National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for water surface water

  1. Surface Water Quality Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Standards Team. This advisory group, with representation from water asso- ciations, the agricultural industry, engineering firms, environmental organizations, consumer groups and government entities, is working with TCEQ staff to review and possibly...SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards...

  2. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul R. Jones; Xiuqing Hao; Eduardo R. Cruz-Chu; Konrad Rykaczewski; Krishanu Nandy; Thomas M. Schutzius; Kripa K. Varanasi; Constantine M. Megaridis; Jens H. Walther; Petros Koumoutsakos; Horacio D. Espinosa; Neelesh A. Patankar

    2014-09-29

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

  3. Enhancing Drinking Water Supply by Better Understanding Surface Water Ground Water Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Enhancing Drinking Water Supply by Better Understanding Surface Water ­ Ground Water Interaction Primary Investigators Thomas Boving Anne Veeger Patricia Logan #12;Enhancing Drinking Water Supply by Better Understanding Surface Water ­ Ground Water Interaction Thomas Boving, Anne Veeger & Patricia Logan

  4. Surface Water Development in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1977-01-01

    ................................. 30 Appendix Tables .......................................... 32 ......... Appendix A: Major Conservation Storage Reservoirs 40 endix B: Water Development Board Policy ............... 41 eferences ............................................... 43... of acre-feet. In Texas, 95 percent of the total conservation storage capacity is concentrated in 63 reservoirs. The Texas Water Development Board has not provided a published figure on average annual yield of surface water from these reservoirs...

  5. Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout Kentucky's 39,486 square miles. Surface water occurs as rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands. Ground- water occurs underlain by soluble carbonate rocks (for example, limestone). Water Supply · Approximately 49 inches

  6. Assessing Phosphorous Loss to Protect Surface Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raul

    2005-01-01

    programs. It is an integrated approach that considers soil and landscape features in order tx H2O | pg. 10 Assessing Phosphorus Loss to Protect Surface Water to find appropriate phosphorus management practices by estimating phosphorus delivery...

  7. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; SURFACE WATERS; SEDIMENTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL...

  8. How the Forest handles stormwater: 15% surface water runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    or contaminants present on the parking lot such as hydrocarbons, silt, salt, and nutrients, and deposits them1 #12;How the Forest handles stormwater: 15% surface water runoff 35% surface water detained or infiltrated 50% evapotranspiration In developed conditions: 5570% surface water runoff 15% surface water

  9. The polluted surface water exerts an influence on underground water and its environmental effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, H.

    1995-12-31

    The relationship between the polluted surface water flowing through urban areas and adjacent ground water resources in the southeast of China was systematically studied. The polluted surface water contained elevated concentrations of heavy metals in the sediment. When this water was directly used in irrigation or as fertilizer, the harmful components and heavy metals were transported from water to soil and were adsorbed by soil and plants. The health of local people who drank the ground water was threatened.

  10. atershed water quality concerns in the Northeast have focused on surface water,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    W atershed water quality concerns in the Northeast have focused on surface water, particularly practices, attempt to improve water quality by altering farm hydrology so as to reduce surface runoff for water quality BMPs are contained in the National Handbook of Conservation Practices (NRCS, 1996

  11. Hawaii Application for Surface Water Use Permit for Proposed...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Application for Surface Water Use Permit for Proposed New Use in a Designated Surface Water Management Area (DLNR Form SWUPA-N) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  12. Water: one molecule, two surfaces, one mistake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Vega

    2015-05-29

    In order to rigorously evaluate the energy and dipole moment of a certain configuration of molecules one needs to solve the Schr\\"odinger equation. Repeating this for many different configurations allows one to determine the potential energy surface (PES) and the dipole moment surface (DMS). Since the early days of computer simulation it has been implicitly accepted that for empirical potentials the charges used to fit the PES should also be used to describe the DMS. This is a mistake. Partial charges are not observable magnitudes. They should be regarded as adjustable fitting parameters. Optimal values used to describe the PES are not necessarily the best to describe the DMS. One could use two fits: one for the PES, and another for the DMS. This is a common practice in the quantum chemistry community, but not used so often by the community performing computer simulations. This idea affects all types of modelling of water (with the exception of ab-initio calculations) from coarse grained to non-polarizable and polarizable models. We anticipate that an area that will benefit dramatically from having both, a good PES and a good DMS, is the modelling of water in the presence of electric fields.

  13. WAC - 173-210A Water Quality Standards for Surface Waters of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Water Quality Standards for Surface Waters of the State of Washington Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC...

  14. Adsorption structure of water molecules on the Be(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yu; Li, Yanfang [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Wang, Shuangxi [College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-07

    By using density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the adsorption of water molecules at different coverages on the Be(0001) surface. The coverage dependence of the prototype water structures and energetics for water adlayer growth are systematically studied. The structures, energetics, and electronic properties are calculated and compared with other available studies. Through our systematic investigations, we find that water molecules form clusters or chains on the Be(0001) surface at low coverages. When increasing the water coverage, water molecules tend to form a 2?×?2 hexagonal network on the Be(0001) surface.

  15. Structure of water adsorbed on a mica surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Sung-Ho; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-01-29

    Monte Carlo simulations of hydration water on the mica (001) surface under ambient conditions revealed water molecules bound closely to the ditrigonal cavities in the surface, with a lateral distribution of approximately one per cavity, and water molecules interposed between K{sup +} counter ions in a layer situated about 2.5 {angstrom} from a surface O along a direction normal to the (001) plane. The calculated water O density profile was in quantitative agreement with recent X-ray reflectivity measurements indicating strong lateral ordering of the hydration water but liquid-like disorder otherwise.

  16. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  17. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  18. Water: one molecule, two surfaces, one mistake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In order to rigorously evaluate the energy and dipole moment of a certain configuration of molecules one needs to solve the Schr\\"odinger equation. Repeating this for many different configurations allows one to determine the potential energy surface (PES) and the dipole moment surface (DMS). Since the early days of computer simulation it has been implicitly accepted that for empirical potentials the charges used to fit the PES should also be used to describe the DMS. This is a mistake. Partial charges are not observable magnitudes. They should be regarded as adjustable fitting parameters. Optimal values used to describe the PES are not necessarily the best to describe the DMS. One could use two fits: one for the PES, and another for the DMS. This is a common practice in the quantum chemistry community, but not used so often by the community performing computer simulations. This idea affects all types of modelling of water (with the exception of ab-initio calculations) from coarse grained to non-polarizable an...

  19. Particles in Surface Waters: Coagulation and Transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culkin, Gerald W.; Lawler, Desmond F.

    1991-01-01

    -averaged, unsteady particle transport were developed to approximate the size-dependent particle transport processes, which included advection, dispersion, and settling. Coupled exchange of discrete particles between the water column and sediment bed was modeled using...

  20. NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN CALIFORNIA VINEYARDS S (sshubbard@lbl.gov) Detailed estimates of water content are necessary for variety of hydrogeological inves to obtain sufficient information about the spatial variation of water content within the root zone using

  1. Water Order Profiles on Phospholipid/Cholesterol Membrane Bilayer Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Paul

    Water Order Profiles on Phospholipid/Cholesterol Membrane Bilayer Surfaces DAVID ROBINSON,1 2011 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). Abstract: Water is pivotal in the stabilization of macromolecular biological structures, although the dynamic en- semble structure of water near to molecular

  2. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Ray G; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2012-01-01

    Fernandez (2010), The surface water and ocean topographyObserving terrestrial surface water and oceanic submesoscaleof trends in streamflow and water availability in a changing

  3. Multiobjective calibration and sensitivity of a distributed land surface water and energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Paul R; Gupta, Hoshin V; Shuttleworth, W. James; Famiglietti, James S

    2001-01-01

    distributed land surface water and energy balance model Pauldistributed land surface water and energy balance model (because models of water and energy balance, Ph.D.

  4. Dynamic behavior of interfacila water at the silica surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Cole, David R [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to study the dynamics properties of water at the silica-liquid interface at ambient temperature. Three different degrees of hydroxylation of a crystalline silica surface were used. To assess the water dynamic properties we calculated the residence probability and in-plane mean square displacement as a function of distance from the surface. The data indicate that water molecules at the fully hydroxylated surface remain longer, on average, in the interfacial region than in the other cases. By assessing the dynamics of molecular dipole moment and hydrogen-hydrogen vector an anisotropic reorientation was discovered for interfacial water in contact with any of the surfaces considered. However, the features of the anisotropic reorientation observed for water molecules depend strongly on the relative orientation of interfacial water molecules and their interactions with surface hydroxyl groups. On the partially hydroxylated surface, where water molecules with hydrogen-down and hydrogen-up orientation are both found, those water molecules associated with surface hydroxyl groups remain at the adsorbed locations longer and reorient slower than the other water molecules. A number of equilibrium properties, including density profiles, hydrogen bond networks, charge densities, and dipole moment densities are also reported to explain the dynamics results.

  5. New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill Permits webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Surface...

  6. Bacteria and Surface Water Quality Standards Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires that each state set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bodies that support oyster harvesting, called oyster waters, have four clas- sifications which determineBacteria and Surface Water Quality Standards Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires that each state set water quality standards to ensure all uses of a water body have the ap- propriate water

  7. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01

    spatially variable water and energy balance processes, Waterdistributed land surface water and energy balance model, J.

  8. Measurements of water surface snow lines in classical protoplanetary disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blevins, Sandra M; Banzatti, Andrea; Zhang, Ke; Najita, Joan R; Carr, John S; Salyk, Colette; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-01

    We present deep Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of far-infrared water lines from a sample of four protoplanetary disks around solar-mass stars, selected to have strong water emission at mid-infrared wavelengths. By combining the new Herschel spectra with archival Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy, we retrieve a parameterized radial surface water vapor distribution from 0.1-100 AU using two-dimensional dust and line radiative transfer modeling. The surface water distribution is modeled with a step model comprising of a constant inner and outer relative water abundance and a critical radius at which the surface water abundance is allowed to change. We find that the four disks have critical radii of $\\sim 3-11$ AU, at which the surface water abundance decreases by at least 5 orders of magnitude. The measured values for the critical radius are consistently smaller than the location of the surface snow line, as predicted by the observed spectral energy distribution. This suggests that the sharp drop-off of the surface water abu...

  9. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2000 Water Year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.A.Shaull; M.R.Alexander; R.P.Reynolds; R.P.Romero; E.T.Riebsomer; C.T.McLean

    2001-06-02

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 23 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs, two that flow into Canon del Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  10. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian

    2007-08-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.

  11. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.A. Shaull; D. Ortiz; M.R. Alexander; R.P. Romero

    2003-03-03

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.

  12. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1999 Water Year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    2000-04-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 22 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory with one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Canon de Valle and nine partial-record storm water stations.

  13. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2009 water year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, David; McCullough, Betsy

    2010-05-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 73 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  14. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  15. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 1998 Water Year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    1999-02-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Caiion de Vane.

  16. WATER-IMMERSION DEEP-SUBWAVELENGTH SURFACE PLASMON VIRTUAL PROBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    WATER-IMMERSION DEEP-SUBWAVELENGTH SURFACE PLASMON VIRTUAL PROBES QIAN WANG Optoelectronics in water by using near- ¯eld scanning optical microscope. The full-width half-maximum of the probe is as small as 0=5:5. Such deep-subwavelength sized plasmonic virtual probe may lead to many potential

  17. Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern? G. Allen Burton Jr; Fracking; Water-quality stressor; Ecological risk assessment Introduction The world's energy marketplace industrial processes, the higher the risk of that ecosystem being impacted by the operation. The associated

  18. Impervious Areas: Examining the Undermining Effects on Surface Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, De'Etra Jenra

    2012-02-14

    lot study. Results indicated that day since last rain event had the most significant effect on surface water quality. Furthermore, concrete produced higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), potassium and calcium...

  19. EA-1093: Surface Water Drainage System, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats...

  20. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  1. Novel Americium Treatment Process for Surface Water and Dust Suppression Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiepel, E.W.; Pigeon, P.; Nesta, S.; Anderson, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), a former nuclear weapons production plant, has been remediated under CERCLA and decommissioned to become a National Wildlife Refuge. The site conducted this cleanup effort under the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) that established limits for the discharge of surface and process waters from the site. At the end of 2004, while a number of process buildings were undergoing decommissioning, routine monitoring of a discharge pond (Pond A-4) containing approximately 28 million gallons of water was discovered to have been contaminated with a trace amount of Americium-241 (Am-241). While the amount of Am-241 in the pond waters was very low (0.5 - 0.7 pCi/l), it was above the established Colorado stream standard of 0.15 pCi/l for release to off site drainage waters. The rapid successful treatment of these waters to the regulatory limit was important to the site for two reasons. The first was that the pond was approaching its hold-up limit. Without rapid treatment and release of the Pond A-4 water, typical spring run-off would require water management actions to other drainages onsite or a mass shuttling of water for disposal. The second reason was that this type of contaminated water had not been treated to the stringent stream standard at Rocky Flats before. Technical challenges in treatment could translate to impacts on water and secondary waste management, and ultimately, cost impacts. All of the technical challenges and specific site criteria led to the conclusion that a different approach to the treatment of this problem was necessary and a crash treatability program to identify applicable treatment techniques was undertaken. The goal of this program was to develop treatment options that could be implemented very quickly and would result in the generation of no high volume secondary waste that would be costly to dispose. A novel chemical treatment system was developed and implemented at the RFETS to treat Am-241 contaminated pond water, surface run-off and D and D dust suppression water during the later stages of the D and D effort at Rocky Flats. This novel chemical treatment system allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment of all contaminated waste waters to the very low stream standard of 0.15 pCi/1 with strict compliance to the RFCA discharge criteria for release to off-site surface waters. The rapid development and implementation of the treatment system avoided water management issues that would have had to be addressed if contaminated water had remained in Pond A-4 into the Spring of 2005. Implementation of this treatment system for the Pond A-4 waters and the D and D waters from Buildings 776 and 371 enabled the site to achieve cost-effective treatment that minimized secondary waste generation, avoiding the need for expensive off-site water disposal. Water treatment was conducted for a cost of less than $0.20/gal which included all development costs, capital costs and operational costs. This innovative and rapid response effort saved the RFETS cleanup program well in excess of $30 million for the potential cost of off-site transportation and treatment of radioactive liquid waste. (authors)

  2. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small molecule–silica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (?hads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 ± 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reachingmore »its only plateau (-20.7 ± 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 ± 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 ± 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing water–silica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.« less

  3. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small molecule–silica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (?hads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 ± 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reaching its only plateau (-20.7 ± 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 ± 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 ± 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing water–silica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.

  4. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hosseini, S. H. R., E-mail: hosseini@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Akiyama, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Lukeš, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, Prague, Prague 18200 (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H?O?) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H?O? and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  5. Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2013-11-14

    Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

  6. Surface Water Quality Modeling Pollutant Release from a Surface Source during Rainfall Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Surface Water Quality Modeling Pollutant Release from a Surface Source during Rainfall Runoff M. Todd Walter,* J.-Y. Parlange, M. F. Walter, X. Xin, and C. A. Scott ABSTRACT different pollutants were is recognized as an impor- Agricultural runoff water quality research has primar-tant mode of nonpoint

  7. A step towards Mobile Arsenic measurement for surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villiers, C. A.; Lapsley, M. C.; Hall, E. A. H.

    2015-02-25

    is also demonstrated using a mobile phone camera to record the measurement, producing a detection limit of 5 ?M. However, copper remains the main interferent of concern. Water-soluble CdTe QDs show little sensitivity to As3+ even with a GSH surface...

  8. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  9. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium concentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  10. Surface water waves and tsunamis By Walter Craig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Surface water waves and tsunamis By Walter Craig Department of Mathematics and Statistics Mc earthquake in Sumatra on December 26, 2004, and the devastating tsunami which followed, I have chosen time of the recent tsunami from its epicenter off of the north Sumatra coast to the coast of nearby

  11. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi, E-mail: songi@chem.ucsb.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Olijve, Luuk L. C. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster surface water diffusivity. Another is the concurrent tightening of lipid packing that reduces passive, possibly unwanted, diffusion of ions and water across the bilayer.

  12. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    Turbid water Clear water pixel position cameraresponsecameraresponse pixel position ABSTRACT: A new underwater laser scanning system, providing microbathymetric information in coastal waters is described the backscatter component resulting in enhanced performance in turbid waters. The system is expected to provide

  13. Effect of water table dynamics on land surface hydrologic memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2010-01-01

    Theory and observations, Water Resour. Res. , 34, 765–776.and macroscale models of water and energy balance, Ph.D.of capillary flux on the soil water balance in a stochastic

  14. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Ray G; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2012-01-01

    model of land surface water and energy fluxes for generalin our water balance. One is a daily, 0.05 ET energy balance

  15. Optimal Use of Groundwater and Surface Water to Reduce Land Subsidence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta-Gonzalez, G.; Reddell, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Optimal Use of Groundwater and Surface Water to Reduce Land Subsidence G. Acosta-Gonzalez D.L. Reddell Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  16. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  17. Interaction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge at a seasonally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Interaction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge the behaviour of the hydrocarbon plume at the groundwater/surface water transition zone to be strongly B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Ground water; Surface water; Hydrocarbons; Discharge; Tides

  18. Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lynn Sager

    2013-01-01

    of small ponds on stream water chemistry. Lake and ReservoirSpeciation of iron in river water using a specific catalyticin surface-subsurface water exchange and lateral hyporheic

  19. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12??m{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  20. The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daulet Moldabayev; Henrik Kalisch; Denys Dutykh

    2014-10-30

    The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better than both the KdV and BBM equations.

  1. Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiro Umeki; Masahiko Ohata; Hiizu Nakanishi; Masatoshi Ichikawa

    2015-01-03

    When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 $\\mu\\,{\\rm m}$; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10$\\sim$100 $\\mu{\\rm m}$; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1$\\sim$2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.

  2. Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surface. The removal rate of human pharmaceutical compounds at 11 water treatment units was also determined. Only caffeine proved to be resistant to drinking water treatment processes (with a minimum rate of 5%). Other

  3. A Surface Water Protection Assessment Tool that uses Digital Elevation Models1 Darwin L. Sorensen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    . A first approximation estimate of pollutant concentration reaching the drinking water treatment plant of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities in the watershed. Surface water of pollution under various storm intensities can be analyzed. The influences of shallow ground water quality (e

  4. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  5. Appendix D Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278MaywoodWayne AnalyticalSurface Water

  6. Diagnosis of Solar Water Heaters Using Solar Storage Tank Surface Temperature Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.; Magnuson, L.; Barker, G.; Bullwinkel, M.

    2009-04-01

    Study of solar water heaters by using surface temperature data of solar storage tanks to diagnose proper operations.

  7. An integrable evolution equation for surface waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kraenkel; H. Leblond; M. A. Manna

    2011-01-30

    In order to describe the dynamics of monochromatic surface waves in deep water, we derive a nonlinear and dispersive system of equations for the free surface elevation and the free surface velocity from the Euler equations in infinite depth. From it, and using a multiscale perturbative methods, an asymptotic model for small-aspect-ratio waves is derived. The model is shown to be completely integrable. The Lax pair, the first conserved quantities as well as the symmetries are exhibited. Theoretical and numerical studies reveal that it supports periodic progressive Stokes waves which peak and break in finite time. Comparison between the limiting wave solution of the asymptotic model and classical irrotational results is performed.

  8. High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    1 High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 1. Introduction Information about near surface soil water content the applicability of a surface geophysical method, ground penetrating radar (GPR), for use as a water content

  9. Correlation Between Opacity and Surface Water Vapor Pressure Measurements at Rio Frio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Correlation Between Opacity and Surface Water Vapor Pressure Measurements at Rio Frio M.A. Holdaway 1, 1996 Abstract We use the surface water vapor pressure measured by weather stations at 4060 m opacity. The surface water vapor pressure is inverted some 20% of the time at night and some 35

  10. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS AND DESIGN TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR SURFACE WATER HEAT PUMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS AND DESIGN TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR SURFACE WATER HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By MATT AND DESIGN TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR SURFACE WATER HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: Jeffrey D. Spitler Thesis Title of Study: EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND DESIGN TOOL DE- VELOPMENT FOR SURFACE WATER HEAT PUMP

  11. Horizon effects with surface waves on moving water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germain Rousseaux; Philippe Maissa; Christian Mathis; Pierre Coullet; Thomas G. Philbin; Ulf Leonhardt

    2010-10-01

    Surface waves on a stationary flow of water are considered, in a linear model that includes the surface tension of the fluid. The resulting gravity-capillary waves experience a rich array of horizon effects when propagating against the flow. In some cases three horizons (points where the group velocity of the wave reverses) exist for waves with a single laboratory frequency. Some of these effects are familiar in fluid mechanics under the name of wave blocking, but other aspects, in particular waves with negative co-moving frequency and the Hawking effect, were overlooked until surface waves were investigated as examples of analogue gravity [Sch\\"utzhold R and Unruh W G 2002 Phys. Rev. D 66 044019]. A comprehensive presentation of the various horizon effects for gravity-capillary waves is given, with emphasis on the deep water/short wavelength case kh>>1 where many analytical results can be derived. A similarity of the state space of the waves to that of a thermodynamic system is pointed out.

  12. Water Clean Water Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Keep Our Water Clean Keep Our Water Clean Home and garden pesticides and fertilizers are polluting residues wash into gutters, storm drains, and streams by rain,garden watering,or cleaning up drinking water. Follow these tips to keep our rivers, creeks, and oceans clean. What can you do to protect

  13. Water, water everywhere,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    1 Water, water everywhere, but is it safe to drink? An Inquiry-based unit investigating the journey of your drinking water from source to tap of drinking water will contain different contaminants, based on surrounding land uses (guided inquiry activity

  14. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  15. Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Tritium in Surface Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah861MayArtQuestions forFeatureSurface Water

  16. Oil spreading in surface waters with an ice cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Weerasuriya, S.A.; Belaskas, D.P.; Chowdhury, T.

    1993-02-01

    A study of oil spreading in surface waters in the presence of a floating ice cover is presented. The ice can be solid or fragmented. Both axi-symmetrical and uni-directional spreading are studied. The report describes the analytical and numerical model development, the experimental set-up, results from the laboratory experiments, and their comparison with the derived theory and the numerical simulation. To analyze the spreading of oil under solid ice, new equations are derived. These equations consider gravity (buoyancy) - inertia phase, gravity (buoyancy) - viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy - surface tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to termination of spreading is presented. The emphasis of the study is on the dominant spreading mechanism for oil under ice, which is the buoyancy-viscous phase.

  17. Near stream groundwater surface water interfaces (GSI) are considered to provide natural remediation for groundwater nitrate before it discharges into surface water bodies,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    #12;2 ABSTRACT Near stream groundwater surface water interfaces (GSI) are considered to provide natural remediation for groundwater nitrate before it discharges into surface water bodies, largely. The purpose of this study was to assess the combined influences of hydrological properties on groundwater

  18. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01

    on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirementsreduced surface water availability can be managed byrequirement and water availability (surface water and

  19. Water at the Surfaces of Aligned Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Membranes Probed with Ultrafast Vibrational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water at the Surfaces of Aligned Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Membranes Probed with Ultrafast@stanford.edu Abstract: The dynamics of water at the surface of artificial membranes composed of aligned multibilayers pump-probe spectroscopy. The experiments are performed at various hydration levels, x ) 2 - 16 water

  20. Hydroecological factors governing surface water flow on a low-gradient floodplain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to flow reductions associated with flood control. We measured flow velocity, water depth, and wind with the square of water surface slope and the fourth power of stem diameter, decreases in direct proportionHydroecological factors governing surface water flow on a low-gradient floodplain Judson W. Harvey

  1. Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. in surface waters of southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selinger, Brent

    Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. in surface waters of southern Alberta and Salmonella spp. in surface water within the basin. This study is the first of its kind to identify E. coli O and Salmonella spp. in water samples was 0.9% (n = 1483) and 6.2% (n = 1429), respectively. While data examined

  2. 5 CCR 1002-31 Basic Standards and Methodologies for Surface Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Surface Water RegulationLegal Abstract Regulations implementing the Colorado Water Quality Control Act, in particular CRS 25-8-203 and 25-8-204, providing basic...

  3. Autocatalytic and cooperatively-stabilized dissociation of water on a stepped platinum surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donadio, Davide; Site, Luigi Delle; 10.1021/ja308899g

    2012-01-01

    Water-metal interfaces are ubiquitous and play a key role in many chemical processes, from catalysis to corrosion. Whereas water adlayers on atomically flat transition metal surfaces have been investigated in depth, little is known about the chemistry of water on stepped surfaces, commonly occurring in realistic situations. Using first-principles simulations we study the adsorption of water on a stepped platinum surface. We find that water adsorbs preferentially at the step edge, forming linear clusters or chains, stabilized by the cooperative effect of chemical bonds with the substrate and hydrogen bonds. In contrast with flat Pt, at steps water molecules dissociate forming mixed hydroxyl/water structures, through an autocatalytic mechanism promoted by hydrogen bonding. Nuclear quantum effects contribute to stabilize partially dissociated cluster and chains. Together with the recently demonstrated attitude of water chains adsorbed on stepped Pt surfaces to transfer protons via thermally activated hopping, th...

  4. SWOT: The Surface Water & Ocean Topography Satellite Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center School of Earth Sciences The Ohio State University Funded By: Funded By: #12;with many-Boundary Issues: ex: Tigris & Euphrates Disputes Slide courtesy Frank Schwartz n Water Usage: n 98.5% water energy of the ocean. For example, the cross-stream scale of the Gulf Stream is 100 km, which is not fully

  5. United: How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    . A?er a major drought in the ????s, the Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill ? in ????, which called for a comprehensive water management planning process and a water availability modeling system to make e?ective management of the surface water... as any possible impacts it might have on existing water rights in the basin. ?If someone applies for a new water right, we have many requirements, one of which is that we have to ?nd that the water is available, a?er we look at all existing water...

  6. Evaporation of tiny water aggregation on solid surfaces of different wetting properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen Wang; Yusong Tu; Rongzheng Wan; Haiping Fang

    2012-03-08

    The evaporation of a tiny amount of water on the solid surface with different wettability has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. We found that, as the surface changed from hydrophobicity to hydrophility, the evaporation speed did not show a monotonically decrease from intuition, but increased first, and then decreased after reached a maximum value. The competition between the number of the water molecules on the water-gas surface from where the water molecules can evaporate and the potential barrier to prevent those water molecules from evaporating results in the unexpected behavior of the evaporation. A theoretical model based on those two factors can fit the simulation data very well. This finding is helpful in understanding the evaporation on the biological surfaces, designing artificial surface of ultra fast water evaporating or preserving water in soil.

  7. Characterizing the Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions in Different Subsurface Geologic Environments Using Geochemical and Isotopic Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Molly

    2014-12-31

    -surface water interactions. Knowledge of the influence these factors have on surface water connections with groundwater will help determine possible recharge and contaminant flow paths affecting future water supply wells installed in similar alluvial...

  8. Water Quality Surface and Ground | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland: EnergyPage EditWater Power ForumWaterWater

  9. On isolated vorticity regions beneath the water surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Octavian G. Mustafa

    2011-03-12

    We present a class of vorticity functions that will allow for isolated, circular vorticity regions in the background of still water preceding the arrival of a tsunami wave at the shoreline.

  10. ORNL/CDIAC-152 GLOBAL OCEAN SURFACE WATER PARTIAL PRESSURE OF CO2 DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/CDIAC-152 NDP-088r GLOBAL OCEAN SURFACE WATER PARTIAL PRESSURE OF CO2 DATABASE: MEASUREMENTS .....................................................................................................................................9 #12;#12;v LIST OF FIGURES 1 Location of LDEO master database of sea surface pCO2 observations. .............................................2 LIST OF TABLES 1 List of data contributors to the global surface water pCO2 LDEO database

  11. Daily Time Step Simulation with a Priority Order Based Surface Water Allocation Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffpauir, Richard James

    2011-02-22

    Surface water availability models often use monthly simulation time steps for reasons of data availability, model parameter parsimony, and reduced computational time. Representing realistic streamflow variability, ...

  12. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will improve the capability of engineers to design heat pump systems that utilize surface water or standing column wells (SCW) as their heat sources and sinks.

  13. Feasibility study of extracting runoff data from satellite altimetry over continental surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    the feasibility of extracting runoff data using satellite altimetry over all possible continental surface waters- ered algorithm for extracting runoff from the satellite altimetry is based on making water level. not feasible be- cause of bad quality of extracted water level time series class 4. impossible. Computed runoff

  14. Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management; Urban areas; Hydraulic models; Sand, filter; Parameters; Estimation; Water treatment. Author and nutrient removal is often low. Water quality performance of the sand filter can be evaluated by comparing a surface sand filter. If the water quality attributes of the sand filter can be confidently mod- eled

  15. Water adsorption on stepped ZnO surfaces from MD simulation David Raymand a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Water adsorption on stepped ZnO surfaces from MD simulation David Raymand a , Adri C.T. van Duin b Keywords: Zinc oxide Water Solid­gas interfaces Construction and use of effective interatomic interactions force-field for use in molecular dynamics simulations of the ZnO­ water system. The force

  16. Retrieving snow mass from GRACE terrestrial water storage change with a land surface model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Retrieving snow mass from GRACE terrestrial water storage change with a land surface model Guo snow water equivalent (SWE) product is critical for climate and hydrology studies in Arctic regions changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS), of which snow mass is the primary component in winter Arctic

  17. Spatial variations in phytoplankton pigment ratios, optical properties, and environmental gradients in Oregon coast surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    by incident solar radiation, stratification of the upper water column from warming and the injection of less:PSC ratios and the aph slope parameter for surface samples grouped by location, date, and water mass, more nutrient deplete water. Temperature and photosynthetic available radiation explained 42

  18. Surface excess properties from energy transport measurements during water evaporation Fei Duan and C. A. Ward*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Charles A.

    Surface excess properties from energy transport measurements during water evaporation Fei Duan condi- tions, accounts for as little as 50% of the energy required to evaporate water at the measured 2004; revised manuscript received 21 March 2005; published 2 November 2005 When water evaporates

  19. RETORT WATER PARTICULATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    layer of retort water from the filter surface, (3) crystaldeep layer of retort water from the filter surface, from C02distilled water before placing the filter RETORT OPERATING

  20. Method of and device for detecting oil pollutions on water surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Michael Leonidovich (Moscow, RU); Gorodnichev, Victor Aleksandrovich (Moscow, RU); Kozintsev, Valentin Ivanovich (Moscow, RU); Smimova, Olga Alekseevna (Moscow, RU); Fedotov, Yurii Victorovich (Moscow, RU); Khroustaleva, Anastasiva Michailovnan (Moscow, RU)

    2008-08-26

    Detection of oil pollution on water surfaces includes providing echo signals obtained from optical radiation of a clean water area at two wavelengths, optically radiating an investigated water area at two wavelengths and obtaining echo signals from the optical radiation of the investigated water area at the two wavelengths, comparing the echo signals obtained from the radiation of the investigated area at two wavelengths with the echo signals obtained from the radiation of the clean water area, and based on the comparison, determining presence or absence of oil pollution in the investigated water area.

  1. On a class of self-similar 2D surface water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sijue Wu

    2012-06-11

    We construct a class of self-similar surface water waves and study its properties. This class of surface waves appears to be in very good agreement with a common type of wave crests in the ocean.

  2. Application Prospect Analysis of the Surface Water Source Heat-Pump in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Zhuang, Z.; Huang, L.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01

    Surface water resources in China are rather abundant and it can be use as the heat or cool source for heat pump. The winter surface water temperatures of 17 typical cities are investigated in December, and they are all distributed in the interval...

  3. Monitoring water stress using time series of observed to unstressed surface temperature difference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, Pierre

    Monitoring water stress using time series of observed to unstressed surface temperature difference to monitor stress have shifted from establishing empirical relationships between combined vegetation cover/temperature surface temperature as a baseline to monitor water stress. The unstressed temperature is the equilibrium

  4. Free energy surface of supercooled water A. Scala,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciortino, Francesco

    Free energy surface of supercooled water A. Scala,1,2 F. W. Starr,1,3 E. La Nave,1 H. E. Stanley,1 a detailed analysis of the free energy surface of a well characterized rigid model for water in supercooled states. We propose a functional form for the liquid free energy, supported by recent theoretical

  5. Near Surface Water Content Estimation using GPR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    waves can be used to estimate soil water content · Short pulses of High frequency EM energy · Variations) Improved irrigation management; 3) Improved understanding of ecosystem responses and terroir; 4) May assist, evapotranspiration, and groundwater storage From Or and Rubin, 1990 ** Accurate Spatial and Temporal Variations

  6. Transport and Fate of Contaminants in Surface Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    has been prepared jointly by the University of California Agricultural Extension Service) solids. The amount of a contaminant of concern (COC) found at a given location in the aquatic environment originates from within the water body. It includes ungrazed plant components such as cells and tissues

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Seasonal progression of diatom assemblages in surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    relative to other periods of the study, although carbon export was relatively low. Melt water flux the Palmer Long Term Ecological Research (Pal-LTER) project have documented a 40% decrease in mean duration Bordeaux 1, Av. Des Facultes, 33405 Talence Cedex, France A. Clarke British Antarctic Survey, High Cross

  8. Ground Water and Surface Water Stable Isotope Data for East Maui, Hawaii Supplement to Scholl et al., 2002, Journal of Hydrology, The influence of microclimates and fog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ground Water and Surface Water Stable Isotope Data for East Maui, Hawaii Supplement to Scholl et al in interpretation of regional hydrology: East Maui, Hawaii Sample Field ID Date Field Field Location Number USGS

  9. Ab initio Investigation of Effect of Vacancy on Dissociation of Water Molecule on Cu(111) Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaware, Vaibhav

    2015-01-01

    Water dissociation is a rate limiting step in many industrially important chemical reactions. In this investigation, climbing image nudged elastic band (CINEB) method, within the framework of density functional theory, is used to report the activation energies (E a ) of water dissociation on Cu(111) surface with a vacancy. Introduction of vacancy results in a reduced coordination of the dissociated products, which facilitates their availability for reactions that involve water dissociation as an intermediate step. Activation energy for dissociation of water reduces by nearly 0.2 eV on Cu(111) surface with vacancy, in comparison with that of pristine Cu(111) surface. We also find that surface modification of the Cu upper surface is one of the possible pathways to dissociate water when the vacancy is introduced. Activation energy, and the minimum energy path (MEP) leading to the transition state remain same for various product configurations. CINEB corresponding to hydrogen gas evolution is also performed which...

  10. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  11. Investigating Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02

    This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity...

  12. Roles of Oxygen and Water Vapor in the Oxidation of Halogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Shiyu; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianette, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-12-18

    The initial stage of the oxidation of Cl and Br terminated Ge(111) surfaces is studied using photoelectron spectroscopy. The authors perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different factors in oxidation, and find that water vapor and oxygen play different roles. Water vapor effectively replaces the halogen termination layers with the hydroxyl group, but does not oxidize the surfaces further. In contrast, little oxidation is observed for Cl and Br terminated surfaces with dry oxygen alone. However, with the help of water vapor, oxygen oxidizes the surface by breaking the Ge-Ge back bonds instead of changing the termination layer.

  13. Molecular Structure and Dynamics in Thin Water Films at the Silica and Graphite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Tummala, Dr. Naga Rajesh [University of Oklahoma; StrioloDr., A [Vanderbilt University; Cole, David R [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The structure and dynamic properties of interfacial water at the graphite and silica solid surfaces were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of surface properties on the characteristics of interfacial water was quantified by computing density profiles, radial distribution functions, surface density distributions, orientation order parameters, and residence and reorientation correlation functions. In brief, our results show that the surface roughness, chemical heterogeneity, and surface heterogeneous charge distribution affect the structural and dynamic properties of the interfacial water molecules, as well as their rate of exchange with bulk water. Most importantly, our results indicate the formation of two distinct water layers at the SiO2 surface covered by a large density of hydroxyl groups. Further analysis of the data suggests a highly confined first layer where the water molecules assume preferential hydrogen-down orientation and a second layer whose behavior and characteristics are highly dependent on those of the first layer through a well-organized hydrogen bond network. The results suggest that water-water interactions, in particular hydrogen bonds, may be largely responsible for macroscopic interfacial properties such as adsorption and contact angle.

  14. Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

  15. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    LBNL collected water and waste water tariffs in Californiastate. Current water and waste water tariffs for these areaswas based on water and waste water tariffs in California

  16. Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds Michael A. Mallin the natureand outflowing water nutrient concentrations. There were substantial suburban runoff inputs entering-circuited pollutant removal contact time. The golf course pond geometry of the system. showed significant increases

  17. A meta-analysis of water vapor deuterium-excess in the midlatitude atmospheric surface layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    are in natural ecosystems, a forest (Borden Forest, Ontario, Canada) and a grassland (Duolun, China). We found.1029/2011GB004246. 1. Introduction [2] Water vapor is the most important atmospheric greenhouse gas and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of water in the air and also on the land surface (i

  18. Polarizable interaction potential for water from coupled cluster calculations. I. Analysis of dimer potential energy surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by nonadditive effects which make it impossible to sufficiently accurately represent the energy of water as a sumPolarizable interaction potential for water from coupled cluster calculations. I. Analysis of dimer potential energy surface Robert Bukowski,1 Krzysztof Szalewicz,1,a Gerrit C. Groenenboom,2 and Ad van der

  19. Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    system for harvesting and returning clean water to Lakeharvesting for landscape and species health, and surface water and

  20. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage, 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01

    2003: Tracking fresh water from space. Science, 301, 1485–2007: Mea- suring surface water from space. Rev. Geophys. ,2011:, Stratospheric water vapor trends over Boulder, Colo-

  1. Summary of Inorganic Compositional Data for Groundwater, Soil-Water, and Surface-Water Samples at the Headgate Draw Subsurface Drip Irrigation Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupanic, John W.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  2. Three-dimensional acoustic propagation through shallow water internal, surface gravity and bottom sediment waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shmelev, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the physics of fully three-dimensional low frequency acoustic interaction with internal waves, bottom sediment waves and surface swell waves that are often observed in shallow waters and on continental ...

  3. Clean Boiler Water-side Heat Transfer Surfaces - Steam Tip Sheet #7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-31

    This revised AMO tip sheet on cleaning boiler water-side heat transfer surfaces provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  4. Parameter estimation of coupled water and energy balance models based on stationary constraints of surface states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jian

    [1] We use a conditional averaging approach to estimate the parameters of a land surface water and energy balance model and then use the estimated parameters to partition net radiation into latent, sensible, and ground ...

  5. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  6. Soliton Turbulence in Shallow Water Ocean Surface Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Andrea; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-01-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of $soliton$ $turbulence$ in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a $dense$ $soliton$ $gas$, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation, a $completely$ $integrable$ $soliton$ $system$: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic/quasiperiodic boundary conditions the $ergodic$ $solutions$ of KdV are exactly solvable by $finite$ $gap$ $theory$ (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as $\\sim\\omega^{-1}$. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter $densely$ $packed$ $soliton$ $wave$ $trains$ from the data. We apply ...

  7. Diffusion Processes in Water on Oxide Surfaces: Quasielastic Neutron Scattering Study of Hydration Water in Rutile Nano-Powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Podlesnyak, Andrey A [ORNL; Wang, Wei [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) was used to investigate the diffusion dynamics of hydration water on the surface of rutile (TiO{sub 2}) nanopowder. The dynamics measurements utilizing two inelastic instruments, a backscattering spectrometer and a disk chopper spectrometer, probed the fast, intermediate, and slow motions of the water molecules on the time scale of picoseconds to more than a nanosecond. We employed a model-independent analysis of the data collected at each value of the scattering momentum transfer to investigate the temperature dependence of several diffusion components. All of the probed components were present in the studied temperature range of 230-320 K, providing, at a first sight, no evidence of discontinuity in the hydration water dynamics. However, a qualitative change in the elastic scattering between 240 and 250 K suggested a surface freezing-melting transition, when the motions that were localized at lower temperatures became delocalized at higher temperatures. On the basis of our previous molecular dynamics simulations of this system, we argue that interpretation of QENS data from such a complex interfacial system requires at least qualitative input from simulations, particularly when comparing results from spectrometers with very different energy resolutions and dynamic ranges.

  8. Water Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  9. Use and abandonment of surface impoundments for the disposal of oil-field produced waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.S. (California Regional Water Quality Board, Fresno (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Surface impoundments, or sumps, are utilized for the disposal of oil-field produced water through percolation and evaporation in California's San Joaquin basin. Environmental concerns have resulted in increased regulation of sumps. Surface disposal of produced waters into unlined sumps is permitted where the quality of the produced water meets the stated criteria in the applicable basin plan as regulated by the local regional water quality control board. In the San Joaquin Basin, surface disposal is initially governed by the Tulare Lake basin plan (5D). A basin plan permits disposal into sumps of produced waters which do not exceed a maximum electrical conductivity, chlorides content, or boron content in areas which overlie useable groundwater. If the produced water exceeds any one of the maximum constituent levels, regulation of surface disposal passes to Title 23, California code of Regulations, sections 2,510-2,601 (subchapter 15). Subchapter 15 regulates the use and abandonment of lined surface impoundments designed to dispose of produced water through evaporation. Subchapter 15 requires the operator to conduct a site hydrogeologic characterization, install a groundwater monitoring system, and construct and enclose the surface impoundment in accordance with specified criteria. Sumps can be utilized in areas which do not meet the criteria of the appropriate basin plan, or subchapter 15, where the operator demonstrates that surface percolation of the produced waters will not degrade underlying useable groundwater. Abandonment of unlined sumps includes removal and disposal of all free liquids, analysis of sludges and soils beneath the sumps, removal of contaminated sludges and soils, analysis of soils after removal of contaminated sludges and soils, backfilling of the sump, and revegetation of the site.

  10. In-situ Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Investigation of the Surface Films on Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in Pressurized Water Reactor-Primary Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    oxidation of Alloy 600 in PWR Primary Water. The layered-oxidation of Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water. The film ofwith oxidation of Alloy 600 in PWR Primary Water. The film

  11. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Congressional District: Fifth Research Category: None Focus Category: Treatment, Waste Water, Surface Water

  12. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District: Fifth Research Category: None Focus Category: Treatment, Waste Water, Surface Water Descriptors

  13. Observation of the Dynamical Change in a Water Monolayer Adsorbed on a ZnO Surface Olga Dulub,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    a wide temperature range from below 200 K up to the boiling point of water [12]. Scanning tunneling-dissociated water structure [see Fig. 1(a) and top left inset, labeled with ``HD'']. A part of the surfaceObservation of the Dynamical Change in a Water Monolayer Adsorbed on a ZnO Surface Olga Dulub,1

  14. Kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of solitary waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Mikyoung Hur

    2015-09-01

    We present an exact relation among the kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of a solitary wave in deep water in all dimensions. We deduce its non-existence in the absence of the effects of surface tension, provided that gravity acts in a direction opposite to what is physically realistic.

  15. Kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of solitary waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hur, Vera Mikyoung

    2015-01-01

    We present an exact relation among the kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of a solitary wave in deep water in all dimensions. We deduce its non-existence in the absence of the effects of surface tension, provided that gravity acts in a direction opposite to what is physically realistic.

  16. MODELING GROUNDWATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS IN AN OPERATIONAL SETTING BY LINKING RIVERWARE WITH MODFLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of groundwater-surface water interactions is critical to modeling low river flow periods in riparian environments in the semi-arid southwestern United States. This thesis presents a modeling tool with significant potential to modeling groundwater-surface interactions in riparian zones, including riparian evapotranspiration

  17. Preliminary examination of oil bonding at sand surfaces and its influence on hot water separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hupka, J.; Budzich, M.; Miller, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The efficiency of water-based separation of oil from sand particles is dependent on the nature of the oil-sand association and a preliminary examination of this bonding has been completed. The degree of hydration of the sand surface at the time of contact with oil was related to the subsequent efficiency of the oil-sand separation process. Variables which influence hot water separation were correlated by multiple linear regression, and a second order experimental model was obtained. The processing temperature appeared to be the most significant variable, followed by digestion time and pH. Oil-coated sand particles which had intrinsic water left on their surface during sample preparation were easily processed in hot water separation experiments, and 64 to 90% of the oil was removed. On the other hand, only 1 to 23% separation and oil recovery was possible when a calcinated sand-oil mixture was used.

  18. Preliminary examination of oil bonding at sand surfaces and its influence on hot water separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hupka, J.; Budzich, M.; Miller, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    The efficiency of water-based separation of oil from sand particles is dependent on the nature of the oil-sand association and a preliminary examination of this bonding has been completed. The degree of hydration of the sand surface at the time of contact with oil was related to the subsequent efficiency of the oil-sand separation process. Variables which influence hot water separation were correlated by multiple linear regression, and a second order experimental model was obtained. The processing temperature appeared to be the most significant variable, followed by digestion time and pH. Oil-coated sand particles which had intrinsic water left on their surface during sample preparation were easily processed in hot water separation experiments, and 64 to 90% of the oil was removed. On the other hand, only 1 to 23% separation and oil recovery was possible when a calcinated sand-oil mixture was used.

  19. Drinking Water Problems: Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    valves and other water control surfaces, creating leaks inside and outside of valves and faucetsDrinking Water Problems: Corrosion Mark L. McFarland, Tony L. Provin, and Diane E. Boellstorff* Professor and Extension Water Quality Coordinator, Professor and Extension Water Testing Laboratory Director

  20. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 7: Regional Groundwater than the unit situations that we saw. Surface water/Groundwater interactions. lakes and streams springs (seepage) Ambient water-table movements Seasonal changes Inteference with other water end-users. Inherent

  1. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 5: Aquifer () August 16 above and below the ground, which affect the water balance. surface features affect infiltration parameters related to water: Porosity, specific yield n, Sy : the maximum volume fraction of water

  2. Economic costs of conventional surface-water treatment: A case study of the Mcallen northwest facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Callie Sue

    2009-05-15

    Conventional water treatment facilities are the norm for producing potable water for U.S. metropolitan areas. Rapidly-growing urban populations, competing demands for water, imperfect water markets, and uncertainty of ...

  3. The 6th International Symposium on Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces Kyoto, Japan, May 17-21, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    .Schimpf,Christoph.Garbe,Bernd.Jähne}@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de The impact of wind, rain, and surface slicks on the transport of heat and gas at the water surfaceThe 6th International Symposium on Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces Kyoto, Japan, May 17-21, 2010 Combined Visualization of Wind Waves and Water Surface Temperature R. Rocholz1 , U. Schimpf1 , C. S. Garbe1

  4. AGENDA ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit Bi-Annual Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01)19^ U N I T E D S T A T ADEP Surface

  5. Concentrations of 23 trace elements in ground water and surface water at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1988--91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liszewski, M.J.; Mann, L.J.

    1993-12-31

    Analytical data for 23 trace elements are reported for ground- and surface-water samples collected at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during 1988--91. Water samples were collected from 148 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer, 18 wells completed in discontinuous deep perched-water zones, and 1 well completed in an alluvial aquifer. Surface-water samples also were collected from three streams, two springs, two ponds, and one lake. Data are categorized by concentrations of total recoverable of dissolved trace elements. Concentrations of total recoverable trace elements are reported for unfiltered water samples and include results for one or more of the following: aluminum, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and zinc. Concentrations of dissolved trace elements are reported for water samples filtered through a nominal 0.45-micron filter and may also include bromide, fluoride, lithium, molybdenum, strontium, thallium, and vanadium. Concentrations of dissolved hexavalent chromium also are reported for many samples. The water samples were analyzed at the US Geological Survey`s National Water Quality Laboratory in Arvada, Colorado. Methods used to collect the water samples and quality assurance instituted for the sampling program are described. Concentrations of chromium equaled or exceeded the maximum contaminant level at 12 ground-water quality monitoring wells. Other trace elements did not exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels.

  6. Studies of the viscoelastic properties of water confined between surfaces of specified chemical nature.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, Jack E.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Moore, Nathan W.; Feibelman, Peter J.

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 10-0973 of the same title. Understanding the molecular origin of the no-slip boundary condition remains vitally important for understanding molecular transport in biological, environmental and energy-related processes, with broad technological implications. Moreover, the viscoelastic properties of fluids in nanoconfinement or near surfaces are not well-understood. We have critically reviewed progress in this area, evaluated key experimental and theoretical methods, and made unique and important discoveries addressing these and related scientific questions. Thematically, the discoveries include insight into the orientation of water molecules on metal surfaces, the premelting of ice, the nucleation of water and alcohol vapors between surface asperities and the lubricity of these molecules when confined inside nanopores, the influence of water nucleation on adhesion to salts and silicates, and the growth and superplasticity of NaCl nanowires.

  7. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollution, Surface Water, Water Quality Descriptors: Bacteria, Suspended Sediments, Water Quality Monitoring Pollution, Surface Water, WInstitute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction In fiscal year 2002

  8. Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

    2008-04-23

    We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

  9. Conjunctive management of groundwater and surface water resources in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-01-01

    The San Joaquin-Tulare Conjunctive Use Model (SANTUCM) was developed to evaluate possible long-term scenarios for long term management of drainage and drainage related problems in the western San Joaquin Valley of California. The unique aspect of the conjunctive use model is its coupling of a surface water delivery operations model with a regional groundwater model. A salinity model has been added to utilize surface water model output and allow assessment of compliance with State Water Resources Control Board water quality objectives for the San Joaquin River. The results of scenario runs, performed to data, using the SANTUCM model show table lowering and consequent drainage reduction can be achieved through a combination of source control, land retirement and regional groundwater pumping. The model also shows that water transfers within the existing distribution system are technically feasible and might allow additional releases to be made from Friant Dam for water quality maintenance in the San Joaquin River. However, upstream of Mendota Pool, considerable stream losses to the aquifer are anticipated, amounting to as much as 70% of in-stream flow.

  10. Walking on water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    The ingenious methods employed by insects and spiders to move across a water surface rely on microphysics that is of little use to larger water walkers but of considerable interest to the microfluidics community.

  11. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Building Numerical Models () August of surface flow of water and infiltration which may include time to flow, movement of solids etc. () August

  12. Category:Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRockEurope JumpStep-outSurface

  13. Ground-water flow and ground- and surface-water interaction at the Weldon Spring quarry, St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imes, J.L.; Kleeschulte, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    Ground-water-level measurements to support remedial actions were made in 37 piezometers and 19 monitoring wells during a 19-month period to assess the potential for ground-water flow from an abandoned quarry to the nearby St. Charles County well field, which withdraws water from the base of the alluvial aquifer. From 1957 to 1966, low-level radioactive waste products from the Weldon Spring chemical plant were placed in the quarry a few hundred feet north of the Missouri River alluvial plain. Uranium-based contaminants subsequently were detected in alluvial ground water south of the quarry. During all but flood conditions, lateral ground-water flow in the bedrock from the quarry, as interpreted from water-table maps, generally is southwest toward Little Femme Osage Creek or south into the alluvial aquifer. After entering the alluvial aquifer, the ground water flows southeast to east toward a ground-water depression presumably produced by pumping at the St. Charles County well field. The depression position varies depending on the Missouri River stage and probably the number and location of active wells in the St. Charles County well field.

  14. Water balance in the Amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getirana, Augusto; Dutra, Emanuel; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Kam, Jonghun; Li, Hongyi; Decharme, Bertrand; Zhang, Zhengqiu J.; Ducharne, Agnes; Boone, Aaron; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Rodell, Matthew; Mounirou Toure, Ally; Xue, Yongkang; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Arsenault, Kristi Rae; Drapeau, Guillaume; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ronchail, Josyane; Sheffield, Justin

    2014-12-06

    Despite recent advances in modeling and remote sensing of land surfaces, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-of-the-art land surface model (LSM) outputs. Water budget variables [total water storage (TWS), evapotranspiration (ET), surface runoff (R) and baseflow (B)] are evaluated at the basin scale using both remote sensing and in situ data. Fourteen LSMs were run using meteorological forcings at a 3-hourly time step and 1-degree spatial resolution. Three experiments are performed using precipitation which has been rescaled to match monthly global GPCP and GPCC datasets and the daily HYBAM dataset for the Amazon basin. R and B are used to force the Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP) river routing scheme and simulated discharges are compared against observations at 165 gauges. Simulated ET and TWS are compared against FLUXNET and MOD16A2 evapotranspiration, and GRACE TWS estimates in different catchments. At the basin scale, simulated ET ranges from 2.39mm.d-1 to 3.26mm.d-1 and a low spatial correlation between ET and P indicates that evapotranspiration does not depend on water availability over most of the basin. Results also show that other simulated water budget variables vary significantly as a function of both the LSM and precipitation used, but simulated TWS generally agree at the basin scale. The best water budget simulations resulted from experiments using the HYBAM dataset, mostly explained by a denser rainfall gauge network the daily rescaling.

  15. In-situ Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Investigation of the Surface Films on Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in Pressurized Water Reactor-Primary Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Cook et. al. developed the Pourbaix diagram for the nickel-W.G. Cook has proposed a Pourbaix diagram for chromium-waterPWR primary water. At 300 o C, Pourbaix diagram shows a wide

  16. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies are used for agriculture, natural resources, salt water intrusion protection, drinking water, industry

  17. Relation of soil-, surface-, and ground-water distributions of inorganic nitrogen with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Relation of soil-, surface-, and ground-water distributions of inorganic nitrogen with topographic position in harvested and unharvested portions of an aspen-dominated catchment in the Boreal Plain M.L. Macrae, K.J. Devito, I.F. Creed, and S.E. Macdonald Abstract: Spatial distributions of soil extractable

  18. Discussions on Disposal Forms of Auxiliary Heat Source in Surface Water Heat Pump System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, X.; Li, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents two common forms of auxiliary heat source in surface water heat pump system and puts forward the idea that the disposal forms affect operation cost. It deduces operation cost per hour of the two forms. With a project...

  19. Near-coastal surface water velocity field estimation using airborne remote sensing11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near-coastal surface water velocity field estimation using airborne remote sensing11 Tim J Malthus1. With airborne remote sensing, however, it is possible to determine synoptic changes in velocity fields because properties of successive remotely sensed images may be used to estimate velocity vectors associated

  20. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  1. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  2. Mobility of D atoms on porous amorphous water ice surfaces under interstellar conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Matar; E. Congiu; F. Dulieu; A. Momeni; J. L. Lemaire

    2008-10-13

    Aims. The mobility of H atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains at low temperature is still a matter of debate. In dense clouds, the hydrogenation of adsorbed species (i.e., CO), as well as the subsequent deuteration of the accreted molecules depend on the mobility of H atoms on water ice. Astrochemical models widely assume that H atoms are mobile on the surface of dust grains even if controversy still exists. We present here direct experimental evidence of the mobility of H atoms on porous water ice surfaces at 10 K. Methods. In a UHV chamber, O2 is deposited on a porous amorphous water ice substrate. Then D atoms are deposited onto the surface held at 10 K. Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) is used and desorptions of O2 and D2 are simultaneously monitored. Results. We find that the amount of O2 that desorb during the TPD diminishes if we increase the deposition time of D atoms. O2 is thus destroyed by D atoms even though these molecules have previously diffused inside the pores of thick water ice. Our results can be easily interpreted if D is mobile at 10 K on the water ice surface. A simple rate equation model fits our experimental data and best fit curves were obtained for a D atoms diffusion barrier of 22(+-)2 meV. Therefore hydrogenation can take place efficiently on interstellar dust grains. These experimental results are in line with most calculations and validate the hypothesis used in several models.

  3. Bridging the Pressure Gap in Water and Hydroxyl Chemistry on Metal Surfaces: the Cu(110) case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    the Pressure Gap in Water and Hydroxyl Chemistry on Metalresults on the water and hydroxyl chemistry on Cu(110) whichhave studied the water and hydroxyl chemistry on Cu(110) at

  4. Constraining water table depth simulations in a land surface model using estimated baseflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, MH; Yeh, PJF; Famiglietti, JS

    2008-01-01

    northeastern Kansas. Adv Water Resour 2002;25:221–38. [68]ing between runoff and soil water storage and differentcycles of base?ow and water table depth show signif- icant

  5. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01

    variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in theAnalysis of terrestrial water storage changes from GRACE and

  6. AFM pictures of the surfaces of glass RPC electrodes damaged by water vapor contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kubo; E. Nakano; Y. Teramoto

    2002-11-08

    We present surface pictures of the damaged electrodes from the Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPCs) taken by an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). For the test, a set of chambers were operated with freon mixed gas (damaged) and freonless gas (not damaged), contaminated with 1000 to 2000 ppm of water vapor. In the AFM pictures, clear differences in damage are seen between the electrodes in the chambers with the freon mixed gas and the freonless gas; a combination of freon and water vapor caused the damage.

  7. Computerized Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    supply diversions, several hydroelectric plants and numerous environ- mental instream flow requirements. Each of these active permits is included in the datasets. Besides the commission using the WAM/WRAP modeling system in water rights permiting... actions be consistent with relevant regional plans. River authorities, water districts and other water management organizations are beginning to use the WRAP model in operational planning studies to optimize operations of their facilities...

  8. Turing Water into Hydrogen Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turning Water into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Water into Hydrogen Fuel New method creates highly reactive catalytic surface, packed with hydroxyl species May 15, 2012 | Tags: Franklin,...

  9. Electric double layer at metal oxide surfaces: Static properties of the cassiterite - Water Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlcek, Lukas; Zhang, Zhan; Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J

    2007-04-01

    The structure of water at the (110) surface of cassiterite ({alpha}-SnO{sub 2}) at ambient conditions was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystal truncation rod experiments and interpreted with the help of the revised MUSIC model of surface protonation. The interactions of the metal oxide in the simulations were described by a recently developed classical force field based on the SPC/E model of water. Two extreme cases of completely hydroxylated and nonhydroxylated surfaces were considered along with a mixed surface with 50% dissociation. To study the dependence of the surface properties on pH, neutral and negatively charged variants of the surfaces were constructed. Axial and lateral density distributions of water for different types of surfaces were compared to each other and to experimental axial density distributions found by X-ray experiments. Although significant differences were found between the structures of the studied interfaces, the axial distances between Sn and O atoms are very similar and therefore could not be clearly distinguished by the diffraction technique. The explanation of structures observed in the density distributions was provided by a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding in the interfacial region. It revealed qualitatively different hydrating patterns formed at neutral hydroxylated and nonhydroxylated surfaces and suggested a preference for the dissociative adsorption of water. At negatively charged surfaces, however, the situation can be reversed by the electric field stabilizing a hydrogen bond network similar to that found at the neutral nonhydroxylated surface. Comparison with previously studied rutile ({alpha}-TiO{sub 2}) surfaces provided insight into the differences between the hydration of these two metal oxides, and an important role was ascribed to their different lattice parameters. A link to macroscopic properties was provided by the revised MUSIC surface protonation model. Explicit use of the Sn-O bond lengths based on ab initio calculations and H-bond configurations as inputs led to the prediction of a pH of zero net-proton induced surface charge (pH{sub pzc}) that agrees very well with those determined experimentally (about 4.4 at 298 K).

  10. Electric double layer at metal oxide surfaces:static properties of the cassiterite-water interface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlcek, L.; Zhang, Z.; Machesky, M .L.; Fenter, P.; Rosenqvist, J.; Wesolowski, D. J.; Anovitz, L. M.; Predota, M.; Cummings, P. T.; Vanderbilt Univ.; ORNL; Univ. of South Bohimia; Illinois State Water Survey

    2007-03-24

    The structure of water at the (110) surface of cassiterite ({alpha}-SnO{sub 2}) at ambient conditions was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystal truncation rod experiments and interpreted with the help of the revised MUSIC model of surface protonation. The interactions of the metal oxide in the simulations were described by a recently developed classical force field based on the SPC/E model of water. Two extreme cases of completely hydroxylated and nonhydroxylated surfaces were considered along with a mixed surface with 50% dissociation. To study the dependence of the surface properties on pH, neutral and negatively charged variants of the surfaces were constructed. Axial and lateral density distributions of water for different types of surfaces were compared to each other and to experimental axial density distributions found by X-ray experiments. Although significant differences were found between the structures of the studied interfaces, the axial distances between Sn and O atoms are very similar and therefore could not be clearly distinguished by the diffraction technique. The explanation of structures observed in the density distributions was provided by a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding in the interfacial region. It revealed qualitatively different hydrating patterns formed at neutral hydroxylated and nonhydroxylated surfaces and suggested a preference for the dissociative adsorption of water. At negatively charged surfaces, however, the situation can be reversed by the electric field stabilizing a hydrogen bond network similar to that found at the neutral nonhydroxylated surface. Comparison with previously studied rutile ({alpha}-TiO{sub 2}) surfaces provided insight into the differences between the hydration of these two metal oxides, and an important role was ascribed to their different lattice parameters. A link to macroscopic properties was provided by the revised MUSIC surface protonation model. Explicit use of the Sn-O bond lengths based on ab initio calculations and H-bond configurations as inputs led to the prediction of a pH of zero net-proton induced surface charge (pH{sub pzc}) that agrees very well with those determined experimentally (about 4.4 at 298 K).

  11. Water jet rebounds on hydrophobic surfaces : a first step to jet micro-fluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Celestini; R. Kofman; Xavier Noblin; Mathieu Pellegrin

    2010-09-28

    When a water jet impinges upon a solid surface it produces a so called hydraulic jump that everyone can observe in the sink of its kitchen. It is characterized by a thin liquid sheet bounded by a circular rise of the surface due to capillary and gravitational forces. In this phenomenon, the impact induces a geometrical transition, from the cylindrical one of the jet to the bi-dimensional one of the film. A true jet rebound on a solid surface, for which the cylindrical geometry is preserved, has never been yet observed. Here we experimentally demonstrate that a water jet can impact a solid surface without being destabilized. Depending on the incident angle of the impinging jet, its velocity and the degree of hydrophobicity of the substrate, the jet can i) bounce on the surface with a fixed reflected angle, ii) land on it and give rise to a supported jet or iii) be destabilized, emitting drops. Capillary forces are predominant at the sub-millimetric jet scale considered in this work, along with the hydrophobic nature of the substrate. The results presented in this letter raise the fundamental problem of knowing why such capillary hydraulic jump gives rise to this unexpected jet rebound phenomenon. This study furthermore offers new and promising possibilities to handle little quantity of water through "jet micro-fluidics"

  12. Trends in Surface Water Quality at the University of Florida, Gainesville.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    that include municipal waste water treatment plants, industrial discharge, urban stormwater drains and water. The NPDES required that the University of Florida implement a stormwater management program (Lindhoss

  13. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 10: Minor Structures for Ground and Surface Water () March 23, 2010 1 / 31 #12;Classification by Purpose We may classify the velocity of water-flow (ii) increasing the infiltration coefficient (iii) explicit groundwater recharge

  14. Adsorption and Reaction of CO2 and SO2 at a Water Surface Teresa L. Tarbuck and Geraldine L. Richmond*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    : The orientation and hydrogen bonding of water molecules in the vapor/water interfacial region in the presenceH of the solution. Surface complexes have recently been invoked to explain the initial step in a number of surface correspondence should be addressed. Phone: 541-346-4635. Fax: 541-346-5859. (1) Cotton, A. F.; Wilkinson, G. AdVanced

  15. Presented at the 2005 EWRI Congress. Strategies/Guidance for Managing Stormwater: Infiltration vs. Surface Water Discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    as the water-quality standards and quality of stormwater that may inhibit the use of infiltration. #12;. Surface Water Discharge Shirley E. Clark1 , Katherine H. Baker2 , Melinda M. Lalor3, J. Bradley Mikula4 decisions as to whether the "disposal" of runoff should be through infiltration, surface discharge

  16. Water-hydroxyl phases on an open metal surface: breaking the ice rules Matthew Forster,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    Water-hydroxyl phases on an open metal surface: breaking the ice rules Matthew Forster,a Rasmitath July 2011 DOI: 10.1039/c1sc00355k Hydroxyl is a key reaction intermediate in many surface catalyzed redox reactions, yet establishing the phase diagram for water/hydroxyl adsorption on metal

  17. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    -relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balanceGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model H. Yan a, , S.Q. Wang b , D. Billesbach c , W. Oechel d , J.H. Zhang e , T. Meyers f , T

  18. Local well-posedness of the two-layer shallow water model with free surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronan Monjarret

    2014-02-13

    In this paper, we adress the question of the hyperbolicity and the local well-posedness of the two-layer shallow water model, with free surface, in two dimensions. We first provide a general criterion that proves the symmetrizability of this model, which implies hyperbolicity and local well-posedness in $\\mathcal{H}^s(\\mathbb{R}^2)$, with s>2. Then, we analyze rigorously the eigenstructure associated to this model and prove a more general criterion of hyperbolicity and local well-posedness, under weak density-stratification assumption. Finally, we consider a new conservative two-layer shallow water model, prove the hyperbolicity and the local well-posedness and rely it to the basic two-layer shallow water model.

  19. Water Rx - The Problem of Pharmaceuticals in Our Nation's Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitman, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    collaboratively lead in our ef- forts to eliminate Water R.PHARMACEUTICALS IN OUR NATION'S WATERS wastes. 20 5 ThisPharmaceuticals in Surface Waters: Use of NEPA, NAT. Ri:s. &

  20. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28

    is abandoned without proper plugging, upward flow of salty water from the deeper aquifer may cause contamination of the shallow, fresh water aquifer. Also, any pollu- tants that occur in one zone can migrate to another zone through a well. Unplugged abandoned... wells may deplete pres- sure within an aquifer. Pressure in artesian aquifers decreases as water discharges at land surface or to less pressurized aquifers. Eventually a drop in pres- sure causes flowing wells to stop flowing and the water level...

  1. Correlation of Oil-Water and Air-Water Contact Angles of Diverse Silanized Surfaces and Relationship to Fluid Interfacial Tensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2012-02-24

    The use of air-water, {Theta}{sub wa}, or air-liquid contact angles is customary in surface science, while oil-water contact angles {Theta}{sub ow}, are of paramount importance in subsurface multiphase flow phenomena including petroleum reocovery, nonaqueous phase liquid fate and transport, and geological carbon sequestration. In this paper we determine both the air-water and oil-water contact angles of silica surfaces modified with a diverse selection of silanes, using hexadecane as the oil. The silanes included alkylsilanes, alkylarylsilanes, and silanes with alkyl or aryl groups that are functionalized with heteroatoms such as N, O, and S. These silanes yielded surfaces with wettabilities from water-wet to oil wet, including specific silanized surfaces functionalized with heteroatoms that yield intermediate wet surfaces. The oil-water contact angles for clean and silanized surfaces, excluding one partially fluorinated surface, correlate linearly with air-water contact angles with a slope of 1.41 (R = 0.981, n = 13). These data were used to examine a previously untested theoretical treatment relating air-water and oil-water contact angles in terms of fluid interfacial energies. Plotting the cosines of these contact angles against one another, we obtain a linear relationship in excellent agreement with the theoretical treatment; the data fit cos {Theta}{sub ow} = 0.667 cos {Theta}{sub ow} + 0.384 (R = 0.981, n = 13), intercepting cos {Theta}{sub ow} = -1 at -0.284. The theoretical slope, based on the fluid interfacial tensions {Theta}{sub wa}, {Theta}{sub ow}, and {Theta}{sub oa}, is 0.67. We also demonstrate how silanes can be used to alter the wettability of the interior of a pore network micromodel device constructed in silicon/silica with a glass cover plate. Such micromodels are used to study multiphase flow phenomena. The contact angle of the resulting interior was determined in situ. An intermediate wet micromodel gave a contact angle in excellent agreement with that obtained on an open planar silica surface using the same silane.

  2. Bending Frustration of Lipid-Water Mesophases Based on Cubic Minimal Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. S. Schwarz; G. Gompper

    2001-02-26

    Inverse bicontinuous cubic phases are ubiquitous in lipid-water mixtures and consist of a lipid bilayer forming a cubic minimal surface, thereby dividing space into two cubic networks of water channels. For small hydrocarbon chain lengths, the monolayers can be modeled as parallel surfaces to a minimal midsurface. The bending energy of the cubic phases is determined by the distribution of Gaussian curvature over the minimal midsurfaces which we calculate for seven different structures (G, D, P, I-WP, C(P), S and F-RD). We show that the free-energy densities of the structures G, D and P are considerably lower than those of the other investigated structures due to their narrow distribution of Gaussian curvature. The Bonnet transformation between G, D, and P implies that these phases coexist along a triple line, which also includes an excess water phase. Our model includes thermal membrane undulations. Our qualitative predictions remain unchanged when higher order terms in the curvature energy are included. Calculated phase diagrams agree well with the experimental results for 2:1 lauric acid/dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine and water.

  3. Spatial Water Balance in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Seann; Maidment, David; Patoux, Jerome

    1994-01-01

    different components of the hydrologic cycle - an atmospheric water balance, a soil-water balance, and a surface water balance. These models were constructed using a geographic information system (GIS). A GIS provides a framework for storing and manipulating...

  4. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  5. May 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-01

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 9-10, 2012, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location Johnson Artesian WL. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods. Results of this monitoring at the Rio Blanco site demonstrate that groundwater and surface water outside the site boundaries have not been affected by project-related contaminants.

  6. Water-waves modes trapped in a canal by a body with the rough surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cardone; T. Durante; S. A. Nazarov

    2009-10-06

    The problem about a body in a three dimensional infinite channel is considered in the framework of the theory of linear water-waves. The body has a rough surface characterized by a small parameter $\\epsilon>0$ while the distance of the body to the water surface is also of order $\\epsilon$. Under a certain symmetry assumption, the accumulation effect for trapped mode frequencies is established, namely, it is proved that, for any given $d>0$ and integer $N>0$, there exists $\\epsilon(d,N)>0$ such that the problem has at least $N$ eigenvalues in the interval $(0,d)$ of the continuous spectrum in the case $\\epsilon\\in(0,\\epsilon(d,N)) $. The corresponding eigenfunctions decay exponentially at infinity, have finite energy, and imply trapped modes.

  7. Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

  8. The thermodynamics of proton hydration and the electrochemical surface potential of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollard, Travis P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Beck, Thomas L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    The free energy change for transferring a single ion across the water liquid/vapor interface includes an electrochemical surface potential contribution. Since this potential is not directly accessible to thermodynamic measurement, several extra-thermodynamic approaches have been employed to infer its sign and magnitude, with a resulting wide spread of values. Here, we examine further the thermodynamics of proton hydration and the electrochemical surface potential of water along three directions: (1) a basic relation of interfacial electrostatics and experimental results on ion distributions near a water/organic interface are employed to infer a solvent contribution to the electrochemical surface potential, (2) a re-analysis is performed of the existing bulk and cluster ion hydration data, and (3) extensive computational modeling is conducted to examine the size dependence of hydration enthalpy differences for the NaF ion pair between the small cluster and the converged bulk limits. The computational studies include classical polarizable models and high-level quantum chemical methods. The new theoretical analysis of existing experimental data and the combined classical/quantum modeling lead to results consistent with our previously derived proton hydration quantities.

  9. Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

    2013-09-30

    Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our team’s exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive ancillary socio-economic, ecosystem, and water treatment/polishing benefits when used to complement water resources at thermoelectric power plants. Through the Phase II pilot study segment of the contract, the project team partnered with Progress Energy Florida (now Duke Energy Florida) to quantify the wetland water cooling benefits at their Hines Energy Complex in Bartow, Florida. The project was designed to test the wetland’s ability to cool and cleanse power plant cooling pond water while providing wildlife habitat and water harvesting benefits. Data collected during the monitoring period was used to calibrate a STELLA model developed for the site. It was also used to inform management recommendations for the demonstration site, and to provide guidance on the use of cooling wetlands for other power plants around the country. As a part of the pilot study, Duke Energy is scaling up the demonstration project to a larger, commercial scale wetland instrumented with monitoring equipment. Construction is expected to be finalized in early 2014.

  10. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems (DE-EE0002961)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitler, J.D.; Culling, J.R.; Conjeevaram, K.; Ramesh, M.; Selvakumar, M.

    2012-11-30

    Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used “sustainable” heating and cooling systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order of 18 GW. They are widely used in residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Standing column wells (SCW) are one form of ground heat exchanger that, under the right geological conditions, can provide excellent energy efficiency at a relatively low capital cost. Closed-loop surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems utilize surface water heat exchangers (SWHE) to reject or extract heat from nearby surface water bodies. For building near surface water bodies, these systems also offer a high degree of energy efficiency at a low capital cost. However, there have been few design tools available for properly sizing standing column wells or surface water heat exchangers. Nor have tools for analyzing the energy consumption and supporting economics-based design decisions been available. The main contributions of this project lie in providing new tools that support design and energy analysis. These include a design tool for sizing surface water heat exchangers, a design tool for sizing standing column wells, a new model of surface water heat pump systems implemented in EnergyPlus and a new model of standing column wells implemented in EnergyPlus. These tools will better help engineers design these systems and determine the economic and technical feasibility.

  11. Water Privatisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zölls, Elisa

    2011-08-17

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  12. Grabbing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Pedro Miguel

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the ...

  13. The ecological evaluation of surface water outfalls at a manufacturing plant in New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harman, C.R.; Gilchrist, W.

    1995-12-31

    Historic metal machining operations at a manufacturing plant in northern New Jersey had resulted in the contamination of three surface water outfalls leading from the plant to a second-order stream used for trout fishing. The outfalls were fed by a combination of non-contact cooling water, stormwater runoff and groundwater infiltration. The outfalls ranged in length from 180 meters to 600 meters. All three of the outfalls pass through forested wetland areas and contained emergent wetland pockets. The ecological evaluation consisted of the collection of sediment samples to evaluate the extent of chemical contamination and the evaluation of the biological integrity of a portion of the surface water outfalls. Additionally, an ecological characterization of the surrounding habitat was prepared. Sediment sampling indicated elevated concentrations of antimony, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, silver, and zinc. Nickel concentrations were the most significant, with concentrations ranging up to 9,850 mg/kg. PCB concentrations ranged between 0.45 mg/kg and 6.4 mg/kg. Elevated concentrations of metals and PCBs were detected to a sediment depth of 45 centimeters. To evaluate the potential for biological impacts from the metals in the sediments, a modified Rapid Bioassessment Protocol 1 evaluation was conducted on the macroinvertebrate population. The results of the evaluation indicated a very sparse macroinvertebrate community. Those organisms that were identified were typical of highly contaminated surface water system. The surrounding wetland systems appeared to be unaffected by the outfall contamination. Based on the results of the first phase of the ecological evaluation, a program of additional sediment sampling and further biological evaluation was prepared.

  14. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  15. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  16. Surface Water Transport for the F/H Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kuo-Fu

    1995-08-29

    The contribution of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSBs) tritium releases to the tritium concentration in the Savannah River are presented in this report. WASP5 was used to simulate surface water transport for tritium releases from the FHSBs. The WASP5 model was qualified with the 1993 tritium measurements at US Highway 301. The tritium concentrations in Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River were calculated for tritium releases from FHSBs. The calculated tritium concentrations above normal environmental background in the Savannah River, resulting from FHSBs releases, drop from 1.25 pCi/ml (<10% of EPA Drinking Water Guide) in 1995 to 0.0056 pCi/ml in 2045.

  17. Quantum Nature of the Proton in Water-Hydroxyl Overlayers on Metal Surfaces Xin-Zheng Li,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    Quantum Nature of the Proton in Water-Hydroxyl Overlayers on Metal Surfaces Xin-Zheng Li,1 Matthew) Using ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics, we show that water-hydroxyl overlayers on transition and hydroxyl molecules [1­11]. These overlayers form because they offer the optimal balance of hydrogen (H

  18. The 6th International Symposium on Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces Kyoto, Japan, May 17-21, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    The 6th International Symposium on Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces Kyoto, Japan, May 17-21, 2010 A new approach for 3C3D measurements of aqueous boundary layer ows relative to the wind-wave undulated thermographic images of the air-water interface show coherent pat- terns, probably generated by Langmuir

  19. Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Marcel

    Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance, J. The algorithms are found to be valid both in coastal and oceanic waters, and largely insensitive to regional

  20. Biomimicry using Nano-Engineered Enhanced Condensing Surfaces for Sustainable Fresh Water Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Beaini, Sara

    2012-01-01

    innovation will enhance a sustainable solution for fresh water produc- tion at a lower costinnovation could o?er a sustainable solution for fresh water production at a lower cost

  1. Incorporating and Evaluating Environmental Instream Flows in a Priority Order Based Surface Water Allocation Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauls, Mark

    2014-03-18

    -step versions of the authorized use scenario water availability models using existing and recently added features of the Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP). Various metrics are developed by this research to characterize the degree to which the environmental...

  2. Free energy surface of ST2 water near the liquid-liquid phase transition Peter H. Poole, Richard K. Bowles, Ivan Saika-Voivod, and Francesco Sciortino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciortino, Francesco

    Free energy surface of ST2 water near the liquid-liquid phase transition Peter H. Poole, Richard K://jcp.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 138, 034505 (2013) Free energy surface of ST2 water near umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the free energy surface of the ST2 model of water

  3. Phase states of water near the surface of a polymer membrane. Phase microscopy and luminescence spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunkin, N. F., E-mail: nbunkin@kapella.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gorelik, V. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Kozlov, V. A., E-mail: v.kozlov@hotmail.com; Shkirin, A. V., E-mail: avshkirin@mephi.ru; Suyazov, N. V., E-mail: nvs@kapella.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Phase microscopy is used to show that the refractive index in the near-surface layer of water at the surface of a polymer Nafion membrane increases by a factor of 1.1 as compared to bulk water. Moreover, this layer exhibits birefringence. Experiments on UV irradiation of dry (anhydrous) and water-soaked Nafion are performed in grazing-incidence geometry to study their stimulated luminescence spectra. These spectra are found to be identical in both cases. For dry Nafion, luminescence can only be excited if probing radiation illuminates the polymer surface. The luminescence of water-soaked Nafion can also be excited if the distance between the optical axis and the surface is several hundred micrometers.

  4. Effects of climatic chance on surface water and energy balances of sorghum and cotton in West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Wen

    1994-01-01

    Global climatic change may be occurring due to the increase of carbon dioxide and other "greenhouse" gases in the atmosphere. Effects of climatic change on surface water and energy balances of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. ...

  5. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

  6. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    in order to reduce the water and energy wasted in hot waterhot water) and 17% if hot water energy is included. The datafrom the delivered hot water energy of 66% to provide the

  7. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District: 2nd District Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Waste Water, Agriculture, Surface

  8. Tuning the interaction between propagating and localized surface plasmons for surface enhanced Raman scattering in water for biomedical and environmental applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shioi, Masahiko; Jans, Hilde; Lodewijks, Kristof; Van Dorpe, Pol; Lagae, Liesbet; Kawamura, Tatsuro

    2014-06-16

    With a view to biomedical and environmental applications, we investigate the plasmonic properties of a rectangular gold nanodisk array in water to boost surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effects. To control the resonance wavelengths of the surface plasmon polariton and the localized surface plasmon, their dependence on the array period and diameter in water is studied in detail using a finite difference time domain method. A good agreement is obtained between calculated resonant wavelengths and those of gold nanodisk arrays fabricated using electron beam lithography. For the optimized structure, a SERS enhancement factor of 7.8?×?10{sup 7} is achieved in water experimentally.

  9. Why the case for clean surfaces does not hold water: Structure and morphology of hydroxylated nickel oxide (1 1 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    Why the case for clean surfaces does not hold water: Structure and morphology of hydroxylated diffraction Density functional calculations Surface structure kinetics Hydroxylation a b s t r a c t We report that the surfaces contain significant coverage of hydroxyl terminations, and the sur- face structures

  10. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 3: Watershed and Maps () July 23, 2013 1 / 18 #12;Domain Decomposition p1 p2 p3 p5 p4 surface water A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 salinity ingress water table q W(q) W(p2) The watershed W (x) of a point x is W (x) = {all points y from where

  11. The Mystery of Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, Anders

    2005-11-21

    Water is essential for our existence on this planet - critical to countless physical, biological, geological and chemical processes - it has defied scientific understanding. Exhibiting peculiar properties such as increased density upon melting and high surface tension, water is one of the most intriguing problems in condensed matter and chemical physics. Current research at SSRL, however, is illuminating the nature of H-bonding, presenting exciting new avenues of research and challenging existing models of water's structure.

  12. Marketing water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info Marketing water savings.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9143 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Marketing water savings.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2... are partnering with federal and state agencies and universities to develop new programs or market existing ones. In North Central Texas, the city of McKin- ney and Texas AgriLife Research and Exten- sion Urban Solutions Center at Dallas recently began...

  13. Overview of groundwater and surface water standards pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundahl, A.L.; Williams, S.; Grizzle, B.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an overview of groundwater- and surface water-related laws, regulations, agreements, guidance documents, Executive Orders, and DOE orders pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This document is a summary and is intended to help readers understand which regulatory requirements may apply to their particular circumstances. However, the document is not intended to be used in lieu of applicable regulations. Unless otherwise noted, the information in this report reflects a summary and evaluation completed July 1, 1995. This document is considered a Living Document, and updates on changing laws and regulations will be provided.

  14. Pipeline rehabilitation -- conclusion: Two projects highlight water, air processes for reconditioning pipeline surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, S.A.; Werner, D.P. (CRC-Evans Rehabilitation Systems Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-02-14

    In jobs for United Texas Transmission Co. and Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America, a proprietary system of high-pressure water jet blasting for cleaning and air abrasive or mechanical-wheel blasting for surface preparation increased productivity and decreased time required for long-line pipelines rehabilitation projects. This second of two articles presents field results of the process' use for cleaning, conditioning, and coating pipelines by line-travel equipment. The first article detailed the procedure and notes tests of the process for asbestos-containing coatings.

  15. May 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-01

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 14-16, 2013, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location CER #1 Black Sulphur. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods.

  16. Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water falling on surface higher evaporation higher rainfall greater intensity of floods and droughts. Water use has grown four on How much storage compared to average flow Demand as percentage of supply How much ground water is used

  17. Grabbing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

    2012-07-16

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

  18. Institute of Water Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on research, and extended education programs on watershed management and surface and ground water protection, microcomputer, nitrogen, nonpoint source pollution, pesticides, pollutants, pollution control, ponds, research transfer, urban water systems, water quality, water quality management, watershed management, wetlands

  19. Thermodynamic and structural aspects of the potential energy surface of simulated water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis W. Starr; Srikanth Sastry; Emilia La Nave; Antonio Scala; H. Eugene Stanley; Francesco Sciortino

    2000-07-28

    Relations between the thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled liquids approaching a glass transition have been proposed over many years. The potential energy surface of model liquids has been increasingly studied since it provides a connection between the configurational component of the partition function on one hand, and the system dynamics on the other. This connection is most obvious at low temperatures, where the motion of the system can be partitioned into vibrations within a basin of attraction and infrequent inter-basin transitions. In this work, we present a description of the potential energy surface properties of supercooled liquid water. The dynamics of this model has been studied in great details in the last years. Specifically, we locate the minima sampled by the liquid by ``quenches'' from equilibrium configurations generated via molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the temperature and density dependence of the basin energy, degeneracy, and shape. The temperature dependence of the energy of the minima is qualitatively similar to simple liquids, but has anomalous density dependence. The unusual density dependence is also reflected in the configurational entropy, the thermodynamic measure of degeneracy. Finally, we study the structure of simulated water at the minima, which provides insight on the progressive tetrahedral ordering of the liquid on cooling.

  20. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE`s predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site.

  1. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE's predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site.

  2. Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

  3. The Electrochemical Surface Potential Due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcel D. Baer; Abraham C. Stern; Yan Levin; Douglas J. Tobias; Christopher J. Mundy

    2013-07-05

    We demonstrate that the driving forces for ion adsorption to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and a term that is of the form of a negative electrochemical surface potential. We carefully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory. Our research suggests that the electrochemical surface potential due to point charge models provides anions with a significant driving force to the air-water interface. This is contrary to the results of ab initio simulations that indicate that the average electrostatic surface potential should favor the desorption of anions at the air-water interface. The results have profound implications for the studies of ionic distributions in the vicinity of hydrophobic surfaces and proteins.

  4. Optimization of Cooling Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    1985-01-01

    A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems....

  5. sor Dr. Jason Gurdak. A colleague who studies surface water once described Gurdak's subject as "voodoo" because of the hidden and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with groundwater--depends on the rate at which rain, snowmelt, or irrigation water from farmlands reaches the water8 #12;sor Dr. Jason Gurdak. A colleague who studies surface water once described Gurdak's subject as "voodoo" because of the hidden and intangible nature of underground water. Nevertheless, Gurdak's research

  6. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    faced with the imperative that water is vital to all life onChoy* and Leon Szeptycki Water in the West Keywords: climategreen infrastructure; water; water-energy; water governance;

  7. Enabling better water management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    CASE STUDY Enabling better water management Seasonal Streamflow Forecast Service influencing water decisions Water management decisions made with confidence Using the Bureau's streamflow forecasting, ACTEW Water confidently removed temporary water restrictions after the millennium drought. Millennium drought

  8. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  9. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  10. Influence of particle size and water coverage on the thermodynamic properties of water confined on the surface of SnO2 cassiterite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Elinor; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Woodfield, Brian; Woodfield, K; Rytting, M; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data for SnO2 nanoparticles of three different sizes and varying hydration levels are presented. Data were recorded on five nanoparticle samples that had the following compositions: 2 nm SnO2*0.82H2O, 6 nm SnO2*0.055H2O, 6 nm SnO2*0.095H2O, 20 nm SnO2*0.072H2O, and 20 nm SnO2*0.092H2O. The isochoric heat capacity and vibrational entropy values at 298 K for the water confined on the surface of these nanoparticles were calculated from the vibrational density of states that were extracted from the INS data. This study has shown that the hydration level of the SnO2 nanoparticles influences the thermodynamic properties of the water layers and, most importantly, that there appears to be a critical size limit for SnO2 between 2 and 6 nm below which the particle size also affects these properties and above which it does not. These results have been compared with those for isostructural rutile-TiO2 nanoparticles [TiO2*0.22H2O and TiO2*0.37H2O], which indicated that water on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles is more tightly bound and experiences a greater degree of restricted motion with respect to water on the surface of SnO2 nanoparticles. This is believed to be a consequence of the difference in chemical composition, and hence surface properties, of these metal oxide nanoparticles.

  11. Steam treatment of surface soil: how does it affect water-soluble organic matter, C mineralization, and bacterial community composition?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roux-Michollet, Dad; Dudal, Yves; Jocteur-Monrozier, Lucile; Czarnes, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    organic components Water extraction was performed by shakingresulting from hot water extraction, as measured by Sparlingboiling soil in water resulted in the extraction of both

  12. On the contribution of leaf surface wetness, leaf size and leaf longevity to variation in leaf water and carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simonin, Kevin Allen

    2009-01-01

    Bible K. (1999) The canopy water relations of old-growthof dew influences shoot water potential and root growth inimproves woody plant water status most during drought.

  13. Environmental geochemistry for surface and subsurface waters in the Pajarito Plateau and outlying areas, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, W.D.; Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Counce, D.

    1995-05-01

    This report provides background information on waters in the Los Alamos and Santa Fe regions of northern New Mexico. Specifically, the presented data include major element, trace element, and isotope analyses of 130 water samples from 94 different springs, wells, and water bodies in the area. The region considered in this study extends from the western edge of the Valles Caldera to as far east as Santa Fe Lake. For each sample, the presented analysis includes fourteen different major elements, twenty-six trace elements, up to five stable isotopes, and tritium. In addition, this data base contains certain characteristics of the water that are calculated from the aforementioned raw data, including the water`s maximum and minimum residence times, as found from tritium levels assuming no contamination, the water`s recharge elevation, as found from stable isotopes, and the charge balance of the water. The data in this report are meant to provide background information for investigations in groundwater hydrology and geochemistry, and for environmental projects. For the latter projects, the presented information would be useful for determining the presence of contamination it any one location by enabling one to compare potential contaminant levels to the background levels presented here. Likely locations of interest are those possibly effected by anthropogenic activities, including locations in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory, White Rock Canyon, and developed areas in the Rio Grande Valley.

  14. Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Global Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Team's Water Safety Plan Assistance 1.5 million deaths occur globally every year due to a lack of clean water, inadequate sanitation, and improper hygiene (1

  15. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    they join tributaries to the Mississippi River. · The deep ground water divide is the underground boundary Deep ground water divide Racine Kenosha Walworth Waukesha Washington Ozaukee Milwaukee LAKE MICHIGANGround water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also

  16. A dimension-breaking phenomenon for water waves with weak surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark D. Groves; Shu-Ming Sun; Erik Wahlén

    2014-11-10

    It is well known that the water-wave problem with weak surface tension has small-amplitude line solitary-wave solutions which to leading order are described by the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The present paper contains an existence theory for three-dimensional periodically modulated solitary-wave solutions which have a solitary-wave profile in the direction of propagation and are periodic in the transverse direction; they emanate from the line solitary waves in a dimension-breaking bifurcation. In addition, it is shown that the line solitary waves are linearly unstable to long-wavelength transverse perturbations. The key to these results is a formulation of the water wave problem as an evolutionary system in which the transverse horizontal variable plays the role of time, a careful study of the purely imaginary spectrum of the operator obtained by linearising the evolutionary system at a line solitary wave, and an application of an infinite-dimensional version of the classical Lyapunov centre theorem.

  17. Effect of composition on adsorption of water on perfect olivine surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deymier, Pierre

    4 Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, USA The origin of water in the terrestrial be a viable source of water in the terrestrial planets. Gases coexist with dust in the accretion disk for long- ulations to gain an understanding of the kinetics of desorption. In this talk we will present the results

  18. Molecular dynamics study of salt–solution interface: Solubility and surface charge of salt in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshifumi E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2014-04-14

    The NaCl salt–solution interface often serves as an example of an uncharged surface. However, recent laser-Doppler electrophoresis has shown some evidence that the NaCl crystal is positively charged in its saturated solution. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the NaCl salt–solution interface system, and calculated the solubility of the salt using the direct method and free energy calculations, which are kinetic and thermodynamic approaches, respectively. The direct method calculation uses a salt–solution combined system. When the system is equilibrated, the concentration in the solution area is the solubility. In the free energy calculation, we separately calculate the chemical potential of NaCl in two systems, the solid and the solution, using thermodynamic integration with MD simulations. When the chemical potential of NaCl in the solution phase is equal to the chemical potential of the solid phase, the concentration of the solution system is the solubility. The advantage of using two different methods is that the computational methods can be mutually verified. We found that a relatively good estimate of the solubility of the system can be obtained through comparison of the two methods. Furthermore, we found using microsecond time-scale MD simulations that the positively charged NaCl surface was induced by a combination of a sodium-rich surface and the orientation of the interfacial water molecules.

  19. Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids by electrochemical exfoliation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Ming; Lai, Wei-Hao [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China)] [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-14

    Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids are obtained by electrochemical exfoliation with hydrophobic graphite electrodes. Such counterintuitive characteristics are caused by partial oxidation and investigated by examining both graphite electrodes and exfoliated particles after electrolysis. The extent of surface oxidation can be explored through contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope, electrical sheet resistance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta-potential analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-visible, and Raman spectroscopy. The degree of wettability of the graphite anode can be altered by the electrolytic current and time. The water contact angle declines generally with increasing the electrolytic current or time. After a sufficient time, the graphite anode becomes superhydrophilic and its hydrophobicity can be recovered by peeling with adhesive tape. This consequence reveals that the anodic graphite is oxidized by oxygen bubbles but the oxidation just occurs at the outer layers of the graphite sheet. Moreover, the characteristics of oxidation revealed by UV peak shift, peak ratio between D and G bands, and negative zeta-potential indicate the presence of graphite oxide on the outer shell of the exfoliated colloids. However, thermogravimetric analysis for the extent of decomposition of oxygen functional groups verifies that the amount of oxygen groups is significantly less than that of graphite oxide prepared via Hummer method. The structure of this partially oxidized graphite may consist of a graphite core covered with an oxidized shell. The properties of the exfoliated colloids are also influenced by pH of the electrolytic solution. As pH is increased, the extent of oxidation descends and the thickness of oxidized shell decreases. Those results reveal that the degree of oxidation of exfoliated nanoparticles can be manipulated simply by controlling pH.

  20. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    8 Assess California’s Small Gas Storage Water HeaterAssess California’s Small Gas Storage Water Heater Marketassess California’s small gas storage water heater market.

  1. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos/01/2012 Page 1Water Power

  2. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  3. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,Saving Water Saves Energy James E. McMahon, Camilla Dunhamavailable products. The energy savings associated with water

  4. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    paper describing produced water from production of crudeEmerging Issues Paper: Mine Water Pollution. Dep. Environ.40. Vine G. 2010. Cooling water issues and opportunities at

  5. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01

    with Subantarctic Mode Water. J. Geophys. Res. , 116,Global Climate] Stratospheric water vapor [in “State of the18 2. Total column water

  6. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial...

  7. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    connections between water and energy, advances in knowledgeimportant nexus between water and energy. The demand fortwo reports on the water and energy nexus highlighting the

  8. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,shorter showers). Water- and energy- conserving activitiesstress imposed on limited water (and energy) supplies from

  9. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01

    model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data,model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow datawith esti- mated base flow data in the model calibration.

  10. Drinking Water Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26

    This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water...

  11. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28

    at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/water/ az9420.pdf. ?Drinking Water Treatment: Distillation.? Nebraska Cooperative Extension. Available at http://ianrpubs. unl.edu/water/g1493.htm. ?Electrodyalisis.? GE Infrastructure Water & Process Technologies. General...

  12. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    the water quality and waste water elements. At the sameAll water supply, waste water, and flood control agenciesprovide services like waste water treatment and drinking

  13. Water watch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

  14. The influence of geometry, surface character and flexibility on the permeation of ions and water through biological pores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Beckstein; Mark S. P. Sansom

    2004-06-17

    A hydrophobic constriction site can act as an efficient barrier to ion and water permeation if its diameter is less than the diameter of an ion's first hydration shell. This hydrophobic gating mechanism is thought to operate in a number of ion channels, e.g. the nicotinic receptor, bacterial mechanosensitive channels (MscL and MscS) and perhaps in some potassium channels (e.g. KcsA, MthK, and KvAP). Simplified pore models allow one to investigate the primary characteristics of a conduction pathway, namely its geometry (shape, pore length, and radius), the chemical character of the pore wall surface, and its local flexibility and surface roughness. Our extended (ca. 0.1 \\mu s) molecular dynamic simulations show that a short hydrophobic pore is closed to water for radii smaller than 0.45 nm. By increasing the polarity of the pore wall (and thus reducing its hydrophobicity) the transition radius can be decreased until for hydrophilic pores liquid water is stable down to a radius comparable to a water molecule's radius. Ions behave similarly but the transition from conducting to non-conducting pores is even steeper and occurs at a radius of 0.65 nm for hydrophobic pores. The presence of water vapour in a constriction zone indicates a barrier for ion permeation. A thermodynamic model can explain the behaviour of water in nanopores in terms of the surface tensions, which leads to a simple measure of "hydrophobicity" in this context. Furthermore, increased local flexibility decreases the permeability of polar species. An increase in temperature has the same effect, and we hypothesise that both effects can be explained by a decrease in the effective solvent-surface attraction which in turn leads to an increase in the solvent-wall surface free energy.

  15. Applying GIS characterizing and modeling contaminant transport in surface water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.M.; Van Eeckhout, E.; David, N.A.; Irvine, J.M.

    1995-10-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was chosen as the site for the secret development of the first atomic bomb. The remote location in the southwestern United States was ideal for such a project. After the war, research activities continued at the Los Alamos installation, focusing on new nuclear weapons models as well as greater effectiveness and reliability of existing weapons. Due to the emphasis on nuclear and non-nuclear weapons development as well as associated nuclear research, a large inventory of radionuclides and heavy metals have been tested, expended, and disposed of in the local environment, a high plateau of tuffaceous volcanic rocks incised by deep canyons in a semi-arid climate. In recent years an intensive evaluation of the environmental, impact of weapons testing at Los Alamos and elsewhere has been undertaken. GIS system utilization and image processing of past and current data has been an important part of this evaluation. Important problems can be more easily displayed and understood using this methodology. The main objective in this paper is to illustrate how transport of depleted uranium and associated heavy metals (copper in this case) used in dynamic testing of weapons components at open air firing sites can be evaluated and visualized. In our studies, surface water has been found to be the predominant transport mechanism. We have sampled soils, sediments, fallout, runoff water and snowmelt over a number of years in order to understand contaminant transport on- and offsite. Statistical analyses of these data have assisted in our characterization of issues such as contaminant variability, spatially and temporally, as well as in development of transport rates.

  16. Prediction of postmine ground-water quality at a Texas surface lignite mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Clifton Farrell

    1995-01-01

    The prediction Of postmine ground-water quality is encumbered with many complications resulting from the complex hydrologic system found in mine spoils. Current analytical methods such as acid/base accounting have only had limited success...

  17. Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lynn Sager

    2013-01-01

    the rocky tailings, water levels in swale ponds and canalstailings, and the red azola, green duckweed-covered swale pondsas swale ponds and at locations between the tailing rows.

  18. Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Eliza

    2012-02-14

    Over the last few decades increasing attention has been paid to the effects of land use activities and land management on stream water quality. Recent research has largely focused on dominant land uses such as urban development and agricultural...

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF WATER ON THE DEGRADATION AND WEAR OF AL2O3 SURFACES 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickett, Ammon T.

    2010-01-16

    As alumina plays ever more important roles in advanced technologies, such as substrates for in vivo biological sensors, catalysts for water purification and components of novel fuel devices, it is exposed to various ...

  20. Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhadi, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

  1. Water table recovery in a reclaimed surface lignite mine, Grimes County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peace, Kelley H.

    1995-01-01

    Water table recovery in four reclaimed mine blocks containing replaced overburden has been monitored at Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas since 1986. Recovery analysis was conducted based on data recorded at 27 wells installed...

  2. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal . 20 Energy Used for Water Services . 20 Transporting Water 21 Pumping Groundwater. 22 Treating Wastewater 23 Desalination ..

  3. Hydrated goethite ([alpha]-FeOOH) (1 0 0 ) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghose, Sanjit K.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Trainor, Thomas P.; Eng, Peter J.

    2010-03-16

    Goethite({alpha}-FeOOH), an abundant and highly reactive iron oxyhydroxide mineral, has been the subject of numerous studies of environmental interface reactivity. However, such studies have been hampered by the lack of experimental constraints on aqueous interface structure, and especially of the surface water molecular arrangements. Structural information of this type is crucial because reactivity is dictated by the nature of the surface functional groups and the structure or distribution of water and electrolyte at the solid-solution interface. In this study we have investigated the goethite (1 0 0) surface using surface diffraction techniques, and have determined the relaxed surface structure, the surface functional groups, and the three dimensional nature of two distinct sorbed water layers. The crystal truncation rod (CTR) results show that the interface structure consists of a double hydroxyl, double water terminated interface with significant atom relaxations. Further, the double hydroxyl terminated surface dominates with an 89% contribution having a chiral subdomain structure on the (1 0 0) cleavage faces. The proposed interface stoichiometry is ((H{sub 2}O)-(H{sub 2}O)-OH{sub 2}-OH-Fe-O-O-Fe-R) with two types of terminal hydroxyls; a bidentate (B-type) hydroxo group and a monodentate (A-type) aquo group. Using the bond-valence approach the protonation states of the terminal hydroxyls are predicted to be OH type (bidentate hydroxyl with oxygen coupled to two Fe{sup 3+} ions) and OH{sub 2} type (monodentate hydroxyl with oxygen tied to only one Fe{sup 3+}). A double layer three dimensional ordered water structure at the interface was determined from refinement of fits to the experimental data. Application of bond-valence constraints to the terminal hydroxyls with appropriate rotation of the water dipole moments allowed a plausible dipole orientation model as predicted. The structural results are discussed in terms of protonation and H-bonding at the interface, and the results provide an ideal basis for testing theoretical predictions of characteristic surface properties such as pK{sub a}, sorption equilibria, and surface water permittivity.

  4. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    2004-02-19

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  5. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  6. User`s Guide: Database of literature pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.F.

    1993-05-01

    Since its beginnings in 1949, hydrogeologic investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have resulted in an extensive collection of technical publications providing information concerning ground water hydraulics and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy through the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office in a grant to compile an INEL-wide summary of unsaturated zone studies based on a literature search. University of Idaho researchers are conducting a review of technical documents produced at or pertaining to the INEL, which present or discuss processes in the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions. Results of this review are being compiled as an electronic database. Fields are available in this database for document title and associated identification number, author, source, abstract, and summary of information (including types of data and parameters). AskSam{reg_sign}, a text-based database system, was chosen. WordPerfect 5.1{copyright} is being used as a text-editor to input data records into askSam.

  7. Unsaturated subsurface flow with surface water and nonlinear in-and outflow conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the permeability k depends only on the saturation s. In the Richards model, the air pressure in the pore space, 1] and the water pressure p : � [0, T] R nts - div k(s)µ-1 ( p + e) = f in � [0, T]. (1) Here n is assumed to be constant. We consider it normalized to pgas = 0 and replace the water pressure in (1

  8. Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon SequestrationSites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2005-06-17

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO{sub 2} may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO{sub 2} overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO{sub 2} bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s{sup -1} at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s{sup -1}. Liquid CO{sub 2} bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO{sub 2} bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} at three different seepage rates reveals that ebullition and bubble flow will be the dominant form of gas transport in surface water for all but the smallest seepage fluxes or shallowest water bodies. The solubility of the gas species in water plays a fundamental role in whether ebullition occurs. We used a solubility model to examine CO{sub 2} solubility in waters with varying salinity as a function of depth below a 200 m-deep surface water body. In this system, liquid CO{sub 2} is stable between the deep regions where supercritical CO{sub 2} is stable and the shallow regions where gaseous CO{sub 2} is stable. The transition from liquid to gaseous CO{sub 2} is associated with a large change in density, with corresponding large change in bubble buoyancy. The solubility of CO{sub 2} is lower in high-salinity waters such as might be encountered in the deep subsurface. Therefore, as CO{sub 2} migrates upward through the deep subsurface, it will likely encounter less saline water with increasing capacity to dissolve CO{sub 2} potentially preventing ebullition, depending on the CO{sub 2} leakage flux. However, as CO{sub 2} continues to move upward through shallower depths, CO{sub 2} solubility in water decreases strongly leading to greater likelihood of ebullition and bubble flow in surface water. In the case of deep density-stratified lakes in which ebullition is suppressed, enhanced mixing and man-made degassing schemes can alleviate the buildup of CO{sub 2} and related risk of dangerous rapid discharges. Future research efforts are needed to increase understanding of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage in surface water and saturated porous media. For example, we recommend experiments and field tests of CO{sub 2} migration in saturated systems to formulate bubble-driven water-displacement models and relative permeability functions that can be used in simulation models.

  9. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY Leadership Team Subcommittee: Mark Clark Karl Havens BJ Jarvis Kelly Morgan Ramesh Reddy #12;Water Quality ­ Situation (resources) Florida has extensive and diverse water resources 54,836 miles of rivers and streams 1.8 million acres of lakes, reservoirs

  10. Water Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Services Homes Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water...

  11. Nationwide water availability data for energy-water modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Zemlick, Katie M.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this effort is to explore where the availability of water could be a limiting factor in the siting of new electric power generation. To support this analysis, water availability is mapped at the county level for the conterminous United States (3109 counties). Five water sources are individually considered, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water (western U.S. only), municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped is projected growth in non-thermoelectric consumptive water demand to 2035. Finally, the water availability metrics are accompanied by estimated costs associated with utilizing that particular supply of water. Ultimately these data sets are being developed for use in the National Renewable Energy Laboratories' (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, designed to investigate the likely deployment of new energy installations in the U.S., subject to a number of constraints, particularly water.

  12. Water Structure at Aqueous Solution Surfaces of Atmospherically Relevant Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Methanesulfonic Acid Revealed by Phase-Sensitive Sum Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Structure at Aqueous Solution Surfaces of Atmospherically Relevant Dimethyl Sulfoxide States ReceiVed: August 26, 2010; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: October 9, 2010 Interfacial water. Through isotopic dilution, we probed bulk water hydrogen bonding strength using the vibrational frequency

  13. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

  14. Contact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    crude oil and water RonaldoG.dosSantos a , Rahoma S. Mohamed a,F , Antonio C. Bannwart b , Watson Loh c alternative for the transportation of heavy crude oils. The lubricating effect of the aqueous film leads of such surfaces by crude oils through contact angle measurements in systems containing heavy oil/aqueous phase

  15. Terrigenous dissolved organic matter in the Arctic Ocean and its transport to surface and deep waters of the North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louchouarn, Patrick

    lignin phenols in polar surface waters are 7-fold to 16-fold higher than those in the Atlantic phenols provide some evidence of photochemical transformations of terrigenous DOM, but it appears the Arctic Ocean by microbial degradation is less clear and warrants further study. Physical transport

  16. Recent California water transfers: Emerging options in water management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, J.R.; Israel, M.

    1992-12-01

    Report examines the recent use of water transfers in California. Emphasis is on the use of water transfers during the current drought and how planners and operators of federal, state, and local systems can integrate water transfers into the planning and operations of their systems. Through the California experience, the study identifies motivations for incorporating water transfers into water supply systems, reviews a variety of water transfer types, and discusses the integration of water transfers with traditional supply argumentation and water conservation measures. Limitations, constraints, and difficulties for employing water transfers within existing systems are also discussed. The study focuses primarily on the technical, planning, and operational aspects of water transfers, rather than the legal, economic, and social implications. Water transfers, Water management, Water bank, Water supply, Water use, Water institutions, Infrastructure, California state water project, Water rights, Drought, Surface water, Groundwater.

  17. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  18. A Monte Carlo simulation study on the wetting behavior of water on graphite surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiongce Zhao

    2012-09-20

    This paper is an expanded edition of the rapid communication published several years ago by the author (Phys. Rev. B, v76, 041402(R), 2007) on the simulation of wetting transition of water on graphite, aiming to provide more details on the methodology, parameters, and results of the study which might be of interest to certain readers. We calculate adsorption isotherms of water on graphite using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations combined with multiple histogram reweighting, based on the empirical potentials of SPC/E for water, the 10-4-3 van der Waals model, and a recently developed induction and multipolar potential for water and graphite. Our results show that wetting transition of water on graphite occurs at 475-480 K, and the prewetting critical temperature lies in the range of 505-510 K. The calculated wetting transition temperature agrees quantitatively with a previously predicted value using a simple model. The observation of the coexistence of stable and metastable states at temperatures between the wetting transition temperature and prewetting critical temperature indicates that the transition is first order.

  19. The water ice rich surface of (145453) 2005 RR43: a case for a carbon-depleted population of TNOs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Pinilla-Alonso; J. Licandro; R. Gil-Hutton; R. Brunetto

    2007-05-26

    Recent results suggest that there is a group of TNOs (2003 EL61 being the biggest member), with surfaces composed of almost pure water ice and with very similar orbital elements. We study the surface composition of another TNO that moves in a similar orbit, 2005 RR43, and compare it with the surface composition of the other members of this group. We report visible and near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope and the 3.58m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo at the "Roque de los Muchachos" Observatory (La Palma, Spain). The spectrum of 2005 RR43 is neutral in color in the visible and dominated by very deep water ice absorption bands in the near infrared (D= 70.3 +/- 2.1 % and 82.8 +/- 4.9 % at 1.5 \\mu and 2.0 \\mu respectively). It is very similar to the spectrum of the group of TNOs already mentioned. All of them present much deeper water ice absorption bands (D>40 %) than any other TNO except Charon. Scattering models show that its surface is covered by water ice, a significant fraction in crytalline state with no trace (5 % upper limit) of complex organics. Possible scenarios to explain the existence of this population of TNOs are discussed: a giant collision, an originally carbon depleted composition, or a common process of continuous resurfacing. We conclude that TNO 2005 RR43 is member of a group, may be a population, of TNOs clustered in the space of orbital parameters that show abundant water ice and no signs of complex organics. The lack of complex organics in their surfaces suggests a significant smaller fraction of carbonaceous volatiles like CH4 in this population than in "normal" TNOs. A carbon depleted population of TNOs could be the origin of the population of carbon depleted Jupiter family comets already noticed by A'Hearn et al. (1995).

  20. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities, Hydrology, Models Descriptors: Drinking Water, Source Water, Pollution Sources, Watershed Management Supply Descriptors: Drinking water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI

  1. Institute of Water Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system focusing on research, and extended education programs on watershed management and surface, Michigan, microcomputer, nitrogen, nonpoint source pollution, pesticides, pollutants, pollution control analysis, technology transfer, urban water systems, water quality, water quality management, watershed

  2. On the contribution of leaf surface wetness, leaf size and leaf longevity to variation in leaf water and carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simonin, Kevin Allen

    2009-01-01

    relation to site water balance. Ecology 58: 893-899. Hornecosystem water and carbon balance (e.g. Diaz & Granadillothe role of the water balance. The American Naturalist 135,

  3. Surfactant/Water Interactions at the Air/Water Interface Probed by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Surfactant/Water Interactions at the Air/Water Interface Probed by Vibrational Sum Frequency and orientation of water molecules at an air/water interface has been measured in the presence of cationic spectrum of both the surfactant and water molecules at the water surface. In the presence of the charged

  4. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, erosion and pollution, water qualityArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  5. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  6. Grains, Water Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Grains, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near the Shore Surf Induced Sand Dynamics Discussion Dry Granular Flows, Water Waves & Surf, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near

  7. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 9: Water in Agriculture () January 13, 2010 1 / 14 #12;Water in Agriculture Historically: Biggest consumer of water, in developed kilos of sugar. Though the source of water in all the three cases is usually different. Agriculture

  8. On the Fluctuations that Order and Frustrate Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limmer, David

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative water model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.3 Determining T g for water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv Contents 6 Frustrating water at ordered surfaces 6.1

  9. LUNAR SURFACE WATER IN AGGLUTINATES: ORIGIN AND ABUNDANCES. Y. Liu1 , G. R. Rossman2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossman. George R.

    -5000 ppm [1-3]. Three sources have been suggested: solar- wind origin; volatile retention from meteoritic. They also showed that D/H values of released H2 gas increased with step heating temperatures from near solar-wind impact; and degassing of indigenous water [1-4]. The relative contributions from each of these sources

  10. MEMBRANES FOR THE CONTROL OF NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER FROM SURFACE WATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    , Boulder Reservoir Water; CHFP, chloral hydrate formation potential; Dalton, indicative of membrane pore, heterotrophic plate count; LSI, Langelier saturation index; MWCO, molecular weight cuto; MTBE, methyl tert.0), silt density index SDI ` 3), and Langelier saturation index LSI ` 0). A potential major role

  11. COMPOUNDING EFFECTS OF FLUID CONFINEMENT AND SURFACE STRAIN ON THE WET-DRY TRANSITION AND DYNAMICS OF GRAPHENE-WATER SYSTEMS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We studied the link between the water-mediated (tensile or compressive) strain-driven hydration free energy changes in the association process involving finite-size graphene surfaces, the resulting water-graphene interfacial behavior, and the combined effect of surface strain and fluid confinement on the thermodynamic response functions and the dynamics of water. We found that either small surface corrugation (compressive strain) or surface stretching (tensile strain) is able to enhance significantly the water-graphene hydrophobicity relative to that of the unstrained surface, an effect that exacerbates the confinement impact on the isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity of confined water, as well as on themore »slowing down of its dynamics that gives rise to anomalous diffusivity.« less

  12. COMPOUNDING EFFECTS OF FLUID CONFINEMENT AND SURFACE STRAIN ON THE WET-DRY TRANSITION AND DYNAMICS OF GRAPHENE-WATER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We studied the link between the water-mediated (tensile or compressive) strain-driven hydration free energy changes in the association process involving finite-size graphene surfaces, the resulting water-graphene interfacial behavior, and the combined effect of surface strain and fluid confinement on the thermodynamic response functions and the dynamics of water. We found that either small surface corrugation (compressive strain) or surface stretching (tensile strain) is able to enhance significantly the water-graphene hydrophobicity relative to that of the unstrained surface, an effect that exacerbates the confinement impact on the isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity of confined water, as well as on the slowing down of its dynamics that gives rise to anomalous diffusivity.

  13. Methodology Water Harvesting Measurements with Biomimetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Methodology Water Harvesting Measurements with Biomimetic Surfaces Zi Jun Wang and Prof. Anne parameters that affect the water harvesting efficiencies of different surfaces · Optimize the experimental Objectives Water is one of the most essential natural resources. The easy accessibility of water

  14. Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension impurities can be corrected if they are a nuisance. Before beginning any treatment plan, have water tested select the most effective and economical treatment method. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications

  15. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  16. Lawn Water Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, James

    2006-06-26

    Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties...

  17. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    H. , Groves D. California Water 2030: An Efficient Future,Preemption of California’s Water Conservation Standards for2Epdf Biermayer P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from

  18. Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Prevent runoff and shrubs, either through directly killing plants or making them more prone to disease. Fertilizer runoff into storm drains pollutes waterways. Maintain plant health and protect water quality by fertilizing

  19. Water Conservation Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01

    Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &aware of the need to use water responsibly, whether or notcut landscape and garden water needs. Here we share some of

  20. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    2009. Thirsty Energy: Water and Energy in the 21st Century.Summary Points 1. Water and energy are strongly dependent onof bioenergy increases water and energy interdependence. 3.

  1. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    4 April, 2013. (4) 2010 Water Use Survey Summary Estimates –State Totals; Texas Water Development Board: Austin, TX,indicators for urban water systems. Urban Water. 2004, 4,

  2. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 5 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-23

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 21, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference, are tabulated. All DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  3. Water Efficiency Goal Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued water efficiency goal guidance in Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514. This...

  4. Drinking Water Problems: Copper 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25

    High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

  5. No steady water waves of small amplitude are supported by a shear flow with still free surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Kozlov; Nikolay Kuznetsov

    2012-09-17

    The two-dimensional free-boundary problem describing steady gravity waves with vorticity on water of finite depth is considered. It is proved that no small-amplitude waves are supported by a horizontal shear flow whose free surface is still in a coordinate frame such that the flow is time-independent in it. The class of vorticity distributions for which such flows exist includes all positive constant distributions, as well as linear and quadric ones with arbitrary positive coefficients.

  6. Irrigation Water Quality Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and industrial waste water can impact water quality. In most irrigation situations, the primary water qual- ity

  7. Water-heating dehumidifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2006-04-18

    A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

  8. 3D Simulation of Missing Pellet Surface Defects in Light Water Reactor Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; R.L. Williamson

    2012-09-01

    The cladding on light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods provides a stable enclosure for fuel pellets and serves as a first barrier against fission product release. Consequently, it is important to design fuel to prevent cladding failure due to mechanical interactions with fuel pellets. Cladding stresses can be effectively limited by controlling power increase rates. However, it has been shown that local geometric irregularities caused by manufacturing defects known as missing pellet surfaces (MPS) in fuel pellets can lead to elevated cladding stresses that are sufficiently high to cause cladding failure. Accurate modeling of these defects can help prevent these types of failures. Nuclear fuel performance codes commonly use a 1.5D (axisymmetric, axially-stacked, one-dimensional radial) or 2D axisymmetric representation of the fuel rod. To study the effects of MPS defects, results from 1.5D or 2D fuel performance analyses are typically mapped to thermo-mechanical models that consist of a 2D plane-strain slice or a full 3D representation of the geometry of the pellet and clad in the region of the defect. The BISON fuel performance code developed at Idaho National Laboratory employs either a 2D axisymmetric or 3D representation of the full fuel rod. This allows for a computational model of the full fuel rod to include local defects. A 3D thermo-mechanical model is used to simulate the global fuel rod behavior, and includes effects on the thermal and mechanical behavior of the fuel due to accumulation of fission products, fission gas production and release, and the effects of fission gas accumulation on thermal conductivity across the fuel-clad gap. Local defects can be modeled simply by including them in the 3D fuel rod model, without the need for mapping between two separate models. This allows for the complete set of physics used in a fuel performance analysis to be included naturally in the computational representation of the local defect, and for the effects of the local defect to be coupled with the global fuel rod model. This approach for modeling fuel with MPS defects is demonstrated and compared with alternative techniques. The effects of varying parameters of the MPS defect are studied using this technique and presented here.

  9. Complex potential surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 1} metastable state of the water anion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Zhang, Zhiyong; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2004-04-23

    The potential energy surface corresponding the complex resonance energy of the 2B1 Feshbach resonance state of the water anion is constructed in its full dimensionality. Complex Kohn variational scattering calculations are used to compute the resonance width, while large-scale Configuration Interaction calculations are used to compute the resonance energy. Near the equilibrium geometry, an accompanying ground state potential surface is constructed from Configuration Interaction calculations that treat correlation at a level similar to that used in the calculations on the anion.

  10. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Fixtures Market Overview: Water Savings Potential forNew Jersey. American Water Works Association ResearchResidential End Uses of Water (REUWS). 1999. American Water

  11. Irrigation Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Lemon, Robert G.; Stichler, Charles

    2002-04-11

    Irrigation water quality is determined by the total amounts of salts and the types of salts the water contains. In this publication you'll learn why well water can be salty, what problems salty water can cause, what tests should be done...

  12. Landscape Design & Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    drainage lines to allow water to filter into surrounding soils. Install gravel sumps or other percolationLandscape Design & Water Quality Landscape Design & Water Quality Create a landscape design that reduces pesticide and fertilizer runoff and conserves water. Good plant choices, proper site preparation

  13. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 8: Wells () August 28, 2012 project, utilizing enhanced ground-water. Water lifted from storage, to accumulate overnight from aquifer. Water from shallow aquifer, of about 7-8m thickness. accounts for about 30% of irrigation Unique

  14. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 2: Water cycle, stocks and flows () July 28, 2013 1 / 30 #12;The basic movement of water source: USGS. () July 28, 2013 2 / 30 #12, humidity and air flow. Formation of liquid-water in the Atmosphere-Cloud-Formation Coming Down Rain

  15. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves nonlinear waves. Throughout the theory is based on the traditional assumptions that water is inviscid

  16. Pesticide Properties that Affect Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Douglas; Baumann, Paul A.; Jackman, John A.

    1997-06-30

    . over the land before running into rivers, aquifers and lakes. It also seeps into underground aquifers. Irrigation and drinking water come from both surface and ground water. Eventually, all of the chemicals we use can pollute our water supplies (see Fig... or disposal of pesticides can lead to water pollution. There is reason for optimism, however. Without being oppressive, the regulation of pesticides is reducing pesticide pollution of surface and ground water. Understanding Pesticides Pesticides are poisons...

  17. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  18. Effects of a nonrigid, impermeable bottom on plane surface waves in shallow water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gade, Herman Gerhard

    1957-01-01

    *a aa tt oaa ot Cue p per. Wee ~ haws besa asdsc sad oar haeakedge et the pbsaoaeaoa te date hag beta daadecpcateo Direst obeervatioas of aaf aetaal ?ave oa the iatcsrfhee betwssa ths water sa4 the eodiaeat eee Oeepkksated by tb? fast tbN whore each... the wave& but at the earns time the wave he1ght was reduoo4 considerably? If a complete filtering to a yare s@smeidal fnga hag been yarfegssd~ the yaws' heights wnnt4 have beeeao he sdatl 'ae te anno eeewsate aonearsaeats iayesgNAoa Therofereq the fi...

  19. Evaluation of Methods to Assess and Reduce Bacterial Contamination of Surface Water from Grazing Lands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Kevin

    2012-10-19

    or unstable streambanks, increasing water supply reliability during droughts, and increasing weight gains in beef cattle by 0.1 to 0.2 kg/day (0.2 to 0.4 lb/day) (Willms et al. 1994; Buchanan 1996; Porath 2002; Willms et al. 2002; Veira 2003; Dickard 1998... and Grazing Management ......... 78 4.4.2 Comparison of BoBac to SR and Grazing Management .......... 80 4.4.3 Comparison of AllBac and BoBac Gene Copy Concentrations to E. coli Levels...

  20. NMSA 72-5 Appropriation and Use of Surface Water | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:EnergyNARI|Forms12 Underground Waters5

  1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    consumption Vehicle production 0.77 0.59 0.79 0.32 4.35 0.44 12.25 2.45 3.85 0.97 (Source: Harto, C; et al% Mining; 1% Decentralized Water Production (LID) Decentralized Energy Production Urban Farming #12;Water Footprint of Agricultural Products #12;`Water for Energy' and `Energy for Water' in US Water for Energy

  2. Water Management Best Practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, W.

    2011-01-01

    Municipal Manufacturing Mining Steam Electric Agriculture New Codes & Standards Green Certification& Labeling Programs ? Green Restaurants, Hotels, etc. ? Green Guide for Health Care ? LEED ? GBI ? EPA Water Sense ? EPA Energy Star US Green... of Assistance ? Texas Water Development Board ? www.twdb.state.tx.us ? California Urban Water Conservation Council ? www.cuwcc.org ? Alliance for Water Efficiency www.allianceforwaterefficiency.org ? EPA Water Sense and Energy Star Programs ? www...

  3. Ground water and energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

  4. Innovative Water Reuse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaber, F. H.

    2011-01-01

    . Introduction 2. Water conservation indoors 1. Retrofit practices 2. Cooling towers 3. Education 3. Water conservation outdoors 1. Landscape practices 2. Irrigation 3. Rainwater harvesting 4.Greywater 4. Stormwater management 1.Rain... ? Plant selection ? Irrigation practices What Can We Do? (cont?d) ? Water Conservation ? New buildings ? Greywater reuse ? Efficient water towers ? A/C Condensate reuse Bathroom ? Faucet Aerators ? Aerators mix air and water together...

  5. Potential Dependent Alignment and Hydrogen Bonding of Water Molecules at Charged Air/Water and CCl4/Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    /Water Interfaces D. E. Gragson and G. L. Richmond* Contribution from the Department of Chemistry, Uni. The presence of surfactants at an air/water or oil/water interface greatly affects the surface tension field has on the structure and hydrogen bonding of interfacial water molecules is not fully understood

  6. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1996. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1997-05-01

    The report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 41 gaging stations and 5 lakes; water quality for 38 surface-water stations (including 22 gage stations) and 100 wells; and water levels for 235 observation wells. Also included are data for 117 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations.

  7. Formation of three-dimensional surface waves on deep-water using elliptic solutions of nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sajjadi, Shahrdad G; Drullion, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    A review of three-dimensional waves on deep-water is presented. Three forms of three dimensionality, namely oblique, forced and spontaneous type, are identified. An alternative formulation for these three-dimensional waves is given through cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The periodic solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation are found using Weierstrass elliptic $\\wp$ functions. It is shown that the classification of solutions depends on the boundary conditions, wavenumber and frequency. For certain parameters, Weierstrass $\\wp$ functions are reduced to periodic, hyperbolic or Jacobi elliptic functions. It is demonstrated that some of these solutions do not have any physical significance. An analytical solution of cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with wind forcing is also obtained which results in how groups of waves are generated on the surface of deep water in the ocean. In this case the dependency on the energy-transfer parameter, from wind to waves, make either the groups of wav...

  8. Modelling On Photogeneration Of Hydroxyl Radical In Surface Waters And Its Reactivity Towards Pharmaceutical Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Radha; Vione, Davide; Rubertelli, Francesca; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Barbati, Stephane; Chiron, Serge

    2010-10-26

    This paper reports a simple model to describe the formation and reactivity of hydroxyl radicals in the whole column of freshwater lakes. It is based on empirical irradiation data and is a function of the water chemical composition (the photochemically significant parameters NPOC, nitrate, nitrite, carbonate and bicarbonate), the lake conformation best expressed as the average depth, and the water absorption spectrum in a simplified Lambert-Beer approach. The purpose is to derive the lifetime of dissolved molecules, due to reaction with OH, on the basis of their second-order rate constants with the hydroxyl radical. The model was applied to two compounds of pharmaceutical wastes ibuprofen and carbamazepine, for which the second-order rate constants for reaction with the hydroxyl radical were measured by means of the competition kinetics with 2-propanol. The measured values of the rate constants are 1.0x10{sup 10} and 1.6x10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for ibuprofen and carbamazepine, respectively. The model suggests that the lifetime of a given compound can be very variable in different lakes, even more than the lifetime of different compounds in the same lake. It can be concluded that as far as the reaction with OH, is concerned the concepts of photolability and photostability, traditionally attached to definite compounds, are ecosystem-dependent at least as much as they depend on the molecule under consideration.

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Reflectance Imaging: A Label-Free/Real-Time Mapping of Microscale Mixture Concentration Fields (Water+Ethanol)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    Mixture Concentration Fields (Water+Ethanol) Iltai Kim and Kenneth D. Kihm Department of Mechanical (water+ethanol) concentration fields with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) reflectance technique based the refractive index and mixture concentration fields. The presented results show that ethanol penetrates

  10. Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 1: An Overview of Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 1: An Overview of Water Use Angele Clarke A SEEDS Work Study Soils 11 Geology 12 Hydrology 13 Glenmore Ellison Improvement District 15 Description of UBCO Water Balance Situation 16 Inputs 16 Outputs 18 Description of UBCO Water Delivery System 19 Surface Water

  11. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15

    Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMsâ�� cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10�° (latitude) x 10�° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

  12. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1995. Water data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1996-05-01

    Water resources data for the 1995 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 65 gaging stations; stage only for 40 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 23 gage stations) and 76 wells; and water levels for 217 observation wells. Also included are data for 113 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  13. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1994. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1995-03-01

    Water resources data for the 1994 water year for Louisiana consists of records for stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 45 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 51 surface-water stations (including 24 gage stations) and 84 wells; and water levels for 209 observations wells. Also included are data for 115 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  14. WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    water quality, and water percolating through the disposaland quality of water applied to surface disposal piles Topeffect on water quality Spent-Shale Disposal Piles Similar

  15. ABSTRACT: Information regarding long term hydrological variabil-ity is critical for the effective management of surface water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenzie 2007). The Rio Santa and its tributaries provide an important source of water for hydroelectric power

  16. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center (AWRC) has a statewide mission to plan and conduct water resource research. AWRC cooperates water modeling, non-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water, efficient septic tank design and ecosystem assessment. These projects have been funded by a variety of federal, state

  17. The Magic and Mysteries of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    The Magic and Mysteries of Water Speaker: Prof. Geri Richmond University of Oregon Water is ubiquitous in our lives. Covering more than two thirds of this planet, water surfaces provide a unique role in controlling our climate. In our bodies, water is the `canal of life', transporting and passing

  18. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystemsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Arkansas Water Resources Center is part

  19. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF OREGON Major water-related problems in Oregon are related to use exceeding availability in numerous watersheds, flooding during winter storm events, water quality degradation of both surface

  20. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  1. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  2. Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    liquid well beyond its typical freezing point. Researchers applied a superthin coating of water-no deeper than a few molecules-to the surface of a barium fluoride crystal....

  3. Energy -Matter Interactions: Water Open water covers about 74% of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    Energy - Matter Interactions: Water #12;Open water covers about 74% of the earth's surface. Oceans this material come from? #12;Energy - Matter Interactions As incident light strikes the water surface, some by energy that is scattered and reflected within the water body itself, known as volume reflection. #12

  4. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  5. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  6. Global study of lake surface water temperature (LSWT) behaviour and the tuning of a 1-dimensional model to determine the LSWTs of large lakes worldwide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layden, Aisling

    2014-11-27

    Lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) of 246 globally distributed large lakes were derived from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) for the period 1991 to 2011. These LSWTs, derived in a systematic manner, presents ...

  7. Ab Initio Study of Water Adsorption on r-Al2O3 (0001) Crystal Surface Vladimir Shapovalov and Thanh N. Truong*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    for treatment of industrial wastewater and municipal sewage.5 In the atmosphere concentration of dispersed surface with water and its hydroxylation is of primary importance in all these fields. The majority

  8. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental, LLC

    2011-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

  9. Water Quality Professional Certificate Training 1. Catalog Description: Certificate course; Open registration. This course focuses on water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliaccio, Kati White

    Water Quality Professional Certificate Training Syllabus 1. Catalog Description: Certificate course; Open registration. This course focuses on water quality sampling, laboratory assessment, and data analyses. It includes surface water, groundwater, and pore water aspects. The course is divided into 6

  10. Freeing up Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    Freeing up Water Story by Kathy Wythe Freeing up Water Brush control efforts yield water tx H2O | pg. 15 For 10 years during the 1990s drought, H. R.Wardlaw, a West Texas rancher, watchedand waited. He watched as the Middle Concho River and Rocky... and Water Conservation Board and designed to increase water yield by removing or controlling water-con- suming plants such as mesquite, cedar and saltcedar. In 2004, just as he finished excavating cedar, aerially spraying mesquite and hand spraying...

  11. Water adsorption on SrTiO3(001): II. Water, water, everywhere A.E. Becerra-Toledo a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    Water adsorption on SrTiO3(001): II. Water, water, everywhere A.E. Becerra-Toledo a, , J January 2012 Available online 17 January 2012 Keywords: Strontium titanate Density functional theory Water adsorption Surface reconstruction X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy Oxide surfaces The role of water

  12. Use of Remote Technology in the Surface Water Environmental Monitoring Program at SRS Reducing Measurements in the Field - 13336

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, T.; Terry, B.; Meyer, A.; Hall, J.; Allen, P.; Hughey, D.; Hartley, T.

    2013-07-01

    There are a wide range of sensor and remote technology applications available for use in environmental monitoring programs. Each application has its own set of limitations and can be challenging when attempting to utilize it under diverse environmental field conditions. The Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Program has implemented several remote sensing and surface water flow technologies that have increased the quality of the data while reducing the number of field measurements. Implementation of this technology reduced the field time for personnel that commute across the Savannah River Site (SRS) over a span of 310 square miles. The wireless surface water flow technology allows for immediate notification of changing field conditions or equipment failure thus reducing data-loss or erroneous field data and improving data-quality. This wireless flow technology uses the stage-to-flow methodology coupled with implementation of a robust highly accurate Acoustic Doppler Profiler system for measuring discharge under various field conditions. Savings for implementation of the wireless flow application and Flowlink{sup R} technology equates to approximately 1175 hours annually for the radiological liquid effluent and surveillance programs. The SonTek River Suveyor and Flowtracker technologies are utilized for calibration of the wireless flow monitoring devices in the site streams and validation of effluent flows at the SRS. Implementation of similar wireless devices is also planned in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm-water Monitoring Program. SRS personnel have been developing a unique flow actuator device. This device activates an ISCO{sup TM} automated sampler under flowing conditions at storm-water outfall locations across the site. This technology is unique in that it was designed to be used under field conditions with rapid changes in flow and sedimentation where traditional actuators have been unsuccessful in tripping the automated sampler. In addition, automated rain gauges will be tied into this technology for immediate notification of rain at storm-water locations further enhancing the automation of environmental data collection. These technological improvements at SRS have led to data-quality improvements while reducing the field technician time in the field and costs for maintaining the traditional environmental monitoring applications. (authors)

  13. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and evaluating the viability of alternate water supplies using abandoned, flooded coal mines for the City-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water, efficient septic tank design, and ecosystem and non-point source nutrient loading of surface streams and reservoirs in northwest Arkansas, identifying

  14. Water produced at the University of Iowa Water treatment plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neiman, Maurine

    Water produced at the University of Iowa Water treatment plant meets or surpasses all federal and state drinking-water standards at this time. For information about the University of Iowa water supply, call us at 319-335-5168 Water Source The University of Iowa Water Plants' primary source of water

  15. Water Scarcity and Energy: Water and Power Efficiency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    ) #12;Water Scarcity = Power Scarcity Lower water availability Lower hydro power availabilityWater Scarcity and Energy: Water and Power Efficiency of Recycled Water Arizona Hydrological and Population Growth · Types of Reuse · Water Efficiency of Reuse · Power Efficiency of Reuse #12;Water Scarcity

  16. Federal Water Use Indices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably.

  17. Water Tower - 14 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Previous studies using tertiary amines to extract water from reagent-grade carboxylate salts (calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate) have shown selectivity for water and not for the carboxylate salts. These results ...

  18. A gathering of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Naomi Leah, 1970-

    2005-01-01

    The act of immersion is a powerful catalyst for the affirmation or transformation of identity. How we place ourselves in water expresses cultural valuations of our bodies, water, and social relations, as well as categories ...

  19. Water Conservation Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01

    Water Needs breath. Adding compost to sandy soils helps thesoil retain water longer—the compost acts like a sponge,from applications of compost and other organic matter. For

  20. Water & Energy Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Poornima Group of Colleges, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India #12;Executive Summary This document for Poornima Group's conservation efforts over the next eight years. PGC currently maintains an unsustainable method of water use Environmental Crisis Poornima Group of Colleges Water

  1. What's In My Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-04-21

    You can learn about the quality of your water by sending a sample to a laboratory for analysis. This publication will help you understand the lab report by explaining the properties, components and contaminants often found in water. It describes...

  2. Drinking Water Problems: Benzene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2009-04-16

    , chlorine, radon and some metals. A typical water softener will not remove benzene from water. Home granular activated carbon systems are usu- ally simple. The activated charcoal is packaged in filter cartridges that are inserted into a purification...

  3. Drinking Water Problems: MTBE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28

    organic compounds, pesticides and benzene, and can also re- move some metals, chlorine and radon. A typical water softener will not remove MTBE from water. Home granular activated carbon filtering systems are usually simple. The activated charcoal...

  4. Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2005-12-02

    High levels of arsenic in drinking water can poison and even kill people. This publication explains the symptoms of arsenic poisoning and common treatment methods for removing arsenic from your water supply....

  5. Indian Water 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Indian Water is a call to help plan a national water summit. This strategic session consist of a facilitated dialog with tribal leaders on important opportunities, challenges and tactics, which...

  6. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroelectricity for agriculture and hydroelectricity. Large volumes of waterElectricity Production Hydroelectricity The most common type

  7. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) fluids, and limited waterEngelder, “Natural gas: Should fracking stop? ” Nature 477 (

  8. Technology in water conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01

    ?? percent to ?? percent. Water reuse systems treat wastewater by various technologies including ?ltering, bioremediation and ozone exposure. ?ese technologies can involve billions of gallons of wastewater ? such as in a municipal recycling e... Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future It is not unusual for individuals to describe water conservation as a behavioral exercise and urge...

  9. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    into a water source—thermal pollution—has also led to theimpacts from this thermal pollution, including the

  10. Water Waves from General, Time-Dependent Surface Pressure Distribution in the Presence of a Shear Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We obtain a general solution for the water waves resulting from a general, time-dependent surface pressure distribution, in the presence of a shear current of uniform vorticity beneath the surface, in three dimensions. Linearized governing equations and boundary conditions including the effects of gravity, a distributed external pressure disturbance, and constant finite depth, are solved analytically, and particular attention is paid to classic initial value problems: an initial pressure impulse and a steady pressure distribution which appears suddenly. In the present paper, good agreement with previous results is demonstrated. We subsequently show both analytically and numerically how transient waves from a suddenly appearing steady pressure distribution vanis for large times, and steady ship waves remain. The transient contribution to wave resistance was derived. The results show that a shear current has significant impact on the transient wave motions, resulting in asymmetry between upstream and downstream...

  11. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  12. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    patterns, and implications." Water Policy 2 (3):175-99.A. K. 2004. "Integrated water resources management: areassessment." Water International 29 (2):248-56. Blomquist,

  13. Review: Water, Peace, and War: Confronting the Global Water Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tans, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Review: Water, War, and Peace:Confronting the Global Water Crisis By Brahma ChellaneyUSA Chellaney, Brahma. Water, Peace, and War: Confronting

  14. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-01-21

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  15. STORM WATER Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

  16. Water treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

    1991-04-30

    A method is described for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

  17. California's Water Energy Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support The California's Water-Energy Relationship report is the product of contributions by many California Energy, Lorraine White and Zhiqin Zhang. Staff would also like to thank the members of the Water-Energy Working

  18. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 6: Mathematics, z). velocity vx (x, y, z, t) : in the x-direction. vx = Kx h/x saturated/water- table. Continuity Equation What is vx x + vy y + vz z ? It is the rate of accumulation of water at the point (x, y

  19. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 1: A Perspective () July 20, 2012 1 / 17 #12;Outline Two parts: The technical side to water. -M. Sohoni The basic hydrological cycle. The societal side to water. -N. C. Narayanan () July 20, 2012 2 / 17 #12;Texts Applied Hydrogeology, by C. W

  20. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 4: Groundwater () December in dried sample. Saturation: When these voids are fully filled with water. Specific Yield Sy : the ration of the colume of water that drains from a rock owing to gravity, to the total rock volumne. 00000000

  1. WATER ADVISORY PARTNERSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    COCONINO PLATEAU WATER ADVISORY COUNCIL& WATERSHED PARTNERSHIP 3624 E. Mesquite St. Gilbe~t, Arizona 85296" 1832 Participants: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Arizona Department of Water City ofFlagstaff City of Page City of Sedona City of Williams Coconino County Doney Park Water Company

  2. Water Resources Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    Water Resources Research Center WASHINGTON, DISTRICT Of COLUMBIA #12;ASSESSMENT OF THE STATE OF THE ART AND DEVELOPMENT OF PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS IN RECREATION BENEFIT, VALUATION FOR WATER RESOURCES PLANNING conducted by Robert C. Waters Vassilios Moustakis Department of Engineering Administration School

  3. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Analysis Framework for the 2009 / 16 #12;Vol II and Vol III Vol. II 1 Annexure I, Chap. 1: Bulk-water and tariffs-Principles. 2 Annexure I, Chap. 2: International Case Studies. 3 Annexure II: Report on water conservation technologies

  4. Saving Water Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-06-15

    Hot water use in households, for showers and baths as wellas for washing clothes and dishes, is a major driver of household energyconsumption. Other household uses of water (such as irrigatinglandscaping) require additional energy in other sectors to transport andtreat the water before use, and to treat wastewater. In California, 19percent of total electricity for all sectors combined and 32 percent ofnatural gas consumption is related to water. There is a criticalinterdependence between energy and water systems: thermal power plantsrequire cooling water, and water pumping and treatment require energy.Energy efficiency can be increased by a number of means, includingmore-efficient appliances (e.g., clothes washers or dishwashers that useless total water and less heated water), water-conserving plumbingfixtures and fittings (e.g., showerheads, faucets, toilets) and changesin consumer behavior (e.g., lower temperature set points for storagewater heaters, shorter showers). Water- and energy-conserving activitiescan help offset the stress imposed on limited water (and energy) suppliesfrom increasing population in some areas, particularly in drought years,or increased consumption (e.g., some new shower systems) as a result ofincreased wealth. This paper explores the connections between householdwater use and energy, and suggests options for increased efficiencies inboth individual technologies and systems. Studies indicate that urbanwater use can be reduced cost-effectively by up to 30 percent withcommercially available products. The energy savings associated with watersavings may represent a large additional and largely untappedcost-effective opportunity.

  5. Addressing Water Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewith, Robbie

    Addressing Water Contamination without Using Chemicals For more information contact WIPO at: World challenge Farmers and gardeners apply pesticides to their crops. Contaminated waters are released when-off contaminates local water supplies and pollutes the environment. As a consequence a range of pesticides may

  6. Water treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH); Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

    1991-04-30

    A method for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

  7. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Honolulu, is truly the "canary in the coal mine" for many water- and energy-related issues that may face surface tensiometer for measuring water quality. The goal of this project was to establish a broad

  8. Regional water planning Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    LOCATE: - Villages - Peri-urban area - Farmland - Roads - Stream - Small dam (KT bandhara) - Waste water for irrigation Percolation Fresh water supply Domestic and industrial use Waste water treatment Waste water Discharge waste water recycle Treat and discharge untreated Run-off #12;Urban water cycle DRINKING WATER

  9. NDMA Formation During Drinking Water Treatment: Veterinary Antibiotics as Precursors, the Effect of Natural Organic Matter and the Significance of Treatment Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roback, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    in Wastewaters, Sewage Sludges, and Surface Waters. CHIMIAin Wastewaters, Sewage Sludges, and Surface Waters. CHIMIA

  10. Water Quality of a Reservoir Used for Reclaimed Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Peter S; Scherfig, Jan

    1981-01-01

    off from upper Santiago Creek and Colorado River water fromSantiago Reservoir (by this time a blend of surface run-off and Colorado RiverSantiago Reservoir, the inputs are derived from direct surface run-off and Colorado River

  11. What's your water footprint? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    stream_source_info What's your water footprint.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 6622 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name What's your water footprint.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 tx H2O | pg. 21 What?s your water footprint? When it comes to your water use, do you tread lightly or are you an H2O Sasquatch? How much water do you think you consume every day? You might initially consider the length of your daily shower...

  12. Coins falling in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heisinger, Luke; Kanso, Eva

    2013-01-01

    When a coin falls in water, its trajectory is one of four types determined by its dimensionless moment of inertia $I^\\ast$ and Reynolds number Re: (A) steady; (B) fluttering; (C) chaotic; or (D) tumbling. The dynamics induced by the interaction of the water with the surface of the coin, however, makes the exact landing site difficult to predict a priori. Here, we describe a carefully designed experiment in which a coin is dropped repeatedly in water, so that we can determine the probability density functions (pdf) associated with the landing positions for each of the four trajectory types, all of which are radially symmetric about the center-drop line. In the case of the steady mode, the pdf is approximately Gaussian distributed, with variances that are small, indicating that the coin is most likely to land at the center, right below the point it is dropped from. For the other falling modes, the center is one of the least likely landing sites. Indeed, the pdf's of the fluttering, chaotic and tumbling modes ar...

  13. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    including delivered hot water and energy losses. Waterand 17% if hot water energy is included. INTRODUCTION Thedrawn, determines the hot water energy output. The current

  14. Planning Water Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2008-01-01

    the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

  15. Super recycled water: quenching computers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super recycled water: quenching computers Super recycled water: quenching computers New facility and methods support conserving water and creating recycled products. Using reverse...

  16. Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Growing Water Martin Felsen andSarah Dunn The Growing Water project addresses a report fromin the world will face water shortages by 2025, a situation

  17. Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wainwright, Katlyn E.

    2008-01-01

    M. Pavlo. 2005. Do iodine water purification tablets provideof Toxoplasma gondii in water from wells located on farms.Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in water. App. Environ. Micro. 73,

  18. Hydrated goethite (alpha-FeOOH) (100) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghose, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    and the (010) surface of goethite. Geochem. Trans. 9, 1–16.Con?rmation of the surface structure of goethite (a-FeOOH. ,phosphated goethite by infrared spectroscopy. Soil Sci. Soc.

  19. Water balance in the amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    land surface and Earth system models. J. Hydro- meteor. ,of the Community Earth System Model (CESM; Vertenstein et

  20. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  1. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  2. Continuous Commissioning of a Central Chilled Water & Hot Water System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Batten, T.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01

    A central chilled water / hot water system provides cooling / heating energy from central utility plants to multiple customers (buildings) through campus distribution loops. To effectively transport the chilled water and hot water to the buildings...

  3. Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

    2007-01-01

    Table 5: Public supply water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000.

  4. Surface topography of a palladium cathode after electrolysis in heavy water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, D.S. ); Dash, J.; Keefe, P.S. )

    1993-12-01

    Electrolysis was performed with a palladium cathode and an electrolyte containing both hydrogen and deuterium ions. The cathode bends toward the anode during this process. Examination of both the concave and the convex surfaces with the scanning electron microscope, scanning tunneling microscope, and atomic force microscope shows unusual surface characteristics. Rimmed craters with faceted crystals inside and multitextural surfaces were observed on an electrolyzed palladium cathode but not on palladium that has not been electrolyzed. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Multiobjective calibration and sensitivity of a distributed land surface water and energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Paul R; Gupta, Hoshin V; Shuttleworth, W. James; Famiglietti, James S

    2001-01-01

    identification and energy balance models on a tallgrassdata for surface energy balance evaluation of a semiaridWatershed. We are energy balance components over a semiarid

  6. West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Exhibit D #12;Summary: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer Primary Credi90023!! #12;Sttmma1·y: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer Credit Profile US$16.STANDARDANDPOORS.COM/RATJNGSDJRECT MAY31 2013 2 I126639 I 301008236 #12;Summary: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer

  7. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;2 The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse was established in 2004 as a joint venture between the South Australian Water Corporation and the University of South Australia (UniSA), adding significant expertise to the water research capability in South

  8. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;' Our Mission The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse aims to advance the science and technology of sustainable water management through fundamental and applied research. Our Vision To be Australia's leading research centre for water reuse

  9. WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

  10. Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 2: Water Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 2: Water Features UBC Okanagan 2007 Angele Clarke A SEEDS and Objectives 2 Methods 3 The Symbolic and Cultural Values of Water 3 Landscape Aesthetics Relationship to Water 5 UBC-Okanagan Campus Landscape and Water Features 8 Water Features and the Built Environment Campus

  11. IWA Balkan Young Water Professionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    Networks Industrial Waste Treatment and Disposal River Basins Management Legislation in the Water those associated with cross-border water management issues, which require experience exchange among 2015 - Thessaloniki, Greece Topics Water Management (Water Loss ­ Mitigation Methods and Technologies

  12. UC Sustainable Water Systems Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    , or lubricating equipment. Purified Water: Water that is free of impurities such as microorganisms, particulate consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including water quality standards for human consumption. Reclaimed or Recycled Water: Wastewater treated

  13. Water Heating | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Heating Water Heating September 2, 2015 - 11:07am Addthis Low-flow fixtures will help you reduce your hot water use and save money on your water heating bills. | Photo...

  14. Water at interface with proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giancarlo Franzese; Valentino Bianco; Svilen Iskrov

    2010-12-07

    Water is essential for the activity of proteins. However, the effect of the properties of water on the behavior of proteins is only partially understood. Recently, several experiments have investigated the relation between the dynamics of the hydration water and the dynamics of protein. These works have generated a large amount of data whose interpretation is debated. New experiments measure the dynamics of water at low temperature on the surface of proteins, finding a qualitative change (crossover) that might be related to the slowing down and stop of the protein's activity (protein glass transition), possibly relevant for the safe preservation of organic material at low temperature. To better understand the experimental data several scenarios have been discussed. Here, we review these experiments and discuss their interpretations in relation with the anomalous properties of water. We summarize the results for the thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled water at an interface. We consider also the effect of water on protein stability, making a step in the direction of understanding, by means of Monte Carlo simulations and theoretical calculations, how the interplay of water cooperativity and hydrogen bonds interfacial strengthening affects the protein cold denaturation.

  15. Water Dynamics at Rough Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Rosenstihl; Kerstin Kämpf; Felix Klameth; Matthias Sattig; Michael Vogel

    2014-07-21

    We use molecular dynamics computer simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to investigate the dynamics of water at interfaces of molecular roughness and low mobility. We find that, when approaching such interfaces, the structural relaxation of water, i.e., the $\\alpha$ process, slows down even when specific attractive interactions are absent. This prominent effect is accompanied by a smooth transition from Vogel to Arrhenius temperature dependence and by a growing importance of jump events. Consistently, at protein surfaces, deviations from Arrhenius behavior are weak when free water does not exist. Furthermore, in nanoporous silica, a dynamic crossover of liquid water occurs when a fraction of solid water forms near 225 K and, hence, the liquid dynamics changes from bulk-like to interface-dominated. At sufficiently low temperatures, water exhibits a quasi-universal $\\beta$ process, which is characterized by an activation energy of $E_a\\!=\\!0.5$ eV and involves anisotropic reorientation about large angles. As a consequence of its large amplitude, the faster $\\beta$ process destroys essentially all orientational correlation, rendering observation of a possible slower $\\alpha$ process difficult in standard experiments. Nevertheless, we find indications for the existence of structural relaxation down to a glass transition of interfacial water near 185 K. Hydrated proteins show a highly restricted backbone motion with an amplitude, which decreases upon cooling and vanishes at comparable temperatures, providing evidence for a high relevance of water rearrangements in the hydration shell for secondary protein relaxations.

  16. Caffeine and agricultural pesticide concentrations in surface water and groundwater on the north shore of Kauai (Hawaii, USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    on the north shore of Kauai (Hawaii, USA) Karen L. Knee a,b,*, Richard Gossett c , Alexandria B. Boehm d, and metribuzin) concen- trations in environmental waters on the tropical north shore of Kauai (Hawaii, USA of Hawaii, have been detected in beach and river water on the north shore of Kauai since 2000 (Hanalei

  17. Analysis of Surface Drag of StromaxTM in Water Alec Ye || Alecye123@yahoo.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    the pressure drag and medium drag the same by having the same air foil design and only changing the experiment learned is data analysis. There is a lot of uncertainty and standard deviation calculated with practical the temperature of the water, temperature of the air, the amount of water in the tank, and the tightness

  18. Effects of Hydrophobic Surface Treatments on Dropwise Condensation and Freezing of Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, John

    1995-01-01

    and a computer-based image capture system. Three different treatments were used on the polished copper condensing surface; no coating, a silicone conformal coating, and a long-chain sulfur based coating. Results for the heat transfer data showed...

  19. Methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in the surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Steve

    production or chlorophyll-a levels in the surface Atlantic Ocean. However, we did find a novel monoxide and formaldehyde [Millet et al., 2008]. Acetone and acetalde- hyde are both recognized precursors

  20. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 4 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUELS SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-08-15

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on June 12, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ≤ 3 indicates at a 99% confidence interval that split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report specifies 95% confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0014 was the exception. The ORAU gross beta result of 6.30 ± 0.65 pCi/L from location NRD is well above NFS's non-detected result of 1.56 ± 0.59 pCi/L. NFS's data package includes no detected result for any radionuclide at location NRD. At NRC's request, ORAU performed gamma spectroscopic analysis of sample 5198W0014 to identify analytes contributing to the relatively elevated gross beta results. This analysis identified detected amounts of naturally-occurring constituents, most notably Ac-228 from the thorium decay series, and does not suggest the presence of site-related contamination.

  1. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaplin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperature...

  2. Arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  3. WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE STATE OF OHIO COMPONENT OF THE OHIO RIVER BASIN WATER QUALITY TRADING PROGRAM #12;Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water Quality Trading Program #12;2 Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water

  4. Selecting a new water heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This fact sheet describes the types of water heaters available (storage water heaters, demand water heaters, heat pump water heaters, tankless coil and indirect water heaters, and solar water heaters). The criteria for selection are discussed. These are capacity, efficiency rating, and cost. A resource list is provided for further information.

  5. Sandia Energy - Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, a backward--bent duct buoy (BBDB) oscillating water column wave energy converter design. The team from HMRC included Tom Walsh, Brian Holmes, Florent Thiebaut, Neil...

  6. Sandia Energy - Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering, Water Power WEC-Sim Code Development Meeting at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  7. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear plants use steam turbines, and cooling water asmajority is used for steam-driven turbines, which generatedelectricity using steam engines, gas turbines, or Stirling

  8. Alkali Soils, Irrigation Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1910-01-01

    ............................................................................ Chloride of soda.. 101 This is an escellcnt water. WATER OF COLORADO RIVER, NEAB SEARON, TEXAS. TPater soluble solids, 1.245 parts per million. MISCELLANEOUS WATERS. The follomirlg ai~alyses give the amount of alkaline salts pre IRIETGITTON WATERS.- S....4LTS IN PARTS PER MILLION . Alkaline Alkaline Alkaline Carbonate Sulphate Chloride I I i 1. 895 ' 1. 558 180 21 112 302 ' 1. 964 703 775 6. 237 F . 934 . 2. 909 635 2. 124 1. 785 951 523 150 1. 788 1. 947 4. 031 1. 698 201...

  9. Cooperating for Cleaner Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    . This TMDL plan will budget how much bacteria pollution from point sources (like wastewater treatment facilities) and nonpoint sources (runoff from land) can occur in a single day and still maintain water quality standards. Kerry Niemann, TCEQ project... of water on its 303(d) list (a list of water segments that do not meet water quality standards) and to develop a TMDL for each pollutant that impairs any segment, according to TCEQ docu- ments. TCEQ has adopted 63 TMDLs with EPA approving 60 of those...

  10. Residential Absorption Water Heater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Absorption Water Heater 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Kyle Gluesenkamp, gluesenkampk@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline:...

  11. Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity March 25, 2015 Cross-cutting Sustainability Platform Review Principle Investigator: Dr. Henriette I. Jager Organization: Oak Ridge National...

  12. ADVANCED MATERIALS Membranes for Clean Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADVANCED MATERIALS Membranes for Clean Water Objective This project provides measurement solutions that probe the surface and internal structure of polymer membranes used in water purification, and correlate that structure to the transport of water and other species through the membrane. Our methods are focused

  13. 2006 Nature Publishing Group Episodic fresh surface waters in the Eocene Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakobsson, Martin

    with a local sea surface temperature rise from ,10 8C to 13 8C, pointing to simultaneous increases in salt. The recent Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 302 (or Arctic Coring Expedition, ACEX tolerant species have experimentally been pre-conditioned by gradual increase of salt concentrations

  14. Coins falling in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luke Heisinger; Paul K Newton; Eva Kanso

    2013-12-08

    When a coin falls in water, its trajectory is one of four types determined by its dimensionless moment of inertia $I^\\ast$ and Reynolds number Re: (A) steady; (B) fluttering; (C) chaotic; or (D) tumbling. The dynamics induced by the interaction of the water with the surface of the coin, however, makes the exact landing site difficult to predict a priori. Here, we describe a carefully designed experiment in which a coin is dropped repeatedly in water, so that we can determine the probability density functions (pdf) associated with the landing positions for each of the four trajectory types, all of which are radially symmetric about the center-drop line. In the case of the steady mode, the pdf is approximately Gaussian distributed, with variances that are small, indicating that the coin is most likely to land at the center, right below the point it is dropped from. For the other falling modes, the center is one of the least likely landing sites. Indeed, the pdf's of the fluttering, chaotic and tumbling modes are characterized by a "dip" around the center. For the tumbling mode, the pdf is a ring configuration about the center-line, with a ring width that depends on the dimensionless parameters $I^\\ast$ and Re and height from which the coin is dropped. For the chaotic mode, the pdf is generally a broadband distribution spread out radially symmetrically about the center-line. For the steady and fluttering modes, the coin never flips, so the coin lands with the same side up as was dropped. For the chaotic mode, the probability of heads or tails is close to 0.5. In the case of the tumbling mode, the probability of heads or tails based on the height of the drop which determines whether the coin flips an even or odd number of times during descent.

  15. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  16. WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY 1939-1948 Marine Biological i STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;a WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM arid to avoid delay in publication. Washington D. CWATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

  17. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  18. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

    1996-01-01

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  19. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    Arkan- sas in order to determine the effect of local manganese, phosphate, pyrite, lead-zinc and uranium mineralization on the groundwater chemistry. Most of this study (75 springs) was concentrated in the Batesville .,.:;, Water Quality. 18 Comparison of Water Chemistry. 27 Geochemical Exploration. 30 Four Minera 1i zed Areas

  20. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  1. SEASONAL SNOWMELT VERSUS IMPACT-TRIGGERED RUNOFF IN MARS' GEOLOGIC RECORD OF SURFACE LIQUID WATER. E. S. Kite1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Early Mars is retreat of water ice to planetary cold traps. (Melt- ing is also suppressed at low, forcing seasonal melting (Fig. 1b). Strong sensitivity to orbital forcing, plus the knowledge

  2. Validation of Hot Water and Lactic Acid Sprays for the Reduction of Enteric Pathogens on the Surface of Beef Carcasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Kyle D.

    2011-02-22

    in eliminating or reducing enteric pathogens. The facilities selected utilized either a lactic acid spray treatment or a combination of hot water followed by a lactic acid treatment. At both facilities, mesophilic plate counts (MPC) were significantly (P < 0...

  3. A Study to Verify the Material Surface Concept of Water Table by Examining Analytical and Numerical Models. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dadi, Sireesh Kumar

    2011-10-21

    : the Neuman model, which assumes instantaneous drainage from the unsaturated zone; the Moench model, which considered gradual drainage from the unsaturated zone using a series of exponential terms in the water table boundary condition; and the Mathias...

  4. Water condensation behavior on the surface of a network of superhydrophobic carbon fibers with high-aspect-ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ho-Young

    membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) [7]. Especially, GDL is composed of microscale CF networks such as CF gases in PEMFC. However, during the PEMFC operation, water is gener- ated from the oxygen reduction

  5. Removal of Animal Antibiotics for Potable Water Reclamation: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Rita

    2015-01-01

    of the Technologies for Water Treatment and Reuse. Ind. Eng.sewage sludge, and surface waters. Chimia. Gobel, A. , C.S.bioreactor treatment. Water Science & Technology. 65(5):

  6. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kienitz, Brian

    2010-01-01

    1993, "The Contact Angle  between Water and the Surface of Desorption, and Transport of Water in  Polymer Electrolyte Vaporization?Exchange Model  for Water Sorption and Flux in 

  7. Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Wolfgang

    Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;Contents Our Breaking News 35 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse University of South Australia Mawson Lakes Campus Mawson Lakes SA 5095 Telephone: +61 (08) 8302 3338 Fax: +61 (08) 8302 3386 Web: unisa.edu.au/water

  8. Headquarters Water Mission Area Water Science Field Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Headquarters Water Mission Area Water Science Field Team John Ho mann(Tucson, AZ) Chief William Guertal Deputy Associate Director for Water Katie Orsi Executive Assistant Harry House Senior Data Science Support Manager Water Business Operations Gene Summerhill O ce of Water Quality Donna Myers Chief Dave

  9. 1. Introduction Chilled water, a unique resource comprising water and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang

    1. Introduction Chilled water, a unique resource comprising water and energy elements, is commonly the targeted buildings. In typical chilled water systems, chilled water is distributed throughout the building to provide air conditioning and equipment cooling. The chilled water system has been one of the most

  10. The floating water bridge The floating water bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    The floating water bridge The floating water bridge Elmar C. Fuchs1 , Jakob Woisetschläger2 , Karl, a stable water connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge. A detailed this bridge. 1. Introduction Water undoubtedly is the most important chemical substance in the world. Many

  11. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  12. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 3 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-05-28

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on March 20, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0012 was the exception. The ORAU result of 9.23 ± 0.73 pCi/L from location MCD is well above NFS's result of -0.567 ± 0.63 pCi/L (non-detected). NFS's data package included a detected result for U-233/234, but no other uranium or plutonium detection, and nothing that would suggest the presence of beta-emitting radionuclides. The ORAU laboratory reanalyzed sample 5198W0012 using the remaining portion of the sample volume and a result of 11.3 ± 1.1 pCi/L was determined. As directed, the laboratory also counted the filtrate using gamma spectrometry analysis and identified only naturally occurring or ubiquitous man-made constituents, including beta emitters that are presumably responsible for the elevated gross beta values.

  13. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Chaplin

    2007-06-10

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

  14. Stratified Steady Periodic Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-02-11

    This paper considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. We prove the existence of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed and amplitude.

  15. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hereman, Willy A.M.

    . Water Wave Experiments and Observations VII. Future Directions VIII. Bibliography Glossary Deep water A surface wave is said to be in deep water if its wavelength is much shorter than the local water depthShallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer

  16. Surface Speciation at Solid/Liquid Interfaces: A Vibrational Sum-Frequency Study of Acetate Adsorption at the Fluorite/Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    recorded in frequency regions corresponding to vibrational modes of the adsorbate and water. Quantitative concentration of surface defects making the interpretation of the results in terms of an intact crystallineH), which generates a strong electric field (ranging up to 107 V,cm-1 4) at the interface. Except

  17. Adsorption of Water on Reconstructed Rutile TiO2(011)-(21): TidO Double Bonds and Surface Reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    , Princeton UniVersity, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, Department of Physics, Tulane UniVersity, New Orleans% of the surface active sites are hydroxylated. These findings are well explained by total energy density functional theory calculations and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations for water adsorption

  18. IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE Irrigation Water Background In the past, there were minor of irrigation water in Georgia. This is because only a small amount of acreage under irrigated agriculture utilized potable (suitable for drinking) quality water. Thus, quality of irrigation water was not closely

  19. Green Systems Solar Hot Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Green Systems Solar Hot Water Heating the Building Co-generation: Heat Recovery System: Solar Thermal Panels (Trex enclosure) Hot Water Storage Tank (TS-5; basement) Hot Water Heaters (HW-1,2; basement) Pre-heats water so water heaters don't need to use as much energy Gas-powered, high efficiency

  20. WATER SUPPLY A Handbook on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    WATER SUPPLY HANDBOOK A Handbook on Water Supply Planning and Resource Management Institute for Water Resources Water Resources Support Center U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 7701 Telegraph Road Studies Division December 1998 Revised IWR Report 96-PS-4 #12;U.S. Army Institute for Water Resources

  1. Water in Asbestos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fomin, Yu D; Tsiok, E N

    2015-01-01

    We present the molecular simulation study of the behavior of water and sodium chloride solution confined in lizardite asbestos nanotube which is a typical example of hydrophilic confinement. The local structure, orientational and dynamic properties are studied. It is shown that the diffusion coefficient drops about two orders of magnitude comparing to the bulk case, and water in lizardite asbestos tubes experiences vitrification rather then crystallization upon cooling in accordance with the results for some other hydrophilic confinements. The behavior of sodium chloride solutions also considered and the formation of double layer is observed. It is shower that both sodium and chlorine have larger diffusion coefficients then water.

  2. Wind/Water Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    Nobel laureate Richard Smalley cited energy and water as among humanity's top problems for the next 50 years as the world's population increases from 6.3 billion to 9 billion. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Program has initiated an effort to explore wind energy's role as a technical solution to this critically important issue in the United States and the world. This four-page fact sheet outlines five areas in which wind energy can contribute: thermoelectric power plant/water processes, irrigation, municipal water supply, desalination, and wind/hydropower integration.

  3. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-08-04

    that are radioactive. The most common radionu- clides in drinking water are radium, radon and uranium. Most of the radionuclides in drinking water occur nat- urally at very low levels and are not considered a pub- lic health concern. However, radionuclides can also...-rays, can pass through the human body and are best shielded by dense materials such as lead or thick concrete. levels no higher than 4,000 pCi/L. Because about 1/10,000th of radon in water transfers to air, this would contribute about 0.4 pCi/L of radon...

  4. Water | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos/01/2012 Page 1WaterWater forWater The

  5. Water | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobsMotionHeatEnergy Solar Training for8 Things YouAboutWater Water Water

  6. Fog Water and Ecosystem Function: Heterogeneity in a California Redwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    access at Springerlink.com Fog Water and Ecosystem Function:The contribution of fog to the water relations of Sequoiaelectrical conductivity, water content, and surface conduc-

  7. Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Molecular Simulations and Bimodal Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. Michigan; Hwang, Gi Suk; Kaviany, Massoud; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Kientiz, Brian; Weber, Adam Z.; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2010-11-19

    Using molecular simulations and a bimodal domain network, the role of water state on Nafion water uptake and water and proton transport is investigated. Although the smaller domains provide moderate transport pathways, their effectiveness remains low due to strong, resistive water molecules/domain surface interactions. The water occupancy of the larger domains yields bulk-like water, and causes the observed transition in the water uptake and significant increases in transport properties.

  8. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI: Darwin L. Sorensen Other PIs of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities in the watershed. The major

  9. California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality Certification Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State...

  10. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Oil Production .quality water (2, 32). Oil Production In 2009, oil supplied90% of U.S. onshore oil production uses between 2.1 and 5.4

  11. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    produced water from production of crude oil, natural gas,the production and processing of each gallon of crude oil (production and processing of 1 gallon (3.8 liters) of crude oil

  12. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    water from production of crude oil, natural gas, and coaleach gallon (3.79 liters) of crude oil. When combined withto refine each gallon of crude oil, between 3.6 and 7.0

  13. UV water disinfector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA); Garud, Vikas (Bombay, IN)

    1998-07-14

    A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system, and an air-suspended bare UV lamp. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir.

  14. Contaminating Fresh Waters (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is illegal to discharge any dyestuff, coal tar, oil, sawdust, poison, or deleterious substances into any fresh running waters in Florida in quantities sufficient to injure, stupefy, or kill fish...

  15. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  16. Cooling Water System Optimization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aegerter, R.

    2005-01-01

    During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower...

  17. Energy and Water Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Letter 2004-02 - FY 2004 Le2islation Provisions (dated March 1.2004) Energy and Water Act AL-2004-02 provides guidance regarding the implementation of Section 30 I. 304....

  18. Electrolysis of Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis of Water Grades: 5-8 Topic: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Solar Owner: Florida Solar Energy Center This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of...

  19. UV water disinfector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.; Garud, V.

    1998-07-14

    A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system and an air-suspended bare UV lamp are disclosed. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir. 7 figs.

  20. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheels, Ronald H. (Concord, MA)

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  1. Purifying contaminated water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

  2. Water Quality Criteria Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    APPENDIX G Water Quality Criteria CONTENTS Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798 EPA's Water Quality Criteria and Standards Plan -- Priorities for the Future............................798 Compilation of Recommended Water Quality Criteria and EPA's Process for Deriving New

  3. Designing Water Smart Landscapes Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Designing Water Smart Landscapes Activity Objective: Create a water smart home landscape. Materials://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/publications/publications.html Draw the plants, using tracing paper. Citizenship Activity Develop a water smart plan for a non

  4. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    B: Input Screens SCREEN D1: WATER HEATER SPECIFICATIONS 1.no baffle present SCREEN G: WATER SUPPLY AND DRAW PIPEfor EIDs (sec) 0.0 9. Supply Water Temperature (F) 58.00 10.

  5. Emergency Food and Water Supplies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    1999-05-14

    Creating an emergency supply of food and water, and knowing how to safely handle food and water after a disaster, can reduce stress, worry and inconvenience. This publication provides information on water supply storage and purification...

  6. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    forty gallon residential gas-fired storage water heater wasthat could replace a gas-fired storage water heater with adefined a baseline gas-fired storage water heater that meets

  7. A rapid method for measuring local groundwater-surface water interactions and identifying potential non-point source pollution inputs to rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Christopher Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Anderson, M.P. , 2005. Heat as a Ground Water Tracer.Ground Water, 43(6): 951-968-951-968. Bencala, K.E. , 1993.the Earth's thermal profile. Water resources research, 1(2):

  8. Investigating groundwater and surface water interactions using novel isotopes and geochemical tracers in the upper Merced River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Glenn David

    2009-01-01

    Mountains of the world, water towers for humanity: typology,and global significance, Water Resources Research, 43,36 Cl pulse in natural water, Letters to Nature, 300, 737-

  9. Groundwater Management and the Cost of Reduced Surface Water Deliveries to Urban Areas: The Case of the Central and West Coast Basins of Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunding, David L.; Hamilton, Stephen F; Ajami, Newsha K

    2009-01-01

    as a separate cost from WCB recycled water (b) Decompose theprice of CB recycled water into two terms: At time t=0: P T1over time for CB recycled water as follows: PPP ???? TtTT =

  10. Pump station for radioactive waste water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitton, John P.; Klos, Dean M.; Carrara, Danny T.; Minno, John J.

    2003-11-18

    A pump station for transferring radioactive particle containing waste water, includes: (a.) an enclosed sump having a vertically elongated right frusto conical wall surface and a bottom surface and (b.) a submersible volute centrifugal pump having a horizontally rotating impeller and a volute exterior surface. The sump interior surface, the bottom surface and the volute exterior surface are made of stainless steel having a 30 Ra or finer surface finish. A 15 Ra finish has been found to be most cost effective. The pump station is used for transferring waste water, without accumulation of radioactive fines.

  11. The Chilled Water and Hot Water Building Differential Pressure Setpoint Calculation - Chilled Water and Hot Water Pump Speed Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H., Jr.; Claridge, D.; Liu, C.; Deng, S.

    2002-01-01

    Water and Hot Water Building Deferential Pressure Setpoint Calculation ? Chilled Water and Hot Water Pump Speed Control Chenggang Liu Research Associate Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University College Station, TX Homer L. Bruner... of chilled water and hot water consumption with the leaking control valves on the cooling and heating coils. Variable speed pumps save cooling and heating energies. However, most of these advantages are lost when proper speed control is not maintained...

  12. Molded polymer solar water heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  13. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Recreation, Waste Water Descriptors: Water Quality Standards,Water Quality Monitoring, Water Quality, Viruses

  14. Time-resolved surface infrared spectroscopy during atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium and water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperling, Brent A. Hoang, John; Kimes, William A.; Maslar, James E.; Steffens, Kristen L.; Nguyen, Nhan V.

    2014-05-15

    Atomic layer deposition of titanium dioxide using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water vapor is studied by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) with a time resolution of 120?ms. At 190?°C and 240?°C, a decrease in the absorption from adsorbed TDMAT is observed without any evidence of an adsorbed product. Ex situ measurements indicate that this behavior is not associated with an increase in the impurity concentration or a dramatic change in the growth rate. A desorbing decomposition product is consistent with these observations. RAIRS also indicates that dehydroxylation of the growth surface occurs only among one type of surface hydroxyl groups. Molecular water is observed to remain on the surface and participates in reactions even at a relatively high temperature (110?°C) and with long purge times (30?s)

  15. Water Network Design by MINLP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-02-12

    We propose a solution method for a water-network optimization problem using a ... The optimal design of a WDN (Water Distribution Network) consists, in its ...

  16. Efficient Residential Water Heaters Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by Jerone Gagliano, director of Energy Engineering Performance Systems Development, about residential water heating technology and how to choose the right water heater.

  17. System for treating produced water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Lynn (Austin, TX); Kinney, Kerry (Austin, TX); Bowman, Robert S. (Lemitar, NM); Kwon, Soondong (Kyungbuk, KR)

    2010-08-03

    A system and method were used to treat produced water. Field-testing demonstrated the removal of contaminants from produced water from oil and gas wells.

  18. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments...

  19. Sandia Energy - Water Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sources and water distribution systems are protected from accidental of intentional contamination events and that reliable systems are in place should an event occur. As water...

  20. Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    intercept combined sewer and stormwater overflow in the citythat naturally manages stormwater and improves waterChicago’s wastewater and stormwater. Treated water would be