the water temperature, and were relatively independent of the metal temperature so long as the metal was fully melted. This makes it possible to estimate the extent of Zr-water reaction that would occur during a reactor accident in which the particle sizes of the residue could be estimated. Comparisons were made with the results of meltdown experiments in TREAT, and applications to reactor hazards analysis were discussed. (auth)

Baker, L. Jr.; Just, L.C.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Coordinated Control of a Central Air Conditioning System Based on Variable Chilled Water Temperature and Variable Chilled Water Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, regulation of water flow by means of pump frequency conversion is one of the major methods for power-saving in central air conditioning systems. In this article, optimization regulation for central air conditioning system on the basis of coordinative optimization control for variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow to obtain better power savings is put forward. According to typical meteorological year data, hourly air conditioning load of whole year for every typical room has been calculated with the transmission function method. In order to guarantee each typical room, the highest cooling load rate is used as an input parameter for optimization calculation. Based on the surface cooler check model, the smallest energy consumption of chiller and chiller water pump was taken as the objective function of the optimization model. The performance characteristics of a chiller, water pump, regulation valve and pipeline are taken into account, and the optimization chilled water temperature and chilled water flow were carried out. The case study for a commercial building in Guangzhou showed that the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is lower by 17% only with employment of variable water flow regulation by pump frequency conversion. In the case of optimization control with coordinative control of variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow, the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is reduced by 22% in presence of remarkable power saving effects. Increasing the chilled water temperature will reduce the dehumidified capability of the air cooler, and the indoor relative humidity will increase. The simulation showed that the adjustment optimized process meets the comfort of each typical room. The lower the cooling load rate is, the more obvious the effect of power-saving is. The highest power-saving rate appears in December, which is 36.7%. Meanwhile, the least rate appears in July, which is only 14.5%.

Liu, J.; Mai, Y.; Liu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Assessment of MTI Water Temperature Thermal Discharge Retrievals with Ground Truth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface water temperatures calculated from Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) brightness temperatures and the robust retrieval algorithm, developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), are compared with ground truth measurements at a mid-latitude cold-water site along the Atlantic coast near Plymouth, MA. In contrast to the relative uniformity of the sea-surface temperature in the open ocean the water temperature near Pilgrim exhibits strong spatial gradients and temporal variability. This made it critical that all images be accurately registered in order to extract temperature values at the six buoy locations. Sixteen images during a one-year period from August 2000 to July 2001 were selected for the study. The RMS error of Pilgrim water temperature is about 3.5 C for the 4 buoys located in open water. The RMS error of the combined temperatures from 3 of the open-water buoys is 2.8 C. The RMS error includes errors in the ground truth. The magnitude of this error is estimated to range between 0.8 and 2.3 C. The two main components of this error are warm-layer effect and spatial variability. The actual error in the MTI retrievals for Pilgrim daytime conditions is estimated to be between 2.7 and 3.4 C for individual buoys and between 1.7 and 2.7 C for the combined open-water buoys.

Kurzeja, R.J.

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

54

MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

Apparent Temperature Dependence on Localized Atmospheric Water Vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the water cloud spectrum, due to the higher altitude of ice clouds. 4. COMPARISON WITH MODTRAN To verify with the MODTRAN4 radiative transfer model (version 1.1, Berk et al., 2000). We chose a triangular slit function chosen for the MODTRAN calculations with a FWHM of 10 cm-1 . This resolution is comparable

Salvaggio, Carl

56

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River area of Idaho contains a geothermal system of intermediate temperatures (approx. = 150 0C) at depths of about 1.5 km. Outside of the geothermal area, temperature measurements in three intermediate-depth drill holes (200 to 400 m) and one deep well (1500 m) indicate that the regional conductive heat flow is about 2.5 mucal/cm 2 sec or slightly higher and that temperature gradients range from 50 0 to 60

57

Method and apparatus for set point control for steam temperatures for start-up of the turbine and steam generator in unit power plants  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus are described for controlling the set point for steam temperatures for cold start-up of a steam generator-turbine unit wherein inlet steam temperature and turbine load absorption are steadily and substantially simultaneously increased in accordance with a predetermined relationship so as to reach their final values substantially synchronously.

Bloch, H.; Salm, M.

1978-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

THERMODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR THERMAL WATER SPLITTING PROCESSES AND HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on thermal water splitting processes is presented. Results of the analysis show that the overall efficiency of any thermal water splitting process operating between two temperature limits is proportional to the Carnot efficiency. Implications of thermodynamic efficiency limits and the impacts of loss mechanisms and operating conditions are discussed as they pertain specifically to hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis. Overall system performance predictions are also presented for high-temperature electrolysis plants powered by three different advanced nuclear reactor types, over their respective operating temperature ranges.

J. E. O'Brien

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Questions and Answers - Does baking soda lower water temperature? If so,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

air made of? air made of? Previous Question (What is air made of?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Do liquids freeze at the same temperature? Why doesn't oil freeze?) Do liquids freeze at the sametemperature? Why doesn't oil freeze? Does baking soda lower water temperature? If so, why? Baking soda added to water raises the temperature slightly. Chemical reactions are either endothermic or exothermic. Endothermic means you have to put energy (heat) in to make the reaction go while exothermic means there's energy (heat) left over. Left over heat will raise the temperature. Baking soda and water is exothermic and so the water gets a little warmer. This is because the binding energy of the chemical bonds of the products has an excess over the binding energy of the components. Therefore, energy

60

Temperature and Water Vapor Variance Scaling in Global Models: Comparisons to Satellite and Aircraft Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the scale dependence of height-resolved temperature T and water vapor q variability are valuable for improved subgrid-scale climate model parameterizations and model evaluation. Variance spectral benchmarks for T and q obtained ...

B. H. Kahn; J. Teixeira; E. J. Fetzer; A. Gettelman; S. M. Hristova-Veleva; X. Huang; A. K. Kochanski; M. Köhler; S. K. Krueger; R. Wood; M. Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Temperature effects on oil-water relative permeabilities for unconsolidated sands  

SciTech Connect

This study presents an experimental investigation of temperature effects on relative permeabilities of oil- water systems in unconsolidated sands. The fluids used in this study were refined mineral oil and distilled water. A rate sensitivity study was done on residual oil saturation and oil and water relative permeabilities. The temperature sensitivity study of relative permeabilities was conducted in 2 parts. The first was to investigate changes in residual oil saturation with temperature where the cores were 100% saturated with oil at the start of the waterflood. The second part continued the floods for a longer time until the water-cut was virtually 100%. Under these conditions, little change in residual oil saturation was observed with temperature. A study on viscous instabilities also was performed. This verified the existence of viscous fingers during waterflooding. It also was observed that tubing volume after the core could cause fingering, resulting in lower apparent breakthrough oil recoveries.

Sufi, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

63

Observed Increase of TTL Temperature and Water Vapor in Polluted Clouds over Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite observations are analyzed to examine the correlations between aerosols and the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) temperature and water vapor. This study focuses on two regions, both of which are important pathways for the mass transport ...

Hui Su; Jonathan H. Jiang; Xiaohong Liu; Joyce E. Penner; William G. Read; Steven Massie; Mark R. Schoeberl; Peter Colarco; Nathaniel J. Livesey; Michelle L. Santee

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An Integrated Approach toward Retrieving Physically Consistent Profiles of Temperature, Humidity, and Cloud Liquid Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for deriving physically consistent profiles of temperature, humidity, and cloud liquid water content. This approach combines a ground-based multichannel microwave radiometer, a cloud radar, a lidar-ceilometer, the nearest ...

Ulrich Löhnert; Susanne Crewell; Clemens Simmer

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Estimating Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using an Adaptive Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple soil heat transfer model is used together with an adaptive Kalman filter to estimate the daily averaged soil volumetric water contents from diurnal variations of the soil temperatures measured at different depths. In this method, the ...

Shu-Wen Zhang; Chong-Jian Qiu; Qin Xu

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Comments on “Estimating Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using an Adaptive Kalman Filter”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scheme was proposed by Zhang et al. to estimate soil water content from soil temperature measurements by using an adaptive Kalman filter. Their scheme is based on the fact that soil heat capacity and thermal conductivity are a monotonic ...

Kun Yang; Toshio Koike

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Microwave Occultation Observing System Optimized to Characterize Atmospheric Water, Temperature, and Geopotential via Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new remote sensing concept extrapolated from the GPS occultation concept is presented in which the signal frequencies are chosen to determine atmospheric water, temperature, and the geopotential of atmospheric pressure surfaces. Using ...

E. R. Kursinski; S. Syndergaard; D. Flittner; D. Feng; G. Hajj; B. Herman; D. Ward; T. Yunck

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Surface Water Vapor Pressure and Temperature Trends in North America during 1948–2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over one-quarter billion hourly values of temperature and relative humidity observed at 309 stations located across North America during 1948–2010 were studied. The water vapor pressure was determined and seasonal averages were computed. Data were ...

V. Isaac; W. A. van Wijngaarden

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Large Field Erected and Packaged High Temperature Water (HTW) Generators for Coal Firing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the paper is to disseminate information on the energy savings possible with High Temperature Water (HTW) for heating and industrial process application and to provide information on coal fired HTW generator design and availability.

Boushell, C. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Temperature Dependence of the Liquid Water Path of Low Clouds in the Southern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite observations of low-level clouds have challenged the idea that increasing liquid water content with temperature combined with constant physical thickness will lead to a negative cloud optics feedback in a decadal climate change. The ...

Anthony D. Del Genio; Audrey B. Wolf

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Low-temperature dynamics of water confined in a hydrophobic mesoporous material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasielastic neutron scattering was used to study the dynamics of three-dimensional confined water in a hydrophobic mesoporous material designated as CMK-1 in the temperature range from 250 to 170 K. We observe a crossover ...

Chu, Xiang-qiang

72

Statistical Retrieval of Humidity Profiles from Precipitable Water Vapor and Surface Measurements of Humidity and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is presented of statistical retrieval of humidity profiles based on measurements of surface temperature ?1, surface dewpoint ?2, and integrated water vapor ?3. In this method the retrieved values of humidity depend nonlinearly on ...

Viatcheslav V. Tatarskii; Maia S. Tatarskaia; Ed R. Westwater

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

HOW WATER TEMPERATURE REALLY LIMITS THE VERTICAL MOVEMENTS OF TUNAS AND BILLFISHES -IT'S THE HEART STUPID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOW WATER TEMPERATURE REALLY LIMITS THE VERTICAL MOVEMENTS OF TUNAS AND BILLFISHES - IT'S THE HEART, especially for highly mobile pelagic species such as tunas (family Scombridae, tribe Thunnini) and billfishes have attempted to delineate the temperatures and oxygen levels that tunas and billfishes prefer, can

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

74

Techniques for Using MODIS Data to Remotely Sense Lake Water Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes a step-wise methodology used to provide daily, high spatial-resolution water surface temperatures from MODIS satellite data for use in a near-real-time system for the Great Salt Lake (GSL). Land surface temperature (LST) is ...

Joseph A. Grim; Jason C. Knievel; Erik T. Crosman

75

FILM GROWTH ON ALUMINUM IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE WATER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Film growths on aluminum and two aluminum-1 wt.% nickel alloys in water at 250 and 350 deg C were studied. It was found that oxide growth does not advance on a uniform front but, to the contrary, the advancing surface contains many outcrops in the form of thin platelets, chunky outcrops, and whiskers. With both the pure metal and the alloys considerable intergranular attack was observed. The general corrosion product was usually more uniform in crystal size when formed on the pure metal, but variations in crystal size were observed on both aluminum and alloys with varying features of the metal surface. The roughness of the general oxide surface (includlng outcrops) was found to increase rapidly to about 0.2 micron and then remain relatively constant with increasing film thickness. The composition of films formed under all investigated conditions, except one, was found to be boehmite ( alpha -Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/- H/sub 2/O). This exception was films carried by the alloy specimens after testing for 32 days at 350 deg C. In this case the main corrosion film was still boehmite, but in addition the outer surface supported long needles of diaspore ( beta -Al/sub 2/ O/sub 3/- H/sub 2/O). (auth)

Hart, R.K.; Ruther, W.E.

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Improving Water Loop Heat Pump Performance by Using Low Temperature Geothermal Fluid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water-loop heat pump (WLHP) systems are an important option for space conditioning of commercial buildings. They provide the opportunity of saving energy through heat recovery and thermal balancing when heating and cooling occur simultaneously. WLHP systems typically operate with loop water temperature between 16 C and 32 C. When cooling loads dominate, loop water temperatures are maintained below 32 C by rejecting excess heat with a cooling tower. When heating dominates, loop water temperatures are maintained above 16 C by a heater input. The capacity and efficiency of water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in both operating modes are strong functions of the inlet water temperature. The emphasis of this paper is on the analysis of system performances, energy savings of the mixed cooling and heating mode of the WLHP systems for it is a unique operating mode in the air-conditioning and space heating systems. The energy saving effect by using low temperature geothermal as the heat input for WLHP systems was examined.

Xinguo, Li

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Consequences of water injection into high-temperature lithium-lead alloy breeder material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion safety experiment was conducted to determine the consequences of water injection into high-temperature lithium-lead alloy under postulated reactor accident conditions. The temperature and pressure response, fraction of water reacted, quantity of hydrogen produced, and behavior of radioactive species associated with the use of this alloy as a breeder material were determined. The reaction products were identified and the aerosol was characterized for particle size, chemical composition, and deposition rate. The water injection was shown to be self limiting for a blanket module designed to withstand the pressure of the water coolant. Radioactive doses associated with the aerosol release from a high-temperature alloy breeder module were determined to be several orders of magnitude below the dose limit for acute health effects. The results were compared to previous experiments and recommendations were made. 5 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Jeppson, D.W. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Savatteri, C. (Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Electro-Osmosis and Water Uptake in Polymer Electrolytes in Equilibrium with Water Vapor at Low Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water uptake and electro-osmosis are investigated to improve the understanding and aid the modeling of water transport in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) below 0 C. Measurements of water sorption isotherms show a significant reduction in the water capacity of polymer electrolytes below 0 C. This reduced water content is attributed to the lower vapor pressure of ice compared to supercooled liquid water. At -25 C, 1100 equivalent weight Nafion in equilibrium with vapor over ice has 8 moles of water per sulfonic acid group. Measurements of the electro-osmotic drag coefficient for Nafion and both random and multiblock copolymer sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (BPSH) chemistries are reported for vapor equilibrated samples below 0 C. The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of BPSH chemistries is found to be {approx}0.4, and that of Nafion is {approx}1. No significant temperature effect on the drag coefficient is found. The implication of an electro-osmotic drag coefficient less than unity is discussed in terms of proton conduction mechanisms. Simulations of the ohmically limited current below 0 C show that a reduced water uptake below 0 C results in a significant decrease in PEMFC performance.

Gallagher, K. G.; Pivovar, B. S.; Fuller, T. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

80

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

82

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

83

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

84

Electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water and methanol in polymer electrolytes at elevated temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water in two polymer electrolytes was experimentally determined as a function of water activity and current density for temperatures up to 200 C. The results show that the electro-osmotic drag coefficient varies from 0.2 to 0.6 in Nafion{reg_sign}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} membrane electrolyte, but is essentially zero in phosphoric acid-doped PBI (polybenzimidazole) membrane electrolyte over the range of water activity considered. The near-zero electro-osmotic drag coefficient found in PBI indicates that this electrolyte should lessen the problems associated with water redistribution in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

Weng, D.; Wainright, J.S.; Landau, U.; Savinell, R.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A new water anomaly: the temperature dependence of the proton mean kinetic energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mean kinetic energy of protons in water is determined by Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments, performed above and below the temperature of maximum density and in the supercooled phase. The temperature dependence of this energy shows an anomalous behavior, as it occurs for many water properties. In particular two regions of maximum kinetic energy are identified: the first one, in the supercooled phase in the range 269 K - 272 K, and a second one above 273 K. In both these regions the measured proton kinetic energy exceedes the theoretical prediction based on a semi-classical model. Noteworthy, the proton mean kinetic energy has a maximum at 277 K, the temperature of the maximum density of water. In the supercooled metastable phase the measured mean kinetic energy and the proton momentum distribution clearly indicate proton delocalization between two H-bonded oxygens.

Davide Flammini; Fabio Bruni; Maria Antonietta Ricci

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

86

Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific recommendations are presented relative to the application of the technique, including ways to mitigate and manage potential sources of error.

He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Temperature distributions of radio-frequency plasma in water by spectroscopic analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributions of emission intensity from radicals, electron temperature, and rotational temperature at a radio frequency of 27.12 MHz plasma in water are clarified by detailed spectroscopy measurement. Through this investigation, the following were observed. The points of maximum emission intensity of Halpha, Hbeta, O (777 nm), and O (845 nm) are almost the same, while that of OH shifts upward. The electron temperature decreases, while the rotational temperature increases with pressure. The distribution of the electron temperature changes at a threshold pressure, which is concerned with a change in the electron discharge mechanism. The self-bias of the electrode changes from a negative to positive at a threshold pressure. The point of the maximum rotational temperature of OH radicals shifts to approximately 1 mm above that for the maximum intensity of OH emission.

Mukasa, Shinobu; Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Abe, Fumiaki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kawashima, Ayato [Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8566 (Japan)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Performance of an air-cooled ammonia-water absorption air conditioner at low generator temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An ammonia--water absorption air conditioning system has been tested to investigate the stability of operation near the cut-off conditions. Circulation ratios were from 8 to 30. Relations for the estimation of the coefficient of performance and for the prediction of operating temperatures were derived and verified experimentally. Possible operating conditions for an air-cooled ammonia--water air conditioning system were concluded.

Dao, K.; Simmons, M.; Wolgast, R.; Wahlig, M.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Assessments of Water Ingress Accidents in a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe water ingress accidents in the 200-MW HTR-module were assessed to determine the safety margins of modular pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR-module). The 200-MW HTR-module was designed by Siemens under the criteria that no active safety protection systems were necessary because of its inherent safe nature. For simulating the behavior of the HTR-module during severe water ingress accidents, a water, steam, and helium multiphase cavity model was developed and implemented in the dynamic simulator for nuclear power plants (DSNP) simulation system. Comparisons of the DSNP simulations incorporating these models with experiments and with calculations using the time-dependent neutronics and temperature dynamics code were made to validate the simulation. The analysis of the primary circuit showed that the maximum water concentration increase in the reactor core was deaerator to the steam generator. A comprehensive simulation of the HTR-module power plant showed that the water inventory in the primary circuit was limited to {approx}3000 kg. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress would lead to a fast power excursion, which would be inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. The integrity of the fuel elements, because the safety-relevant temperature limit of 1600 deg. C is not reached in any case, is not challenged.

Zhang Zuoyi [Tsinghua University (China); Dong Yujie [Tsinghua University (China); Scherer, Winfried [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 7. Geochemistry and geologic setting of the thermal waters of the Camas Prairie area, Blaine and Camas Counties, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal waters of the east-west trending intermontane basin making up the Camas Prairie area were sampled during the fall of 1973. Average ground water temperature is 15/sup 0/C (10/sup 0/C above mean annual temperature). The thermal waters, chemically similar to thermal waters discharging from granitic rocks elsewhere in Idaho, have high pH, high Na/K and Na/Ca ratios, and high fluoride content. They are low in total dissolved solids (less than 365 mg/l), low in chloride, and exhibit relatively constant chloride/fluoride ratios and silica concentrations. Geochemical thermometers are interpreted to indicate that maximum aquifer temperatures in the Camas Prairie Basin are only about 100/sup 0/C, although higher temperatures were predicted by the quartz equilibrium geochemical thermometer and mixing models. The Magic Hot Springs well, located near the north shore of the Magic Reservoir at Hot Springs Landing, is an exception to these general conclusions. These waters may be circulating to depths approaching 1,800 to 2,500 m along faults or fissures; or may be due to leakage from an aquifer or reservoir heated by a shallow heat source, related perhaps to the Holocene basalt flows south of Magic Reservoir. These waters are nearly neutral in pH, are much higher in dissolved solids, exhibit higher chloride/fluoride, chloride/carbonate plus bicarbonate, and chloride/sulfate ratios, and are, in general, chemically dissimilar to thermal waters elsewhere in the area. Temperatures predicted by geochemical thermometers are thought to indicate that Magic Hot Springs well waters are ascending from an aquifer or reservoir with temperatures from 140/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/C. Temperatures in this range would be sufficient for application in many industrial processes, including power generation, should sufficient water be available.

Mitchell, J.C.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Geothermal data-base study: mine-water temperatures. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigation of about 1,600 mines and prospects for perennial discharge resulted in the measurement of temperature, pH, specific conductance, and discharge at 80 sites to provide information for a geothermal data base. Measurements were made in the fall, winter, and late spring or early summer to provide information about seasonal variability. None of the temperatures measured exceeded the mean annual air temperature by 15/sup 0/F, but three areas were noted where discharges were anomalously warm, based upon high temperatures, slight temperature variation, and quantity of discharge. The most promising area, at the Gold Bug mine in the Little Rockies, discharges water averaging 7.3/sup 0/C (12.1/sup 0/F) above the mean annual air temperature. The discharge may represent water heated during circulation within the syenite intrusive body. If the syenite is enriched in uranium and thorium, an abnormal amount of heat would be produced by radioactive decay. Alternatively, the water may move through deep permeable sedimentary strata, such as the Madison Group, and be discharged to the surface through fractures in the pluton.

Lawson, D.C.; Sonderegger, J.L.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 5. Geochemistry and geologic setting of the thermal waters of the northern Cache Valley area, Franklin County, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal waters of the north-south trending graben structure known as northern Cache Valley in southeastern Idaho were sampled during the summer and fall of 1973. Geologic and gravity data for the area indicate fault control for nearly all thermal water occurrences. Thermal-water discharges are generally restricted to the course of the Bear River with few known in areas away from the river. Spring deposits in the form of travertine may not be indications of low temperature thermal waters because abundant limestone and dolomite make up the geologic framework. Much gas, believed to consist mostly of carbon dioxide, is being evolved from many of the springs. The hottest water is found near Battle Creek and Squaw hot springs approximately 4 kilometers northwest of the town of Preston. Metoric waters descend along fault planes, fractures, and fissures to depths at which they are heated by increasing rock temperatures (geothermal gradient of 5/sup 0/C per 100 meters). Due to decreased density, the heated waters rise along the same or adjacent fault planes to the surface. The quartz equilibrium geochemical thermometer applied to the thermal water discharges indicates temperatures approaching 150/sup 0/C may be encountered by deep drilling. Mixing models, based on quartz solubility, indicate higher aquifer temperatures than the quartz equilibrium thermometer, but chloride concentration vs. temperature plots are not linear. The sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometer indicates higher temperatures than quartz equilibrium and mixing models. The thermal waters are higher in total dissolved solids (12,000 to 13,000 milligrams per liter) than are known elsewhere in Idaho and represent potential pollution hazards should large scale withdrawal be attempted.

Mitchell, J.C.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Wind and Temperature Structure over a Land-Water-Land Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind and temperature data obtained on 5 June 1984 during the Øresund experiment are analyzed. The day was characterized by moderately strong winds blowing from a heated land area over a colder water surface and then over a second heated land ...

J. C. Doran; Sven-Erik Gryning

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Sea Surface Temperature Sensitivity to Water Turbidity from Simulations of the Turbid Black Sea Using HYCOM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the sensitivity of sea surface temperature (SST) to water turbidity in the Black Sea using the eddy-resolving (3.2-km resolution) Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), which includes a nonslab K-profile parameterization (KPP)...

A. Birol Kara; Alan J. Wallcraft; Harley E. Hurlburt

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Use of lce-Liquid Water Potential Temperature as a Thermodynamic Variable In Deep Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have shown liquid water potential temperature to be an inappropriate choice for a thermodynamic variable in a deep cumulus convection model. In this study, an alternate form of this variable called ice-liquid water potential ...

Gregory J. Tripoli; William R. Cotton

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fire Water Lodge Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fire Water Lodge Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fire Water Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Truth or Consequences, New Mexico Coordinates 33.1284047°, -107.2528069° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

97

The Effect of the Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide on the Radiation Absorption and Temperature Profile in Troposphere.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work on this paper focus on the effect of the water vapor and carbon dioxide on the absorption of atmospheric radiation and the temperature… (more)

Li, Chieh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

STUDIES OF METAL-WATER REACTIONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES: I. THE CONDENSER DISCHARGE EXPERIMENT: PRELIMINARY RESULTS WITH ZIRCONIUM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The condenser-discharge method of conducting molten metal- water reactions at high temperatures was refined. Two methods to measure energy input to specimen wires and, therefore, to compute initial metal temperatures were developed. Calculated metal temperatures were estimated to be accurate to within 100 deg C. Two reaction cells were designed, one for operation at atmospheric pressure with water at room temperature, and the other for operation at high pressure and with water at elevated temperature. Means were developed to determine the surface area of metal exposed to reaction and to determine the total extent of reaction. Pressure transducers were used to record the rate of reactions. The zirconium- water reaction was studied with initial metal temperatures from 1100 to 4000 deg C with 30 and 60-mil wires in room-temperature water. Initial pressures in these runs were the vapor pressures of water at room temperature (20-30 mm). Runs were made with 60-mil wires in water heated to 200 deg C (225 psi). Results in room-temperature water indicated that the reaction became explosive at an initial metal temperature of 2600 deg C. Below this temperature, 20% or less reaction occurred. At higher water temperatures, reaction ranged from 40 to 70%. Runs in heated water showed markedly greater reaction, reaching 50% for fully melted metal at the melting point (1840 deg C). Results suggested that the rates of both solid-state processes and the diffusion of water vapor through the hydrogen blanket surrounding reacting particles must be considered. (auth)

Baker, L. Jr.; Warchal, R.L.; Vogel, R.C.; Kilpatrick, M.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 in high temperature water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SCC susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 C (statically loaded U-bend specimens) is dependent on microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures (optical metallography). In CWA tubing materials, one crack dominated and grew to a visible size. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (980 C) and a high-temperature final anneal (>1040 C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks in all specimens. These materials did not develop large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 C for 7h), which reduces or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in high temperature processed HWA materials. Conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) were done on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behavior. Major difference between high-temperature HWA and low-temperature HWA and CWA materials was that the high temperature processing and final annealing produced predominantly ``semi-continuous`` dendritic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides along grain boundaries with a minimal amount of intragranular carbides. Lower temperature processing produced intragranular M7C3 carbides, with less intergranular carbides.

Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal field, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of steam pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption and desorption runs were made in order to investigate the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were made on the same rock samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there was no direct correlation between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The hysteresis decreased significantly at 250 C. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption, rather than capillary condensation, is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Observed Increase of TTL Temperature and Water Vapor in Polluted Couds over Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols can affect cloud particle size and lifetime, which impacts precipitation, radiation and climate. Previous studies1-4 suggested that reduced ice cloud particle size and fall speed due to the influence of aerosols may increase evaporation of ice crystals and/or cloud radiative heating in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), leading to higher water vapor abundance in air entering the stratosphere. Observational substantiation of such processes is still lacking. Here, we analyze new observations from multiple NASA satellites to show the imprint of pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. We focus our analysis on the highly-polluted South and East Asia region during boreal summer. We find that "polluted" ice clouds have smaller ice effective radius than "clean" clouds. In the TTL, the polluted clouds are associated with warmer temperature and higher specific humidity than the clean clouds. The water vapor difference between the polluted and clean clouds cannot be explained by other meteorological factors, such as updraft and detrainment strength. Therefore, the observed higher water vapor entry value into the stratosphere in the polluted clouds than in the clean clouds is likely a manifestation of aerosol pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. Given the radiative and chemical importance of stratospheric water vapor, the increasing emission of aerosols over Asia may have profound impacts on stratospheric chemistry and global energy balance and water cycle.

Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, J.; Read, William G.; Massie, Steven T.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Colarco, Peter; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Global Approach to Assess the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Stream Water Temperatures and Related In-Stream First-Order Decay Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stream water temperature is an important factor used in water quality modeling. To estimate monthly stream temperature on a global scale, a simple nonlinear regression model was developed. It was applied to stream temperatures recorded over a 36-...

Manuel Punzet; Frank Voß; Anja Voß; Ellen Kynast; Ilona Bärlund

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Strees Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Ni-Bassed Alloys in High Temperature Water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the work is to provide stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation data for Alloy 600 that is not compromised by (1) specimens that suffer from stress relaxation, (2) specimens which have an unknown stress state, (3) specimens which are tested at unknown positions electrochemically relative to the Ni/NiO phase transition, and (4) testing which relies on the period of time between specimen inspection intervals to estimate SCC initiation times. The current study was aimed at studying the effects of temperature and coolant hydrogen concentration on SCC initiation in high purity, high temperature water.

E Richey; D Morton

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

Comparison of MTI Satellite-Derived Surface Water Temperatures and In-Situ Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperatures of the water surface of a cold, mid-latitude lake and the tropical Pacific Ocean were determined from MTI images and from in situ concurrent measurements. In situ measurements were obtained at the time of the MTI image with a floating, anchored platform, which measured the surface and bulk water temperatures and relevant meteorological variables, and also from a boat moving across the target area. Atmospheric profiles were obtained from concurrent radiosonde soundings. Radiances at the satellite were calculated with the Modtran radiative transfer model. The MTI infrared radiances were within 1 percent of the calculated values at the Pacific Ocean site but were 1-2 percent different over the mid-latitude lake.

Kurzeja, R.

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

Measurements of the Infrared SpectraLines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures P. Varanasi and Q. Zou Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York Introduction Water vapor is undoubtedly the most dominant greenhouse gas in the terrestrial atmosphere. In the two facets of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research, atmospheric remote sensing (air-borne as well as Cloud and Radiation Testbed [CART] site-based) and modeling of atmospheric radiation, the spectrum of water vapor, ranging from the microwave to the visible wavelengths, plays a significant role. Its spectrum has been the subject of many studies throughout the last century. Therefore, it is natural to presume it should be fairly well established by now. However, the need for a

107

SAFARI 2000 Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Surface Temperature Data Set Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a new SAFARI 2000 data set. The data set "SAFARI 2000 AVHRR-derived Land Surface Temperature...

108

Experimental Assessment of Water Based Drilling Fluids in High Pressure and High Temperature Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper selection of drilling fluids plays a major role in determining the efficient completion of any drilling operation. With the increasing number of ultra-deep offshore wells being drilled and ever stringent environmental and safety regulations coming into effect, it becomes necessary to examine and understand the behavior of water based drilling fluids - which are cheaper and less polluting than their oil based counterpart - under extreme temperature and pressure conditions. In most of the existing literature, the testing procedure is simple - increase the temperature of the fluid in steps and record rheological properties at each step. A major drawback of this testing procedure is that it does not represent the continuous temperature change that occurs in a drilling fluid as it is circulated through the well bore. To have a better understanding of fluid behavior under such temperature variation, a continuous test procedure was devised in which the temperature of the drilling fluid was continuously increased to a pre-determined maximum value while monitoring one rheological parameter. The results of such tests may then be used to plan fluid treatment schedules. The experiments were conducted on a Chandler 7600 XHPHT viscometer and they seem to indicate specific temperature ranges above which the properties of the drilling fluid deteriorate. Different fluid compositions and drilling fluids in use in the field were tested and the results are discussed in detail.

Ravi, Ashwin

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development of an artificial neural network-based software for prediction of power plant canal water discharge temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant cooling water systems that interact with nearby effluents are complex non-linear, large-time-delay systems. A neural network-based software tool was developed for prediction of the canal water discharge temperature at a coal-fired power plant ... Keywords: Canal water thermal discharge, Neural networks, Power plants

Carlos E. Romero; Jiefeng Shan

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL ENDOTOXIN ON WATER INTAKE, FOOD INTAKE, AND BODY TEMPERATURE IN THE ALBINO RAT*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1961, Dubos and Schaedler (1) reported a reduction in water intake in animals treated with bacterial endotoxin. Mice were raised in a pathogen-free environment and subsequently tested with one of several toxins. Alteration in daily water intake was found to occur at doses well below the LDs0. Because of the long-standing interest in this laboratory in drive states, their behavioral consequences, and physiological basis (2), this property of endotoxin was explored in the albino rat. Our animals were not raised in a pathogen-free environment. Using fairly large doses of toxin, we were able to confirm the findings of Dubos and Schaedler, and, in addition, demonstrate a profound toxin effect on food intake and body temperature. Using behavioral and physiological techniques, we made exploratory studies of resistance and sensitization to toxin and of its possible site of action. Materials and Methods Animals.--AU the animals were male Sprague-Dawley albino rats, 90 to 120 days old, weighing 300 gm or more. They were housed in individual wire cages in a temperature-controlled room, and were fed Purina lab chow and tap water. Water intakes were measured by making water bottles available for 30 minutes every day and weighing the bottles before and after consumption. After several "familiarization " days the rats would drink a fairly standard amount each day. Food intake was measured by weighing the food in the cages every 24 hours, the food being continuously available. Animals on food-intake measurement were given water ad lib and those on water-intake measurement were given food ad lib. Temperatures were taken with an ordinary rectal thermometer, lubricated and inserted almost its entire length. The animals showed no unusual distress and tolerated the procedure day after day. Thermometers were left in place 3 to 5 minutes and then read. Thermometem that dropped out were replaced for 3 additional minutes. A paper towel on the cage floor facilitated recovery of lost thermometers. Toxin.--A eommerdally prepared lipopolysaccharide extract of Eschericlda coli was used

E. Holmes; Neal; E. Miller, Ph.D.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

DEVELOPMENT AND PROPERTIES OF URANIUM-BASE ALLOYS CORROSION RESISTANT IN HIGH TEMPERATURE WATER. PART III. CORROSION MECHANISM OF URANIUM-BASE ALLOYS IN HIGH TEMPERATURE WATER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The factors affecting corrosion resistance both of bare and of clad uranium-base alloys are reviewed and a mechanism proposed for their corrosion behavior. For unclad gamma-phase uranium alloys exposed to a high temperature water corrodent, it is proposed that the corrosion rate is determined primarily by the oxidation of the alloy by water. This behavior is contrary to that of alpha uranium in which the corrosion rate is primarily determined by the formation and subsequent oxidation of a nonadherent hydride layer. In gamma- phase alloys the hydrogen released by the corrosion reaction, rather than forming the thermodynamically stable UH/sub 3/ phase, dissolves (at least in part) in the base metal where it precipitates as a metastable hydride. The amount of hydrogen absorbed by the metal and hence precipitating as the metastable hydride may be markedly reduced by the addition of hydrogen depolarizers such as nickel or platinum to the water or to the metal. Similarly the amount of absorbed hydrogen may be reduced by introducing sinks that preferentially absorb hydrogen. Both alpha uranium and zirconium were shown to be suitable sinks. Precipitated hydride hardens and embrittles the matrix and by its preferential corrosion eventually leads to discontinuous failure. The hydride may be made to precipitate in a less harmful manner by heat treatments which precipitate nucleating and hardening impurities. The mode of the precipitation is shown to be sensitive to stress; in fact, the assumption of elastic stress as contributing to hydride precipitation is considered necessary to explain the distribution of the precipitate during corrosion. In order to apply a gammaphase fuel alloy as a fuel element material, it is necessary primarily to reduce the amount of hydrogen absorbed by the fuel. This can be done by cladding the fuel with a zirconium- base alloy. Under such conditions it has been shown that fuel element lives in excess of 4 years should be obtainable with properly fabricated fuel elements before they are subject to corrosion failure. Optimum fuel element corrosion life can be achieved by decreasing the general corrosion rate, increasing the hydrogen solubility, increasing the hydrogen diffusion rate, and maintaining a proper clad-fuel bond. For uranium-base alloys such as U/sub 3/Si that do not form a hydride during hot water corrosion, use of a Zircaloy clad is unnecessary. Therefore, the development of alternate cladding materials such as Al for corrosion resistant fuel elements is predicted upon the development of uranium- base alloys that do not corrode by a hydride mechanism. In addition to U/sub 3/ both Zr-U alloys and the strained alpha uranium-base alloys do not appear to corrode by a hydride mechanism. (auth)

Burkart, M.W. ed.

1956-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Polarization induced water molecule dissociation below the first-order electronic-phase transition temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen produced from the photocatalytic splitting of water is one of the reliable alternatives to replace the polluting fossil and the radioactive nuclear fuels. Here, we provide unequivocal evidence for the existence of blue- and red-shifting O$-$H covalent bonds within a single water molecule adsorbed on MgO surface as a result of asymmetric displacement polarizabilities. The adsorbed H-O-H on MgO gives rise to one weaker H-O bond, while the other O-H covalent bond from the same adsorbed water molecule compensates this effect with a stronger bond. The weaker bond (nearest to the surface), the interlayer tunneling electrons and the silver substrate are shown to be the causes for the smallest dissociative activation energy on MgO monolayer. The origin that is responsible to initiate the splitting mechanism is proven to be due to the changes in the polarizability of an adsorbed water molecule, which are further supported by the temperature-dependent static dielectric constant measurements for water below the...

Arulsamy, Andrew Das; Elersic, Kristina; Modic, Martina; Subramani, Uma Shankar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Instantaneous gas water heater  

SciTech Connect

Hot water supply temperature is set by a temperature setting device in response to an instantaneous flow rate signal from a water flow rate sensor arranged in a water supply pipe and a feeding water temperature signal from a feeding water temperature sensor which are compared with a predetermined hot water supply temperature and calculated in a control unit. A proportional valve and other devices in a gas supply pipe are controlled in response to the result of the comparison and calculation to define a required volume of gas for ignition and heating. At the same time, a fan damper is controlled by a damper control device so as to adjust the volume of combustion air. A signal representing discharging hot water temperature from a discharging hot water temperature sensor arranged in a hot water feeding pipe is fed back to the control unit and calculated therein, and a valve in the hot water supply pipe is adjusted in response to the result of calculation to attain the desired hot water supply temperature. In order to prevent freezing in the system in winter season, a signal from a thermostat in the water feeding pipe is transmitted to a heater arranged in an air supply chamber so as to heat a heat exchanger pipe and, at the same time, heaters arranged in the water feeding pipe and the hot water supply pipe are also controlled to prevent freezing.

Tsutsui, O.; Kuwahara, H.; Murakami, Sh.; Yasunaga, Sh.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater  

SciTech Connect

The following document is the final report for DE-FC26-05NT42327: Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater. This work was carried out under a cooperative agreement from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with additional funding from Keltech, Inc. The objective of the project was to improve the temperature control performance of an electric tankless water heater (TWH). The reason for doing this is to minimize or eliminate one of the barriers to wider adoption of the TWH. TWH use less energy than typical (storage) water heaters because of the elimination of standby losses, so wider adoption will lead to reduced energy consumption. The project was carried out by Building Solutions, Inc. (BSI), a small business based in Omaha, Nebraska. BSI partnered with Keltech, Inc., a manufacturer of electric tankless water heaters based in Delton, Michigan. Additional work was carried out by the University of Nebraska and Mike Coward. A background study revealed several advantages and disadvantages to TWH. Besides using less energy than storage heaters, TWH provide an endless supply of hot water, have a longer life, use less floor space, can be used at point-of-use, and are suitable as boosters to enable alternative water heating technologies, such as solar or heat-pump water heaters. Their disadvantages are their higher cost, large instantaneous power requirement, and poor temperature control. A test method was developed to quantify performance under a representative range of disturbances to flow rate and inlet temperature. A device capable of conducting this test was designed and built. Some heaters currently on the market were tested, and were found to perform quite poorly. A new controller was designed using model predictive control (MPC). This control method required an accurate dynamic model to be created and required significant tuning to the controller before good control was achieved. The MPC design was then implemented on a prototype heater that was being developed simultaneously with the controller development. (The prototype's geometry and components are based on a currently marketed heater, but several improvements have been made.) The MPC's temperature control performance was a vast improvement over the existing controller. With a benchmark for superior control performance established, five additional control methods were tested. One problem with MPC control is that it was found to be extremely difficult to implement in a TWH, so that it is unlikely to be widely adopted by manufacturers. Therefore the five additional control methods were selected based on their simplicity; each could be implemented by a typical manufacturer. It was found that one of these methods performed as well as MPC, or even better under many circumstances. This method uses a Feedback-Compensated Feed-Forward algorithm that was developed for this project. Due to its simplicity and excellent performance this method was selected as the controller of choice. A final higher-capacity prototype heater that uses Feedback-Compensated Feed-Forward control was constructed. This prototype has many improvements over the currently marketed heaters: (1) excellent control; (2) a modular design that allows for different capacity heaters to be built easily; (3) built-in fault detection and diagnosis; (4) a secondary remote user-interface; and (5) a TRIAC switching algorithm that will minimize 'flicker factor'. The design and engineering of this prototype unit will allow it to be built without an increase in cost, compared with the currently marketed heater. A design rendering of the new product is shown below. It will be launched with a new marketing campaign by Keltech in early 2009.

David Yuill

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part II. Water temperature and chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal reconnaissance techniques have identified five areas in Utah County warranting further investigation for low-temperature geothermal resources. One area in northern Utah Valley is along Utah Lake fault zone and includes Saratoga Hot Springs. Water temperatures within this area range from 21 to 43/sup 0/C. Common ion analyses as well as B and Li concentrations indicate waters sampled in this area are anomalous when compared to other samples from the same aquifer. Two other areas in southern Utah Valley also coincide with the Utah Lake fault zone. Common ion analyses, trace element concentrations, and C1/HCO/sub 3/ ratios distinguish these areas from all other waters in this valley. Temperatures within these southern areas range from 21 to 32/sup 0/C. All three thermal areas are possibly the result of deep circulation of meteoric water being warmed and subsequently migrating upward within the Utah Lake fault zone. The Castilla Hot Springs area has been expanded by this study to include a spring located 3 mi further up Spanish Fork Canyon near the Thistle earthflow. A temperature of 50/sup 0/C was recorded for this spring and chemistry is similar to Castilla. In Goshen Valley, the fifth geothermal area identified, measured temperatures range from 20 to 27/sup 0/C for some wells and springs. Chemical analyses, however, do not discern the location of low-temperature geothermal reservoirs. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Klauk, R.H.; Davis, D.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Comparative reflections on the use of modelling tools in conflictive water management settings: The Mancha Occidental aquifer, Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Participatory methods provide an increasingly accepted path to integrated assessment. This paper reflects on the role of two participatory modelling initiatives implemented in a highly conflictive setting: the Mancha Occidental aquifer, Spain. The methodologies ... Keywords: Aquifer, Bayesian belief networks, Groundwater modelling, Integrated assessment, Mancha Occidental, Participatory modelling

P. Martínez-Santos; H. J. Henriksen; P. Zorrilla; P. E. Martínez-Alfaro

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A catalytic membrane reactor for facilitating the water-gas shift reaction at high temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is directed toward the development of a metal-membrane-based process for the economical production of hydrogen at elevated temperature by the reaction of carbon monoxide with steam--i.e., the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction. Key to achieving this objective is the development of an inexpensive and durable metal-membrane module. The specific program objectives include the following: design, fabrication, and demonstration of prototype membrane modules; improving the membrane composition to increase the hydrogen flux; demonstrating that membrane lifetime {ge}2 years is likely to be achieved; and conducting engineering and economic analyses of the process. Results to date are given and discussed.

Edlund, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Floatabilities of treated coal in water at room temperature. Annual topical report, September 1992--August 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a research paper entitled ``Floatability of Treated Coal in Water at Room Temperature.`` Experimental data on equilibrium adsorption loadings of probe compounds on coal, and flotation of raw coals as well as treated coal were obtained, using Illinois No. 6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville No. 1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal (PSOC-1549). The raw data of this Annual Topical Report are also available in the Quarterly Progress Report for the period April--June 1993 and the Quarterly Progress Report July--September 1993.

Kwon, K.C. [Tuskegee Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rohrer, R.L.; Lai, R.W.; Finseth, D.H. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Effect of temperature on oil/water relative permeabilities of unconsolidated and consolidated sands  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 20 years, a number of studies have reported temperature effects on two-phase relative permeabilities in porous media. However, some of the reported results have been contradictory. Also, observed effects have not been explained in terms of fundamental properties known to govern two-phase flow. The purpose of this study was to attempt to isolate the fundamental properties affecting two-phase relative permeabilities at elevated temperature. Laboratory dynamic displacement relative permeability measurements were made on unconsolidated and consolidated sand cores, using water and a refined white mineral oil. Experiments were run on 2 in. (51 mm) diameter, 20 in. (510 mm) long cores from room temperature to 300/sup 0/F (149/sup 0/C). Unlike the results of previous researchers, essentially no changes with temperatures were observed in either residual saturations or relative permeability relationships. It was concluded that previous results may have been affected by viscous instabilities, capillary end-effects, and/or difficulties in maintaining material balances.

Miller, M.A.; Ramey, H.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

SIZE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE IN THE FAR-IR SPECTRA OF WATER ICE PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

Spectra of water-ice aerosol particles have been measured in the far-IR region using synchrotron radiation. The particles in the nanoscale size regime of 1-100 nm were formed by rapid collisional cooling at temperatures ranging from 4 to 190 K. The spectra show the characteristic bands centered near 44 {mu}m (230 cm{sup -1}) and 62 {mu}m (160 cm{sup -1}) associated with the intermolecular lattice modes of crystalline ice at all temperatures, in contrast to previous studies of thin films formed by vapor deposition where amorphous ice is generated below 140 K. The bands shift to higher wavenumber values as the temperature is reduced, consistent with the trend seen in earlier studies, but in our experiments the actual peak positions in the aerosol particle spectra are consistently higher by ca. 4 cm{sup -1}. This finding has implications for the potential use of these spectral features as a temperature probe. The particle sizes are small enough for their spectra to be free of scattering effects, and therefore provide a means to assess imaginary refractive index values obtained through Kramers-Kronig analyses of thin film spectra.

Medcraft, Chris; McNaughton, Don; Thompson, Chris D. [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Appadoo, Dominique [Australian Synchrotron, Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Bauerecker, Sigurd [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Robertson, Evan G., E-mail: E.Robertson@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and La Trobe Institute of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Measurements of metabolically active inorganic phosphate in plants growing in natural and agronomic settings and under water stress. [Stromal Phosphate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At high rates of photosynthesis, the conflicting requirements of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis for phosphate and starch and sucrose synthesis for low phosphate, may limit the overall rate of photosynthesis. This is called feedback limitation of photosynthesis. A nonaqueous fractionation technique was used to measure stromal phosphate levels without contamination from vacuolar phosphate. Under normal conditions the stromal phosphate level was found to be 7mM. Under feedback limited photosynthesis, this value dropped to <1mM. In a related study, the effect of water stress on photosynthesis was examined. Water stress was shown to cause a decrease in total leaf photosynthesis, due not to a total loss of photosynthetic ability, but rather due to photosynthesis only occurring in patches of the leaf. Water stress was shown to cause a reduction in starch and sucrose synthesis. Since this decline can be reversed by increasing the CO{sub 2} level around the plant, this is proposed to be due to closing of stomata due to the water stress. (MHB)

Sharkey, T.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Parameterization of Joint Frequency Distributions of Potential Temperature and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio in the Daytime Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Joint frequency distributions (JFDs) of potential temperature (?) versus water vapor mixing ratio (r) within the convective boundary layer were measured during a new field experiment named Boundary Layer Experiment 1996 (BLX96). These JFDs were ...

Larry K. Berg; Roland B. Stull

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Satellite-Model Coupled Analysis of Convective Potential in Florida with VAS Water Vapor and Surface Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for time-continuous mesoscale weather analysis is applied to a study of convective cloud development in central Florida. The analysis system incorporates water vapor concentrations and surface temperatures retrieved from infrared VISSR (...

Alan E. Lipton; George D. Modica; Scot T. Heckman; Arthur J. Jackson

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Satellite Study of the Relationship between Sea Surface Temperature and Column Water Vapor over Tropical and Subtropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The known characteristics of the relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) and column water vapor (CWV) are reevaluated with recent satellite observations over tropical and subtropical oceans. Satellite data acquired by the Aqua Advanced ...

Kaya Kanemaru; Hirohiko Masunaga

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Distance-Scaled Water Concentrations versus Mass-Median Drop Size, Temperature, and Altitude in Supercooled Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 28 000 nautical miles (n mi) of select in-flight measurements of liquid water content (LWC), droplet sizes, temperature, and other variables in supercooled clouds from a variety of research projects over portions of North America, Europe, ...

Richard K. Jeck

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Analysis of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Brightness Temperatures from SSM/T2, HIRS, and GMS-5 VISSR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite microwave and infrared instruments sensitive to upper-tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) are compared using both simulated and observed cloud-cleared brightness temperatures (Tb’s). To filter out cloudy scenes, a cloud detection algorithm ...

Wesley Berg; John J. Bates; Darren L. Jackson

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Influence of dissolved hydrogen on nickel alloy SCC in high temperature water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stress corrosion crack growth rate (SCCGR) tests of nickel alloys were conducted at 338 C and 360 C as a function of the hydrogen concentration in high purity water. Test results identified up to a 7 x effect of hydrogen levels in the water on crack growth rate, where the lowest growth rates were associated with the highest hydrogen levels. At 338 C, the crack growth rate decreased as the hydrogen levels were increased. However, different results were observed for the test conducted at 360 C. As the hydrogen level was increased in the 360 C tests, the crack growth rate initially increased, a maximum was exhibited at a hydrogen level of {approximately} 20 scc/kg, and thereafter the crack growth rate decreased. Based on this testing and a review of the commercial literature, the thermodynamic stability of nickel oxide, not the dissolved hydrogen concentration, was identified as a fundamental parameter influencing the susceptibility of nickel alloys to SCC. These test results are discussed in relation to the accuracy of extrapolating high temperature SCC results to lower temperatures.

Morton, D.S.; Attanasio, S.A.; Fish, J.S.; Schurman, M.K. [Lockheed Martin, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Design concepts for flash steam systems for use with medium temperature geothermal water  

SciTech Connect

Medium temperature water can be utilized for production of electrical energy when it is available in massive quantities. The design concepts herein are to provide a base for feasibility studies and evaluate processes with consideration of the economics of developing this electrical energy on a commercial scale. Two methods of producing electrical energy with geothermal water are being considered. The methods discussed in this document are by the flashing process of producing steam for driving turbine-generators. Flash steam systems were evaluated for use with 300/sup 0/F water. Single and multiflash systems were evaluated and component size sensitivity to operating pressures were studied. It was determined that a double flash system is the most practical system. Net power production of approximately 2.4 megawatts/million pounds per hour of brine is estimated for the double flash system which operates at an initial flash pressure of 30 psia and a second stage pressure of 13 psia. Flash pressures below atmospheric are not recommended due to oxygen leakage into the system. Sensitivity analysis has indicated that the power output is not highly sensitive to the first stage flash pressure. A significant loss in power output occurs if the second stage pressure is increased significantly.

Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect of water addition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect 20 December 2011 Keywords: Syngas combustion Elevated temperatures Water addition Laminar flame speed a b s t r a c t Laminar flame speeds of premixed syngas/air mixtures were measured at various fuel

Qiao, Li

130

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generators. The plant's water intake structure, which isoff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory, andat the aquarium's water system intake located in a deep

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1977  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.Thermograph record of intake water at Pacific Gas andtemperatures and water samples at the intake pipe to their

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Thermographthat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The development of code inservice inspection (ISI) requirements for Low Temperature Heavy Water Reactors (LTHWR)  

SciTech Connect

DOE Savannah River Field office requested that the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) develop rules for inservice inspection (ISI) of Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Temperature Heavy Water Reactors (LTHWR's) in January 1990. The request is part of the SRS Reactor Safety Improvement Program (RSIP). RSIP will implement an ASME B PV Code Section XI based ISI program after restart of K Reactor. The establishment of a Code based ISI program at SRS will affect a transition from a standing log which scheduled inspections to a program structured to commercial reactor standards. The SRS standing log for periodic inspection of equipment was initiated in the early 1970's, approximately the same time Section XI ISI programs were initiated at commercial reactors. The information contained in this article was developed during the course of work under Contract Number AC09-89SR18035 with the US Department of Energy.

Cowfer, C.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

L1157-B1: Water and ammonia as diagnostics of shock temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the origin and nature of the profiles of water and ammonia observ ed toward the L1157-B1 clump as part of the HIFI CHESS survey (Ceccarelli et al. 2010) using a new code coupling a gas-grain chemical model with a parametric shock model. Fir st results from the unbiased survey (Lefloch et al. 2010, Codella et al. 2010) reveal different molecular components at different excitation conditions coexisting in the B1 bow shock structure, with NH$_3$, H$_2$CO and CH$_3$OH emitting only at relatively low outflow velocities whereas H$_2$O shows bright emission at high velocities. Our model suggests that these differences are purely chemical and can be explained by the presence of a C-type shock whose maximum temperature must be close to 4000 K along the B1 clump.

Viti, S; Yates, J A; Codella, C; Vasta, M; Caselli, P; Lefloch, B; Ceccarelli, C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

L1157-B1: WATER AND AMMONIA AS DIAGNOSTICS OF SHOCK TEMPERATURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the origin and nature of the profiles of water and ammonia observed toward the L1157-B1 clump as part of the HIFI CHESS survey using a new code coupling a gas-grain chemical model with a parametric shock model. First results from the unbiased survey reveal different molecular components at different excitation conditions coexisting in the B1 bow shock structure, with NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}CO, and CH{sub 3}OH emitting only at relatively low outflow velocities whereas H{sub 2}O shows bright emission at high velocities. Our model suggests that these differences are purely chemical and can be explained by the presence of a C-type shock whose maximum temperature must be close to 4000 K along the B1 clump.

Viti, S.; Yates, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Jimenez-Serra, I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Codella, C.; Vasta, M.; Caselli, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, 50125, Firenze (Italy); Lefloch, B.; Ceccarelli, C., E-mail: sv@star.ucl.ac.uk [Laboratoire d'astrophysique de Grenoble, UMR 5571-CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Colorado river basin and climatic change. The sensitivity of streamflow and water supply to variations in temperature and precipitation  

SciTech Connect

Growing international concern about the greenhouse effect has led to increased interest in the regional implications of changes in temperature and precipitation patterns for a wide range of societal and natural systems, including agriculture, sea level, biodiversity, and water resources. The accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere due to human activities are likely to have significant, though still poorly understood, impacts on water quality and availability. One method developed over the last several years for determining how regional water resources might be affected by climatic change is to develop scenarios of changes in temperature and precipitation and to use hydrologic simulation models to study the impacts of these scenarios on runoff and water supply. In the paper the authors present the results of a multi-year study of the sensitivity of the hydrology and water resources systems in the Colorado River Basin to plausible climatic changes.

Nash, L.L.; Gleick, P.H.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Experimental Analysis of Water Based Drilling Fluid Aging Processes at High Temperature and High Pressure Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In efforts to render the safest, fastest, and most cost efficient drilling program for a high temperature and high pressure (HT/HP) well the maximization of drilling operational efficiencies is key. Designing an adequate, HT/HP well specific, drilling fluid is of most importance and a technological challenge that can greatly affect the outcome of the overall operational efficiency. It is necessary to have a sound fundamental understanding of the behavior that water-based muds (WBM) exhibit when exposed to HT/HP conditions. Therefore, in order to adequately design and treat a WBM for a HT/HP well specific drilling program, it is essential that the mud be evaluated at HT/HP conditions. Currently, industry standard techniques used to evaluate WBM characteristics involve aging the fluid sample to a predetermined temperature, based on the anticipated bottom hole temperature (BHT), either statically or dynamically, for a predetermined length, then cooling and mixing the fluid and measuring its rheological properties at a significantly lower temperature. This, along with the fact that the fluid is not subjected to the anticipated bottom hole pressure (BHP) during or after the aging process, brings to question if the properties recorded are those that are truly experienced down-hole. Furthermore, these testing methods do not allow the user to effectively monitor the changes during the aging process. The research in this thesis is focused on evaluating a high performance WBM and the current test procedures used to evaluate their validity. Experimental static and dynamic aging tests were developed for comparative analysis as well to offer a more accurate and precise method to evaluate the effects experienced by WBM when subjected to HT/HP conditions. The experimental tests developed enable the user to monitor and evaluate, in real-time, the rheological changes that occur during the aging of a WBM while being subjected to true BHT and BHP. Detailed standard and experimental aging tests were conducted and suggest that the standard industry tests offer false rheological results with respect to true BHT and BHP. Furthermore, the experimental aging tests show that high pressure has a significant effect on the rheological properties of the WBM at elevated temperatures.

Zigmond, Brandon

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

SCC Initiation in Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Temperature Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies have shown that grain boundary chromium carbides improve the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nickel based alloys exposed to high temperature, high purity water. However, thermal cycles from welding can significantly alter the microstructure of the base material near the fusion line. In particular, the heat of welding can solutionize grain boundary carbides and produce locally high residual stresses and strains, reducing the SCC resistance of the Alloy 600 type material in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Testing has shown that the SCC growth rate in Alloy 600 heat affected zone samples can be {approx}30x faster than observed in the Alloy 600 base material under identical testing conditions due to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and increased plastic strain in the HAZ [1, 2]. Stress corrosion crack initiation tests were conducted on Alloy 600 HAZ samples at 360 C in hydrogenated, deaerated water to determine if these microstructural differences significantly affect the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to the Alloy 600 base material. Alloy 600 to EN82H to Alloy 600 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) specimens where fabricated from an Alloy 600 to Alloy 600 narrow groove weld with EN82H filler metal. The approximate middle third of the specimen gauge region was EN82H such that each specimen had two HAZ regions. Tests were conducted with in-situ monitored smooth tensile specimens under a constant load, and a direct current electric potential drop was used for in-situ detection of SCC. Test results suggest that the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 and its weld metal follows the following order: EN82H > Alloy 600 HAZ > Alloy 600. The high SCC initiation resistance observed to date in Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to wrought Alloy 600 is unexpected based on the microstructure of HAZ versus wrought material and based on prior SCC growth rate studies. The observed behavior for the HAZ specimens is likely not related to differences in the environment, differences in surface stress/strain between the various specimen regions (weld, HAZ, wrought), differences in surface residual stress, or differences in the microstructure of the various specimen regions (weld, HAZ, wrought). The behavior may be related to differences in the creep behavior of the various weld regions or differences in the surface area of the various materials (weld, HAZ, wrought) exposed to high temperature water.

E Richey; DS Morton; RA Etien; GA Young; RB Bucinell

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

Markov sets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We deduce a polynomial estimate on a compact planar set from a polynomial estimate on its circular projection, which enables us to prove Markov and Bernstein-Walsh type inequalities for certain sets. We construct • totally disconnected Markov sets, that are scattered around zero in different directions; • a Markov set E ? R such that neither E?[0, +?) nor E?(??, 0] admit Markov’s inequality; • a Markov set that is not unifomly perfect. Finally, we propose a construction based on a generalization of iterated function systems – a way of obtaining a big family of uniformly perfect sets.

L. Bia?as-cie?; M. Kosek; L. Bia?as-cie?; M. Kosek; L. Bia?as-cie?; M. Kosek

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Investigations of Temperature Effects on NOAA's Next Generation Water Level Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration collects tide and water-level data by using an acoustic tide gauge in its Next Generation Water Level Measurement System (NGWLMS). The elevation of the water is calculated from the round-trip ...

David L. Portep; H. H. Shih

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1984  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Trinidadthat monitors the cool- ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Surface Water Temperatures and Salinities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1987  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.for rocks near water laboratory intake Granite Canyon 55.0'W

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has a large-volume water intake from which the daily wateroff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Off rocks near water Intake for laboratory Thermograph

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1986  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Farallónthat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1983  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Granitethat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Station Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Farallónthat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Program on Technology Innovation: Review of Advanced Cooling Tower Technologies with Reduced Cooled Water Temperature and Evaporatio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews current technologies and solutions for advanced cooling towers with reduced cooled water temperature and evaporation losses. This is the first report for the dew-point cooling tower fill development project, funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Program on Technology Innovation, Water Conservation program. It is prepared by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI).This review is based on a literature and patent survey; it summarizes advancements in cooling ...

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

HIGH TEMPERATURE CONDUCTIVITY PROBE FOR MONITORING CONTAMINATION LEVELS IN POWER PLANT BOILER WATER.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A high temperature/high pressure flow through probe was designed to measure high temperature electrical conductivity of aqueous (aq) dilute electrolyte solutions, an application which can… (more)

Hipple, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Temperature and Water Depth Monitoring Within Chum Salmon Spawning Habitat Below Bonneville Dam : Annual Report October 2007-September 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project described in this report is to provide a sound scientific basis for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance chum salmon populations - a species listed in March 1999 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The study objective during fiscal year 2008 was to provide real-time data on Ives Island area water temperature and water surface elevations from the onset of chum salmon spawning through the end of chum salmon emergence. Sampling locations included areas where riverbed temperatures were elevated, potentially influencing alevin development and emergence timing. In these locations, hydrosystem operation caused large, frequent changes in river discharge that affected salmon habitat by dewatering redds and altering egg pocket temperatures. The 2008 objective was accomplished using temperature and water-level sensors deployed inside piezometers. Sensors were integrated with a radio telemetry system such that real-time data could be downloaded remotely and posted hourly on the Internet. During our overall monitoring period (October 2007 through June 2008), mean temperature in chum spawning areas was nearly 2 C warmer within the riverbed than in the overlying river. During chum salmon spawning (mid-November 2007 through December2007), mean riverbed temperature in the Ives Island area was 14.5 C, more than 5 C higher than in the river, where mean temperature was 9.4 C. During the incubation period (January 2008 through mid-May 2008), riverbed temperature was approximately 3 C greater than in the overlying river (10.5 C and 7.2 C, respectively). Chum salmon preferentially select spawning locations where riverbed temperatures are elevated; consequently the incubation time of alevin is shortened before they emerge in the spring.

Arntzen, E.V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Influence of Different Inflow Water Rate and Temperature on Heat Exchange Performance of Underground Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

in the paper, the influence of different inflow water rate and temperature on heat exchange performance of underground heat pump were discussed by experiment, two vital parameters was defined to measure the properties of ground heat exchanger: Energy ... Keywords: heat pump, underground tube, influential factors, parameters

Zheng Min; Li Bai-yi

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Molecular properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: an investigation on the role of the wave function ansatz and the basis set in the water molecule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely: the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculations, although several lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are also reported. Through a systematic study, we provide a useful guide to the choice of the wave function, the pseudo potential, and the basis set for QMC calculations. We also introduce a new strategy for the definition of the atomic orbitals involved in the Jastrow - Antisymmetrised Geminal power wave function, in order to drastically reduce the number of variational parameters. This scheme significantly improves the efficiency of QMC energy minimization in case of large basis sets.

Andrea Zen; Ye Luo; Sandro Sorella; Leonardo Guidoni

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electro-Osmosis and Water Uptake in Polymer Electrolytes in Equilibrium with Water Vapor at Low Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the electro-osmotic drag coefficient for Nafion{reg_sign} and both random and multi-block co-polymer sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (BPSH) chemistries are reported for vapor equilibrated samples below 0 C. No significant change in the drag coefficient behavior for Nafion from that reported above 0 C is found. However BPSH is found to have a drag coefficient of 0.4. The implication of a drag coefficient less than unity in the interpretation of conduction mechanisms is discussed. Measurements of water sorption isotherms below 0 C are also presented. A significant reduction in the capacity of polymer electrolytes to store water below 0 C is found. This reduced water content is a result of the lower vapor pressure of ice compared to supercooled liquid.

Gallagher, K. G.; Pivovar, B. S.; Fuller, T. F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Temperature and Supersaturation Dependent Nucleation Rates of Water by Molecular Cluster Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The homogeneous nucleation process for water has been the subject of great interest, despite the fact that water droplet formation in the atmosphere occurs by heterogeneous nucleation. This is because the homogeneous nucleation process is the ...

Sung-Ho Suck Salk; C. K. Lutrus; D. E. Hagen

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Sensitivity of Cloud Liquid Water Content Estimates to the Temperature-Dependent Thermodynamic Phase: A Global Study Using CloudSat Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study is to underline the sensitivity of cloud liquid water content (LWC) estimates purely to 1) the shape of computationally simplified temperature-dependent thermodynamic phase and 2) the range of subzero temperatures ...

Abhay Devasthale; Manu Anna Thomas

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Proposal for the Purchase, Without a Call for Tenders, of a Medium-Temperature Hot Water Boiler for the 300 GeV Accelerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the Purchase, Without a Call for Tenders, of a Medium-Temperature Hot Water Boiler for the 300 GeV Accelerator

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o f f the rocks near the water intake f o r the laboratory.a t monitors the cooling intake water f o r the generators.Thermograph record o f intake water a t P a c i f i c Gas

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Geologic setting and geochemistry of thermal water and geothermal assessment, Trans-Pecos Texas. Final report, June 1, 1976-May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot springs and wells in West Texas and adjacent Mexico are manifestations of active convective geothermal systems, concentrated in a zone along the Rio Grande between the Quitman Mountains and Big Bend National Park. Maximum temperatures are 47/sup 0/ and 72/sup 0/C for hot springs and wells in Texas and 90/sup 0/C for hot springs in Mexico within 5 km of the border. Existing information is summarized and the results of a 1-year intensive study of the area are presented. The study includes several overlapping phases: (1) compilation of existing geologic information, both regional studies of geology, structure and geophysics, and more detailed local studies of individual hot spring areas; (2) detailed geologic mapping of hot spring areas to understand the origin and geologic controls of hot springs; (3) field measurement and sampling of hot spring or well waters for geochemical analysis; and (4) synthesis and interpretation of the data.

Henry, C.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Rough sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rough set theory, introduced by Zdzislaw Pawlak in the early 1980s [11, 12], is a new mathematical tool to deal with vagueness and uncertainty. This approach seems to be of fundamental importance to artificial intelligence (AI) and cognitive sciences, ...

Zdzislaw Pawlak; Jerzy Grzymala-Busse; Roman Slowinski; Wojciech Ziarko

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

GATE Air-Sea Interactions II: Numerical-Model Calculation of Regional Sea-Surface Temperature Fields Using the GATE Version III Gridded Global Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical model of air-sea interaction previously described in Brown et al. (1982), Pandolfo and Jacobs (1972) and Pandolfo (1969) is applied over a limited horizontal portion of the GATE III Gridded Global Data set (including continental ...

P. S. Brown Jr.; J. P. Pandolfo; G. D. Robinson

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Radiance Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Temperature using Detectors Calibrated for Absolute Spectral Power Response, HW ... A Third Generation Water Bath Based Blackbody Source, JB ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

CDIAC Climate Reconstruction Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Reconstructions CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Climate Reconstruction Data Data Set Name Investigators Data TypeFormat Period of Record Historic isotopic temperature...

166

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

167

Projections of Future Soil Temperature and Water Content for Three Southern Quebec Forested Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of climate change on future soil temperature Ts and soil moisture Ms of northern forests are uncertain. In this study, the authors first calibrated Ts and Ms models [Forest Soil Temperature Model (ForSTeM) and Forest Hydrology Model (...

Daniel Houle; Ariane Bouffard; Louis Duchesne; Travis Logan; Richard Harvey

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

GATE Air-Sea Interaction. I: Numerical Model Calculation of Local Sea-Surface Temperatures on Diurnal Time Scales Using the GATE Version III Gridded Global Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical model of air-sea interaction previously described in Jacobs (1978), Pandolfo and Jacobs (1972) and Pandolfo (1969) is inserted at one horizontal grid point in the GATE III Gridded Global Data Set to calculate a model-generated, ...

P. S. Brown Jr.; J. P. Pandolfo; S. J. Thoren

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by PNNL that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall chinook salmon spawning areas. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The hydrologic regime during the 2002?2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, the results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only two sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude changes in discharge, these flux reversals had minimal effect on emergence timing estimates. Indeed, the emergence timing estimates at all sites was largely unaffected by the changes in river stage resulting from hydropower operations at Hells Canyon Dam. Our results indicate that the range of emergence timing estimates due to differences among the eggs from different females can be as large as or larger than the emergence timing estimates due to site differences (i.e., bed temperatures within and among sites). We conclude that during the 2002-2003 fall chinook salmon incubation period, hydropower operations of Hells Canyon Dam had an insignificant effect on fry emergence timing at the study sites. It appears that short-term (i.e., hourly to daily) manipulations of discharge from the Hells Canyon Complex during the incubation period would not substantially alter egg pocket incubation temperatures, and thus would not affect fry emergence timing at the study sites. However, the use of hydropower operational manipulations at the Hells Canyon Complex to accelerate egg incubation and fry emergence should not be ruled out on the basis of only one water year's worth of study. Further investigation of the incubation environment of Snake River fall chinook salmon is warranted based on the complexity of hyporheic zone characteristics and the variability of surface/subsurface interactions among dry, normal, and wet water years.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Abernethy, Cary S.

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

Predicting CO2-water interfacial tension under pressure and temperature conditions of geologic CO2 storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of caprock minerals by carbon dioxide. Geofluids 7, 112-122.between water and carbon dioxide. Langmuir 15, 419-428. DaYung, K. H. (1995) Carbon dioxide’s liquid—vapor coexistence

Nielsen, L.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Glycol-Water Interactions and co-existing phases and Temperature Dependent Solubility. An Example Of Carbon-Hydrogen Chemistry In Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently there has been great interest in Glycol-Water chemistry and solubility and temperature dependent phase dynamics. The Glycol-Water biochemistry of interactions is present in plant biology and chemistry, is of great interest to chemical engineers and biochemists as it is a paradigm of Carbon-Hydrogen Water organic chemistry. There is an interest moreover in formulating a simpler theory and computation model for the Glycol-Water interaction and phase dynamics, that is not fully quantum mechanical yet has the high accuracy available from a fully quantum mechanical theory of phase transitions of fluids and Fermi systems. Along these lines of research interest we have derived a Lennard-Jones -like theory of interacting molecules-Water in a dissolved adducts of Glycol-Water system interacting by Hydrogen bonds whose validity is supported at the scale of interactions by other independent molecular dynamics investigations that utilize force fields dependent on their experimental fittings to the Lennard-Jones potential and where we have relaxed or generalized the potential to arbitrary and possibly fractional powers. The theory then is a semi-classical theory as the repulsion of particles is incorporated in the Lennard-Jones -like potential's energy required to bring two molecules together, a repulsion of sorts. We derive distributions for the molecular species that are exactly solved, and are derived from maximum entropy, here the semi-classical analogue of the Hamiltonian superposition of quantum phase theory of fluids. We also derive the similar statistics from the microscopic SDEs stochastic differential dynamics equations, verifying the macroscopic state function entropic-thermodynamic derivation.

Fredrick Michael

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effects of Micro/Nano-Scale Surface Characteristics on the Leidenfrost Point Temperature of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent film boiling heat transfer studies with nanofluids, it was reported that deposition of nanoparticles on a surface significantly increases the nominal minimum heat flux (MHF) or Leidenfrost Point (LFP) temperature, ...

Hu, Lin-Wen

173

Retrieval of Precipitable Water from Observations in the Split Window over Varying Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The split window technique makes use of two differentially absorbing channels in the 11 ?m region to remove the attenuating effects of atmospheric absorption so as to achieve a better estimate of the underlying skin temperature than could be ...

Thomas J. Kleespies; Larry M. McMillin

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Field monitoring of solar domestic hot water systems based on simple tank temperature measurement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By dynamically measuring solar storage tank temperature(s), the solar storage tank effectively becomes a dynamic calorimeter to measure the energy flows in a solar system. The energy flows include solar loop gain, tank losses, and potentially draw extraction. With one-channel temperature loggers storing data over several days to several weeks, this approach provides low-cost, modest-accuracy performance assessment, useful for determination of savings persistence and diagnostics. Analysis is based upon the tank energy balance, identifying solar gain during the day and tank losses at night. These gains and losses can be compared to expectations based upon prior knowledge, and estimated weather conditions. Diagnostics include controller and pump operation, and excessive nighttime losses. With one point temperature logger, solar gain accuracy is expected to be 20 to 50%, depending on draw frequency and volume. Two examples are shown, a properly operating system and a system with excessive nighttime losses.

Burch, J.; Xie, Yuantao [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Murley, C.S. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Laboratory Measurements and Parameterizations of Supercooled Water Skin Temperatures and Bulk Properties of Gyrating Hailstones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accretional growth of gyrating hailstones was studied in a pressure- and temperature-controlled icing wind tunnel, starting with oblate ice spheroids, under cloud conditions and at free-fall speeds. Measured parameters were hailstone surface ...

F. García-García; Roland List

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

X-ray scattering intensities of water at extreme pressure and temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have calculated the coherent x-ray scattering intensity of several phases of water at 1500 and 2000 K under high pressure, using ab initio Density Functional Theory (DFT). Our calculations span the molecular liquid, ice VII, and superionic solid phases, including the recently predicted symmetrically hydrogen bonded region of the superionic phase. We show that wide angle x-ray scattering intensity could be used to determine phase boundaries between these high pressure phases, and we compare the results for ice VII and superionic water. We compute simulated spectra and provide new atomic scattering form factors for water at extreme conditions, which take into account frequently neglected changes in ionic charge and electron delocalization. We show that our modifed atomic form factors allow for a nearly exact comaprison to the total x-ray scattering intensities calculated from DFT. Finally, we analyze the effect our new form factors have on determination of the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function.

Goldman, N; Fried, L E

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

177

Feasibility study of underground energy storage using high-pressure, high-temperature water. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical, operational and economic feasibility study on the storage of energy as heated high pressure water in underground cavities that utilize the rock overburden for containment is presented. Handling peak load requirements of electric utility power networks is examined in some detail. The cavity is charged by heating water with surplus steaming capacity during periods of low power requirement. Later this hot water supplies steam to peaking turbines when high load demands must be met. This system can be applied to either new or existing power plants of nuclear or fossil fuel type. The round trip efficiency (into storage and back) is higher than any other system - over 90%. Capital costs are competitive and the environmental impact is quite benign. Detailed installation and design problems are studied and costs are estimated. The continental United States is examined for the most applicable geology. Formations favorable for these large cavities exist in widespread areas.

Dooley, J.L.; Frost, G.P.; Gore, L.A.; Hammond, R.P.; Rawson, D.L.; Ridgway, S.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hydroclimatology Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality and Water Quality and Spectral Reflectance, Peace-Athabasca Delta, Canada, 2010 - 2011 , prepared by Colleen Long and Tamlin Pavelsky. This data set includes water quality and site characteristics data for June and July 2010 and June and July 2011, and spectral reflectance of the water surface for 2011. Data were originally collected to study the spatial transferability of models that relate suspended sediment concentration to remotely sensed water surface reflectance, and to further understand changes in hydrologic recharge in the Peace-Athabasca Delta. The Peace-Athabasca Delta (PAD) is a hydrologically complex and ecologically diverse freshwater delta formed by the confluence of the Peace, Athabasca, and Birch Rivers near the western end of Lake Athabasca,

179

Atmospheric Temperatures near the Tropical Tropopause: Temporal Variations, Zonal Asymmetry and Implications for Stratospheric Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of temperature measurements obtained over an eight-year period in the vicinity of the low-latitude tropopause confirms the existence of longitude regions which are consistently colder by approximately 2–3 K than elsewhere in the tropics. ...

J. E. Frederick; A. R. Douglass

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Evaluation of Water Temperatures at Which Ohio River Fishes have been Collected, 1991-2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI-Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) Technical Brief can be used to identify the temperatures preferred, tolerated, and avoided by Ohio River fishes. These data result from long-term 1991–2011 ORERP electrofishing upstream and downstream of participating power plants as well as data collected by the Ohio River Valley Sanitation Commission from Ohio River navigation pools during the same period. A description of ORERP is provided in EPRI Technical Brief 1023292.

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Materials Reliability Program: Loading Effects on the Low-Temperature Crack Propagation Phenomenon in 182 Weld Metal in a Pressurize d Water Reactor Environment (MRP-285)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of a study of loading effects on the low-temperature crack propagation (LTCP) phenomenon in 182 weld metal in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

2H and 13C NMR studies on the temperature-dependent water and protein dynamics in hydrated elastin, myoglobin and collagen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2H NMR spin-lattice relaxation and line-shape analyses are performed to study the temperature-dependent dynamics of water in the hydration shells of myoglobin, elastin, and collagen.

S. A. Lusceac; C. R. Herbers; M. Vogel

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Subsurface monitoring of reservoir pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and water content at the CAES Field Experiment, Pittsfield, Illinois: system design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This subsurface-instrumentation design has been developed for the first Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) field experiment to be performed in porous media. Energy storage will be accomplished by alternating the injection and withdrawal of compressed air in a confined sandstone aquifer near Pittsfield, Illinois. The overall experiment objective is to characterize the reservoir's geochemical and thermohydraulic response to imposed CAES conditions. Specific experiment objectives require monitoring: air-bubble development; thermal development; cyclic pressure response; reservoir dehydration; and water coning. Supporting these objectives, four parameters will be continuously monitored at depth in the reservoir. They are: temperature; pressure; pore-air relative humidity; and pore-water content. Reservoir temperatures and pressures will range to maximum values approaching 200/sup 0/C and 300 psi, respectively. Both pore-air relative humidity and pore-water content will range from approx. 0 to 100%. This report discusses: instrumentation design; sensor and sensor system calibration; field installation and testing; and instrument-system operation. No comprehensive off-the-shelf instrument package exists to adequately monitor CAES reservoir parameters at depth. The best available sensors were selected and adapted for use under expected ranges of reservoir conditions. The instrumentation design criteria required: suitable sensor accuracy; continuous monitoring capability; redundancy; maximum sensor integrity; contingency planning; and minimum cost-information ratio. Three wells will be instrumented: the injection/withdrawal (I/W) well and the two instrument wells. Sensors will be deployed by wireline suspension in both open and backfilled (with sand) wellbores. The sensors deployed in the I/W well will be retrievable; the instrument-well sensors will not.

Hostetler, D.D.; Childs, S.W.; Phillips, S.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Temperature-dependent Structural Arrest of Silica Colloids in a Water–lutidine Binary Mixture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the onset of structural arrest and glass formation in a suspension of silicananoparticles in a water-lutidine binary mixture near its consolute point. By exploiting the near-critical fluid degrees of freedom to control the strength of an attraction between particles and multispeckle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy to characterize the particles collective dynamics, we show that this model liquid undergoes a glass transition both on cooling and on heating, and that the intermediate liquid realizes unusual logarithmic relaxations. We are able to characterize in unprecedented detail how vitrification occurs for the two different glass transitions observed, and draw comparisons to recent theoretical predictions for glass formation in systems with attractive interactions.

Lu, X.; Mochrie, S.G.J.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A.R.; Sprung, M.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

185

Low-temperature geothermal water in Utah: A compilation of data for thermal wells and springs through 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Division of DOE initiated the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program, following a special appropriation by Congress in 1991, to encourage wider use of lower-temperature geothermal resources through direct-use, geothermal heat-pump, and binary-cycle power conversion technologies. The Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI), and the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute organized the federally-funded program and enlisted the help of ten western states to carry out phase one. This first phase involves updating the inventory of thermal wells and springs with the help of the participating state agencies. The state resource teams inventory thermal wells and springs, and compile relevant information on each sources. OIT and UURI cooperatively administer the program. OIT provides overall contract management while UURI provides technical direction to the state teams. Phase one of the program focuses on replacing part of GEOTHERM by building a new database of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal systems for use on personal computers. For Utah, this involved (1) identifying sources of geothermal date, (2) designing a database structure, (3) entering the new date; (4) checking for errors, inconsistencies, and duplicate records; (5) organizing the data into reporting formats; and (6) generating a map (1:750,000 scale) of Utah showing the locations and record identification numbers of thermal wells and springs.

Blackett, R.E.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

External vs. body temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External vs. body temperature External vs. body temperature Name: jacqui Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If one's internal body temperature is approximately 98.6, WHY when the external temperature is 98.6 do we feel hot? Since both temperatures are "balanced", shouldn't we feel comfortable? I am assuming here that humidity levels are controlled, and play no factor in the external temperature. Replies: First of all, skin temperature is lower than 98.6F; 98.6F is internal body temperature, so air at 98.6F is hotter than skin. But more important, it is the nervous system, and the cells in your skin that your brain uses to detect temperature that determine whether you "feel" hot or not, not whether the air is hotter than your skin. These are set so that you feel hot when the air is actually colder than your skin. Why? They are probably set to make you feel hot whenever the air is warm enough so that your body has some trouble getting rid of the excess heat it produces through metabolism. This insures that you take some actions to help your body cool off. Like drinking cool water, or reducing exercise

187

Corrosion Behavior of NiCrFe Alloy 600 in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water  

SciTech Connect

The corrosion behavior of Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) is investigated in hydrogenated water at 260 C. The corrosion kinetics are observed to be parabolic, the parabolic rate constant being determined by chemical descaling to be 0.055 mg dm{sup -2} hr{sup -1/2}. A combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, are used to identify the oxide phases present (i.e., spinel) and to characterize their morphology and thickness. Two oxide layers are identified: an outer, ferrite-rich layer and an inner, chromite-rich layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with argon ion milling and target factor analysis is applied to determine spinel stoichiometry; the inner layer is (Ni{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, while the outer layer is (Ni{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})(Fe{sub 0.85}Cr{sub 0.15}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. The distribution of trivalent iron and chromium cations in the inner and outer oxide layers is essentially the same as that found previously in stainless steel corrosion oxides, thus confirming their invariant nature as solvi in the immiscible spinel binary Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} (or NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Although oxidation occurred non-selectively, excess quantities of nickel(II) oxide were not found. Instead, the excess nickel was accounted for as recrystallized nickel metal in the inner layer, as additional nickel ferrite in the outer layer, formed by pickup of iron ions from the aqueous phase, and by selective release to the aqueous phase.

SE Ziemniak; ME Hanson

2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

188

Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for Magnesite Formation at Low Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of the reaction products that form on the surfaces of nanometer-sized forsterite particles during reaction with H2O saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 35 C and 50 C were examined under in situ conditions and ex situ following reaction. The in situ analysis was conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ex situ analysis consisted of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surface phases and chemical characterization of precipitates using a combination of confocal Raman spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the forsterite surface is highly reactive with the primary reaction products being a mixture of nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3) at short reaction times ({approx}3-4 days) and then magnesite (MgCO3) and a highly porous amorphous silica phase at longer reaction times (14 days). After 14 days of reaction most of the original forsterite transformed to reaction products. Importantly, the formation of magnesite was observed at temperatures much lower (35 C) than previously thought needed to overcome its well known sluggish precipitation kinetics. The conversion of nesquehonite to magnesite liberates H2O which can potentially facilitate further metal carbonation, as postulated by previous investigators, based upon studies at higher temperature (80 C). The observation that magnesite can form at lower temperatures implies that water recycling may also be important in determining the rate and extent of mineral carbonation in a wide range of potential CO2 storage reservoirs.

Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Hess, Nancy J.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Feng, Ju; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Note: This Permit follows the standard NPDES template and the substantive changes from the existing Permit are underlined and in bold. The following Discharger is subject to waste discharge requirements as set forth in this Order:

South Bay; Power Plant; For Dynegy; South Bay; South Bay; Power Plant; Dynegy South Bay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures temperatures are kept to less than or equal to 700{sup 0}C, even open boreholes in granodiorite are apt to be stable to >10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Program on Technology Innovation: Proceedings--2007 AECL/COG/EPRI Workshop on Cold Work in Iron- and Nickel-Base Alloys Exposed to H igh Temperature Water Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A workshop was held June 3-8, 2007 at the Delta Meadowvale Resort and Conference Center in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada to discuss the effects of cold work on the environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of structural materials exposed to high temperature water environments in water cooled nuclear power reactors. This report summarizes the presentations and subsequent discussions and includes the actual presentations as linked appendices.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Parameterization of the Particle Size Spectrum of Ice Clouds in Terms of the Ambient Temperature and the Ice Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data set obtained in cirrus clouds has been examined to deduce any dependencies of the particle size spectral form or the crystal habit on the temperature. It was found that both form of the spectra and crystal habit changed systematically with ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; C. M. R. Platt

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Molecular properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: an investigation on the role of the wave function ansatz and the basis set in the water molecule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely: the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculations, although several lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are also reported. Throu...

Zen, Andrea; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Three New Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Data Sets On-Line New Data Sets On-Line The ORNL DAAC announces the release of three new data sets. The data set "Global Maps of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition, 1860, 1993, and 2050" provides global gridded estimates of atmospheric deposition of total inorganic nitrogen (N), NHx (NH3 and NH4+), and NOy (all oxidized forms of nitrogen other than N2O), in mg N/m2/year, for the years 1860 and 1993 and projections for the year 2050. Please visit the ORNL DAAC's Climate Collections web page for additional information about this data set. In addition, the ORNL DAAC has made available the data set entitled "Leaf Area Index Maps at 30-m Resolution, VALERI Site, Larose, Canada," which provides local LAI maps for the Larose (Ontario) site in Canada. The LAI data are suitable for use in modeling carbon, water, energy, and trace gas

195

A BASIC program for calculating subsurface water temperatures using chemical geothermometers—implication to geothermal reservoir estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: BASIC, Na-K-Ca geothermometer, Na/K ratio, geothermometer, silica geothermometer, subsurface temperature

Ali El-Naqa; Nasser Abu Zeid

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Determination of Ice-Phase Water Capture Temperatures Using Isotopic Composition and Habits of Ice Crystals?Relevance to Snowpack Augmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxygen 18/oxygen 16 (18O/16O) and deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios of snowmelt have been used for estimating the weighted mean temperatures in clouds where ice-phase water capture has occurred during the precipitation-forming process. The ...

Joseph A. Warburton

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 3, Water heaters, pool heaters, direct heating equipment, and mobile home furnaces  

SciTech Connect

This is Volume 3 in a series of documents on energy efficiency of consumer products. This volume discusses energy efficiency of water heaters. Water heaters are defined by NAECA as products that utilize oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use outside the heater upon demand. These are major appliances, which use a large portion (18% on average) of total energy consumed per household (1). They differ from most other appliances in that they are usually installed in obscure locations as part of the plumbing and are ignored until they fail. Residential water heaters are capable of heating water up to 180{degrees}F, although the setpoints are usually set lower.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Solar water heater lease program. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Water Heater Lease Program consists of the installation and leasing of ten solar systems to central Illinois homeowners. The measured energy savings to the homeowners and the impact of such systems on energy production requirements are studied. Each homeowner collects data on the gallons of hot water used, electricity used to heat water, and the temperatures of the cold and hot water outlet temperatures at the sink. The data are presented and conclusions are drawn, including the optimum slope of the collector, comparison of the actual hot water consumption and the estimated consumption, evaluation of the effects of temperature settings of the non-solar water heater, and the percentage of the energy provided for hot water by the solar system. The monitoring procedures and results are evaluated. Recommendations for improving the solar hot water systems are presented. (LEW)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPA and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The short-term failure strengths and strains at failure of room-dry and water-saturated, cylindrical specimens (2 by 4 cm) of Charcoal Granodiorite (CG), Mt. Hood Andesite (MHA), and Cuerbio Basalt (CB) at a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting were investigated. Data from water-saturated specimens of the granodiorite and andesite, compared to room-dry counterparts, indicate (1) the pore pressures are essentially communicated throughout each test specimen so that they are fully effective; (2) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 50 MPa the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (3) at these same effective pressures the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (4) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 870 to 900/sup 0/C the andesite's strength averages 20 MPa while the strength of dry specimens at the same P and T exhibit a strength of 100 MPa; (5) at P/sub e/ = 50 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (6) the basalt at P/sub e/ = 0, appears to be water-weakened at 800/sup 0/C; (7) water saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than that of melting exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2% shortening and then work-soften along faults; (8) again as do the dry counterparts, the wet specimens deform primarily by microscopic fracturing that coalesces into one or more macroscopic faults; and (9) the temperature for incipient melting of the andesite is decreased >150/sup 0/C in the water-saturated tests.

Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

CDIAC Atmospheric Moisture Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moisture Atmospheric Moisture CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Moisture Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of dew point depression (combined with air temperature) Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Surface stations; 6- and 3-hourly observations of relative humidity, vapor pressure, humidity deficit, and dew point temperature Varies by station; through 2000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Application note: A low-cost microcontroller-based system to monitor crop temperature and water status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype system was developed and constructed for automating the measurement and recording of canopy-, soil-, and air temperature, and soil moisture status in cropped fields. The system consists of a microcontroller-based circuit with solid-state ... Keywords: Air temperature, Datalogging, Infrared thermometer, Microcontrollers, Sensors, Soil moisture, Soil temperature

Daniel K. Fisher; Hirut Kebede

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006); M. M. Reif and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}) and halide (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998); Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}]=-1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol{sup -1}, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets L{sub E}, M{sub E}, and H{sub E} for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective ionic radius entering into the calculation of the correction terms is also evaluated and found to be very limited. Ultimately, it is expected that comparison with other experimental ionic properties (e.g., derivative single-ion solvation properties, as well as data concerning ionic crystals, melts, solutions at finite concentrations, or nonaqueous solutions) will permit to validate one specific set and thus, the associated {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] value (atomistic consistency assumption). Preliminary results (first-peak positions in the ion-water radial distribution functions, partial molar volumes of ionic salts in water, and structural properties of ionic crystals) support a value of {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] close to -1100 kJ{center_dot}mol{sup -1}.

Reif, Maria M.; Huenenberger, Philippe H. [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas, 2002-2003 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall Chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period (mid- to late-summer) when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River Chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations (e.g., summer flow augmentation) to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile Chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall Chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. This was a pilot-scale study to evaluate these relationships under existing operations of Hells Canyon Dam (i.e., without any prescribed manipulations of river discharge) during the 2002-2003 water year. The project was initiated in the context of examining the potential for improving juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon survival by modifying the discharge operations of Hells Canyon Dam. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project at index sites throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The HCR extends from Hells Canyon Dam (river kilometer [rkm] 399) downstream to the upper end of Lower Granite Reservoir near rkm 240. We randomly selected 14 fall Chinook salmon spawning locations as study sites, which represents 25% of the most used spawning areas throughout the HCR. Interactions between river water and pore water within the riverbed (i.e., hyporheic zone) at each site were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. Surrounding the piezometer cluster at each site were 3 artificial egg pockets. In mid-November 2002, early-eyed stage fall Chinook salmon eggs were placed inside of perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, along with a temperature data logger, and buried within the egg pockets. Fall Chinook salmon eggs were also incubated in the laboratory for the purpose of developing growth curves that could be used as indicators of emergence timing. The effects of discharge on vertical hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed were inferred from measured temperature gradients between the river and riverbed, and the application of a numerical model. The hydrologic regime during the 2002-2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only 2 of 14 sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude

Hanrahan, T.; Geist, D.; Arntzen, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Saving Water Saves Energy  

SciTech Connect

Hot water use in households, for showers and baths as wellas for washing clothes and dishes, is a major driver of household energyconsumption. Other household uses of water (such as irrigatinglandscaping) require additional energy in other sectors to transport andtreat the water before use, and to treat wastewater. In California, 19percent of total electricity for all sectors combined and 32 percent ofnatural gas consumption is related to water. There is a criticalinterdependence between energy and water systems: thermal power plantsrequire cooling water, and water pumping and treatment require energy.Energy efficiency can be increased by a number of means, includingmore-efficient appliances (e.g., clothes washers or dishwashers that useless total water and less heated water), water-conserving plumbingfixtures and fittings (e.g., showerheads, faucets, toilets) and changesin consumer behavior (e.g., lower temperature set points for storagewater heaters, shorter showers). Water- and energy-conserving activitiescan help offset the stress imposed on limited water (and energy) suppliesfrom increasing population in some areas, particularly in drought years,or increased consumption (e.g., some new shower systems) as a result ofincreased wealth. This paper explores the connections between householdwater use and energy, and suggests options for increased efficiencies inboth individual technologies and systems. Studies indicate that urbanwater use can be reduced cost-effectively by up to 30 percent withcommercially available products. The energy savings associated with watersavings may represent a large additional and largely untappedcost-effective opportunity.

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

El Niño: An Approach Towards Equilibrium Temperature in the Tropical Eastern Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A different view of El Niño is proposed, namely, that it represents an approach towards the tropical equilibrium temperature of approximately 30°C, set essentially by evaporation, by the waters of the eastern tropical Pacific.

Reginald E. Newell

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Savings Project: Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings Savings Project: Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings Addthis Project Level Medium Energy Savings $8-$12 annually Time to Complete 3 hours for a small house Overall Cost $10-$15 Insulating water pipes can save you water, energy, and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/nsj-images Insulating water pipes can save you water, energy, and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/nsj-images Insulating your hot water pipes reduces heat loss and can raise water temperature 2°F-4°F hotter than uninsulated pipes can deliver, allowing for a lower water temperature setting. You also won't have to wait as long for hot water when you turn on a faucet or showerhead, which helps conserve water. Paying for someone to insulate your pipes-as a project on its own-may

207

Direct use of low temperature geothermal water by Aquafarms International, Inc. for freshwater aquaculture (prawns and associated species). An operations and maintenance manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In connection with an ongoing commercial aquaculture project in the Coachella Valley, California; a twelve month prawn growout demonstration project was conducted. This project began in August, 1979 and involved the use of low temperature (85/sup 0/F) geothermal waters to raise freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (deMan), in earthen ponds. The following publication is an operations and maintenance guide which may by useful for those interested in conducting similar enterprises.

Broughton, R.; Price, M.; Price, V.; Grajcer, D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Designing Turbine Endwalls for Deposition Resistance with 1,400 °C Combustor Exit Temperatures and Syngas Water Vapor Levels„The Ohio State University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing Turbine Endwalls for Designing Turbine Endwalls for Deposition Resistance with 1,400 °C Combustor Exit Temperatures and Syngas Water Vapor Levels-The Ohio State University Background This University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) project will explore a critical need for innovative turbine endwall designs that could increase turbine durability and mitigate the adverse effects of residue deposition from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). The Ohio State University (OSU), in cooperation with Brigham Young University (BYU),

209

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Water Vapor, Surface Temperature, and the Greenhouse Effect—A Statistical Analysis of Tropical-Mean Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor feedback is one of the important factors that determine the response of the atmosphere to surface warming. To take into account the compensating drying effects in downdraft regions, averaging over the whole Tropics is necessary. ...

Hu Yang; Ka Kit Tung

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

How Well Does Water Activity Determine Homogeneous Ice Nucleation Temperature in Aqueous Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate Droplets?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frozen fraction measurements made using a droplet free-fall freezing tube apparatus are presented and used, along with other recent laboratory measurements, to evaluate how well both the water activity idea and the translated melting-point curve ...

Brian D. Swanson

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Role of Local Heating in Producing Temperature Variations in the Offshore Waters of the Eastern Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of local heating in producing annual and interannual sea-surface temperature variations in the eastern tropical Pacific is studied. Removed from the eastern boundary (122°W), and off the equator, local heating plays a major role in ...

Ants Leetmaa

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Four LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The research was The research was performed by the Carbon Dynamics Team (CD-02). LBA-ECO CD-02 Oxygen Isotopes of Plant Tissue Water and Atmospheric Water Vapor. Data set prepared by J. Ehleringer, L.A. Martinelli, C. Cook, T.F. Domingues, L. Flanagan, J. Berry, and J.P. Ometto. This data set reports the oxygen isotope signatures of water extracted from plant tissue (xylem from the stems and leaf tissue) and of atmospheric water vapor from twelve different sites (including both pasture and forest). Water vapor from the troposphere was also collected during a series of aircraft flights over the Tapajos National Forest. LBA-ECO CD-02 02 Leaf Level Gas Exchange, Chemistry, and Isotopes, Amazonia, Brazil. Data set prepared by J. Ehleringer, L.A. Martinelli, C. Cook, T.F. Domingues, L. Flanagan, J. Berry, and J.P. Ometto. This data set

215

Observed dependence of the water vapor and clear-sky greenhouse effect on sea surface temperature: Comparison with climate warming experiments  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a comparison of the water vapor and clear-sky greenhouse effect dependence on sea surface temperature for climate variations of different types. Firstly, coincident satellite observations and meteorological analyses are used to examine seasonal and interannual variations and to evaluate the performance of a general circulation model. Then, this model is used to compare the results inferred from the analysis of observed climate variability with those derived from global climate warming experiments. One part of the coupling between the surface temperature, the water vapor and the clear-sky greenhouse effect is explained by the dependence of the saturation water vapor pressure on the atmospheric temperature. However, the analysis of observed and simulated fields shows that the coupling is very different according to the type of region under consideration and the type of climate forcing that is applied to the Earth-atmosphere system. This difference, due to the variability of the vertical structure of the atmosphere, is analyzed in detail by considering the temperature lapse rate and the vertical profile of relative humidity. Our results suggest that extrapolating the feedbacks inferred from seasonal and short-term interannual climate variability to longer-term climate changes requires great caution. It is argued that our confidence in climate models` predictions would be increased significantly if the basic physical processes that govern the variability of the vertical structure of the atmosphere, and its relation to the large-scale circulation, were better understood and simulated. For this purpose, combined observational and numerical studies focusing on physical processes are needed. 44 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Bony, S.; Le Treut, H. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France); Duvel, J.P. [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.

Bharathan, D.; Nix, G.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

217

ARM - Related Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govDataRelated Data Sets Related Data Sets Numerous ARM collaborators compile and share similar types of data from their own research efforts. The links below provide a lengthy...

218

NACP Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Set Released The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a Global Soil data set : A Global Database of Gas Fluxes from Soils after Rewetting or Thawing, Version 1.0 . Data...

219

Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Rules for contrast sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a technique to derive rules describing contrast sets. Contrast sets are a formalism to represent groups differences. We propose a novel approach to describe directional contrasts using rules where the contrasting effect is partitioned ... Keywords: Bonferroni adjustment, Contrast Sets, Fisher exact test, association rules

Paulo J. Azevedo

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Search for the First-Order Liquid-to-Liquid Phase Transition in Low-Temperature Confined Water by Neutron Scattering  

SciTech Connect

It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the alpha-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

Chen, Sow-Hsin [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Wang, Zhe [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Liu, Kao-Hsiang [National Taiwan University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Thermally activated low temperature creep and primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A phenomenological SCC-CGR model is developed based on an apriori assumption that the SCC-CGR is controlled by low temperature creep (LTC). This mode of low temperature time dependent deformation occurs at stress levels above the athermal flow stress by a dislocation glide mechanism that is thermally activated and may be environmentally assisted. The SCC-CGR model equations developed contain thermal activation parameters descriptive of the dislocation creep mechanism. Thermal activation parameters are obtained by fitting the CGR model to SCC-CGR data obtained on Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750. These SCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to LTC activation parameters obtained from stress relaxation tests. When the high concentration of hydrogen at the tip of an SCC crack is considered, the SCC-CGR activation energies and rate sensitivities are shown to be quantitatively consistent with hydrogen reducing the activation energy and increasing the strain rate sensitivity in LTC stress relaxation tests. Stress dependence of SCC-CGR activation energy consistent with that found for the LTC activation energy. Comparisons between temperature dependence of the SCC-CGR stress sensitivity and LTC stress sensitivity provide a basis for speculation on effects of hydrogen and solute carbon on SCC crack growth rates.

Hall, M.M. Jr.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by X-RayAbsorption and Resonant X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-resolution x-ray absorption and emission spectra ofliquid water exhibit a strong isotope effect. Further, the emissionspectra show a splitting of the 1b1 emission line, a weak temperatureeffect, and a pronounced excitation-energy dependence. They can bedescribed as a superposition of two independent contributions. Bycomparing with gasphase, ice, and NaOH/NaOD, we propose that the twocomponents are governed by the initial state hydrogen bondingconfiguration and ultrafast dissociation on the time scale of the O 1score hole decay.

Fuchs, O.; Zharnikov, M.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Zubavichus, Y.; Bar, M.; Maier, F.; Denlinger, J.D.; Heske, C.; Grunze,M.; Umbach, E.

2007-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Production test IP-338-A, Supp. A, DR-Reactor heat decay test at high outlet water temperatures  

SciTech Connect

This test is identical to the original except that it authorizes the performance of a trial reduction in reactor flow during a prior reactor shutdown. This trial flow reduction will be performed in the same manner as proposed for the actual test, with one exception. This is, that based upon the results of this preliminary test some changes in the timing of the different steps may be indicated. Such changes can readily be handled by making each step dependent upon the observed reactor outlet temperature during the test performance. The other significant change in the production test is the increase in the allowable bulk outlet temperature from Ti + 40 {plus_minus} 3{degrees}C{sup *}. This change is needed to obtain a reasonable extrapolation of the results of tests No. 1 and No.2 to 90{degrees}C, and is justified from a hazards standpoint by the excellent flow control achieved during test No. 1 and by the trial test that will be run prior to the performance of the actual test No. 2. Other aspects of the test basis and justification are presented in the original production test.

Jones, S.S.

1962-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

High temperature post-irradiation performance of spent pressurized-water-reactor fuel rods under dry-storage conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-irradiation studies on failure mechanisms of well characterized PWR rods were conducted for up to a year at 482, 510 and 571/sup 0/C in unlimited air and inert gas atmospheres. No cladding breaches occurred even though the tests operated many orders of magnitude longer in time than the lifetime predicted by Blackburn's analyses. The extended lifetime is due to significant creep strain of the Zircaloy cladding which decreases the internal rod pressures. The cladding creep also contributes to radial cracks, through the external oxide and internal FCCI layers, which propagated into and arrested in an oxygen stabilized ..cap alpha..-Zircaloy layer. There were no signs of either additional cladding hydriding, stress-corrosion cracking or fuel pellet degradation. Using the Larson-Miller formulization, a conservative maximum storage temperature of 400/sup 0/C is recommended to ensure a 1000-year cladding lifetime. This accounts for crack propagation and assumes annealing of the irradiation-hardened cladding.

Einziger, R.E.; Atkin, S.D.; Stellrecht, D.E.; Pasupathi, V.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

NACP Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated with The North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP North American Forest Dynamics Project: Forest Disturbance and...

227

A survey of potential low-cost concentrator concepts for use in low-temperature water detoxification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several different concentrator concepts have been considered for use in the detoxification of chemically contaminated water. The reactions of interest are predominantly photocatalytic in nature and are driven by low concentrations (between 1 and 50 suns) of UV radiation in the 300- to 385-nm wavelength range. Optical performance characteristics of these concentrators are thus somewhat different compared to concentrators developed for industrial process heat and electrical energy production. Relaxed optical tolerances might lead to reductions in concentrator cost that, when integrated into overall field system cost, could make the solar-driven process competitive with current UV lamp technology. Aspects of the concentrator system that might realize cost reductions include the concentrating element, the support structure, the tracking and drive system, the manufacturing processes, and the installation procedures. Several ideals have been resurrected from earlier research in the Solar Thermal Program where the need for more stringent optical performance requirements led to a decline or even an end to further investigation. In light of this new application, the most promising of these ideas are presented, including a description and a discussion of the cost and performance trade-offs. In addition, the results of recent investigate research on several of these concepts will be presented. The concepts include a low-cost parabolic trough, the inflatable line-focus concentrator, and the holographic concentrator. 16 refs., 5 figs.

Wendelin, T.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Balanced fuzzy sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a new approach to fuzzy sets and uncertain information based on an observation of asymmetry of classical fuzzy operators. Parallel is drawn between symmetry and negativity of uncertain information. The hypothesis is raised that classical ... Keywords: Balanced norms, Fuzzy sets, Membership functions, Negative information, Triangular norms, Uninorms and nullnorms

W?adys?aw Homenda

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Skill Set Training Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MGTP-002 Skill Set/Training Process 11_0502 Page 1 of 7 MGTP-002 Skill Set/Training Process 11_0502 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Skill Set/Training Process Document Number: MGTP-002 Rev. 11_0502 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Documents: MGTF-002 Skill Set Model, MGTF-003 Training Review/Record, MGTF-004 New Employee Checklist, MGTF-005 Departing Employee Checklist, MGTF-006 Position Descriptions MGTP-002 Skill Set/Training Process 11_0502 Page 2 of 7 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial revision B Made minor, non-content editorial changes based on internal audit results 08_0805 Minor, non-content editorial changes based on internal audit results

230

NACP Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated with The North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP: MODIS Daily Land Incident 4-km PAR Images for North America, 2003-2005 . Data set prepared by S. Liang and D. Wang. This data set contains daily Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) Images over North America for the years 2003 - 2005. The daily images were derived by integrating MODIS/Terra and MODIS/Aqua instantaneous PAR data where the instantaneous PAR data is estimated directly from Terra or Aqua MODIS 5-min L1b swath data (Liang et al., 2006 and Wang et al., 2010). The spatial distribution of this data set includes the MODIS tile subsets covering North America, Central America, portions of South America, and

231

Development of a high temperature solar powered water chiller, Volume 4. Phase 1 technical progress report, September 26, 1977--June 1, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the high temperature solar powered water chiller was evaluated in a solar system. Three climatic regions were selected for the evaluation which represent significant variations in heating to cooling ratio. Typical multi-family and commercial building constructions were selected for each location, and building load files created using the TRNSYS program. Solar system components were selected on a preliminary basis and simulation models were prepared for each, including the chiller. Component cost and total system cost data were developed for economic trade-off studies. It is intended, under this contract, to evaluate various system configurations to determine which best interfaces with the solar driven Rankine unit, both from a performance and economic standpoint. Preliminary parametric studies were begun to identify the best type of system and best component sizing for a commercial building in two cities. Some prelimanry annual performance data have been obtained and related to conventional equipment performance.

English, R. A.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Northern pike bycatch in an inland commercial hoop net fishery: effects of water temperature and net tending frequency on injury, physiology, and survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In lakes and rivers of eastern Ontario (Canada) commercial fishers use hoop nets to target a variety of fishes, but incidentally capture non-target (i.e., bycatch) gamefish species such as northern pike (Esox lucius). Little is known about the consequences of bycatch in inland commercial fisheries, making it difficult to identify regulatory options. Regulations that limit fishing during warmer periods and that require frequent net tending have been proposed as possible strategies to reduce bycatch mortality. Using northern pike as a model, we conducted experiments during two thermal periods (mid-April: 14.45 ± 0.32 °C, and late May: 17.17 ± 0.08 °C) where fish were retained in nets for 2 d and 6 d. A ‘0 d’ control group consisted of northern pike that were angled, immediately sampled and released. We evaluated injury, physiological status and mortality after the prescribed net retention period and for the surviving fish used radio telemetry with manual tracking to monitor delayed post-release mortality. Our experiments revealed that injury levels, in-net mortality, and post-release mortality tended to increase with net set duration and at higher temperatures. Pike exhibited signs of chronic stress and starvation following retention, particularly at higher temperatures. Total mortality rates were negligible for the 2 d holding period at 14 °C, 14% for 6 d holding at 14 °C, 21% for 2 d holding at 17 °C, and 58% for 6 d holding at 17 °C. No mortality was observed in control fish. Collectively, these data reveal that frequent net tending, particularly at warmer temperatures, may be useful for conserving gamefish populations captured as bycatch in inland hoop net fisheries.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Raby, Graham D.; Hasler, Caleb T.; Haxton, Tim; Smokorowski, Karen; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

NACP Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NACP Aboveground Biomass and Carbon Baseline Data (NBCD 2000), U.S.A., 2000 NACP Aboveground Biomass and Carbon Baseline Data (NBCD 2000), U.S.A., 2000 . Data set prepared by J. Kellndorfer, W. Walker, K. Kirsch, G. Fiske, J. Bishop, L. LaPoint, M. Hoppus, and J. Westfall. The NBCD 2000 (National Biomass and Carbon Dataset for the Year 2000) data set provides a high-resolution (30 m) map of year-2000 baseline estimates of basal area-weighted canopy height, aboveground live dry biomass, and standing carbon stock for the conterminous United States. This data set distributes, for each of 66 map zones, a set of six raster files in GeoTIFF format. There is a detailed README companion file for each map zone. There is also an ArcGIS shapefile with the boundaries of all the map zones. A mosaic image of biomass at 240-m resolution for the whole conterminous U.S. is

234

CDIAC Precipitation Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precipitation Precipitation CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Precipitation Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Stations data; monthly totals Varies by station; through 1990 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Station data; monthly totals Varies by station; some through most recent month A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (CDIAC DB-1003) R.S. Bradley et al. Monthly, seasonal, and annual anomaly maps of precipitation 1851 - 1989 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record

235

data_sets.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DATA SETS DATA SETS T est your technology with real data from RMOTC. RMOTC offers its non-proprietary data free of charge under certain terms and conditions. If you or your organization is interested in receiving any or all of the data sets, con- tact RMOTC at 888.599.2200 or talk@ rmotc.doe.gov. Offi ce of Fossil Energy Partnering to Power the World Terms of Use The data contained on RMOTC's data CDs is non-proprietary. Its intended use is for scientifi c research, testing and demonstrat- ing software,training end-users, and as an exploration/produc- tion analog. In order to track the data sets and their use, your contact information must be provided for RMOTC's records. If you use any of RMOTC's data in a presentation or publication, acknowledge RMOTC and the U.S. Department of Energy as the

236

Problem Set 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Set 1. ESS 138 Remote Sensing. Due April 26 th in lab. Choose 1 of 7 land cover types to ground truth in Southern California and identify your team, working with the T.A. Possible...

237

Packing sets of patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Packing density is a permutation occurrence statistic which describes the maximal number of permutations of a given type that can occur in another permutation. In this article we focus on containment of sets of permutations. Although this question has ...

Alexander Burstein; Peter Hästö

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NACP Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECHIDNA Lidar Campaigns: Forest Canopy Imagery and Field Data, U.S.A., 2007-2009 . Data set prepared by A. Strahler, C. Schaaf, C. Woodcock, D. Jupp, D. Culvenor, G. Newnham, R....

239

Building Technologies Office: Schedule Setting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schedule Setting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Schedule Setting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Schedule Setting on Delicious Rank Building...

240

TRACKING ACCELERATOR SETTINGS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recording setting changes within an accelerator facility provides information that can be used to answer questions about when, why, and how changes were made to some accelerator system. This can be very useful during normal operations, but can also aid with security concerns and in detecting unusual software behavior. The Set History System (SHS) is a new client-server system developed at the Collider-Accelerator Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory to provide these capabilities. The SHS has been operational for over two years and currently stores about IOOK settings per day into a commercial database management system. The SHS system consists of a server written in Java, client tools written in both Java and C++, and a web interface for querying the database of setting changes. The design of the SHS focuses on performance, portability, and a minimal impact on database resources. In this paper, we present an overview of the system design along with benchmark results showing the performance and reliability of the SHS over the last year.

D OTTAVIO,T.; FU, W.; OTTAVIO, D.P.

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Setting E. C. priorities  

SciTech Connect

Presents a method for setting priorities for energy conservation by calculating potential savings based on cost of energy, energy usage intensity (Btu/ft/sup 2/), projected energy usage and size of the building. Equation for determining projected annual savings in dollars for a building encompasses all 4 factors.

Sampson, W.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Phase Transition in High Temperature Hydrogenated Water Using the Contact Electric Resistance (CER) Technique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior studies of Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 have shown the existence of a maximum in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in high temperature water (e.g., at 360 C), when testing is conducted over a range of dissolved (i.e., aqueous) hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentrations. It has also been shown that this maximum in SCC susceptibility tends to occur in proximity to the nickel/nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition, suggesting that oxide phase stability may affect primary water SCC (PWSCC) resistance. Previous studies have estimated the Ni/NiO transition using thermodynamic calculations based on free energies of formation for NiO and H{sub 2}O. The present study reports experimental measurements of the Ni/NiO transition performed using a contact electric resistance (CER) instrument. The CER is capable of measuring the surface resistance of a metal to determine whether it is oxide-covered or oxide-free at a given condition. The transition aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentration corresponding to the Ni/NiO equilibrium was measured at 288, 316, 338 and 360 C using high purity Ni specimens. The results showed an appreciable deviation (i.e., 7 to 58 scc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O) between the measured Ni/NiO transition and the theoretical Ni/NiO transition previously calculated using free energy data from the Journal of Solution Chemistry. The CER-measured position of the Ni/NiO transition is in good agreement with the maxima in PWSCC susceptibility at 338 and 360 C. The measured Ni/NiO transition provides a reasonable basis for estimating the aqueous H{sub 2} level at which the maximum in SCC susceptibility is likely to be observed at temperatures lower than 338 to 360 C, at which SCC tests are time-consuming to perform. Limited SCC data are presented which are consistent with the observation that SCC susceptibility is maximized near the Ni/NiO transition at 288 C.

S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; M.A. Ando; N.F. Panayotou; C.D. Thompson

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

243

Mapping of a reactor coolant effluent ground disposal test using an infrared imaging system and ground water potential and temperature measurements  

SciTech Connect

The concept of reactor effluent disposal to ground in infiltration trenches was proposed by Nelson and Alkire in 1963. At that time the available data indicated that radionuclide infiltration rates were probably adequate for trench disposal and that decontamination factors of 10 to 100 should be obtainable. Field tests at 100-F Area 1965 and 100-D Area 1967 have indicated that the infiltration rates are adequate and DF`s of from 2.5 for {sup 51}Cr to 7276 for {sup 65}Zn were obtained during the 100-D test. The purpose of this report is to present the results and interpretations of data from studies conducted over a reactor coolant effluent disposal test site. Data presented in this report were collected over the 100-C Area test in which a significant percentage of the reactor coolant effluent was disposed to an existing trench for a five-month period. Results of infrared thermal surveys and ground water temperature and potential measurements collected during this test are presented.

Eliason, J.R.

1969-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

244

Index Sets and Vectorization  

SciTech Connect

Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid index sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid index sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.

Keasler, J A

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

Seven LBA Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA-ECO Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of one data set from the CD-06 Carbon Dynamics team, and six data sets from the Land Use-Land Change...

246

CDIAC Snow Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snowfall and Snow Depth Snowfall and Snow Depth CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Snow Data Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record United States Historical Climatology Network M. Menne et al. Station data; daily snowfall and snow depth Varies by station; through 2010 Daily Snow Depth Measurements from 195 Stations in the United States (CDIAC NDP-059) D. Easterling et al. Station data; daily snow depth Varies by station; max. period is 1893-1992 Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Station data; 6- and 3-hourly state of any snowcover on ground; occurrance of snowfall in past and present weather observations Varies by station; through 2000 Two Long-Term Instrumental Climatic Data Bases of the People's Republic of China

247

Tool setting device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a tool setting device for use with numerically controlled machine tools, such as lathes and milling machines. A reference position of the machine tool relative to the workpiece along both the X and Y axes is utilized by the control circuit for driving the tool through its program. This reference position is determined for both axes by displacing a single linear variable displacement transducer (LVDT) with the machine tool through a T-shaped pivotal bar. The use of the T-shaped bar allows the cutting tool to be moved sequentially in the X or Y direction for indicating the actual position of the machine tool relative to the predetermined desired position in the numerical control circuit by using a single LVDT.

Brown, Raymond J. (Clinton, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

More Southern African Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fifteen southern African data sets fifteen southern African data sets for the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000). These data sets, originally prepared in coordination with data investigators by the SAFARI 2000 Data Group at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, contain the results of fire-related measurements including field and laboratory measurements of burning biomass emissions, pre- and post-burning site and ash reflectance, estimates of regional fuel load and emissions, and historical fire occurrence. These data sets also contain the results of measurements and estimates of vegetation emissions of volatile organic compounds; flux measurements of carbon, heat, and water vapor along the Kalahari Transect and at fixed tower sites; and meteorological data from tower sites.

249

Three LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies were studies were conducted by the Nutrients Dynamics teams of ND-07 at studies sites near Brasilia, Brazil. LBA-ECO ND-07 Hydrochemistry of Natural and Developed Land Cover, Brasilia, Brazil. Data set prepared by J.S.O. Silva and M. Bustamante. This data set reports on dissolved nutrient concentrations, as well as dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, conductivity, turbidity, and pH measured in water samples collected from nine streams, surface runoff, wells, lysimeters, and precipitation sites located in the state of Brasilia, Brazil, between September 2004 and December 2006. LBA-ECO ND-07 Microbial Biomass in Cerrado Soils, Brasilia, Brazil. Data set prepared by L.T. Viana, M. Molina, M. Bustamante, A.S. Pinto, K. Kisselle, R. Zepp, and R. Burke. This data set reports the microbial

250

CDIAC Surface Wind Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Wind CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Surface Wind Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data TypeFormat Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud...

251

Southern African Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eleven southern African data sets for the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000). These data sets, originally prepared in coordination with data investigators...

252

Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set forth requirements for the registration of water withdrawals and reporting of water losses from the Great Lakes Basin. The regulations apply to water withdrawals from...

253

set5.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings ............................................... 67,338 65,753 65,716 45,525 13,285 5,891 2,750 6,290 2,322 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 6,774 6,309 6,280 3,566 620 Q Q 635 292 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 8,238 7,721 7,721 5,088 583 Q Q 986 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 11,153 10,851 10,843 7,001 983 414 Q 1,203 290 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 9,311 9,175 9,175 6,405 983 660 294 568 250 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 10,112 10,034 10,034 7,165 1,612 933 525 865 350 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 8,271

254

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 39 mm), after which average lengths increased to 294 {+-} 145 mm for mid-November though early December. Fish behavior analysis indicates milling in front of the intake tower was the most common behavior observed throughout the study period (>50% of total fish events). The next most common movement patterns were fish traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east. The proportion of fish events seen moving into (forebay to tower) or out of (tower to forebay) the tower was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall for both directions combined. From mid-December 2010 through the end of the study, the combined proportions of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher than previous months of this study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring from late April through mid-June. Schooling events were present in 30 - 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak in mid-May. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring, fall, and winter months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours. No schooling was observed at night. Predator activity was observed during late spring, when fish abundance and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months. For the two days of BlueView data analyzed for vertical distribution in the forebay, a majority of fish (>50%) were present in the middle of the water column (10 - 20 m deep). Between 20 and 41 % of total fish abundance were found in the bottom of the water column (20 - 30 m deep). Few fish were observed in the top 10 m of the water column.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (<200 fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 39 mm), after which average lengths increased to 294 {+-} 145 mm for mid-November though early December. Fish behavior analysis indicates milling in front of the intake tower was the most common behavior observed throughout the study period (>50% of total fish events). The next most common movement patterns were fish traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east. The proportion of fish events seen moving into (forebay to tower) or out of (tower to forebay) the tower was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall for both directions combined. From mid-December 2010 through the end of the study, the combined proportions of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher than previous months of this study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring from late April through mid-June. Schooling events were present in 30 - 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak in mid-May. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring, fall, and winter months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours. No schooling was observed at night. Predator activity was observed during late spring, when fish abundance and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months. For the two days of BlueView data analyzed for vertical distribution in the forebay, a majority of fish (>50%) were present in the middle of the water column (10 - 20 m deep). Between 20 and 41 % of total fish abundance were found in the bottom of the water column (20 - 30 m deep). Few fish were observed in the top 10 m of the water column.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Section E: WATER HEATING  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Form EIA-457A (2005)--Household Questionnaire OMB No.: 1905-0092, ... automatically adjust the cooling temperature setting during the day when no one is at

257

NACP Site Data Set Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Data Set Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a data set from the North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP Site: Tower Meteorology, Flux...

258

Tectonic Settings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic Settings Tectonic Settings Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Tectonic Settings Dictionary.png Tectonic Settings: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Map showing worldwide plate tectonics(reference: NASA) Plate tectonics - or the large scale movements of Earth's crusts - result in a number of distinct settings. Major tectonic settings that commonly host geothermal systems include subduction zones, rift zones, extensional regimes, and transtensional or strike-slip zones. Hot spots are thought to occur independent of tectonic activity but will be considered a tectonic setting in the context of geothermal areas because they do not fit into any other category. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tectonic_Settings&oldid=600139"

259

Low Temperature Proton Conductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and MEAs at Freezing Temperatures Thomas A. Zawodzinski, Jr. Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio 2 Freezing Fuel Cells: Impact on MEAS Below 0 o C *Transport processes/motions slow down: questions re: lower conductivity,water mobility etc *Residual water will have various physical effects in different portions of the MEA questions re: durability of components 3 3 'States' of Water in Proton Conductors ? Freezing (bulk), bound freezable, bound non freezable water states claimed based on DSC * Freezing water more mobile, allegedly important for high conductivity Analysis common for porous systems Does the presence of these states matter? Why? 4 'State of Water' in PEMs At T < 0 o C *'Liquid-like' water freezes *'Non-freezing' fraction: water of solvation at pore

260

Speeding up solar disinfection : effects of hydrogen peroxide, temperature, and copper plus ascorbate on the photoinactivation of E. coli in Charles River water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sunlight efficiently disinfects drinking water in plastic bottles over two days, but simple additives may show promise for reducing this time to several hours. This study found that adding up to 500 [micro]M hydrogen ...

Fisher, Michael Benjamin, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

BWRVIP-186: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Effect of Water Chemistry and Temperature Transients on the IGSCC Growth Rates in BWR Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidizing nature of the boiling water reactor (BWR) environment, coupled with high tensile residual stresses, have led to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) events. This report summarizes the available information on the effect of water chemistry transients on crack growth rates of Type 304 stainless steel and nickel-base weld metal Alloy 182. The report also provides crack growth rate equations and tables for evaluating the amount of crack extension that may have occurred during a trans...

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

Performance Evaluation of Hot Water Efficiency Plumbing System Using Thermal Valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Korea two popular water distribution systems—the branch type and the separate type systems—have serious drawbacks. The branch type suffers from temperature instability while the separate type suffers from excessive piping. Neither of them re-circulates water. The system proposed in this paper utilizes a water-conserving piping system with a thermostat valve. This paper compares the proposed system with that of the separate type. Our findings show that the proposed system wastes less water. After re-circulating for 78-87 seconds, water is available at set point temperature (40°C). Also, when multiple water taps are in use, the average temperature deviation is less than 0.6°C. Moreover, the proposed system has 50% less flow rate than the separate type system.

Cha, K. S.; Park, M. S.; Seo, H. Y.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (Pfish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Energy test method development for electric heat pump water heaters  

SciTech Connect

Modifications are proposed for the current US Department of Energy test procedures for water heaters in order to make them applicable to electric heat pump water heaters. The modifications are in the areas of definitions and technical procedures. The latter include the test conditions, test procedures and measurements, and calculations. Reasons for making these modifications and laboratory test data are provided to support the modifications in the technical procedures. The main modifications include: (1) lowering the water supply temperature from 70/sup 0/F to 55/sup 0/F, (2) lowering the tank thermostat setting from 160/sup 0/F to 145/sup 0/F to maintain the same 90/sup 0/F temperature rise, (3) measuring the power input instead of using the nameplate rating as in the case for an electric water heater, and (4) measuring the recovery efficiency instead of calculating it by using the standby losses in the case for an electric water heater.

Wan, C.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Set point calculations for RAPID project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This change modifies accuracies of the water skid temperature indicators and controllers TIC-410. TI-412, TI-413, TIC-413, TIC-414, TIC-415. Acknowledges ability to calibrate PQIT-367 and modifies the accuracy of that instrument loop. Adjusts the allowable dilution dater temperature from 110-130F to 102-130F based on PCP Rev.2 and adjusts alarm and other points to reflect that change. Removes revision numbers for all references. Numerous additional changes (fixing typos, more detailed explanations etc.) throughout.

HICKMAN, G.L.

1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

266

Mechanisms of Summertime Subtropical Southern Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperature Variability: On the Importance of Humidity Anomalies and the Meridional Advection of Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that some austral summertime subtropical Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) variability correlates with rainfall over certain regions of Africa that depend on rainfall for their economic well-being. Recent studies have ...

A. M. Chiodi; D. E. Harrison

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Climate Change, High-Temperature Stress, Rice Productivity, and Water Use in Eastern China: A New Superensemble-Based Probabilistic Projection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of climate change on rice productivity in China remains highly uncertain because of uncertainties from climate change scenarios, parameterizations of biophysical processes, and extreme temperature stress in crop models. Here, the Model ...

Fulu Tao; Zhao Zhang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamic properties of water given any of the following pairs of knowns to define a thermodynamic state: pressure and entropy, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and quality, temperature and pressure, or temperature and quality. These five pairs of knowns allow the user to evaluate any thermodynamic cycle using water, as a working fluid. The basic equations came from Keenan, Keyes, Hill and Moore, Steam Tables, John Wiley and Sons, 1969. A complete derivation of equations, program listing, program symbol description, a complete set of flow charts and a sample steam turbine calculation are included.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Thermal-Structural Design of a Water Shield For Surface Reactor Missions  

SciTech Connect

Water shielding is an attractive option for an affordable lunar surface fission reactor program. The attractiveness of the water shielding option arises from the relative ease of proto-typing and ground testing, the relatively low development effort needed, as well as the fabrication and operating experience with stainless steel and water. The most significant limitation in using a water shield is temperature: to prevent the formation of voids and the consequent loss of cooling, the water temperature has to be maintained below the saturation temperature corresponding to the shield pressure. This paper examines natural convection for a prototypic water shield design using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX-5 as well as analytical modeling. The results show that natural convection is adequate to keep the water well-mixed. The results also show that for the above-ground configuration, shield surface and water temperatures during lunar day conditions are high enough to require shield pressures up to 2.5 atm to prevent void formation. For the buried configuration, a set of ammonia heat pipes attached to the shield outer wall can be used to maintain water temperatures within acceptable limits. Overall the results show that water shielding is feasible for lunar surface applications. The results of the CFD analyses can also be used to guide development of testing plans for shield thermal testing. (authors)

Sadasivan, Pratap; Kapernick, Richard J.; Poston, David I. [D-5 Nuclear Systems Design Group MS K575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 and TG-06 Data Sets Published 2 and TG-06 Data Sets Published The ORNL DAAC announces the release of data sets from two LBA-ECO science themes: Carbon Dynamics and Trace Gases. Both data sets provide data from similar time periods and study areas. LBA-ECO CD-32 Flux Tower Network Data Compilation, Brazilian Amazon: 1999-2006. Data set prepared by S.R. Saleska, H.R. da Rocha, A.R. Huete, A.D. Nobre, P. Artaxo, and Y.E. Shimabukuro. This data set is a compilation of carbon and energy eddy covariance flux, meteorology, radiation, canopy temperature, humidity, CO2 profiles, soil moisture, and temperature profile data that were collected at nine towers across the Brazilian Amazon. Independent investigators provided the data from a variety of flux tower projects over the period 1999 thru 2006 for use in a model intercomparison.

271

Effect of sulfuric acid, oxygen, and hydrogen in high-temperature water on stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen and dilute sulfuric acid in 289/sup 0/C water on the stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of lightly and moderately sensitized Type 304 stainless steel was determined in constant-extension-rate tensile (CERT) tests. The CERT parameters and the fracture surface morphologies were correlated with the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and sulfate, and the electrochemical potentials of platinum and Type 304 stainless steel electrodes in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) environments. A particularly high susceptibility to intergranular cracking was found for the steel in the lightly sensitized condition at oxygen concentrations between approx. 0.05 and 0.2 ppM under slightly acidic conditions (pH approx. 6.0 at 25/sup 0/C), which may, in part, account for the pervasive nature of intergranular cracking in BWR piping systems. Scanning-transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed significant differences between samples in the lightly and the moderately sensitized condition with respect to the width, but not the depth, of the chromium-depleted region at the grain boundaries. The addition of 0.5 ppM hydrogen to the water had only a small mitigating effect on intergranular cracking in water containing oxygen and sulfuric acid at low concentrations; however, oxygen suppression to less than or equal to 0.05 ppM in the reactor-coolant water, by means of hydrogen additions to the feedwater, would be quite beneficial provided impurities are also maintained at very low levels.

Ruther, W.E.; Soppet, W.K.; Ayrault, G.; Kassner, T.F.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Closed sets of nonlocal correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a fundamental concept - closed sets of correlations - for studying nonlocal correlations. We argue that sets of correlations corresponding to information-theoretic principles, or more generally to consistent physical theories, must be closed under a natural set of operations. Hence, studying the closure of sets of correlations gives insight into which information-theoretic principles are genuinely different, and which are ultimately equivalent. This concept also has implications for understanding why quantum nonlocality is limited, and for finding constraints on physical theories beyond quantum mechanics.

Allcock, Jonathan; Linden, Noah [Department of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom); Brunner, Nicolas; Popescu, Sandu; Skrzypczyk, Paul [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Vertesi, Tamas [Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

GENERALIZED SUPPORT SET INVARIANCY SENSITIVITY ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Type II sensitivity analysis (Support Set Invariancy Sen- ..... u are obtained by solving the following auxiliary. LO problems, respectively: ?LP l. = min. {. ?|(x(1) ...

274

Prepare Mode: Setting up Runs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A4-end The value of motor 4 for the last point in the pattern. ... Field This invokes a menu for setting magnetic field conditions. ...

275

Accumulator Based Test Set Embedding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this paper a test set embedding based on accumulator driven by an odd additive constant is presented. The problem is formulated around finding the… (more)

Sudireddy, Samara Simha Reddy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (<200 fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (<100 fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with forebay elevation, velocity over the WTC tower intake gate weirs, and river flows into the reservoir. A subsequent multiple regression analysis resulted in a model (R2=0.70) predicting fish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Relationships between Ice Water Content and Volume Extinction Coefficient from In Situ Observations for Temperatures from 0 C to ?86 C: Implications for Spaceborne Lidar Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An examination of two years of CALIPSO lidar observations and CloudSat cloud radar observations shows that ice clouds at temperatures below about ?45 C frequently fall below the CloudSat radar’s detection threshold, yet are readily detectable by ...

Andrew Heymsfield; Dave Winker; Melody Avery; Mark Vaughan; Glenn Diskin; Min Deng; Valentin Mitev

278

Low Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Low Temperature Dictionary.png Low Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 150°C and 190°C is considered by Sanyal to be "low temperature." "The mobile fluid phase in these reservoirs is liquid water. A number of commercial power projects have been operated over the last two decades

279

Showering behavior: implications for water and energy conservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three groups of subjects were selected to determine the amount and temperature of the water used when showering. The control group of 120 subjects (60 men and 60 women) was divided into four groups (15 men and 15 women) who, after showering, dressed in rooms whose temperatures were 18.3/sup 0/C (65 F) 21.1/sup 0/C (70 F) 23.9/sup 0/C (75 F) and 26.7/sup 0/C (80 F). The greatest amount of comfort after showering was experienced in the 26.7/sup 0/C (80 F) room. This group, who did not wash their hair while showering used a mean of 36 liters (9.2 gal) of water for their showers. A second group of subjects (12 men and 12 women), who did wash their hair, used 62 liters (16.4 gal); this represented an increase in water used by 78%. A third group (12 men and 12 women), who had their showers fitted with a shower head that restricted the flow-rate of water, used 24 liters (6.4 gal) or 30% less water. However, they set their water temperature at 41.1/sup 0/C (106 F) vs the 38.9/sup 0/C (102 F) setting of the other two groups. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to both water and energy conservation and the amount of water used at different latitudes in the continental U.S. where the temperature of the water supply is different.

Rohles, F.H.; Konz, S.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Set separation Neural Network paradigms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for forecasting financial time series 29 f´evrier 2008 Designing a neural network for forecasting financial time for forecasting financial time series #12;Neural Net The inputs Set separation Neural Network paradigms From network for forecasting financial time series #12;Neural Net The inputs Set separation Neural Network

Chen, Yiling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SAFARI 2000 Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Sets Available Data Sets Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of four data sets for the SAFARI 2000 project. Two data sets, "SAFARI 2000 TOMS Tropospheric Ozone Data, Southern Africa Subset, Dry Season 2000" and "SAFARI 2000 TOMS Aerosol Index Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000," contain ozone and aerosol data from the Earth Probe (EP) Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) for the time period August-September 2000. The data set "SAFARI 2000 AVHRR Daily Site (1.5 km) and 15-Day Regional (1.5- and 6-km) Imagery" contains remotely sensed satellite data products at the site and regional level provided by the Global Inventory Mapping and Modeling (GIMMS) group at NASA/GSFC. These Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data contain site extracts of SAFARI core sites (Mongu,

282

Five LBA Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use-Land Change Data Sets Released Use-Land Change Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of three data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-09 Land Cover Transitions Maps for Study Sites in Para, Brazil: 1970-2001 . Data set prepared by E.S. Brondizio and E.F. Moran. This data set includes classified land cover transition maps at 30-m resolution derived from Landsat TM, MSS, ETM+ imagery and aerial photos of Altamira, Santarem, and Ponta de Pedras, in the state of Para, Brazil. The Landsat images were classified into several types of land use and subjected to change detection analysis to create transition matrices of land cover change. LBA-ECO LC-22 Post-deforestation Land Use, Mato Grosso, Brazil:

283

RMOTC - Field Information - Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data sets Data sets The U.S. Department of Energy has made its RMOTC data sets available on CD-ROM for use in scientific research, testing, demonstration, and training. Non-proprietary seismic, well log, core, and GIS data are available at no charge with some restrictions (see Terms of Use). Contact Us to request a copy of any or all of the data sets. Well Log Data Log Curve LAS Files (900 wells) Teapot Dome Well Headers (1,300 wells) Directional Surveys Formation Log Tops & Formation Codes Key Teapot Dome Base Map NPR-3 Type Log Teapot Dome Geologic Column RMOTC Well Log Data Set, CD Image Core Data Tensleep Formation, 300 ft core Core Pore/Perm Analysis LAS Files FMI Log Mud Log Core Descriptions Core Photos RMOTC Core Data, CD Image Seismic Data 2D Seismic Data 3D Seismic Data (SEGY)

284

High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity, Polymer-type Membranes Based on Disulfonated Poly(arylene ether) Block and Random Copolymers Optionally Incorporating Protonic Conducting Layered Water insoluble Zirconium Fillers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research group has been engaged in the past few years in the synthesis of biphenol based partially disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) random copolymers as potential PEMs. This series of polymers are named as BPSH-xx, where BP stands for biphenol, S stands for sulfonated, H stands for acidified and xx represents the degree of disulfonation. All of these sulfonated copolymers phase separate to form nano scale hydrophilic and hydrophobic morphological domains. The hydrophilic phase containing the sulfonic acid moieties causes the copolymer to absorb water. Water confined in hydrophilic pores in concert with the sulfonic acid groups serve the critical function of proton (ion) conduction and water transport in these systems. Both Nafion and BPSH show high proton conductivity at fully hydrated conditions. However proton transport is especially limited at low hydration level for the BPSH random copolymer. It has been observed that the diffusion coefficients of both water and protons change with the water content of the pore. This change in proton and water transport mechanisms with hydration level has been attributed to the solvation of the acid groups and the amount of bound and bulk-like water within a pore. At low hydration levels most of the water is tightly associated with sulfonic groups and has a low diffusion coefficient. This tends to encourage isolated domain morphology. Thus, although there may be significant concentrations of protons, the transport is limited by the discontinuous morphological structure. Hence the challenge lies in how to modify the chemistry of the polymers to obtain significant protonic conductivity at low hydration levels. This may be possible if one can alter the chemical structure to synthesize nanophase separated ion containing block copolymers. Unlike the BPSH copolymers, where the sulfonic acid groups are randomly distributed along the chain, the multiblock copolymers will feature an ordered sequence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments. If, like in Nafion, connectivity is established between the hydrophilic domains in these multiblock copolymers, they will not need as much water, and hence will show much better protonic conductivity than the random copolymers (with similar degree of sulfonation, or IEC) at partially hydrated conditions. The goal of this research is to develop a material suitable for use as a polymer electrolyte membrane which by the year 2010 will meet all the performance requirements associated with fuel cell operation at high temperatures and low relative humidity, and will out-perform the present standard Nafion{reg_sign}. In particular, it is our objective to extend our previous research based on the use of thermally, oxidatively, and hydrolytically, ductile, high Tg ion containing polymers based on poly(arylene ethers) to the production of polymer electrolyte membranes which will meet all the performance requirements in addition to having an areal resistance of < 0.05 ohm-cm{sup 2} at a temperature of up to 120 C, relative humidity of 25 to 50%, and up to 2.5 atm total pressure. In many instances, our materials already out performs Nafion{reg_sign}, and it is expected that with some modification by either combining with conductive inorganic fillers and/or synthesizing as a block copolymer it will meet the performance criteria at high temperatures and low relative humidity. A key component in improving the performance of the membranes (and in particular proton conductivity) and meeting the cost requirements of $40/m{sup 2} is our development of a film casting process, which shows promise for generation of void free thin films of uniform thickness with controlled polymer alignment and configuration.

McGrath, James E.; Baird, Donald G.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

285

LBA Data Sets Released from Two Science Themes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

two data sets from the Land Use and two data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover Change science theme, and one data set from the Carbon Dynamics theme. These science research themes are components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-07 Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Balbina Reservoir, Brazil. Data set prepared by A. Kemenes, B.R. Forsberg, and J.M. Melack. This data set provides flux measurements of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from surface waters to the atmosphere, and CH4, CO2, and oxygen (O2) concentrations of surface water, and concentrations measured at several depths of the Balbina Reservoir in the central Amazon Basin, Amazonas, Brazil. The Balbina Reservoir was formed by impounding the Uatuma River in 1987.

286

Effectively reasoning about infinite sets in answer set programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In answer set programming (ASP), one does not allow the use of function symbols. Disallowing function symbols avoids the problem of having logic programs which have stable models of excessively high complexity. For example, Marek, Nerode, and Remmel ...

Victor Marek; Jeffrey B. Remmel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Water-heating dehumidifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

288

Certified Sites (Ready! Set! Build!) (Wisconsin) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certified Sites (Ready! Set! Build!) (Wisconsin) Certified Sites (Ready! Set! Build!) (Wisconsin) Certified Sites (Ready! Set! Build!) (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Developer General Public/Consumer Institutional Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Training/Technical Assistance Siting and Permitting Provider Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation WEDC has created, in partnership with Deloitte Consulting (Site Selector Consultant) and community partners, the Ready! Set! Build! Program, which provides consistent standards for industrial site certification in

289

What Do You Set Your Thermostat to? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Set Your Thermostat to? Set Your Thermostat to? What Do You Set Your Thermostat to? June 29, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis Earlier this week, Kristin was telling us how you can use a programmable thermostat to save money when you're not at home. This is an easy trick that's useful in the winter as well as the summer, and can always help save you some money. Why heat or cool your house when you're not there? So this week, we'd like to know: What temperature do you set your thermostat to in the summer? You have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles What Are Your Top Tips for Saving Energy? At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Summer?

290

ORNL DAAC Data Set Retired  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baseline Data (NBCD 2000), U.S.A., 2000, due to the release of a new version of the data set, NACP Aboveground Biomass and Carbon Baseline Data, Version. 2 (NBCD 2000), U.S.A.,...

291

SAFARI 2000 Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Set Released Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "SAFARI 2000 MISR Level 2 Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000". This data set is a product of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative containing 240 HDF-EOS formatted MISR Level 2 Top-of-Atmosphere/Cloud and Aerosol/Surface Products focused in a southern African study area which includes: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The MISR Level 2 Products are geophysical measurements derived from the Level 1B2 data which consists of parameters that have been geometrically corrected and projected to a standard map grid. The products are in swaths, each derived from a single MISR orbit, where the imagery is 360 km wide and

292

Southern African Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thirteen new Southern African data thirteen new Southern African data sets. Originally offered on the second CD-ROM volume prepared for the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) by the Goddard Space Flight Center, these data sets contain meteorological, aerosol, atmospheric chemistry, and precipitation data. In addition, this data release includes a new data set that compares Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) and Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire data from the dry season 2001. The SAFARI 2000 project was conducted during 1999-2001 to develop a better understanding of the earth-atmosphere-human system in southern Africa. These data sets focus primarily on the 2000 dry season— and September— the southern African region, defined as latitude 5° N to 35° S and

293

STAT 341 Problem set 1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;7. A set of cheap light bulbs have a lifetime (in hours) which is exponentially distributed with the unknown mean . Choosing a random sample of the light bulbs light bulbs were still working. How would you define the likelihood function

Guttorp, Peter

294

On the Linking Set Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 24, 2007... 1,...,m, can be obtained by inspection setting xjt = 1 for t = argmini?{1,...,k}{cij ? i?} ..... The p-centers,” SIAM J. Appl. Math., 37, 513–538, 1979.

295

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water heating costs Read more Selecting a New Water Heater Tankless? Storage? Solar? Save money on your water heating bill by choosing the right type of energy-efficient water heater for your needs. Read more Sizing a New Water Heater When buying a new water heater, bigger is not always better. Learn how to buy the right size of water heater. Read more You can reduce your monthly water heating bills by selecting the appropriate water heater for your home or pool and by using some energy-efficient water heating strategies. Some simple do-it-yourself projects, like insulating hot water pipes and lowering your water heating temperature, can also help you save money and energy on your water heating.

296

Observed annual and interannual variations in tropospheric water vapor  

SciTech Connect

Radiosonde observations from a global network of 56 radiosonde stations for 1973-1990 are used to describe and quantify annual and interannual variations of tropospheric water vapor. Taking care to identify data inhomogeneities related to changes in instruments or observing practices, monthly mean and anomaly data sets are constructed for dew point, specific humidity, relative humidity, temperature and precipitable water from the surface to 500 mb. Local annual cycles of tropospheric humidity can be classified according to the amplitude and phase of humidity variations which define five humidity regimes. For two regimes, both in middle and high latitudes, relative humidity is fairly constant while the annual cycle of precipitable water is in phase with that of temperature. At some midlatitude stations with a monsoon-like climate, seasonal relative humidity variations are large. In the tropics, seasonal relative humidity variations, especially above the boundary layer, dominate the annual cycle of precipitable water, and precipitable water variations are not related to temperature variations. Correlations of temperature and specific humidity anomalies are generally positive outside the tropics, suggesting that atmospheric warming is associated with increases in water vapor content. However, correlations of temperature and relative humidity anomalies are sometimes not significant and are often negative (e.g., in mid- and high latitude continental regions). Thus relative humidity is not always insensitive to temperature changes. In the tropics, tropospheric water vapor and temperature variations are not well correlated. An empirical orthogonal function analysis of tropical specific humidity variations identified two important modes of variability. The first is a step-like increase in specific humidity that occurred in about 1976-1977, and the second is associated with the El Nino phenomenon.

Gaffen, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Residential hot water usage: A review of published metered studies. Topical report, August-December 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report presents a review of residential hot water usage studies. The studies included were published and publicly available, they measured actual hot water usage or energy usage, and they had sufficient demographic information to determine the number of people per household. The available hot water usage data were normalized to a 135 F setpoint temperature to eliminate the variations in usage caused by different water heater thermostat settings. Typical hot water usage as a function of family size was determined from linear regression analyses of the normalized metered studies` data points. A national average hot water usage of 53 gallons per day was determined from the regression analyses and census data on average household size. The review of metered studies also shows that there is no discernible difference in hot water usage for households with either electric or gas water heaters.

Paul, D.D.; Ide, B.E.; Hartford, P.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Reply to Comment on"Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by X-ray Absorption and Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Ref. [1], we present and analyze experimental high resolution x-ray emission spectra (XES) of liquid water which exhibit a splitting of the 1b1 line into two components. We also suggest a qualitative model to explain the experimental spectra which, even though tentative (as clearly stated in the summary of Ref. [1]), is able to explain ALL available experimental data. In the preceding Comment, Pettersson et al. [3]claim that a spectrum with two similarly sharp 1b1 features both from a dissociated product (d2) and from the intact molecule (d1) would be"unphysical and unsubstantiated" since"the path connecting initial and final structure" is not taken into account. In the meantime, we have collected new data [2], which further support and strengthen our model.

Heske, C.; Zharnikov, M.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Zubavichus, Y.; Bar, M.; Maier, F.; Denlinger, J. D.; Fuchs, O.; Grunze, M.; Umbach, E.

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

299

Water heater heat reclaimer  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to the conservation of energy in a domestic gas water heater by utilizing the hot exhaust gases in a gas water heater for the preheating of the incoming unheated water into the water heater. The exhaust gases from a domestic gas water heater carry wasted heat and the present invention provides a mean to reclaim part of the wasted heat for the preheating of the incoming unheated water during hot water usage periods. During non hot water usage periods the heat in the exhaust gases is not reclaimed to prevent overheating of the water and also to prevent the formation of water deposit in the preheating assembly or heat reclaimer. During the non hot water usage periods the heat produced in the water heater is normally needed only to maintain the desired water temperature of the stored water in the water tank of the water heater. Due to the rapid heating or recovery rate, the present invention enables the use of a smaller water heater. The use of a smaller water heater reduces the normal heat loss from the stored hot water thereby further reduces energy consumption.

Wie, C.T.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

300

Solar water heating: FEMP fact sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the sun to heat domestic water makes sense in almost any climate. Solar water heaters typically provide 40 to 80{percent} of a building's annual water-heating needs. A solar water-heating system's performance depends primarily on the outdoor temperature, the temperature to which the water is heated, and the amount of sunlight striking the collector.

Clyne, R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Makeshift cold water aquarium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Hi- I am a student teacher in the Seattle area. As a hobby, I scuba dive in the icy waters of Puget Sound. I would love to set...

302

Cr-free Fe-based metal oxide catalysts for high temperature water gas shift reaction of fuel processor using LPG  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to identify the most suitable chromium-free iron-based catalysts for the HTS (high temperature shift) reaction of a fuel processor using LPG. Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in the commercial HTS catalyst has been regarded as hazardous material. We selected Ni and Co as the substitution for chromium in the Fe-based HTS catalyst and investigated the HTS activities of these Crfree catalysts at LPG reformate condition. Cr-free Fe-based catalysts which contain Ni, Zn, or Co instead of Cr were prepared by coprecipitation method and the performance of the catalysts in HTS was evaluated under gas mixture conditions (42% H2, 10% CO, 37% H2O, 8% CO2, and 3% CH4; R (reduction factor): about 1.2) similar to the gases from steam reforming of LPG (100% conversion at steam/carbon ratio = 3), which is higher than R (under 1) of typically studied LNG reformate condition. Among the prepared Cr-free Febased catalysts, the 5 wt%-Co/Fe/20 wt%-Ni and 5 wt%-Zn/Fe/20 wt%-Ni catalysts showed good catalytic activity under this reaction condition simulating LPG reformate gas.

lee, Joon Y.; Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kwan Young; Wang, Yong

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

A model of the domestic hot water load  

SciTech Connect

The electrical load required to supply domestic hot water is an important load for two reasons: (1) It represents a large portion (30 to 50%) of the domestic load; (2) It is a load which can easily be controlled by the consumer or the supplier, because the use of the hot water need not coincide with the heating of hot water. A model representing the electrical system load due to hot water consumption from storage water heaters is provided. Variable parameters include the average amount of water used, the mean and deviation of distributions of usage times, thermostat settings, inlet water temperature and electrical heating element ratings. These parameters are used to estimate the after diversity electricity demand profile, and were verified for accuracy by comparison with measurements. The model enables this prediction of the effects of load control, examples of which are given in this paper. The model is also useful for evaluation of the response which could be expected from demand-side management options. These include changing the size of heating elements, reduction in water consumption and reduction in thermostat settings.

Lane, I.E. [Energy Efficiency Enterprises, Lynnwood Manor (South Africa); Beute, N. [Cape Technikon, Cape Town (South Africa)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Clustering in massive data sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the time and storage costs of search and clustering algorithms. We exemplify these, based on case-studies in astronomy, information retrieval, visual user interfaces, chemical databases, and other areas. Theoretical results developed as far ... Keywords: clustering, massive data sets

Fionn Murtagh

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sequenced event set pattern matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Event pattern matching is a query technique where a sequence of input events is matched against a complex pattern that specifies constraints on extent, order, values, and quantification of matching events. The increasing importance of such query techniques ... Keywords: automaton, event pattern matching, permutation, set

Bruno Cadonna; Johann Gamper; Michael H. Böhlen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Beeping a maximal independent set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of computing a maximal independent set (MIS) in an extremely harsh broadcast model that relies only on carrier sensing. The model consists of an anonymous broadcast network in which nodes have no knowledge about the topology of ...

Yehuda Afek; Noga Alon; Ziv Bar-Joseph; Alejandro Cornejo; Bernhard Haeupler; Fabian Kuhn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Free Fermions on causal sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a Dirac theory on causal sets; a key element in the construction being that the causet must be regarded as emergent in an appropriate sense too. We further notice that mixed norm spaces appear in the construction allowing for negative norm particles and "ghosts".

Johan Noldus

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Concise descriptions of subsets of structured sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the problem of economical representation of subsets of structured sets, that is, sets equipped with a set cover. Given a structured set U, and a language L whose expressions define subsets of U, the problem of Minimum Description ...

Alberto O. Mendelzon; Ken Q. Pu

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The previously examined geothermal sites at Long Valley and Coso were studied in much greater detail. Techniques for correcting the 2-m temperature data were evaluated. Using a preliminary model and analysis of the Coso data, the importance of measuring soil thermal diffusivity data at each temperature probe site was shown. Corrected 2-m temperature anomaly at Coso was compared with a low altitude aeromagnetic anomaly and an anomaly outlined by electrical resistivity methods obtained independently. Preliminary tests were made with a simple thermal conductivity probe demonstrating the feasibility of measuring soil thermal diffusivity at the time the 2-m temperatures are recorded. This opens the way for operational shallow temperature surveys in areas which do not have, as at Coso, a simple set of surface conditions. It is concluded that making useful shallow temperature measurements where there is a modest amount of ground water flow need not be a hopeless task.

LeSchack, L.A.; Lewis, J.E.; Chang, D.C.; Lewellen, R.I.; O'Hara, N.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the second and third years, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities at different concentration levels of added contaminant.

Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Dennis Sparks; Khalid Azzam; Janet Chakkamadathil Mohandas; Wilson Shafer; Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Simple Method to Continuous Measurement of Energy Consumption of Tank Less Gas Water Heaters for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy consumptions of hot water supply in restaurants or residential houses are large amount, guidelines for optimal design are not presented. measurements of energy consumption of tank less gas water heaters very difficult unless gas flow meters were installed. however a gas flow meters is hardly installed for individual heater. in this study, a simple method to estimate gas consumption of such appliances form temperature of exhaust gas and electric current was presented. experiments of japanese major hot water gas heaters were conducted change under conditions of various water flow rate at constant output temperature. the empirical equations, which related gas consumption to exhaust gas temperature and operative current, were obtained for each type of water heaters, each manufacturer and overall heaters. verification of the method was conducted at a commercial building. some thresholds to decide status of operation, such as anti-freeze operation, were set, and sufficient accuracy of around 10 % error was achieved.

Yamaha, M.; Fujita, M.; Miyoshi, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Variation (Status and Trend) of Stream Water Temperature within th Entiat River Subbasin : January 2008 - October 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

Dawson, Pierre

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

314

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

315

Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluoride crystal. This surface was expected to stimulate ice formation, but even when chilled to a temperature of about 6.5 F-well below water's normal freezing point-the water...

316

Dewpoint Temperature Prediction Using Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dewpoint temperature, the temperature at which water vapor in the air will condense into liquid, can be useful in estimating frost, fog, snow, dew, evapotranspiration, and other meteorological variables. The goal of this study was to use ...

D. B. Shank; G. Hoogenboom; R. W. McClendon

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

ARM - Measurement - Virtual temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVirtual temperature govMeasurementsVirtual temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Virtual temperature The virtual temperature Tv = T(1 + rv/{epsilon}), where rv is the mixing ratio, and {epsilon} is the ratio of the gas constants of air and water vapor ( 0.622). Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RWP : Radar Wind Profiler

318

Fever and Body Temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fever and Body Temperature Fever and Body Temperature Name: Ying Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I have a few questions that I want to ask you: Why does your body chose to raise its temperature when you have a fever? Replies: Most bacteria and viruses that live in your body grow best at body temperature. They don't grow very well when the temperature is raised. When there are bacteria in your body they give off chemicals that signal white blood cells to come to try to eat them and also affect an area in your brain called the hypothalamus. This part of the brain controls alot of the automatic functions in your body and is also the site of your body's "thermostat". When the chemicals from the bacteria circulate through the hypothalamus it sets the body's temperature higher. This is called a fever. Your body kind of tries to "sweat out" the bacteria and kill them with a higher temperature. Some scientists question whether trying to bring down a fever is the best thing to do. If it isn't too high, some believe we should just let it work

319

Humidity–Temperature Relationships in the Tropical Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the observed interannual variations of water vapor and temperature over the past 26 years the authors have examined the relationship between the variations of water vapor and temperature in the tropical troposphere. The authors find that ...

De-Zheng Sun; Abraham H. Oort

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Desalination of brackish ground waters and produced waters using in-situ precipitation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for fresh water has increased exponentially during the last several decades due to the continuous growth of human population and industrial and agricultural activities. Yet existing resources are limited often because of their high salinity. This unfavorable situation requires the development of new, long-term strategies and alternative technologies for desalination of saline waters presently not being used to supply the population growth occurring in arid regions. We have developed a novel environmentally friendly method for desalinating inland brackish waters. This process can be applied to either brackish ground water or produced waters (i.e., coal-bed methane or oil and gas produced waters). Using a set of ion exchange and sorption materials, our process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps. The ion exchange materials were chosen because of their specific selectivity for ions of interest, and for their ability to work in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. For anion exchange, we have focused on hydrotalcite (HTC), a layered hydroxide similar to clay in structure. For cation exchange, we have developed an amorphous silica material that has enhanced cation (in particular Na{sup +}) selectivity. In the case of produced waters with high concentrations of Ca{sup 2+}, a lime softening step is included.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Pless, Jason; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn; Sattler, Allan Richard

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Distribution and Circulation of Labrador Sea Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Labrador Sea Water is the final product of the cyclonic circulation of Subpolar Mode Water in the open northern North Atlantic (McCartney and Talley, 1982). The temperature and salinity of the convectively formed Subpolar Mode Water decrease from ...

L. D. Talley; M. S. McCartney

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Water mist injection in oil shale retorting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Water mist is utilized to control the maximum temperature in an oil shale retort during processing. A mist of water droplets is generated and entrained in the combustion supporting gas flowing into the retort in order to distribute the liquid water droplets throughout the retort. The water droplets are vaporized in the retort in order to provide an efficient coolant for temperature control.

Galloway, T.R.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

NPP and Vegetation Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Data Sets Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of three new net primary production (NPP) and two vegetation data sets. The NPP data sets contain data for...

324

ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP 2004.03.09 - 2004.04.09 Lead Scientist : Ed Westwater Data Availability http://www.etl.noaa.gov/programs/2004/wviop/data will contain quicklooks of all of the data. For data sets, see below. Summary During the IOP, the Ground-based Scanning Radiometer of NOAA/ETL, and the ARM MicroWave Radiometer and Microwave Profiler, yielded excellent data over a range of conditions. In all, angular-scanned and calibrated radiometric data from 22.345 to 380 GHz were taken. The Precipitable Water Vapor varied about an order of magnitude from 1 to 10 mm, and surface temperatures varied from about -10 to -40 deg. Celcius. Vaisala RS90

325

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations. In the second and third years, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities at different concentration levels of added contaminant.

Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Dennis Sparks; Khalid Azzam; Janet Chakkamadathil Mohandas; Wilson Shafer; Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

Order-theoretic, topological, categorical redundancies of interval-valued sets, grey sets, vague sets, interval-valued “intuitionistic” sets, “intuitionistic” fuzzy sets and topologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates two meta-mathematical propositions concerning the increasingly popular ''intuitionistic'' (= vague) approaches to fuzzy sets and fuzzy topology, as well as the closely related interval-valued (= grey) sets and interval-valued ... Keywords: Categorical (functorial) isomorphism, Criteria of redundancy, DeMorgan algebras, L-double double fuzzy topology, L-double fuzzy topology, L-double gradation fuzzy topology, L-double topology, L-fuzzy topology, L-topology, Order-isomorphism, Semi-DeMorgan algebras, Semi-polarity

J. Gutiérrez García; S. E. Rodabaugh

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Funding Source Job Creation, Retention and Enhancement Fund State Iowa Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Iowa Economic Development Authority The Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) program provides financial assistance to those businesses and industries requiring such assistance in order to create new job opportunities. Assistance is provided to encourage

328

Grid Points (GridSampleSet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Grid Points (GridSampleSet). ... Name. Grid Points (GridSampleSet) — Evaluate data on a rectangular grid of points. Synopsis. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

329

Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet). ... Name. Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet) — Evaluate data on a rectangular grid of points. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

More Southern African Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

six data sets for the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000). These data sets, originally prepared in coordination with data investigators by the SAFARI 2000...

331

Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs.

Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Measurement and Calculation of Electrochemical Potentials in Hydrogenated High Temperature Water, including an Evaluation of the Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia/Iron-Iron Oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) Probe as Reference Electrode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The importance of knowing the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP, also referred to as E{sub con}) of nickel-base alloys in hydrogenated water is related to the need to understand the effects of dissolved (i.e., aqueous) hydrogen concentration ([H{sub 2}]) on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Also, the use of a reference electrode (RE) can improve test quality by heightening the ability to detect instances of out-of-specification or unexpected chemistry. Three methods are used to measure and calculate the ECP of nickel-based alloys in hydrogenated water containing {approx} 1 to 150 scc/kg H{sub 2} (0.1 to 13.6 ppm H{sub 2}) at 260 to 360 C. The three methods are referred to as the specimen/component method, the platinum (Pt) method, and the yttria-stabilized zirconia/iron-iron oxide (YSZ/Fe-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) RE method. The specimen/component method relies upon the assumption that the specimen or component behaves as a hydrogen electrode, and its E{sub corr} is calculated using the Nernst equation. The present work shows that this method is valid for aqueous H{sub 2} levels {ge} {approx} 5 to 10 scc/kg H{sub 2}. The Pt method uses a voltage measurement between the specimen or component and a Pt electrode, with the Pt assumed to behave as a hydrogen electrode; this method is valid as long as the aqueous H{sub 2}level is known. The YSZ/Fe-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, which represents a relatively new approach for measuring E{sub corr} in this environment, can be used even if the aqueous H{sub 2} level is unknown. The electrochemical performance of the YSZ/Fe-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} probe supports its viability as a RE for use in high temperature hydrogenated water. Recent design modifications incorporating a teflon sealant have improved the durability of this RE (however, some of the REs do still fail prematurely due to water in-leakage). The Pt method is judged to represent the best overall approach, though there are cases where the other methods are superior. For example, the specimen/component method provides the simplest approach for calculating the E{sub corr} of plant components, and the YSZ/Fe-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} RE method provides the best approach if the H{sub 2} level is unknown, or in off-nominal chemistry conditions. The present paper describes the use of these methods to determine the ECP of a specimen or component versus the ECP of the nickel/nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition, which is important since prior work has shown that this parameter (ECP-ECP{sub Ni/NiO}) can be used to assess aqueous H{sub 2} effects on PWSCC.

Steven A. Attanasio; David S. Morton; Mark A. Ando

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

333

BASIS Set Exchange (BSE): Chemistry Basis Sets from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Basis Set Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Basis Set Exchange (BSE) provides a web-based user interface for downloading and uploading Gaussian-type (GTO) basis sets, including effective core potentials (ECPs), from the EMSL Basis Set Library. It provides an improved user interface and capabilities over its predecessor, the EMSL Basis Set Order Form, for exploring the contents of the EMSL Basis Set Library. The popular Basis Set Order Form and underlying Basis Set Library were originally developed by Dr. David Feller and have been available from the EMSL webpages since 1994. BSE not only allows downloading of the more than 200 Basis sets in various formats; it allows users to annotate existing sets and to upload new sets. (Specialized Interface)

Feller, D; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Didier, Brett T.; Elsethagen, Todd; Sun, Lisong; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Chase, Jared; Li, Jun

334

World's Largest Laser Sets New Records | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World's Largest Laser Sets New Records World's Largest Laser Sets New Records World's Largest Laser Sets New Records November 10, 2010 - 6:26pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The National Ignition Facility in California fired a shot of 300 trillion neutrons -- one step closer to the amount of neutrons needed to reach fusion ignition. Scientists also used the laser to create a temperature of six million degrees Fahernheit. The world's largest laser, located at the National Ignition Facility (or NIF) in California, set new records on October 31 and November 2. Specifically, on October 31 the NIF laser fired a shot of 300 trillion neutrons, the most neutrons ever yielded by a laser to date, and one step closer to the amount of neutrons (about 10 to the 18th power) needed to

335

Very Low Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Very Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Very Low Temperature Dictionary.png Very Low Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 100°C and 150°C is considered by Sanyal to be "very low temperature." "The mobile fluid phase in these reservoirs is liquid water. Very few power projects have been developed in the U.S. based on geothermal resources in

336

Initial data sets for the Schwarzschild spacetime  

SciTech Connect

A characterization of initial data sets for the Schwarzschild spacetime is provided. This characterization is obtained by performing a 3+1 decomposition of a certain invariant characterization of the Schwarzschild spacetime given in terms of concomitants of the Weyl tensor. This procedure renders a set of necessary conditions--which can be written in terms of the electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl tensor and their concomitants--for an initial data set to be a Schwarzschild initial data set. Our approach also provides a formula for a static Killing initial data set candidate--a KID candidate. Sufficient conditions for an initial data set to be a Schwarzschild initial data set are obtained by supplementing the necessary conditions with the requirement that the initial data set possesses a stationary Killing initial data set of the form given by our KID candidate. Thus, we obtain an algorithmic procedure of checking whether a given initial data set is Schwarzschildean or not.

Gomez-Lobo, Alfonso Garcia-Parrado; Kroon, Juan A. Valiente [Matematiska institutionen, Linkoepings Universitet, SE-58183 Linkoeping (Sweden); School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Initial data sets for the Schwarzschild spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A characterisation of initial data sets for the Schwarzschild spacetime is provided. This characterisation is obtained by performing a 3+1 decomposition of a certain invariant characterisation of the Schwarzschild spacetime given in terms of concomitants of the Weyl tensor. This procedure renders a set of necessary conditions --which can be written in terms of the electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl tensor and their concomitants-- for an initial data set to be a Schwarzschild initial data set. Our approach also provides a formula for a static Killing initial data set candidate --a KID candidate. Sufficient conditions for an initial data set to be a Schwarzschild initial data set are obtained by supplementing the necessary conditions with the requirement that the initial data set possesses a stationary Killing initial data set of the form given by our KID candidate. Thus, we obtain an algorithmic procedure of checking whether a given initial data set is Schwarzschildean or not.

Alfonso García-Parrado Gómez-Lobo; Juan A. Valiente Kroon

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature temperature Dataset Summary Description Freedom Field is a not-for-profit organization formed to facilitate development and commercialization of renewable energy solutions. The organization has installed a variety of renewable energy generating technologies at their facility (located at Rock River Water Reclamation in Rockford, IL), with the intention of serving as a demonstration facility. The facility monitors data (at 5-minute intervals) from a weather station, 12.4 kW of PV panels (56 220-watt panels), a 10kW wind turbine (HAWT), a 1.2 kW wind turbine (VAWT), an absorption cooling system, and biogas burners. Source Freedom Field Date Released July 19th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biogas monitoring data PV radiance solar temperature

339

Measurements of the Skin Temperature on Small Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus to measure the skin temperature and related variables on inland lakes is described. The apparatus is a transparent frame with sensors to measure the skin and bulk water temperature, the wind velocity, and the air temperature and ...

Robert Kurzeja; Malcolm Pendergast; Eliel Villa-Aleman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

342

TRENDS: TEMPERATURE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Graphics Digital Data J.R. Petit, D. Raynaud, and C. Lorius Laboratoire de Glaciogie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, CNRS, Saint Martin d'Hères Cedex, France J. Jouzel and G. Delaygue Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE), CEA/CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France N.I. Barkov Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, Beringa Street 38, 199397 St. Petersburg, Russia V.M. Kotlyakov Institute of Geography, Staromonetny, per 29, Moscow 109017, Russia DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.006 Period of Record 420,000 years BP-present Methods Because isotopic fractions of the heavier oxygen-18 (18O) and deuterium (D) in snowfall are temperature-dependent and a strong spatial correlation

343

Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Set Point Determination  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Safety Class Instrumentation and Control (SCIC) system provides active detection and response to process anomalies that, if unmitigated, would result in a safety event. Specifically, actuation of the SCIC system includes two portions. The portion which isolates the MCO and initiates the safety-class helium (SCHe) purge, and the portion which detects and stops excessive heat input to the MCO annulus on high Tempered Water (TW) inlet temperature. For the MCO isolation and purge, the SCIC receives MCO pressure (both positive pressure and vacuum), helium flow rate, bay high temperature switch status, seismic trip status, and time-under-vacuum trips signals. The SCIC system will isolate the MCO and start an SCHe system purge if any of the following occur. (1) Isolation and purge from one of the SCHe ''isolation'' and ''purge'' buttons is manually initiated (administratively controlled). (2) The first vacuum cycle exceeds 8 hours at vacuum, or any subsequent vacuum cycle exceeds 4 hours at vacuum without re-pressurizing the MCO for a minimum of 4 hours. (This is referred to as the 8/4/4 requirement and provides thermal equilibrium within the MCO.) (3) MCO is below atmospheric pressure and the helium flow is below the minimum required to keep hydrogen less than 4% by volume. (When MCO pressure is below 12 torr there is insufficient hydrogen to exceed the 4% level and therefore no purge is required. A five minute time delay on low flow allows flow to be stopped in order to reach < 12 torr.) (4) The duration for the transition from above atmospheric pressure to vacuum (time to reach pressure below -11.7 psig [{approx}155 torr]) exceeds 5 minutes. (5) The duration for the transition from vacuum (below -11.1 psig [{approx}185 torr]) back to pressure [greater than 0.5 psig] exceeds 5 minutes. (6) MCO reaches a vacuum state (<0.5 psig) without an adequate, verified purge volume. (The MCO must be maintained above atmospheric pressure (approximately 0.5 psig) to prevent oxygen ingress unless a purge of adequate volume has been completed. During bulk water draining, the MCO must remain above atmospheric pressure.) (7) Seismic event of sufficient magnitude is detected. (Trip point is below the Uniform Building Code levels). Setpoint determination is required for trips C through H. Sensor error determination for additional safety-significant sensors used by the HVAC system or the SCHe system are also required.

PHILIPP, B.L.

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

344

Par Pond water balance  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Dixon, K.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Each county is encouraged to develop and implement a local water management plan. This section sets the specifications that must be met by local plans. The status of county water plans is shown...

346

Interoperability Context-Setting Framework  

SciTech Connect

As the deployment of automation technology advances, it touches upon many areas of our corporate and personal lives. A trend is emerging where systems are growing to the extent that integration is taking place with other systems to provide even greater capabilities more efficiently and effectively. GridWise™ provides a vision for this type of integration as it applies to the electric system. Imagine a time in the not too distant future when homeowners can offer the management of their electricity demand to participate in a more efficient and environmentally friendly operation of the electric power grid. They will do this using technology that acts on their behalf in response to information from other components of the electric system. This technology will recognize their preferences to parameters such as comfort and the price of energy to form responses that optimize the local need to a signal that satisfies a higher-level need in the grid. For example, consider a particularly hot day with air stagnation in an area with a significant dependence on wind generation. To manage the forecasted peak electricity demand, the bulk system operator issues a critical peak price warning. Their automation systems alert electric service providers who distribute electricity from the wholesale electricity system to consumers. In response, the electric service providers use their automation systems to inform consumers of impending price increases for electricity. This information is passed to an energy management system at the premises, which acts on the homeowner’s behalf, to adjust the electricity usage of the onsite equipment (which might include generation from such sources as a fuel cell). The objective of such a system is to honor the agreement with the electricity service provider and reduce the homeowner’s bill while keeping the occupants as comfortable as possible. This will include actions such as moving the thermostat on the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) unit up several degrees. The resulting load reduction becomes part of an aggregated response from the electricity service provider to the bulk system operator who is now in a better position to manage total system load with available generation. Looking across the electric system, from generating plants, to transmission substations, to the distribution system, to factories, office parks, and buildings, automation is growing, and the opportunities for unleashing new value propositions are exciting. How can we facilitate this change and do so in a way that ensures the reliability of electric resources for the wellbeing of our economy and security? The GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) mission is to enable interoperability among the many entities that interact with the electric power system. A good definition of interoperability is, “The capability of two or more networks, systems, devices, applications, or components to exchange information between them and to use the information so exchanged.” As a step in the direction of enabling interoperability, the GWAC proposes a context-setting framework to organize concepts and terminology so that interoperability issues can be identified and debated, improvements to address issues articulated, and actions prioritized and coordinated across the electric power community.

Widergren, Steven E.; Hardin, Dave; Ambrosio, Ron; Drummond, R.; Gunther, E.; Gilchrist, Grant; Cohen, David

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

Liqiang Wei

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalystes to Poisons form High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations.

Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Khalid Azzam; Janet ChakkamadathilMohandas; Wilson Shafer

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful adaptation of conventional cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts for use in converting biomass-derived syngas hinges in part on understanding their susceptibility to byproducts produced during the biomass gasification process. With the possibility that oil production will peak in the near future, and due to concerns in maintaining energy security, the conversion of biomass-derived syngas and syngas derived from coal/biomass blends to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products to liquid fuels may provide a sustainable path forward, especially considering if carbon sequestration can be successfully demonstrated. However, one current drawback is that it is unknown whether conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt will be suitable without proper development because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using an entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier) than solely from coal, other byproducts may be present in higher concentrations. The current project examines the impact of a number of potential byproducts of concern from the gasification of biomass process, including compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the second year, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities.

Burtron Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Khalid Azzam; Dennis Sparks; Wilson Shafer

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

LBA Fire Detection Data Set Puvlished  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Detection Data Set Published The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme, a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale...

351

Three LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Soil Moisture Data, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest. Data set prepared by M.L. Goulden, S.D. Miller, and H.R. da Rocha. This data set reports continuous high-resolution...

352

BigFoot Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meteorological Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated with The BigFoot project: BIGFOOT Meteorological Data for North and South...

353

BigFoot Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

users to download the data sets in one click. The download link is listed on the data set lister. Example Access: 1. Go to http:daac.ornl.govcgi-bindatasetlister.pl?p3...

354

Attractor Sets and Quasi-Geostrophic Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The attractor set of a forced dissipative dynamical system is for practical purposes the set of points in phase-space which continue to be encountered by an arbitrary orbit after an arbitrary long time. For a reasonably realistic atmospheric ...

Edward N. Lorenz

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Continuity properties of fuzzy set multifunctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study continuity properties in Hausdorff topology for different special set multifunctions. Keywords: exhaustive, increasing/decreasing convergent, multi(sub)measure, order continuity, probability, regular, set multifunction

Alina Gavrilut; Anca Croitoru; Nikos E. Mastorakis

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the ORNL DAAC on-line archive before May 06, 2004 you should download it again from the ORNL DAAC. Please note that the BOREAS CD-ROM Set of 12 disks was not affected. Data Set...

357

Statistical Analysis of Historical Climate Data Sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of determining confidence intervals for climatic signals using data sets with spatial and temporal sampling inhomogeneities is solved by a four-step process. First, the actual data set is analysed to determine autoregressive models ...

Curtis D. Mobley; Rudolph W. Preisendorfer

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Online decision problems with large strategy sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an online decision problem, an algorithm performs a sequence of trials, each of which involves selecting one element from a fixed set of alternatives (the "strategy set") whose costs vary over time. After T trials, the ...

Kleinberg, Robert David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Two New SAFARI 2000 Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data sets. The data set "SAFARI 2000 MODIS L3 Albedo and Land Cover Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000" is a southern Africa subset of Filled Land Surface Albedo and of...

360

Five LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(LBA): LBA-ECO CD-08 Radiocarbon Dates for Large Trees from a Forest near Manaus, Brazil. Data set prepared by J. Chambers, N. Higuchi, and J. Schimel. This data set reports...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Three LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LC-24 Cadastral Property Map of Uruara, Para, Brazil: ca.1975. Data set prepared by R.T. Walker and M.M. Caldas. This data set contains a shapefile of a digitized map of the land...

362

Two LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LC-09 Landsat TM and ETM+ Data, Sites in Rondonia and Para, Brazil: 1985-2004. Data set prepared by E.S. Brondizio and E.F. Moran. This data set includes 15 zipped archives of...

363

Three LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the three data sets provides meteorological data from the km 77 pasture site, Para, Brazil. The other two data sets report survey data taken in the North Western area of Mato...

364

SetSolar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SetSolar Jump to: navigation, search Name SetSolar Place Cape Town, South Africa Zip 7460 Sector Solar Product South African company that specialises in the manufacture of PV solar...

365

Winter Energy Savings from Lower Thermostat Settings  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This discussion provides details on the effect of lowering thermostat settings during the winter heating months of 1997.

Information Center

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

Extending soft sets with description logics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molodtsov initiated the concept of soft set theory, which can be used as a generic mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. Description Logics (DLs) are a family of knowledge representation languages which can be used to represent the terminological ... Keywords: Description logics, Extended soft sets, Soft sets, Terminology

Yuncheng Jiang; Yong Tang; Qimai Chen; Ju Wang; Suqin Tang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Free idempotent generated semigroups over biordered sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free idempotent generated semigroups over biordered sets Dandan Yang The University of York (Dandan Yang ) Free idempotent generated semigroups over biordered sets May 3, 2012 1 / 1 #12;Outline Free idempotent generated semigroup IG(E) over biordered set E. (Dandan Yang ) Free idempotent generated

Gould, Victoria

368

Visualizing large data sets in the earth sciences  

SciTech Connect

With single data sets containing billions of points, meteorologists and other earth scientists face an avalanche of data received from their remote-sensing instruments and numerical simulation models. The Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison led the evolution of weather visualization systems from paper to electronic displays with their Mancomputer Interactive Data Access System (MCIDAS). They have continued this evolution into animated three-dimensional images and recently into highly interactive displays. Their software can manage, analyze, and visualize large data sets that span many physical variables (such as temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind speed), as well as time and three spatial dimensions. McIDAS has produced three-dimensional animations of data sets from many diverse sources on videotape and on a special binocular stereo workstation. Its applications are discussed in this paper.

Hibbard, W.; Santek, D. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Control of Chilled Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loop chilled water pumps, condenser water pumps, and coolingsuch as 55°F, and lower condenser water temperatures such assizing ? Cooling tower and condenser optimization ? Variable

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Liner hanger assembly with setting tool  

SciTech Connect

A setting tool and liner hanger for setting a liner in a well bore traversing earth formations is described including: a tubular outer hanger member adapted for coupling to a depending liner, the outer hanger member having circumferentially disposed elongated slip openings, elongated slip members disposed in the slip openings for movement of the slip members from a first retracted position within the outer hanger member to an extended position in engagement with the wall of a well casing, a setting tool having a tubular inner member adapted for coupling to a drill string; hydraulic slip setting means for response to hydraulic pressure for producing a slip setting force and mechanical slip setting means for producing a slip setting force, the hydraulic slip setting means and the mechanical slip setting means being carried by the tubular inner member; coupling means for releasably coupling the tubular inner member to the outer hanger member. The slip setting means include an upper dog member and a lower dog member which are respectively connected to the hydraulic slip setting means and to the mechanical slip setting means wherein the dog members are movable longitudinally relative to the tubular member in response to a slip setting force for moving the slip members from the first retracted position to the extended position. The hydraulic slip setting means and the mechanical slip setting means for moving the upper and lower dog members respectively include selectively operable actuator means for selectively moving one of the dog members longitudinally relative to the tubular inner member and the outer hanger member.

Dockins, R.R. Jr.; Lindsey, H.E. Jr.

1987-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Intermediate temperature electrolytes for SOFC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify a new set of materials that would allow the operation of the solid oxide fuel cell in the 600--800{sup degrees}C temperature range. The approach that is being used is to start with a systematic evaluation of new electrolyte materials and then to develop compatible electrode and interconnect materials.

Bloom, I.; Krumpelt, M.; Hash, M.C.; Zebrowski, J.P.; Zurawski, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Intermediate temperature electrolytes for SOFC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify a new set of materials that would allow the operation of the solid oxide fuel cell in the 600--800{sup degrees}C temperature range. The approach that is being used is to start with a systematic evaluation of new electrolyte materials and then to develop compatible electrode and interconnect materials.

Bloom, I.; Krumpelt, M.; Hash, M.C.; Zebrowski, J.P.; Zurawski, D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Innovative solar thermochemical water splitting.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is evaluating the potential of an innovative approach for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen using two-step thermochemical cycles. Thermochemical cycles are heat engines that utilize high-temperature heat to produce chemical work. Like their mechanical work-producing counterparts, their efficiency depends on operating temperature and on the irreversibility of their internal processes. With this in mind, we have invented innovative design concepts for two-step solar-driven thermochemical heat engines based on iron oxide and iron oxide mixed with other metal oxides (ferrites). The design concepts utilize two sets of moving beds of ferrite reactant material in close proximity and moving in opposite directions to overcome a major impediment to achieving high efficiency--thermal recuperation between solids in efficient counter-current arrangements. They also provide inherent separation of the product hydrogen and oxygen and are an excellent match with high-concentration solar flux. However, they also impose unique requirements on the ferrite reactants and materials of construction as well as an understanding of the chemical and cycle thermodynamics. In this report the Counter-Rotating-Ring Receiver/Reactor/Recuperator (CR5) solar thermochemical heat engine and its basic operating principals are described. Preliminary thermal efficiency estimates are presented and discussed. Our ferrite reactant material development activities, thermodynamic studies, test results, and prototype hardware development are also presented.

Hogan, Roy E. Jr.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Evans, Lindsey R.; Moss, Timothy A.; Stuecker, John Nicholas (Robocasting Enterprises, Albuquerque, NM); Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); James, Darryl L. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX)

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Water heater secondary control device  

SciTech Connect

A secondary control device for gas water heaters is described having a tank, cold water inlet, hot water outlet and a heater thermostat, the control device comprising: valve means for controlling the flow of gas from a source thereof to the heater thermostat, the valve means connected between the gas source and the heater thermostat; means attached to the outside of the cold water inlet for sensing the temperature of water in the cold water inlet and providing an electrical signal representative thereof, the signal generated by the temperature sensing means being connected to the valve means; means for opening the valve means for transmitting the gas to the heater thermostat when the signal is representative of the temperature of the cold water being less than a predetermined temperature; and means for closing the valve means for preventing transmission of the energy to the heater thermostat when the signal is representative of the temperature of the cold water being equal to or greater than the predetermined temperature.

Subherwal, B.R.

1987-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

375

Desalination of brackish waters using ion exchange media.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of {approx} 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x+2y}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}O{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of {approx}2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = {approx}11,000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

Pless, Jason D.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Desalination of brackish waters using ion-exchange media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of around 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x}+2yAl{sub x}Si{sub 1}-xO{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of around to 2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = similar to 11 000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

Pless, J.D.; Philips, M.L.F.; Voigt, J.A.; Moore, D.; Axness, M.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Nenoff, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Beamline Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperatures Temperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV Current: 493.2242 mA Date: 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 Beamline Temperatures Energy 3.0000 GeV Current 493.2 mA 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 LN:MainTankLevel 124.4 in LN:MainTankPress 56.9 psi SPEAR-BL:B120HeFlow 15.4 l/min SPEAR-BL:B131HeFlow 22.2 l/min BL 4 BL02:LCW 0.0 ℃ BL02:M0_LCW 31.5 ℃ BL 4-1 BL04-1:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom1 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom2 47.0 ℃ BL04-1:Lower 32.0 ℃ BL04-1:Moly 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalA -167.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalB -172.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalA -177.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalB -175.0 ℃ BL 4-2 BL04-2:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom1 24.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom2 25.0 ℃

378

Lag Relationships Involving Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long historical record (100 years) of monthly sea surface temperature anomalies from the Comprehensive Ocean–Atmosphere Data Set was used to examined the lag relationships between different locations in the global Tropics. Application of ...

John R. Lanzante

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Analytic Representations of Standard Atmosphere Temperature Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytic functions which approximate six commonly used standard temperature profiles (the AFGL set, and the 1976 U.S. Standard) are described. These provide a uniform way of rounding off the sharp corners of the original models, and have been ...

Stephen B. Fels

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Measurement of Simulated Convective Temperature Distribution Near Ancient Wall Paintings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a method for measuring the temperature distribution in a confined volume of water used to simulate heat convection in the air. The water was seeded with thermo sensitive crystals as an indicator for the temperature. A 1:10 scale model ... Keywords: air modeling in water, natural convection, thermo-sensitive liquid crystals

V. S. Fonov; C. F. Joeckel; I. Grant

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

High temperatures drove record electricity demand and very ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Therefore, the high prices for Friday were set on Thursday when ERCOT had called a supply emergency and temperatures were expected to remain high on ...

384

NPP Grassland: Tullgarnsnäset, Sweden  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tullgarnsnäset, Sweden, 1968-1969 Tullgarnsnäset, Sweden, 1968-1969 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Wallentinus, H. G., and G. Tyler. 1997. NPP Grassland: Tullgarnsnäset, Sweden, 1968-1969. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a sea-shore meadow was studied from 1968 to 1969 at Tullgarnsnäset, near Stockholm, Sweden. Measurements of above-ground live biomass and total dead matter were made approximately monthly. Below-ground biomass was measured, but data were not reported. Above-ground net primary production was estimated by several methods, including peak total live and dead, and accounting for mortality determined by several different methods.

385

Homometric model sets and window covariograms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two Delone sets are called homometric when they share the same autocorrelation or Patterson measure. A model set LAMBDA within a given cut and project scheme is a Delone set that is defined through a window W in internal space. The autocorrelation measure of LAMBDA is a pure point measure whose coefficients can be calculated via the so-called covariogram of W. Two windows with the same covariogram thus result in homometric model sets. On the other hand, the inverse problem of determining LAMBDA from its diffraction image ultimately amounts to reconstructing W from its covariogram. This is also known as Matheron's covariogram problem. It is well studied in convex geometry, where certain uniqueness results have been obtained in recent years. However, for non-convex windows, uniqueness fails in a relevant way, so that interesting applications to the homometry problem emerge. We discuss this in a simple setting and show a planar example of distinct homometric model sets.

Michael Baake; Uwe Grimm

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahlén

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface temperature surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil surface temperature The temperature of the soil measured near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

389

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

390

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Surface water sampling of hot and cold spring discharges has traditionally

392

Closed sets of non-local correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a fundamental concept -- closed sets of correlations -- for studying non-local correlations. We argue that sets of correlations corresponding to information-theoretic principles, or more generally to consistent physical theories, must be closed under a natural set of operations. Hence, studying the closure of sets of correlations gives insight into which information-theoretic principles are genuinely different, and which are ultimately equivalent. This concept also has implications for understanding why quantum non-locality is limited, and for finding constraints on physical theories beyond quantum mechanics.

Jonathan Allcock; Nicolas Brunner; Noah Linden; Sandu Popescu; Paul Skrzypczyk; Tamas Vertesi

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

393

SAFARI 2000 MODIS Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the SAFARI 2000 project. The data set "SAFARI 2000 MODIS MOD04L2 Aerosol Data, GRANT Format, for Southern Africa" contains...

394

Property:TectonicSetting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TectonicSetting TectonicSetting Jump to: navigation, search Property Name TectonicSetting Property Type Page Description Describes tectonic process responsible for development of geothermal resource. This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "TectonicSetting" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Amedee Geothermal Area + Extensional Tectonics + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Extensional Tectonics + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Extensional Tectonics + Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Extensional Tectonics + C Chena Geothermal Area + Non-tectonic (radiogenic) + Coso Geothermal Area + Extensional Tectonics + D Desert Peak Geothermal Area + Extensional Tectonics + Dixie Valley Geothermal Area + Extensional Tectonics +

395

Approximating the Radii of Point Sets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p and flat F. Computing the radii of point sets is a fundamental problem ...... tributions, and order statistics,” Handbook of Combinatorial Optimization. (Vol.

396

Null-Control and Measurable Sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove the interior and boundary null-controllability of some parabolic evolutions with controls acting over measurable sets with positive measure.

Apraiz, J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

On Test Sets for Nonlinear Integer Maximization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On Test Sets for Nonlinear. Integer Maximization. July 2007; revised February 2008. Jon Leea, Shmuel Onnb, Robert Weismantelc a IBM T.J. Watson Research  ...

398

Pharmaceutical Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Water treatment process for water for injection (WFI)...deionization WFI production Evaporation still or vapor compression...

399

Water Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER SNAKES Contrary to popular belief, the Water Moccasin commonly known as the...

400

Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

Martin Chaplin

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Remote Sensing Methods for Imaging Dose to Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote Sensing Methods for Imaging Dose to Water. Summary: Calorimetry based upon remote sensing of the temperature ...

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

Designing a 'Near Optimum' Cooling-Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling water is expensive to circulate. Reducing its flow - i.e., hiking exchanger outlet temperatures - can cut tower, pump and piping investment as much as one-third and operating cost almost in half. Heat-exchanger-network optimization has been accomplished in large integrated plants, such as petroleum refineries. In many of the chemical process industries, however, a plant contains several individual processes, and network optimization, except on a limited basis, is not feasible. So far, no one has developed similar procedures for designing and optimizing a cooling-water once through-exchanger system. This article attempts to fill the void by presenting a design basis that will produce a 'near optimum' system. A cooling-water system consists of four major components: heat exchangers, cooling towers, circulation piping and pumps. To optimize such a system, one must define the system interactions and apply these relationships to the simultaneous design of the aforementioned equipment. This article develops criteria that for most applications allow one to ignore system interactions, and still design a 'near optimum' system. Cooling-water systems have long been designed by 'rules of thumb' that call for fixing the cool ant temperature-rise across all heat exchangers (usually 20 F) and setting the coolant inlet temperature to the heat exchanger at the site's wet-bulb temperature plus 8 F. These rules produce a workable cooling system; but, by taking the same coolant rise across all exchangers, regardless of the individual process outlet-temperatures, this cannot result in an optimized design. The design method presented in this article replaces the 'rules of thumb' with criteria that are easy to apply and that take into account the effect that the individual exchanger process outlet- temperatures have on cooling-system economics. Economic analyses of actual process have shown that cooling-system investment can be reduced by one third, and cooling-system operating cost by one half, If the proposed design criteria are used instead of the 'rules of thumb.' It has been found that the controlling economic factor for a cooling system is the quantity of water being circulated. Reducing the flow (raising the coolant outlet temperature of heat exchangers) significantly reduces cooling tower, pump and piping investment, and operating cost, and only moderately increases the heat-exchanger investment. The overriding conclusion to be drawn is that cooling water is very expensive, and its conservation can result in significant savings.

Crozier, R. A., Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Water heater control module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

Hammerstrom, Donald J

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Stability analysis of supercritical water cooled reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is a concept for an advanced reactor that will operate at high pressure (25MPa) and high temperature (500°C average core exit). The high coolant temperature as it leaves the ...

Zhao, Jiyun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Vapor Pressure Measurement of Supercooled Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new dewpoint hygrometer was developed for subfreezing temperature application. Vapor pressure of supercooled water was determined by measuring temperatures at the dew-forming surface and the vapor source ice under the flux density balance, and ...

N. Fukuta; C. M. Gramada

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Synchrotrons Explore Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluoride crystal. This surface was expected to stimulate ice formation, but even when chilled to a temperature of about 6.5 degrees Fahrenheit - well below water's normal...

407

ANOMALOUS EFFECTS OF WATER IN FIREFIGHTING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... As shown in Figures 1 - 3 for benzene, xylene, and water, the boiling point of any liquid or mixture of liquids is that temperature at which the vapor ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

408

Efficient set intersection for inverted indexing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conjunctive Boolean queries are a key component of modern information retrieval systems, especially when Web-scale repositories are being searched. A conjunctive query q is equivalent to a |q|-way intersection over ordered ... Keywords: Compact data structures, bitvector, byte-code, information retrieval, set intersection, set representation

J. Shane Culpepper; Alistair Moffat

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Constructing Uncertainty Sets for Robust Linear Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a methodology for constructing uncertainty sets within the framework of robust optimization for linear optimization problems with uncertain parameters. Our approach relies on decision maker risk preferences. Specifically, we ... Keywords: coherent risk measures, distortion risk measures, robust optimization, uncertainty sets

Dimitris Bertsimas; David B. Brown

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The parabolic Mandelbrot set Pascale ROESCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The parabolic Mandelbrot set Pascale ROESCH (joint work with C. L. PETERSEN, IMFUFA Roskilde) Institute of Mathematics of Toulouse 21 february 2011 Roesch P. (IMT) The parabolic Mandelbrot set 21 february 2011 1 / 94 #12;Consider a rational map of degree d 2 Roesch P. (IMT) The parabolic Mandelbrot

Roesch, Pascale

411

Efficient dynamic mining of constrained frequent sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data mining is supposed to be an iterative and exploratory process. In this context, we are working on a project with the overall objective of developing a practical computing environment for the human-centered exploratory mining of frequent sets. One ... Keywords: Association rules, constraints, data mining, dynamic changes, frequent sets, limited buffer space

Laks V. S. Lakshmanan; Carson Kai-Sang Leung; Raymond T. Ng

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Euphausiids of Southeast Asian waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the northeast winds. Offshore winds in the eastern Gulf havewinds and mean northerly current ?ow in both the southern and offshorewinds and strong southward ?ow of coastal water. Temperatures also were low in the offshore

Brinton, Edward

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

SER Temperature Coefficient  

SciTech Connect

Experimentally determine the overall isothermal temperature coefficient of the SER up to the design operating temperatures.

Johnson, J.L.

1959-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Two LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LC-15 Data Sets Released LC-15 Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large Scale Biosphere- Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 JERS-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar, 1- km Mosaic, Amazon Basin: 1995-1996 . Data set prepared by S.S. Saatchi, B. Nelson, E. Podest, and J. Holt. This data set contains two image mosaics of L-band radar backscatter and two images of derived first order texture. The mosaics were created from 1,500 images collected by the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) over the Amazon River Basin as part of the Global Rainforest Mapping Project (GRMP). Backscatter image mosaics were developed for the dry season of 1995 and the wet season

415

Alpine Stream Temperature Response to Storm Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite continued interest in meteorological influences on the thermal variability of river systems, there are few detailed studies of stream temperature dynamics during storm events. This paper reports high-resolution (15 min) water column and ...

Lee E. Brown; David M. Hannah

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity and record sheets for hands-on learning experiences. This curriculum is intended for students in about 4th to 8th grades.

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

417

Rapid and medium setting high float bituminous emulsions  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a rapid set high float aqueous bituminous emulsion-comprising bitumen, water, and from about 0.4% to about 0.6%, based on the weight of the emulsion, of an anionic emulsifier comprised of an alkaline solution of a combination of (1) 20% to 80% fatty acids selected from the group consisting of tall oil fatty acids, tallow fatty acids, and mixtures. (2) 20% to 80% of a product of the reaction of the fatty acids with a member of the group consists of acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, fumaric acid, and maleic anhydride.

Schilling, P.; Schreuders, H.G.

1987-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

Impact of Atmospheric Forcing on Antarctic Continental Shelf Water Masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antarctic continental shelf seas feature a bimodal distribution of water mass temperature, with the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas flooded by Circumpolar Deep Water that is several degrees Celsius warmer than the cold shelf waters prevalent ...

Alek A. Petty; Daniel L. Feltham; Paul R. Holland

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Average Data for Each Choke Setting (before 24-May 2010 06:00), 6-hour average (  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Average Data for Each Choke Setting (before 24-May 2010 06:00), 6-hour average (after 24-May 2010 06:00):" Average Data for Each Choke Setting (before 24-May 2010 06:00), 6-hour average (after 24-May 2010 06:00):" ,,"Choke","Average","Average","Fluid","Methanol","Water","Oil","Gas","Hyd. Eq.","Gas" ,"Choke","Setting","Upstream","Upstream","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery" "Date and Time","Setting","Duration","Pressure","Temp.","Rate","Rate","Rate","Rate","Rate","Rate","Portion" "dd-mmm-yy","(64ths)","(hours)","(psia)","(degF)","(bfpd)","(bfpd)","(bwpd)","(bopd)","(mmcfpd)","(boepd)","(%)"

420

Automated flow-temperature-humidity control system  

SciTech Connect

An automated system that controls air flow, temperature, and humidity was developed from a commercially available temperature-humidity indicator and a specially built flow-temperature-humidity control module. Parameters are set using direct-reading dials on the control module. The air flow is maintained using a mass-flow controller while process controllers connected to the indicator regulate humidity and temperature. The system will run indefinitely without need for operator intervention. If the module and indicator are calibrated properly, accurate air flows (+-2% of full scale), temperatures (+-0.3/sup 0/C), and humidities (+-2% RH) can be achieved.

Nelson, G.O.; Taylor, R.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water temperature setting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Model Intercomparison Project Meteorological Forcing Data Published LBA Model Intercomparison Project Meteorological Forcing Data Published The ORNL DAAC announces the release of LBA Model Intercomparison Project (LBA-MIP) meteorological forcing data from nine Brazilian flux towers for periods between 1999 and 2006. LBA-ECO CD-32 LBA Model Intercomparison Project (LBA-MIP) Meteorological Forcing Data. Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, N. Restrepo-Coupe, H.R. da Rocha, S.R. Saleska, and R. Stockli. This data set provides gap-filled meteorological observations from nine Brazilian flux towers for periods between 1999 and 2006. The measurements include: air temperature, specific humidity, module of wind speed, downward long wave and shortwave radiation at the surface, surface pressure, precipitation, and carbon dioxide (CO2). These atmospheric data are provided at 1-hour time-steps,

422

EVSE Features Low and High Current Settings Integrated Flashlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low and High Current Settings Integrated Flashlight Low and High Current Settings Integrated Flashlight Auto-restart EVSE Specifications Grid connection Plug and cord NEMA 5-15 Connector type J1772 Test lab certifications ETL Listed Approximate size (H x W x D inches) 16 x 9 x 4 Charge level AC Level 1 Input voltage 120 VAC Maximum input current 12 Amp Circuit breaker rating 20 Amp Test Conditions 1 Test date 9/4/2012 Nominal supply voltage (Vrms) 117.05 Supply frequency (Hz) 59.99 Initial ambient temperature (°F) 58 Test Vehicle 1,3 Make and model 2012 Chevrolet Volt Battery type Li-ion Steady state charge power (AC kW) 1.36 Maximum charge power (AC kW) 1.45 EVSE Test Results 1,2,4 EVSE consumption prior to charge (AC W) 3.6

423

Development of Environmentally Benign Heat Pump Water Heaters for the US Market  

SciTech Connect

Improving energy efficiency in water heating applications is important to the nation's energy strategies. Water heating in residential and commercial buildings accounts for about 10% of U.S. buildings energy consumption. Heat pump water heating (HPWH) technology is a significant breakthrough in energy efficiency, as an alternative to electric resistance water heating. Heat pump technology has shown acceptable payback period with proper incentives and successful market penetration is emerging. However, current HPWH require the use of refrigerants with high Global Warming Potential (GWP). Furthermore, current system designs depend greatly on the backup resistance heaters when the ambient temperature is below freezing or when hot water demand increases. Finally, the performance of current HPWH technology degrades greatly as the water set point temperature exceeds 330 K. This paper presents the potential for carbon dioxide, CO2, as a natural, environmentally benign alternative refrigerant for HPWH technology. In this paper, we first describe the system design, implications and opportunities of operating a transcritical cycle. Next, a prototype CO2 HPWH design featuring flexible component evaluation capability is described. The experimental setup and results are then illustrated followed by a brief discussion on the measured system performance. The paper ends with conclusions and recommendations for the development of CO2 heat pump water heating technology suitable for the U.S. market.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Wang, Kai [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Roetker, Jack [General Electric - Appliance Park

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Synthesis of application specific instruction sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An instruction set serves as the interface between hardware and software in a computer system. In an application specific environment, the system per-formance can be improved by designing an instruction set that matches the characteristics of hardware and the application. We present a systematic approach to generate application-specific instruction sets so that software applications can be efficiently mapped to a given pipelined microarchitec-ture. The approach synthesizes instruction sets from application bench-marks, given a machine model, an objective function, and a set of design constraints. In addition, assembly code is generated to show how the benchmarks can be compiled with the synthesized instruction set. The problem of designing instruction sets is formulated as a modified schedul-ing problem. A binary tuple is proposed to model the semantics of instruc-tions and integrate the instruction formation process into the scheduling process. A simulated annealing scheme is used to solve for the schedules. Experiments have shown that the approach is capable of synthesizing pow-erful instructions for modern pipelined micro-processors, and running with reasonable time and a modest amount of memory for large applications.

Ing-jer Huang

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase.

R. D. Adams; S. M. Berry; K. J. Galloway; T. A. Langenwalter; D. A. Lopez; C. M. Noakes; H. K. Peterson; M. I. Pope; R. J. Turk

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The CMB in a Causal Set Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss Cosmic Microwave Background constraints on the causal set theory of quantum gravity, which has made testable predictions about the nature of dark energy. We flesh out previously discussed heuristic constraints by showing how the power spectrum of causal set dark energy fluctuations can be found from the overlap volumes of past light cones of points in the universe. Using a modified Boltzmann code we put constraints on the single parameter of the theory that are somewhat stronger than previous ones. We conclude that causal set theory cannot explain late-time acceleration without radical alterations to General Relativity.

Joe Zuntz

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

427

Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal outflow occurs most commonly at the terminations of individual faults and where multiple faults interact. These areas of fault propagation and interaction are sites of elevated stress termed breakdown regions. Here, stress concentrations cause active fracturing and continual re-opening of fluid-flow conduits, permitting long-lived hydrothermal flow despite potential clogging of fractures due to mineral precipitation. As

428

Clear-Sky Nocturnal Temperatures Forecast and the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nocturnal evolution of air and soil temperatures are computed for clear-sky situations. The model takes into account the soil heat conduction and the atmospheric radiative transfers by using radiosonde data for temperature, water vapor, and ...

A. Quinft; J. Vanderborght

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Temperature, Humidity, and Wind at the Global Tropopause  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents global statistics of tropopause parameters for a 15-yr period (1979–93). The parameters are height, temperature, potential temperature, mixing ratio of water vapor, and zonal, meridional and vertical wind. The global ...

Klaus P. Hoinka

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Dynamic Response of CTD Pressure Sensors to Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure sensors used in CTDs (conductivity temperature depth) respond to transients in temperature. It is often assumed that these transients have a negligible effect on pressure. However, in a Sea-Bird CTD used in Hawaiian waters, these ...

S. M. Chiswell

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Effect of Temperature and Ion Irradiation on the Mechanical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of Water Radiolysis on Stellite-6 Corrosion: Dependence on pH and Temperature · Environmentally Assisted Cracking Susceptibility Assessment of AP ...

432

Setting the global thermostat with an exhaustible tradeable permit system  

SciTech Connect

The global warming policy debate has centered largely on near-term objectives such as freezing 1990 CO{sub 2} emissions without regard to long-run implications. A policy of freezing CO{sub 2} emissions is shown to slow but not halt global warming, while requiring expensive near-term adjustments. If the long-run temperature change outcome of the freeze policy is set as the goal of a more graduated control policy, one which allows the market to determine annual emissions, a more cost-effective solution is obtained that reduces the negative adjustment effects on the energy and other affected industries. The most cost-effective emissions time path of a graduated control policy could be achieved by an evaporative marketable CO{sub 2} emissions permit system. This paper provides a preliminary examination of an evaporative permit system used to achieve long-run stabilization of greenhouse-induced temperature change.

Kosobud, R.G.; Quinn, K.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics; South, D.W.; Daly, T.A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

ARM - Measurement - Sea surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSea surface temperature govMeasurementsSea surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sea surface temperature The temperature of sea water near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model Data Field Campaign Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model Data MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai

434

A note on three dimensional good sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that as in the case of n- fold Cartesian product for n greater than or equal to 4, even in 3-fold Cartesian product, a related component of a good set need not be a full component.

K. Gowri Navada

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

435

Pre-Packaged Data Set List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-Packaged Data Sets You will need to RegisterSign In to Order Pre-Packaged Products. You must RegisterSign In to order Pre-Packaged Products. Close window....

436

Data Sets for Amazonia Released, January 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America (i.e., longitude 85 deg to 30 deg W, latitude 25 deg S to 10 deg N). The data set entitled "LBA Regional Global Historical Climatology Network, V. 1, 1832-1990"...

437

New Global Vegetation Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

prepared by L. Vergutz, S. Manzoni, A. Porporato, R.F. Novais, and R.B. Jackson. This data set provides carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and...

438

ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Biome Gridded Data Revised Data Set: NPP Multi-Biome: Gridded Estimates for Selected Regions Worldwide, 1989-2001, Revision1 Effective Date of Revision: February 7, 2003...

439

International Macroeconomic Data Set | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Macroeconomic Data Set International Macroeconomic Data Set Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data International Macroeconomic Data Set Dataset Summary Description The International Macroeconomic Data Set provides data from 1969 through 2020 for real (adjusted for inflation) gross domestic product (GDP), population, real exchange rates, and other variables for the 190 countries and 34 regions that are most important for U.S. agricultural trade. The data presented here are a key component of the USDA Baseline projections process, and can be used as a benchmark for analyzing the impacts of U.S. and global macroeconomic shocks. The data for the Baseline projections are updated once a year to reflect the assumptions used for the Baseline. The historical data will be revised several times a year as the underlying data evolve.

440

Two LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CD-08 Carbon Isotopes in Belowground Carbon Pools, Amazonas and Para, Brazil . Data set prepared by E.D.C. Telles, P.B. de Camargo, L.A. Martinell, S.E. Trumbore, E.S. da Costa, J....

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441

Maximum Empirical Likelihood: Empty Set Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resulted in the extension of ESP into aESP A feedback fromand therefore may be subject to the empty set problem (ESP).In other words, ESP introduces the possibility that for the

Grendar, Marian; Judge, George G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Five LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-07 Lake Sediment Nutrient Data, Lago Calado, Brazil: 1982-1984. Data set prepared by L.K. Smith, J.M. Melack, and D.E. Hammond. This data...

443

A Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development is described of a Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS)—the result of a cooperative project to collect global weather observations taken near the ocean's surface since 1854, primarily from merchant ships, into a compact and ...

Scott D. Woodruff; Ralph J. Slutz; Roy L. Jenne; Peter M. Steurer

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

LANL sets TRU waste hauling record  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sets TRU waste hauling record sets TRU waste hauling record LANL sets TRU waste hauling record TRU waste consists of clothing, tools, rags, debris, soil, and other items contaminated with radioactive elements, mostly plutonium. October 4, 2011 TRU waste from LANL to WIPP TRU waste from LANL to WIPP Contact Colleen Curran Communications Office (505) 664-0344 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, October 4, 2011-Los Alamos National Laboratory has set a new LANL record for the amount of transuranic (TRU) waste from past nuclearoperations shipped in a single year to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. In fact, the Laboratory has shipped record numbers of transuranic waste each of the past three years. The Laboratory's TRU Waste Program completed 171 shipments in the past

445

Four LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

These data sets are from These data sets are from the Carbon Dynamics Team and report research results from the km 83 logged forest tower site, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil. LBA-ECO CD-04 Leaf Area Index, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil . Data set prepared by M. Figueira, C.A.D. de Sousa, M. Menton, R.N. Juarez, H.R. da Rocha, S.D. Miller, and M.L. Goulden. This data set reports on leaf area determination utilizing a computer scanner and image processing software. LBA-ECO CD-04 Biomass Survey, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil . Data set prepared by M. Menton, M. Figueira, C.A.D. de Sousa, S.D. Miller, H.R. da Rocha, and M.L.Goulden. This data set contains the results of a biometric tree survey of a 19.25 ha area adjacent to the eddy flux tower at the km 83 logged forest tower site.

446

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Influence of a Tropical Island Mountain on Solar Radiation, Air Temperature and Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation, air temperature, and water vapor pressure at 17 stations on the northwest flank of Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii are compared with modeled clear day solar radiation and free atmosphere air temperature and water vapor pressure. ...

Dennis Nullet

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

449

Examination of the relationship of river water to occurrences of bottom water with reduced oxygen concentrations in the northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six years of comprehensive data sets collected over the northern continental shelf and upper slope of the Gulf of Mexico during the LATEX-A and NEGOM-COH programs showed that low-oxygen waters (Gulf show considerable differences in the occurrence of low-oxygen waters. Lowoxygen waters are observed almost exclusively in regions subject to large riverine influences: the Louisiana and Mississippi-Alabama shelves. Hypoxic waters (oxygen concentrations <1.4 mL�·L-1) are found only over the Louisiana shelf. No low-oxygen water is found over the Florida shelf which has minimum riverine influence. Lowoxygen water is found at only one station on the Texas shelf; this is during spring when the volume of low-salinity water is at maximum. The distributions of low-salinity water influenced the different distributions of low-oxygen and hypoxic waters in the four regions. Low-oxygen occurrences are clearly related to vertical stratification. Lowoxygen occurred only in stable water columns with maximum Brunt-V�¤is�¤l�¤ frequency (Nmax) greater than 40 cycles�·h-1. When Nmax exceeded 100 cycles�·h-1 in summer over the Louisiana shelf, oxygen concentrations dropped below 1.4 mL�·L-1, and the bottom waters became hypoxic. Salinity is more important than temperature in controlling vertical stratification. Locations where temperature influence was larger were found in summer in water depth greater than 20 m over the Louisiana shelf, along the near shore areas of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf west of 87�ºW, and in the inner shelf waters of the Texas shelf. The extent of oxygen removal at the bottom of these stable water columns is reflected in the amount of remineralized silicate. Silicate concentrations are highest closest to the Mississippi River Delta and decrease east and west of the Delta. EOF analyses show that more than 65% of the oxygen variance is explained by the first mode. The amplitude functions of the first EOF modes of bottom oxygen, water column Brunt- V�¤is�¤l�¤ maxima, and bottom silicate are well correlated, indicating that much of the variance in bottom oxygen is explained by water column stratification and bottom remineralization.

Belabbassi, Leila

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Solar hot water heater  

SciTech Connect

A solar hot water heater includes an insulated box having one or more hot water storage tanks contained inside and further having a lid which may be opened to permit solar radiation to heat a supply of water contained within the one or more hot water storage tanks. A heat-actuated control unit is mounted on an external portion of the box, such control unit having a single pole double throw thermostat which selectively activates an electric winch gear motor to either open or close the box lid. The control unit operates to open the lid to a predetermined position when exposed to the sun's rays, and further operates to immediately close the lid in response to any sudden drop in temperature, such as might occur during a rainstorm, clouds moving in front of the sun, or the like.

Melvin, H.A.

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil & Indirect Water Heaters Water Heating A variety of...

452

Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Nature Bulletin No. 408-A February 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND WATER We take...

453

Water Dogs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA Question: I'd like to know about the water dogs and their life cycle? Replies: Water dog, or mud puppy, is a common name for a type of salamander that never develops lungs, but...

454

Power Potential of Geothermal Wells Related to Reservoir Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For equal flows of hot water wells, the electric power which can be generated increases with feed water temperature. However, high temperature wells discharge greater flows than that of lower temperature wells of similar permeability, with the result of enhanced power potential. In fact, where fluids are exploited utilizing two-stage flash, these factors combine to give a power potential which is proportional to the cube of the feed water temperature in degrees celsius. Hence a feed of 315 C would generate twice the power of that of water at 250 C for wells of good permeability and where the reservoir exists under conditions of boiling point with depth. Higher temperature water (exceeding 300 C) has, however, a commensurate higher tendency to mineral deposition in reinjection water lines and this disposes design to single-stage flash with slightly reduced power, compared with the two-stage alternative.

James, Russell

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

455

Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy consumption. Both reset strategies make engineering sense as long as the reset schedules are reasonable. Quite often the decision to use one over the other is made with the assumption that they will all achieve some sorts of energy savings. However, the impact of these two strategies on AHU energy consumption could be very different. A comparison of these two commonly used supply air temperature reset strategies for a single-duct constant air volume system is presented in this paper. It is shown that from either the building energy consumption or building comfort point of view, the reset strategy based on outside air temperature is inherently better than that based on return air temperature. Significant amount of heating energy savings can be achieved by switching from return air temperature based reset to outside air temperature based reset. The reset strategy can also benefit variable air volume (VAV) AHUs. An improved supply air temperature set point reset control strategy is proposed by combining and staging the outside air and return air temperature based resets.

Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Observation-based test set generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When circuits are manufactured, there are unavoidable defects that occur in a small but significant portion of the products. Input test patterns that can detect these defects are uniquely generated for each circuit in advance of their production. Current test set generation relies primarily on the "stuck-at" model, which both excites and observes every site of the circuit. However, a test set with good stuck-at fault coverage will not necessarily find all the defects in a circuit. Other models, such as bridging surrogates and transition surrogates, can also be considered when evaluating the quality of a test set. My research explores the role that observation alone plays in generating a set of valuable tests. I compare the performance of test patterns generated with traditional detection methods and ones made only considering the observation of each site. I also compare the lengths of each test set, with the goal of finding shorter and more effective tests that achieve an acceptable defective part level for a circuit.

Cobb, Jeffrey Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Data editing on large data sets  

SciTech Connect

The process of analyzing large data sets often includes an early exploratory stage to first, develop a basic understanding of the data and its interrelationships and second, to prepare and cleanup the data for hypothesis formulation and testing. This preliminary phase of the data analysis process usually requires facilities found in research data management systems, text editors, graphics packages, and statistics packages. Also this process usually requires the analyst to write special programs to cleanup and prepare the data for analysis. This paper describes a technique now implemented as a single computational tool, a data editor, which combines a cross section of facilities from the above systems with emphasis on research data base manipulation and subsetting techniques. The data editor provides an interactive environment to explore and manipulate data sets with particular attention to the implications of large data sets. It utilizes a relational data model and a self describing binary data format which allows data transportability to other data analysis packages. Some impacts of editing large data sets will be discussed. A technique for manipulating portions or subsets of large data sets without physical replication is introduced. Also an experimental command structure and operating environment are presented.

Thomas, J.J.; Burnett, R.A.; Lewis, J.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z