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1

Seismoelectric Phenomena in Fluid-Saturated Sediments  

SciTech Connect

Seismoelectric phenomena in sediments arise from acoustic wave-induced fluid motion in the pore space, which perturbs the electrostatic equilibrium of the electric double layer on the grain surfaces. Experimental techniques and the apparatus built to study this electrokinetic (EK) effect are described and outcomes for studies of seismoelectric phenomena in loose glass microspheres and medium-grain sand are presented. By varying the NaCl concentration in the pore fluid, we measured the conductivity dependence of two kinds of EK behavior: (1) the electric fields generated within the samples by the passage of transmitted acoustic waves, and (2) the electromagnetic wave produced at the fluid-sediment interface by the incident acoustic wave. Both phenomena are caused by relative fluid motion in the sediment pores--this feature is characteristic of poroelastic (Biot) media, but not predicted by either viscoelastic fluid or solid models. A model of plane-wave reflection from a fluid-sediment interface using EK-Biot theory leads to theoretical predictions that compare well to the experimental data for both sand and glass microspheres.

Block, G I; Harris, J G

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

Method of determining interwell oil field fluid saturation distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining the oil and brine saturation distribution in an oil field by taking electrical current and potential measurements among a plurality of open-hole wells geometrically distributed throughout the oil field. Poisson's equation is utilized to develop fluid saturation distributions from the electrical current and potential measurement. Both signal generating equipment and chemical means are used to develop current flow among the several open-hole wells.

Donaldson, Erle C. (Bartlesville, OK); Sutterfield, F. Dexter (Bartlesville, OK)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

ELECTROKINETIC WAVE PHENOMENA IN FLUID-SATURATED GRANULAR MEDIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrokinetic (EK) phenomena in sediments arise from relative fluid motion in the pore space, which perturbs the electrostatic equilibrium of the double layer at the grain surface. We have developed EK techniques in the laboratory to monitor acoustic wave propagation in electrolyte-saturated, unconsolidated sediments. Our experimental results indicate that as an acoustic wave travels through electrolyte-saturated sand, it can generate electric potentials greater than 1 mV. A careful study of these potentials was performed using medium-grain sand and loose glass microspheres for a range of pore fluid salinities and ultrasonic frequencies. Experimental results are also shown to compare well with numerical and analytical modeling based on the coupled electrokinetic-Biot theory developed by Pride (1994).

Block, G

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Gas saturated reservoirs change reflection amplitudes significantly. The goal for the final project period was to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration and transfer this knowledge as clearly and effectively as possible.

Michael Batzle

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Nonlinear pressure and temperature waves propagation in fluid-saturated rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study for the simulation of rock deformation due to nonlinear temperature and pressure waves in fluid saturated porous rock is presented. The problem of an homogeneous, thermoelastic, and isotropic fluid-saturated matrix, lying over an aquifer ... Keywords: Fluid dynamics, Geothermics, Nonlinear model, Quasi-Newton solver

M. De' Michieli Vitturi; F. Beux

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Predicting water saturation using artificial neural networks (ANNS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in the petroleum industry is widely increasing after major developments in ANN design. In this study, ANNs were used to develop a model for predicting water saturation in shaly formations using wireline ... Keywords: artificial neural networks, petroleum industry, shaly sandstone formation, water saturation

Nabil Al-Bulushi; Mariela Araujo; Martin Kraaijveld

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow. Water Flow Calibrations 18020C. ... NIST provides calibration services for water flow meters. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

9

Water-Miscible (Water-Soluble) Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, algae, and fungi. If disposal is of no concern, phenolics can be used. The soaps, wetting agents, and couplers used as emulsifiers in water-miscible fluids reduce surface

10

Nonlinear Saturation of Baroclinic Instability. Part II: Continuously Stratified Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rigorous upper bounds are derived that limit the finite-amplitude growth of arbitrary nonzonal disturbances to an unstable baroclinic zonal flow in a continuously stratified, quasi-geostrophic, semi-infinite fluid. Bounds are obtained bath on the ...

Theodore G. Shepherd

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, or Liquid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, Natural Gas, or Liquid Hydrocarbon Flows Special Tests. Fluid Metrology ...

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

12

Frequency-dependent processing and interpretation (FDPI) of seismic data for identifying, imaging and monitoring fluid-saturated underground reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for identifying, imaging and monitoring dry or fluid-saturated underground reservoirs using seismic waves reflected from target porous or fractured layers is set forth. Seismic imaging the porous or fractured layer occurs by low pass filtering of the windowed reflections from the target porous or fractured layers leaving frequencies below low-most corner (or full width at half maximum) of a recorded frequency spectra. Additionally, the ratio of image amplitudes is shown to be approximately proportional to reservoir permeability, viscosity of fluid, and the fluid saturation of the porous or fractured layers.

Goloshubin, Gennady M. (Sugar Land, TX); Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA)

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mathematical modelling and study of the consolidation of an elastic saturated soil with an incompressible fluid by FEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main aim of this paper is to validate and to solve a model for consolidation of an elastic saturated soil with incompressible fluid. Firstly, we prove the existence and uniqueness of the solution of the variational problem corresponding to an initial ... Keywords: Finite element analysis, Numerical methods, Partial differential equation, Porous media, Soil consolidation

C. MenéNdez; P. J. G. Nieto; F. A. Ortega; A. Bello

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

On the hot-spot-controlled critical heat flux mechanism in pool boiling of saturated fluids  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we further investigate the hypothesis that the critical heat flux (CHF) occurs when some point on the heated surface reaches a high enough temperature that liquid can no longer contact that point, resulting in a gradual but continuous increase in the overall surface temperature. This hypothesis unifies the occurrence of the CHF and the quenching of hot surfaces by relating both to the same concept, i.e., the ability of a liquid to contact a hot surface. We use a two-dimensional transient conduction model to study the boiling phenomenon in the second transition region of saturated pool nucleate boiling on a horizontal surface. The heater surface is assumed to consist of two regions: a dry patch region formed as a result of complete evaporation of the thinner liquid macrolayers and a two-phase macrolayer region formed by numerous vapor stems penetrating relatively thick liquid macrolayers. The constitutive relations used to determine the stem-macrolayer configuration in the two-phase macrolayer region of the boiling surface were reevaluated for Gaertner's clean water and water-nickel/salt solution. 29 refs.

Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Nelson, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

On the hot-spot-controlled critical heat flux mechanism in pool boiling of saturated fluids  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we further investigate the hypothesis that the critical heat flux (CHF) occurs when some point on the heated surface reaches a high enough temperature that liquid can no longer contact that point, resulting in a gradual but continuous increase in the overall surface temperature. This hypothesis unifies the occurrence of the CHF and the quenching of hot surfaces by relating both to the same concept, i.e., the ability of a liquid to contact a hot surface. We use a two-dimensional transient conduction model to study the boiling phenomenon in the second transition region of saturated pool nucleate boiling on a horizontal surface. The heater surface is assumed to consist of two regions: a dry patch region formed as a result of complete evaporation of the thinner liquid macrolayers and a two-phase macrolayer region formed by numerous vapor stems penetrating relatively thick liquid macrolayers. The constitutive relations used to determine the stem-macrolayer configuration in the two-phase macrolayer region of the boiling surface were reevaluated for Gaertner`s clean water and water-nickel/salt solution. 29 refs.

Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Nelson, R.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

X-ray Microtomography Determination of Air?Water Interfacial Area?Water Saturation Relationships in Sandy Porous Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, total smooth air-water interfacial areas were measured for a series of nine natural and model sandy porous media as a function of water saturation using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Interfacial areas decreased linearly with water saturation, while the estimated maximum interfacial area compared favorably to the media geometric surface areas. Importantly, relative interfacial area (i.e., normalized by geometric surface area) versus water saturation plots for all media collapsed into a single linear cluster (r{sup 2} = 0.93), suggesting that geometric surface area is an important, and perhaps sufficient, descriptor of sandy media that governs total smooth interfacial area?water saturation relationships. Measured relationships were used to develop an empirical model for estimating interfacial area-water saturation relationships for sandy porous media. Model-based interfacial area estimates for independent media were generally slightly higher than interfacial areas measured using aqueous-phase interfacial tracer methods, which may indicate that microtomography captures regions of the air-water interface that are not accessible to aqueous-phase interfacial tracers. The empirical model presented here requires only average particle diameter and porosity as input parameters and can be used to readily estimate air-water interfacial area?water saturation relationships for sandy porous media.

Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Harrold, Katherine H.; Lieb-Lappen, Ross M. (Middlebury)

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

17

Effect of Pressure Gradient and InitialWater Saturation on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'40 30 20 10 0 !2 5 Water injection was stopped for 14 hours t q,=5 crn3/rnin,Ap=O.OIO psi/cm qp11 crn

Firoozabadi, Abbas

18

Does Life Come from Water or Fluids?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work the Stochastic generalization of the quantum hydrodynamic analogy (SQHA) is used to obtain the far from equilibrium kinetics for a real gas and its fluid phase. In gasses and their liquids, interacting by Lennard-Jones potentials whose mean distance is bigger than the quantum correlation distance and than the molecular interaction distance r0, it is possible to define a Fokker-Plank type equation of motion as a function of the mean phase space molecular volume that far from equilibrium shows maximizing the dissipation of a part of the generalized SQHA-free energy. In the case of a real gas with no chemical reactions and at quasi-isothermal conditions, the principle disembogues into the maximum free energy dissipation confirming the experimental outputs of electro-convective instability. In this case, the model shows that the transition to stationary states with higher free energy can happen and that, in incompressible fluids, the increase of free energy is almost given by a decrease of entropy leading to the appearance of self-ordered structures. The output of the theory showing that the generation of order, via energy dissipation, is more efficient in fluids than in gasses, because of their incompressibility, leads to the re-conciliation between physics and biology furnishing the eplanation why the life was born in water. The theoretical output also suggests that the search for life out of the earth must consider the possibility to find it in presence of liquid phases different from water.

Piero Chiarelli

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport in variably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiphase flow, solute transport and reactive chemistry in porousmultiphase flow, solute transport and reactive chemistry in porousmultiphase fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) we consider not only porous

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Acoustic Emission in a Fluid Saturated Hetergeneous Porous Layer with Application to Hydraulic Fracture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motion for a New Model of Hydraulic Fracture With an Induced1987. Hydrodynamics of a Vertical Hydraulic Fracture, Earthand Fluid Flow in the Hydraulic Fracture Pmess, (PhD.

Nelson, J.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Acoustic emission in a fluid saturated heterogeneous porous layer with application to hydraulic fracture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A theoretical model for acoustic emission in a vertically heterogeneous porous layer bounded by semi-infinite solid regions is developed using linearized equations of motion for a fluid/solid mixture and a reflectivity method. Green's functions are derived for both point loads and moments. Numerically integrated propagators represent solutions for intermediate heterogeneous layers in the porous region. These are substituted into a global matrix for solution by Gaussian elimination and back-substitution. Fluid partial stress and seismic responses to dislocations associated with fracturing of a layer of rock with a hydraulically conductive fracture network are computed with the model. A constitutive model is developed for representing the fractured rock layer as a porous material, using commonly accepted relationships for moduli. Derivations of density, tortuosity, and sinuosity are provided. The main results of the model application are the prediction of a substantial fluid partial stress response related to a second mode wave for the porous material. The response is observable for relatively large distances, on the order of several tens of meters. The visco-dynamic transition frequency associated with parabolic versus planar fluid velocity distributions across micro-crack apertures is in the low audio or seismic range, in contrast to materials with small pore size, such as porous rocks, for which the transition frequency is ultrasonic. Seismic responses are predicted for receiver locations both in the layer and in the outlying solid regions. In the porous region, the seismic response includes both shear and dilatational wave arrivals and a second-mode arrival. The second-mode arrival is not observable outside of the layer because of its low velocity relative to the dilatational and shear wave propagation velocities of the solid region.

Nelson, J.T. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

CORRELATIONS BETWEEN VAPOR SATURATION, FLUID COMPOSITION, AND WELL DECLINE IN LARDERELLO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large body of field data from Larderello shows striking temporal correlations between decline of well flow-rate, produced gas/steam ratio, chloride concentration and produced vapor fraction. The latter is inferred from measured concentrations of non-condensible gases in samples of well fluid, using chemical phase equilibrium principles. Observed temporal changes in the vapor fractions can be interpreted in term of a ''multiple source'' model, as suggested by D'Amore and Truesdell (1979). This provides clues to the dynamics of reservoir depletion, and to the evaluation of well productivity and longevity.

D'Amore, F.; Pruess, K.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

Saturation meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A saturation meter for use in a pressurized water reactor plant comprising a differential pressure transducer having a first and second pressure sensing means and an alarm. The alarm is connected to the transducer and is preset to activate at a level of saturation prior to the formation of a steam void in the reactor vessel.

Gregurech, S.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Numerical Modeling of Coupled Variably-Saturated Fluid Flow and Reactive Transport with Fast and Slow Chemical Reactions  

SciTech Connect

The couplings among chemical reaction rates, advective and diffusive transport in fractured media or soils, and changes in hydraulic properties due to precipitation and dissolution within fractures and in rock matrix are important for both nuclear waste disposal and remediation of contaminated sites. This paper describes the development and application of LEHGC2.0, a mechanistically-based numerical model for simulation of coupled fluid flow and reactive chemical transport including both fast and slow reactions invariably saturated media. Theoretical bases and numerical implementations are summarized, and two example problems are demonstrated. The first example deals with the effect of precipitation-dissolution on fluid flow and matrix diffusion in a two-dimensional fractured media. Because of the precipitation and decreased diffusion of solute from the fracture into the matrix, retardation in the fractured medium is not as large as the case wherein interactions between chemical reactions and transport are not considered. The second example focuses on a complicated but realistic advective-dispersive-reactive transport problem. This example exemplifies the need for innovative numerical algorithms to solve problems involving stiff geochemical reactions.

LI, MING-HSU; SIEGEL, MALCOLM D.; YEH, GOUR-TSYH (GEORGE)

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

Free convection over a non-isothermal axisymmetric body immersed in a porous medium saturated with an electrically conducting non-Newtonian fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study investigates the problem of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) free convection over a non-isothermal axisymmetric body under the action of transverse magnetic field. The body is embedded in a porous medium saturated with electrically conducting non-Newtonian power law fluid. In order to obtain similarity solution, it is assumed that the viscosity of the fluid decays exponentially with temperature. The qualitative results are illustrated for a vertical flat plate, horizontal cylinder and sphere.

Shobha Bagai; Chandrashekhar Nishad

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Subcooled and saturated water flow boiling pressure drop in small diameter helical coils at low pressure  

SciTech Connect

Experimental pressure drop results on boiling water flow through three helical coils of tube inner diameter of 4.03 mm and 4.98 mm and coil diameter to tube diameter ratio of 26.1, 64.1 and 93.3 are presented. Both subcooled and saturated flow boiling are investigated, covering operating pressures from 120 to 660 kPa, mass fluxes from 290 to 690 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and heat fluxes from 50 to 440 kW m{sup -2}. Existing correlations for subcooled flow pressure drop are found not capable to fit the present subcooled database, while the measurements in saturated flow conditions are successfully reproduced by existing correlations for both straight and coiled pipe two-phase flow. The experimental database is included in tabular form. (author)

Cioncolini, Andrea; Santini, Lorenzo; Ricotti, Marco E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Influence of Viscous and Capillary Forces on Immiscible Fluid Displacement: Pore-Scale Experimental Study in a Water-Wet Micromodel Demonstrating Viscous and Capillary Fingering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unstable immiscible fluid displacement in porous media affects geological carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and groundwater contamination by nonaqueous phase liquids. Characterization of immiscible displacement processes at the pore-scale is important to better understand macroscopic processes at the continuum-scale. A series of displacement experiments was conducted to investigate the impacts of viscous and capillary forces on displacement stability and fluid saturation distributions in a homogeneous water-wet pore network micromodel with precisely-microfabricated pore structures. Displacements were studied using seven wetting-nonwetting fluid pairs with viscosity ratios M (viscosity of the advancing nonwetting fluid divided by the viscosity of the displaced wetting fluid) ranging four orders of magnitude from logM = -1.95 to 1.88. The micromodel was initially saturated with either polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG200) or water as a wetting fluid, which was then displaced by a nonwetting alkane fluid under different flow rates. Capillary numbers (Ca) ranged over four orders of magnitude for the reported experiments, from logCa = -5.88 to -1.02. Fluorescent microscopy was used to visualize displacement and measure nonwetting fluid saturation distributions. These experiments extend the classical work by Lenormand et al. by using water-wet micromodels, high-precision fabrication, and enhanced image analysis of the saturation distributions. In the micromodel experiments initially saturated with PEG200, a viscous wetting fluid, unstable displacement occurred by viscous fingering over the whole range of imposed capillary numbers. For the experiments initially saturated with water, unstable displacement occurred by capillary fingering at low capillary numbers. When the viscous forces were increased by increasing the injection rate, crossover into stable displacement was observed for the fluid pairs with M > 0. For unstable displacement experiments applying the same capillary number for the various fluid pairs, nonwetting fluid saturations were higher when capillary fingering was the dominant fingering process compared to viscous fingering. Our saturation distributions are consistent with other published experimental work and confirm the numerical results obtained by Lenormand et al.

Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

28

Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olivines, a significant constituent of basaltic rocks, have the potential to immobilize permanently CO2 after it is injected in the deep subsurface, due to carbonation reactions occurring between CO2 and the host rock. To investigate the reactions of fayalitic olivine with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and formation of mineral carbonates, experiments were conducted at temperatures of 35 °C to 80 °C, 90 atm pressure and anoxic conditions. For every temperature, the dissolution of fayalite was examined both in the presence of liquid water and H2O-saturated scCO2. The experiments were conducted in a high pressure batch reactor at reaction time extending up to 85 days. The newly formed products were characterized using a comprehensive suite of bulk and surface characterization techniques X-ray diffraction, Transmission/Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Focused Ion Beam, and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Siderite with rhombohedral morphology was formed at 35 °C, 50 °C, and 80 °C in the presence of liquid water and scCO2. In H2O-saturated scCO2, the formation of siderite was confirmed only at high temperature (80 °C). Characterization of reacted samples in H2O-saturated scCO2 with high resolution TEM indicated that siderite formation initiated inside voids created during the initial steps of fayalite dissolution. Later stages of fayalite dissolution result in the formation of siderite in layered vertical structures, columns or pyramids with a rhombus base morphology.

Qafoku, Odeta; Kovarik, Libor; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Arey, Bruce W.; Tucek, Jiri; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host brine, some will remain as neat to water saturated super critical CO2 (scCO2) near the well bore and at the caprock, especially in the short-term life cycle of the sequestration site. Little is known about the reactivity of minerals with scCO2 containing variable concentrations of water. In this study, we used high-pressure infrared spectroscopy to examine the carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) in situ over a 24 hr reaction period with scCO2 containing water concentrations between 0% and 100% saturation, at temperatures of 35, 50, and 70 °C, and at a pressure of 100 bar. Little or no detectable carbonation was observed when brucite was reacted with neat scCO2. Higher water concentrations and higher temperatures led to greater brucite carbonation rates and larger extents of conversion to magnesium carbonate products. The only observed carbonation product at 35 °C was nesquehonite (MgCO3 • 3H2O). Mixtures of nesquehonite and magnesite (MgCO3) were detected at 50 °C, but magnesite was more prevalent with increasing water concentration. Both an amorphous hydrated magnesium carbonate solid and magnesite were detected at 70 °C, but magnesite predominated with increasing water concentration. The identity of the magnesium carbonate products appears strongly linked to magnesium water exchange kinetics through temperature and water availability effects.

Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Zhang, Changyong; Wang, Zheming; Schaef, Herbert T.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

31

A Study on the Analysis of the Formation of High Water Saturation zones around Well perforations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The water produced with oil as a result of water coning is a serious problem as it decreases well productivity and increases the cost of… (more)

Alrumah, Muhammad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Investigation of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and water systems for saturated solar ponds. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this study was to gather relevant data primarily from the published literature to investigate the technical feasibility of using a Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-NaHCO/sub 3/ mixture for a saturated solar pond. This objective was accomplished by a literature search and review of existing chemical information and by performing simple chemistry experiments in the laboratory. Information on density, solubility, phase diagram, equilibrium compositions, reaction rate constant, equilibrium constant, diffusion coefficient, vapor pressure and potentially useful additives is compiled. It is concluded that even though both the saturation density and solubility increase with temperature for trona, it is not chemically stable either at room temperature or higher temperatures (80/sup 0/C). Therefore, as is, trona is not suitable for use in a saturated solar pond. From the literature it has been found that sugar and gum can retard the decomposition of bicarbonate to carbonate in the mixture. Nevertheless, trona is a very attractive solute for an unsaturated solar pond. A laboratory unsaturated pond with a stable density gradient has worked without any problems for about two months at InterTechnology/Solar Corporation.

None

1980-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

33

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

> 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which...

34

Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Conditions from Oven-Dry to Full Saturation  

SciTech Connect

Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to the capillary force only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which the water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified measurements. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but underestimate the conductivity. The extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

Zhang, Z. F.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

35

Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Full Range of Saturation  

SciTech Connect

Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to capillary forces only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified with six datasets from the literature. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but under-estimate the conductivity while the extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

Zhang, Z. F.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

37

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems May 16, 2013 - 3:02pm Addthis Illustration of a solar water heater. Illustration of a solar water heater. Heat-transfer fluids carry heat through solar collectors and a heat exchanger to the heat storage tanks in solar water heating systems. When selecting a heat-transfer fluid, you and your solar heating contractor should consider the following criteria: Coefficient of expansion - the fractional change in length (or sometimes in volume, when specified) of a material for a unit change in temperature Viscosity - resistance of a liquid to sheer forces (and hence to flow) Thermal capacity - the ability of matter to store heat Freezing point - the temperature below which a liquid turns into a

38

MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENTS FOR A NON-NEWTONIAN FLUID AND WATER WITH AND WITHOUT ANTI-FOAM AGENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mass transfer rates were measured in a large scale system, which consisted of an 8.4 meter tall by 0.76 meter diameter column containing one of three fluids: water with an anti-foam agent, water without an anti-foam agent, and AZ101 simulant, which simulated a non-Newtonian nuclear waste. The testing contributed to the evaluation of large scale mass transfer of hydrogen in nuclear waste tanks. Due to its radioactivity, the waste was chemically simulated, and due to flammability concerns oxygen was used in lieu of hydrogen. Different liquids were used to better understand the mass transfer processes, where each of the fluids was saturated with oxygen, and the oxygen was then removed from solution as air bubbled up, or sparged, through the solution from the bottom of the column. Air sparging was supplied by a single tube which was co-axial to the column, the decrease in oxygen concentration was recorded, and oxygen measurements were then used to determine the mass transfer coefficients to describe the rate of oxygen transfer from solution. Superficial, average, sparging velocities of 2, 5, and 10 mm/second were applied to each of the liquids at three different column fill levels, and mass transfer coefficient test results are presented here for combinations of superficial velocities and fluid levels.

Leishear, R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

Separation of saturated hydrocarbons from coal by treatment with water at supercritical parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The treatment of coals of various degrees of metamorphism in supercritical water (SCW) over the temperature region 380-800{sup o}C was studied. The yields and compositions of liquid products obtained by treatment in SCW were determined. These data were compared with the results of the semicoking of the above coals.

M.R. Predtechenskiy; M.V. Pukhovoy [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russia). Kutateladze Institute of Thermophysics

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Radionuclide behavior in water saturated porous media: Diffusion and infiltration coupling of thermodynamically and kinetically controlled radionuclide water - mineral interactions  

SciTech Connect

A model is developed describing one dimensional radionuclide transport in porous media coupled with locally reversible radionuclide water-mineral exchange reactions and radioactive decay. Problems are considered in which radionuclide transport by diffusion and infiltration processes occur in cases where radionuclide water-solid interaction are kinetically and thermodynamically controlled. The limits of Sr-90 and Cs-137 migration are calculated over a wide range of the problem variables (infiltration velocity, distribution coefficients, and rate constants of water-mineral radionuclide exchange reactions).

Spasennykh, M.Yu. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Apps, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ultrasonic properties of granular media saturated with dnapl/watermixtures  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of four experiments investigating the ultrasonic properties of granular materials partially saturated with trichloroethylene (TCE), a dense non-aqueous contaminant. P-wave velocity measurements were made under in situ effective stress conditions using a pulse transmission cell at ?250 kHz. Two synthetic samples and two natural aquifer cores were fully saturated with water and then subjected to an axial injection of TCE. The resulting measurements show reductions in P-wave velocity of up to 15% due to contaminant saturation. A theoretical model combining Gassmann fluid substitution and Hill's equation was used to estimate the effects of DNAPL saturation; this model underpredicted observed reductions in velocity at high TCE saturations. A linear relationship, expressed in terms of volumetric contaminant fraction, provided an excellent empirical fit to the laboratory measurements.

Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Geller, J.T.; Harris, J.M.

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. |...

43

Experimental Assessment of Water Based Drilling Fluids in High Pressure and High Temperature Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper selection of drilling fluids plays a major role in determining the efficient completion of any drilling operation. With the increasing number of ultra-deep offshore wells being drilled and ever stringent environmental and safety regulations coming into effect, it becomes necessary to examine and understand the behavior of water based drilling fluids - which are cheaper and less polluting than their oil based counterpart - under extreme temperature and pressure conditions. In most of the existing literature, the testing procedure is simple - increase the temperature of the fluid in steps and record rheological properties at each step. A major drawback of this testing procedure is that it does not represent the continuous temperature change that occurs in a drilling fluid as it is circulated through the well bore. To have a better understanding of fluid behavior under such temperature variation, a continuous test procedure was devised in which the temperature of the drilling fluid was continuously increased to a pre-determined maximum value while monitoring one rheological parameter. The results of such tests may then be used to plan fluid treatment schedules. The experiments were conducted on a Chandler 7600 XHPHT viscometer and they seem to indicate specific temperature ranges above which the properties of the drilling fluid deteriorate. Different fluid compositions and drilling fluids in use in the field were tested and the results are discussed in detail.

Ravi, Ashwin

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPA and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The short-term failure strengths and strains at failure of room-dry and water-saturated, cylindrical specimens (2 by 4 cm) of Charcoal Granodiorite (CG), Mt. Hood Andesite (MHA), and Cuerbio Basalt (CB) at a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting were investigated. Data from water-saturated specimens of the granodiorite and andesite, compared to room-dry counterparts, indicate (1) the pore pressures are essentially communicated throughout each test specimen so that they are fully effective; (2) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 50 MPa the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (3) at these same effective pressures the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (4) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 870 to 900/sup 0/C the andesite's strength averages 20 MPa while the strength of dry specimens at the same P and T exhibit a strength of 100 MPa; (5) at P/sub e/ = 50 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (6) the basalt at P/sub e/ = 0, appears to be water-weakened at 800/sup 0/C; (7) water saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than that of melting exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2% shortening and then work-soften along faults; (8) again as do the dry counterparts, the wet specimens deform primarily by microscopic fracturing that coalesces into one or more macroscopic faults; and (9) the temperature for incipient melting of the andesite is decreased >150/sup 0/C in the water-saturated tests.

Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for Magnesite Formation at Low Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of the reaction products that form on the surfaces of nanometer-sized forsterite particles during reaction with H2O saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 35 C and 50 C were examined under in situ conditions and ex situ following reaction. The in situ analysis was conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ex situ analysis consisted of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surface phases and chemical characterization of precipitates using a combination of confocal Raman spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the forsterite surface is highly reactive with the primary reaction products being a mixture of nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3) at short reaction times ({approx}3-4 days) and then magnesite (MgCO3) and a highly porous amorphous silica phase at longer reaction times (14 days). After 14 days of reaction most of the original forsterite transformed to reaction products. Importantly, the formation of magnesite was observed at temperatures much lower (35 C) than previously thought needed to overcome its well known sluggish precipitation kinetics. The conversion of nesquehonite to magnesite liberates H2O which can potentially facilitate further metal carbonation, as postulated by previous investigators, based upon studies at higher temperature (80 C). The observation that magnesite can form at lower temperatures implies that water recycling may also be important in determining the rate and extent of mineral carbonation in a wide range of potential CO2 storage reservoirs.

Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Hess, Nancy J.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Feng, Ju; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Seismic low-frequency effects from oil-saturated reservoir zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the frequency dependence of seismic reflections from a thin (compared to the dominant wavelength), fluid saturated reservoir for the cases of oil and water saturation. Reflections from a thin, water or oil-saturated layer have increased amplitude and delayed travel time at low frequencies if compared with reflections from a gas-saturated layer. This effect was observed for both ultrasonic lab data and seismic field data. One set of field data revealed high correlation of low frequency processed image for two different production horizons represented by fractured shale and sandstone. Another set was processed for the purpose of contouring of oil/water contact, and reveal very good correlation with available well data. The frequency dependent amplitude and phase reflection properties can be used for detecting and monitoring thin liquid saturated layers.

Goloshubin, Gennady M.; Korneev, Valeri A.; Vingalov, Vjacheslav M.

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

On the propagation of a coupled saturation and pressure front  

SciTech Connect

Using an asymptotic technique, valid for a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity, I derive an expression for the velocity of a propagating, coupled saturation and pressure front. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing equations, the velocity of the propagating front depends upon the magnitude of the saturation and pressure changes across the front in addition to the properties of the medium. Thus, the expression must be evaluated in conjunction with numerical reservoir simulation. The propagation of the two-phase front is governed by the background saturation distribution, the saturation-dependent component of the fluid mobility, the porosity, the permeability, the capillary pressure function, the medium compressibility, and the ratio of the slopes of the relative permeability curves. Numerical simulation of water injection into a porous layer saturated with a nonaqueous phase liquid indicates that two modes of propagation are important. The fastest mode of propagation is a pressure-dominated disturbance that travels through the saturated layer. This is followed, much later, by a coupled mode with a large saturation change. These two modes are also observed in a simulation using a heterogeneous porous layer. A comparison between the propagation times estimated from the results of the numerical simulation and predictions from the asymptotic expression indicates overall agreement.

Vasco, D. W.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Transport in shales and the design of improved water-based shale drilling fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transport of water and ions in shales and its impact on shale stability were studied to facilitate the improvement of water-based muds as shale drilling fluids. Transport parameters associated with flows driven by gradients in pressure and chemical potential were quantified in key laboratory and full-scale experiments. The experimental results show that the low-permeability matrices of intact, clay-rich shales can act as imperfect or leaky membranes that will sustain osmotic flow of water. Moreover, the ability of shales to act as osmotic membranes is shown to provide a powerful new means for stabilizing these rocks when exposed to water-based drilling fluids. Guidelines are presented for effective exploitation of shale membrane action and induced osmotic flows through optimized water-based drilling fluid formulation. In addition, special attention is given to induced electro-osmotic water flow in shales driven by electric potential gradients, which may provide an exciting, new, environmentally benign means for stabilizing shale formations.

Oort, E. van; Hale, A.H.; Mody, F.K.; Roy, S.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Origin of fluid inclusion water in bedded salt deposits, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Salt horizons in the Palo Duro Basin being considered for repository sites contain fluid inclusions which may represent connate water retained in the salt from the time of original salt deposition and/or external waters which have somehow penetrated the salt. The exact origin of this water is important to the question of whether or not internal portions of the salt deposit have been, and are likely to be, isolated from the hydrosphere for long periods of time. The /sup 18/O//sup 16/O and D/H ratios measured for water extracted from solid salt samples show the inclusions to be dissimilar in isotopic composition to meteoric waters and to formation waters above and below the salt. The fluid inclusions cannot be purely external waters which have migrated into the salt. The isotope data are readily explained in terms of mixed meteoric-marine connate evaporite waters which date back to the time of deposition and early diagenesis of the salt (>250 million years). Any later penetration of the salt by meteoric waters has been insufficient to flush out the connate brines.

Knauth, L.P.; Beeunas, M.A.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures 10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Radiation stability of biocompatibile magnetic fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radiation stability of biocompatibile magnetic fluid used in nanomedicine after electron irradiation was studied. Two types of the water-based magnetic fluids were prepared. The first one was based on the magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by one surfactant natrium oleate. The second one was biocompatibile magnetic fluid stabilized with two surfactants, natrium oleate as a first surfactant and Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as a second surfactant. The magnetization measurements showed that electron irradiation up to 1000Gy caused 50% reduction of saturation magnetization in the case of the first sample with only one surfactant while in the case of the second biocompatibile magnetic fluid, only 25% reduction of saturation magnetization was observed. In the first magnetic fluid the radiation caused the higher sedimentation of the magnetic particles than in the second case, when magnetic particles are covered also with PEG. The obtained results show that PEG behave as a protective element.

Natalia Tomasovicova; Ivan Haysak; Martina Koneracka; Jozef Kovac; Milan Timko; Vlasta Zavisova; Alexander Okunev; Alexander Parlag; Alexey Fradkin; Peter Kopcansky

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

Determination of the effect of formation water on fracture-fluid cleanup  

SciTech Connect

Understanding hydraulic-fracture cleanup is essential for improving well stimulation. Residual gel damages fracture conductivity, shortens effective fracture half-length, and limits well productivity. The drive to develop fluids, additives, and procedures that minimize this damage continues to be a dominant theme in fracture-fluid-development programs. Fracture cleanup is a complex problem, and many parameters (e.g., fluid system, job design, flowback procedure, and reservoir conditions) can influence polymer and fluid recovery efficiencies. Often, specific products and methods that work well in one reservoir have little effect in another. Systematic analysis of fluid and polymer returns after a treatment is completed is the only way to quantify fracture cleanup. This is referred to as flowback analysis. This paper discusses a flowback-analysis field study on large hydraulic-fracturing treatments in the Taylor zone of the Cotton Valley formation in east Texas. This is a low-permeability (approximately 0.01 md) tight gas formation. It is a heterogeneous zone with layers of productive sandstone interspersed with relatively impermeable layers of shale. A typical well in this field initially produces approximately 0.75 to 1.3 MMcf/D gas and 35 to 40 bbl of water/MMcf of gas. The returns from 10 wells in this field were analyzed thoroughly.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Status of understanding of the saturated-zone ground-water flow system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as of 1995  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, which is being studied extensively because it is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository, consists of a thick sequence of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age that are underlain, at least to the southeast, by carbonate rocks of Paleozoic age. Stratigraphic units important to the hydrology of the area include the alluvium, pyroclastic rocks of Miocene age (the Timber Mountain Group; the Paintbrush Group; the Calico Hills Formation; the Crater Flat Group; the Lithic Ridge Tuff; and older tuffs, flows, and lavas beneath the Lithic Ridge Tuff), and sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The saturated zone generally occurs in the Calico Hills Formation and stratigraphically lower units. The saturated zone is divided into three aquifers and two confining units. The flow system at Yucca Mountain is part of the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek subbasin of the Death Valley groundwater basin. Variations in the gradients of the potentiometric surface provided the basis for subdividing the Yucca Mountain area into zones of: (1) large hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change at least 300 meters in a few kilometers; (2) moderate hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change about 45 meters in a few kilometers; and (3) small hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change only about 2 meters in several kilometers. Vertical hydraulic gradients were measured in only a few boreholes around Yucca Mountain; most boreholes had little change in potentiometric levels with depth. Limited hydraulic testing of boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area indicated that the range in transmissivity was more than 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in a particular hydrogeologic unit, and that the average values for the individual hydrogeologic units generally differed by about 1 order of magnitude. The upper volcanic aquifer seems to be the most permeable hydrogeologic unit, but this conclusion was based on exceedingly limited data.

Luckey, R.R.; Tucci, P.; Faunt, C.C.; Ervin, E.M. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

55

Saturated poroelastic actuators generated by topology optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the fluid-structure interaction problem of a saturated porous media is considered. The pressure coupling properties of porous saturated materials change with the microstructure and this is utilized in the design of an actuator using a topology ... Keywords: Coupled problems, FSI, Homogenization, Multi-scale modeling, Topology optimization

Casper Schousboe Andreasen; Ole Sigmund

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Combined Effect of Ocean Acidification and Euthrophication on water pH and Aragonite Saturation State in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing the rate at which anthropogenic CO2 is accumulating in the ocean, and thereby acidifying ocean water. However, accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 is not the only process affecting coastal oceans. Anthropogenic inputs of nutrients to coastal waters can result in massive algal blooms, a process known as eutrophication. Microbial consumption of this organic matter depletes bottom waters of oxygen and increases acidity through the release of CO2. This study assesses the synergistic effect of ocean acidification and eutrophication in the coastal ocean using data from six cruises to the northern Gulf of Mexico. In addition, this study investigates the effect of the 2011 Mississippi River flood on coastal pH and aragonite saturation states. Data from a model simulation using data collected from the northern Gulf of Mexico indicates that eutrophication is contributing to acidification of subsurface waters and plays a larger role than acidification from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Furthermore, results from the model simulation show that the decrease in pH since the industrial era is 0.04 units greater than expected from ocean acidification and eutrophication combined. The additional decrease was attributed to the reduced buffering capacity of the region and may be related to the uptake of atmospheric CO2 into O2-depleted and CO2-enriched waters, the addition of atmospheric CO2 into O2-rich and CO2-poor waters, the input of CO2 via respiration into waters in equilibrium with high atmospheric CO2, or a combination of all three processes.

Garcia Tigreros, Fenix

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Dehydration of acetic acid-water mixtures with near critical and supercritical fluid solvents  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium tie lines and phase densities are presented for acetic acid-water mixtures with near critical propane at 361K and 52 bar. Experimental measurements were obtained with a static technique; the equilibrium phases were directly sampled with high-pressure liquid sample injection valves at the temperature and pressure of interest. The data obtained in this work indicate that near critical propane can be used to facilitate the production of glacial acetic acid from dilute acetic acid-water solutions. Both these experimental data and the authors earlier results for acetic acid-water mixtures with supercritical carbon dioxide have been used to test an equation of state which has recently been developed by Grenzheuser and Gmehling for systems which contain associating fluids. Results indicate that the equation's pure component parameters need to be refitted to represent the critical region more accurately.

McCully, M.A.; Mullins, J.C.; Thies, M.C.; Hartley, I.J.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Organic Rankine-Cycle Power Systems Working Fluids Study: Topical report No. 3, 2-methylpyridine/water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mixture of 35 mole percent (mol %) 2-methylpyridine and 65 mol % water was tested at 575, 625, and 675/degree/F in a dynamic loop. Samples of the degraded fluid were chemically analyzed to determine the identities of major degradation products and the quantity of degradation. Computed degradation rates were found to be higher than those for Fluorinol 85 or toluene. For this reason (and other reasons, related to fluid handling), other fluids are recommended as the first choice for service in organic Rankine-cycle systems in preference to 2-methylpyridine/water. 7 refs., 39 figs., 39 tabs.

Cole, R.L.; Demirgian, J.C.; Allen, J.W.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Core-softened Fluids, Water-like Anomalies and the Liquid-Liquid Critical Points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations are used to examine the relationship between water-like anomalies and the liquid-liquid critical point in a family of model fluids with multi-Gaussian, core-softened pair interactions. The core-softened pair interactions have two length scales, such that the longer length scale associated with a shallow, attractive well is kept constant while the shorter length scale associated with the repulsive shoulder is varied from an inflexion point to a minimum of progressively increasing depth. As the shoulder well depth increases, the pressure required to form the high density liquid decreases and the temperature up to which the high-density liquid is stable increases, resulting in the shift of the liquid-liquid critical point to much lower pressures and higher temperatures. The pair correlation entropy is computed to show that the excess entropy anomaly diminishes when the shoulder well depth increases. Excess entropy scaling of diffusivity in this class of fluids is demonstrated, showing that decreasing strength of the excess entropy anomaly with increasing shoulder depth results in the progressive loss of water-like thermodynamic, structural and transport anomalies. Instantaneous normal mode analysis was used to index the overall curvature distribution of the fluid and the fraction of imaginary frequency modes was shown to correlate well with the anomalous behaviour of the diffusivity and the pair correlation entropy. The results suggest in the case of core-softened potentials, in addition to the presence of two length scales, energetic and entropic effects associated with local minima and curvatures of the pair interaction play an important role in determining the presence of water-like anomalies and the liquid-liquid phase transition.

Evy Salcedo; Alan B. de Oliveira; Ney M. Barraz Jr; Charusita Chakravarty; Marcia C. Barbosa

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heattransmission fluids  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes our research to date into operatingEGS with CO2. Our modeling studies indicate that CO2 would achieve morefavorable heat extraction than aqueous fluids. The peculiarthermophysicalproperties of CO2 give rise to unusual features in the dependence ofenergy recovery on thermodynamic conditions and time. Preliminarygeochemical studies suggest that CO2 may avoid unfavorable rock-fluidinteractions that have been encountered in water-basedsystems. To morefully evaluate the potential of EGS with CO2 will require an integratedresearch programme of model development, and laboratory and fieldstudies.

Pruess, Karsten

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Radiation-cooled Dew Water Condensers Studied by Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harvesting condensed atmospheric vapour as dew water can be an alternative or complementary potable water resource in specific arid or insular areas. Such radiation-cooled condensing devices use already existing flat surfaces (roofs) or innovative structures with more complex shapes to enhance the dew yield. The Computational Fluid Dynamic - CFD - software PHOENICS has been programmed and applied to such radiation cooled condensers. For this purpose, the sky radiation is previously integrated and averaged for each structure. The radiative balance is then included in the CFD simulation tool to compare the efficiency of the different structures under various meteorological parameters, for complex or simple shapes and at various scales. It has been used to precise different structures before construction. (1) a 7.32 m^2 funnel shape was studied; a 30 degree tilted angle (60 degree cone half-angle) was computed to be the best compromise for funnel cooling. Compared to a 1 m^2 flat condenser, the cooling efficienc...

Clus, O; Muselli, M; Nikolayev, Vadim; Sharan, Girja; Beysens, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Stable isotope investigation of fluids and water-rock interaction in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-hydrogen-oxygen isotope compositions have been measured in regional cold waters, geothermal fluids, and hydrothermally altered rocks from the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area. These data have been used, in conjunction with other geological and geochemical data from this geothermal system, to place some limits on the origin of geothermal fluids and reservoir carbon, the fluid recharge area, physical-chemical environment of hydrothermal alteration, and relative permeability of the geothermal system. The similarity of hydrogen isotope compositions of local meteoric water and geothermal reservoir fluid indicate that the geothermal fluids are virtually entirely of surface derivation. An isotopically reasonable source area would be the Mineral Mountains directly to the east of the Roosevelt system. Hydrothermal calcite appears to be in isotopic equilibrium with the deep reservoir fluid. The deltaC/sup 13/ values of deep calcites and T- pH-f0/sub 2/ conditions of the reservoir defined by measured temperature, fluid chemistry, and alteration mineralogy fix the delta/sup 13/C value of the geothermal system to -5 to -6.5% (PDB). These values do not unambiguously define any one source or process, however. There is a relatively small increase in /sup 18/O of geothermal fluids relative to their cold surface water precursors and significant /sup 18/O depletion accompanying hydrothermal alteration of the granitic host rock. These isotopic shifts indicate a high ratio of geothermal fluid to altered rock for the geothermal system, implying relatively rapid (geologically) recirculation rates and significant permeability of the geothermal system.

Bowman, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

Maerefat, Nicida L. (Sugar Land, TX); Parmeswar, Ravi (Marlton, NJ); Brinkmeyer, Alan D. (Tulsa, OK); Honarpour, Mehdi (Bartlesville, OK)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Potential Cost Effective Liquefaction Mitigation Countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is devoted to illustrate the potential liquefaction mitigation countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation. Firstly the potential liquefaction mitigation method is briefly introduced. Then the numerical model for partially saturated sandy soil is presented. At last the dynamic responses of liquefiable free filed with different water saturation is given. It shows that the induced partial saturation is efficiency for preventing the liquefaction.

Bian Hanbing; Jia Yun; Shahrour, Isam [Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR 8107), Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

Experimental Analysis of Water Based Drilling Fluid Aging Processes at High Temperature and High Pressure Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In efforts to render the safest, fastest, and most cost efficient drilling program for a high temperature and high pressure (HT/HP) well the maximization of drilling operational efficiencies is key. Designing an adequate, HT/HP well specific, drilling fluid is of most importance and a technological challenge that can greatly affect the outcome of the overall operational efficiency. It is necessary to have a sound fundamental understanding of the behavior that water-based muds (WBM) exhibit when exposed to HT/HP conditions. Therefore, in order to adequately design and treat a WBM for a HT/HP well specific drilling program, it is essential that the mud be evaluated at HT/HP conditions. Currently, industry standard techniques used to evaluate WBM characteristics involve aging the fluid sample to a predetermined temperature, based on the anticipated bottom hole temperature (BHT), either statically or dynamically, for a predetermined length, then cooling and mixing the fluid and measuring its rheological properties at a significantly lower temperature. This, along with the fact that the fluid is not subjected to the anticipated bottom hole pressure (BHP) during or after the aging process, brings to question if the properties recorded are those that are truly experienced down-hole. Furthermore, these testing methods do not allow the user to effectively monitor the changes during the aging process. The research in this thesis is focused on evaluating a high performance WBM and the current test procedures used to evaluate their validity. Experimental static and dynamic aging tests were developed for comparative analysis as well to offer a more accurate and precise method to evaluate the effects experienced by WBM when subjected to HT/HP conditions. The experimental tests developed enable the user to monitor and evaluate, in real-time, the rheological changes that occur during the aging of a WBM while being subjected to true BHT and BHP. Detailed standard and experimental aging tests were conducted and suggest that the standard industry tests offer false rheological results with respect to true BHT and BHP. Furthermore, the experimental aging tests show that high pressure has a significant effect on the rheological properties of the WBM at elevated temperatures.

Zigmond, Brandon

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

New Techniques to Characterize and Remove Water-Based Drilling Fluids Filter Cake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filter cake characterization is very important in drilling and completion operations. Heterogeneity of the filter cake plays a key role in the design of chemical treatments needed to remove the filter cake. The objectives of this study are to characterize the filter cake under static and dynamic conditions, evaluate the using of polylactic acid and chelating agents to remove calcium carbonate-based filter cake, assess glycolic acid to remove Mn3O4-based filter cake, and evaluate ilmenite as a weighting material for water-based drilling fluid. In order to characterize the filter cake, computer tomography (CT) was used in combination with the scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) to analyze the filter cake. A modified HPHT filter cell was developed to perform the filtration tests. A see-through-cell was used to check the compatibility of different chemicals that were used to remove the filter cake. The results obtained from the CT scan showed that the filter cake was heterogeneous and contained two layers with different properties under static and dynamic conditions. Under static conditions, the formation of filter cake changed from compression to buildup; while under dynamic conditions, the filter cake was formed under continuous buildup. Polylactic acid was used as a component of the drilling fluid components and the results obtained showed that the drill-in fluid had stable rheological properties up to 250?F over 24 hrs. The removal efficiency of the filter cake was nearly 100% and the return permeability was about 100% for Indiana limestone and Berea sandstone cores, when using a weight ratio of polylactic acid to calcium carbonate 3 to 1. GLDA (pH 3.3) and HEDTA (pH 4) can be used to remove the filter cake in one step without using ?-amylase enzyme solutions. GLDA (20 wt% in a 200 g solution and pH of 3.3) and HEDTA (20 wt% in a 200 g solution and pH 4) had 100% removal efficiency of the filter cake using Indiana limestone and Berea sandstone cores. Chelate solutions, GLDA (pH of 3.3 - 13) and HEDTA (pH of 4 and 7) were incompatible with ?-amylase enzyme solutions over a wide range of temperatures. CT results showed that no formation damage was observed when using chelating agents as a breaker to remove the calcium carbonate filter cake. Manganese tetraoxide-based filter cake had a removal efficiency of 85% after 20 hrs soaking with glycolic acid (5 wt%) after soaking with ?-amylase for 24 hrs, and 89% after reaction with acid mixture (1 wt% HCl and 7 wt% glycolic acid) for 16 hrs. for both methods, the retained permeability was 100% for Indiana limestone cores and 120% for Berea sandstone cores, which indication maximum productivity of these formations. Ilmenite-based filter cake was ideal for HPHT applications, 0.2 in. thickness and 12 cm3 filtrate under dynamic conditions. The filtrate volume was reduced by adding a minor amount of CaCO3 solids that improved the particles packing. No sag problem was observed when using the micronized ilmenite in water-based drilling fluids. Ilmenite has a negative zeta potential in alkaline media and had a stable dispersion in water at pH > 7.

Elkatatny, Salaheldin Mahmoud

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Preliminary performance estimates and value analyses for binary geothermal power plants using ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids in binary geothermal power generation systems is investigated. The available thermodynamic data is discussed and the methods of extrapolating this data to give the quantities needed to perform analyses of the system is given. Results indicated that for a system without a recuperator and with a working fluid which is 50 percent by mass of each constituent, the geofluid effectiveness (watt-hr/lbm geofluid) is 84 percent of that for the 50MW Heber Plant. The cost of generating electric power for this system was estimated to be 9 percent greater than for the Heber Plant. However, if a recuperator is incorporated in the system (using the turbine exhaust to preheat and partially boil the working fluid) the geofluid effectiveness becomes 102 percent of that for the Heber Plant, and the cost of electricity is 5-1/4 percent lower (relative to the Heber Plant) because of less expensive equipment resulting from lower pressure, better heat transfer, and less working fluid to handle for the ammonia-water plant. These results do not necessarily represent the optimum system. Because of uncertainty in thermodynamic properties, it was felt that detailed optimization was not practical at this point. It was concluded that use of nonazeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons as working fluids should be studied before expending further effort in the investigation of the ammonia-water mixtures.

Bliem, C.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Computer simulation models relevant to ground water contamination from EOR or other fluids - state-of-the-art  

SciTech Connect

Ground water contamination is a serious national problem. The use of computers to simulate the behavior of fluids in the subsurface has proliferated extensively over the last decade. Numerical models are being used to solve water supply problems, various kinds of enertgy production problems, and ground water contamination problems. Modeling techniques have progressed to the point that their accuracy is only limited by the modeller's ability to describe the reservoir in question and the heterogeneities therein. Pursuant to the Task and Milestone Update of Project BE3A, this report summarizes the state of the art of computer simulation models relevant to contamination of ground water by enhanced oil recovery (EOR) chemicals and/or waste fluids. 150 refs., 6 tabs.

Kayser, M.B.; Collins, A.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

Spinrad, R.J.

1961-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

72

Photomultiplier tube saturation indicator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically a light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated. This photomultiplier tube is used with alpha contamination probes.

Ruch, J.F.; Urban, D.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

air saturated water and the observed variations are not readily explained by the distillation of air saturated water. In characterizing each area of hydrothermal activity by the...

74

Removal of Filter Cake Generated by Manganese Tetraoxide Water-based Drilling Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three effective solutions to dissolve the filter cake created by water-based drilling fluids weighted with Mn3O4 particles were developed. Hydrochloric acid at concentration lower than 5 wt% can dissolve most of Mn3O4-based filter cake. Dissolving the filter cake in two-stage treatment of enzyme and organic acid was effective and eliminated the associated drawbacks of using HCl. Finally, combining low and safe concentration of HCl with an organic acid in one-stage treatment was very effective. Hydrochloric acid (10-wt%) dissolved 78 wt% of Mn3O4-based filter cake at 250°F after 28 hours soaking time. However, Chlorine gas was detected during the reaction of 5 to 15-wt% HCl with Mn3O4 particles. At 190°F, 1- and 4-wt% HCl dissolved most Mn3O4 particles (up to 70-wt% solubility). Their reactions with Mn3O4 particles followed Eq. 8 at 190°F, which further confirmed the absence of chlorine gas production at HCl concentrations lower than 5-wt%. EDTA and DTPA at high pH (12) and acetic, propionic, butyric, and gluconic acids at low pH (3-5) showed very low solubilities of Mn3O4 particles. GLDA, citric, oxalic, and tartaric acids produced large amount of white precipitation upon the reactions with Mn3O4 particles. Similarly, DTPA will produce damaging material if used to dissolve Mn3O4-based filter cake in sandstone formation. At 4-wt% acid concentration, lactic, glycolic, and formic acids dissolved Mn3O4 particles up to 76 wt% solubility at 190°F. Malonic acid at lower concentration (2-wt%) dissolved 54 wt% of Mn3O4 particles at 190°F. Manganese tetraoxide particles were covered with polymeric material (starch), which significantly reduced the solubility of filter cake in organic acids. Therefore, there was a need to remove Mn3O4-based filter cake in two-stage treatment. Enzyme-A (10-wt%) and Precursor of lactic acid (12.5-wt%) dissolved 84 wt% of the filter cake. An innovative approach led to complete solubility of Mn3O4 particles when low and safe concentration of HCl (1-wt%) combined with 4-wt% lactic acid at 190°F. HCl (1-wt%) combined with lactic acid (4-wt%), dissolved 85 wt% of the Mn3O4-based filter cake after 18-22 hours soaking time at 250°F in one stage treatment.

Al Mojil, Abdullah Mohammed A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A study on chemical interactions between waste fluid, formation water, and host rock during deep well injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the area. While drilling NDW-1, fluid samples were collectedorigin of the fluid collected while drilling the new well

Spycher, Nicolas; Larkin, Randy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cyclogenesis in a Saturated Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of baroclinic wave growth in a saturated environment is examined using linear and nonlinear models employing a parameterization of latent heat release that assumes all rising air is saturated, and saturation equivalent potential ...

Jeffrey S. Whitaker; Christopher A. Davis

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Numerical simulation of fluid flow and heat transfer in a water heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy consumption represents a major concern, considering the limited resources and latest targets for lower emissions of carbon dioxide. Therefore design of electric heating elements for household and industry are more and more subject to optimization, ... Keywords: electric heating, finite elements, fluid flow, heat transfer

Mircea Nicoar?; Aurel R?du??; Lauren?iu Roland Cucuruz; Cosmin Locovei

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Correlation of Oil-Water and Air-Water Contact Angles of Diverse Silanized Surfaces and Relationship to Fluid Interfacial Tensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of air-water, {Theta}{sub wa}, or air-liquid contact angles is customary in surface science, while oil-water contact angles {Theta}{sub ow}, are of paramount importance in subsurface multiphase flow phenomena including petroleum reocovery, nonaqueous phase liquid fate and transport, and geological carbon sequestration. In this paper we determine both the air-water and oil-water contact angles of silica surfaces modified with a diverse selection of silanes, using hexadecane as the oil. The silanes included alkylsilanes, alkylarylsilanes, and silanes with alkyl or aryl groups that are functionalized with heteroatoms such as N, O, and S. These silanes yielded surfaces with wettabilities from water-wet to oil wet, including specific silanized surfaces functionalized with heteroatoms that yield intermediate wet surfaces. The oil-water contact angles for clean and silanized surfaces, excluding one partially fluorinated surface, correlate linearly with air-water contact angles with a slope of 1.41 (R = 0.981, n = 13). These data were used to examine a previously untested theoretical treatment relating air-water and oil-water contact angles in terms of fluid interfacial energies. Plotting the cosines of these contact angles against one another, we obtain a linear relationship in excellent agreement with the theoretical treatment; the data fit cos {Theta}{sub ow} = 0.667 cos {Theta}{sub ow} + 0.384 (R = 0.981, n = 13), intercepting cos {Theta}{sub ow} = -1 at -0.284. The theoretical slope, based on the fluid interfacial tensions {Theta}{sub wa}, {Theta}{sub ow}, and {Theta}{sub oa}, is 0.67. We also demonstrate how silanes can be used to alter the wettability of the interior of a pore network micromodel device constructed in silicon/silica with a glass cover plate. Such micromodels are used to study multiphase flow phenomena. The contact angle of the resulting interior was determined in situ. An intermediate wet micromodel gave a contact angle in excellent agreement with that obtained on an open planar silica surface using the same silane.

Grate, Jay W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fluid effects on seismic waves in hard rocks with fractures and in soft granular media  

SciTech Connect

When fractures in otherwise hard rocks are filled with fluids (oil, gas, water, CO{sub 2}), the type and physical state of the fluid (liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the wave speeds and attenuation properties of seismic waves. The present work summarizes methods of deconstructing theses effects of fractures, together with any fluids contained within them, on wave propagation as observed in reflection seismic data. Additional studies of waves in fluid-saturated granular media show that the behavior can be quite different from that for fractured media, since these materials are typically much softer mechanically than are the fractured rocks (i.e., having a very small drained moduli). Important fluid effects in such media are often governed as much by fluid viscosity as by fluid bulk modulus.

Berryman, James G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Preliminary screening of thermal storage concepts for water/steam and organic fluid solar thermal receiver systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary comparison of thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications was done generically for large and small solar systems with sensible and latent heat and two-stage storage concepts. Concepts were ranked based on the cost of delivered energy. A +- 20% uncertainty in subsystem cost was included in the analysis. Water/steam and organic fluid collector/receivers were studied separately. For the water/steam concept, Barstow technology (100 MW/sub e/) was examined. A nitrite/nitrate salt with a low-cost solid medium was best for buffer storage; for diurnal storage, the two-stage draw salt/low-cost media and oil/rock concept was best. Phase change concepts require improvements on the concept analyzed to be attractive. For the organic fluid system, a Shenandoah total energy system was examined. The Syltherm trickle charge taconite concept was the most favorable and may be improved by replacing the taconite with a lower-cost oil-compatible medium. Salt concepts can be competitive with this system only if there is a low-cost solid medium that is compatible with the salt and the end use requires a large amount of storage. The phase change concept examined was found to be quite poor for this total energy application.

Copeland, R.J.; Karpuk, M.E.; Ullman, J.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Improving Water Loop Heat Pump Performance by Using Low Temperature Geothermal Fluid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water-loop heat pump (WLHP) systems are an important option for space conditioning of commercial buildings. They provide the opportunity of saving energy through heat recovery and thermal balancing when heating and cooling occur simultaneously. WLHP systems typically operate with loop water temperature between 16 C and 32 C. When cooling loads dominate, loop water temperatures are maintained below 32 C by rejecting excess heat with a cooling tower. When heating dominates, loop water temperatures are maintained above 16 C by a heater input. The capacity and efficiency of water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in both operating modes are strong functions of the inlet water temperature. The emphasis of this paper is on the analysis of system performances, energy savings of the mixed cooling and heating mode of the WLHP systems for it is a unique operating mode in the air-conditioning and space heating systems. The energy saving effect by using low temperature geothermal as the heat input for WLHP systems was examined.

Xinguo, Li

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermodynamic properties of ammonia-water mixtures for power cycles  

SciTech Connect

Power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids have been shown to reach higher thermal efficiencies than the traditional steam turbine (Rankine) cycle with water as the working fluid. Different correlations for the thermodynamic properties of ammonia-water mixtures have been used in studies of ammonia-water mixture cycles described in the literature. Four of these correlations are compared in this paper. The differences in thermal efficiencies for a bottoming Kalina cycle when these four property correlations are used are in the range 0.5 to 3.3%. The properties for saturated liquid and vapor according to three of the correlations and available experimental data are also compared at high pressures and temperatures [up to 20 MPa and 337 C (610 K)]. The difference in saturation temperature for the different correlations is up to 20%, and the difference in saturation enthalpy is as high as 100% when the pressure is 20 MPa.

Thorin, E. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Maelardalen Univ., Vaesteraas (Sweden). Dept. of Energy; Dejfors, C.; Svedberg, G. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Simulation of a viscous fluid spreading by a bidimensional shallow water model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a numerical method to solve the Cauchy problem based on the viscous shallow water equations in an horizontally moving domain. More precisely, we are interested in a flooding and drying model, used to modelize the overflow of a river or the intrusion of a tsunami on ground. We use a non conservative form of the two-dimensional shallow water equations, in eight velocity formulation and we build a numerical approximation, based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation, in order to compute the solution in the moving domain.

Di Martino, Bernard; Paoli, Jean-Martin; Simonnet, Pierre; 10.1016/j.apm.2011.01.015

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Construction and testing of ceramic fabric heat pipe with water working fluid  

SciTech Connect

A prototype ceramic fabric/titanium water heat pipe has been constructed and tested; it transported 25 to 80 W of power at 423 K. Component development and testing is continuing with the aim of providing an improved prototype, with a 38-{mu}m stainless steel linear covered by a biaxially-braided Nextel (trademark of the 3M Co., St. Paul Minnesota) sleeve that is approximately 300-{mu}m thick. This fabric has been tested to 800 K, and its emittance is about 0.5 at that temperature. Advanced versions of the water heat pipe will probably require a coating over the ceramic fabric in order to increase this emittance to the 0.8 to 0.9 range. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Webb, B.J.; Bates, J.M.; Cooper, M.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Working/Functional Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power cycle except that it uses an organic working fluid instead of water to allow operation at lower temperatures, including geothermal or solar ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Modeling studies of cold water injection into fluid-depleted, vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physical processes involved in cold water injection into a ''superheated'' fractured reservoir are not yet fully understood, and this insufficient knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms limits the possibility of forecasting future resevoir behavior and optimizing the heat extraction process. Numerical simulation can be a very effective tool in the study of the complex phenomena involved, allowing a rapid examination of different situations and conditions, a systematic investigation of the effects of various parameters on reservoir performance, and some insight into long term behavior. We have performed simulation experiments on simple one-dimensional, porous and fractured reservoir models in order to study the migration of injected water, thermodynamic conditions in the boiling zone, heat extraction, and vapor generation. A two-dimensional radial porous medium model, with some characteristics typical of the high productivity zones of Larderello, has also been applied for studying the evolution of the shape and the thermodynamic conditions of the injection plume in the presence of gravity, reservoir heterogeneities and anisotropy.

Calore, C.; Pruess, K.; Celati, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Evaluation and Test of Improved Fire Resistant Fluid Lubricants for Water Reactor Coolant Pump Motors, Volume 1: Fluid Evaluation, Bearing Model Tests, Motor Tests, and Fire Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercially available fire-resistant fluid lubricants were evaluated to determine their suitability for use in primary-system pump motors in nuclear reactors. Volume 1 describes the procedures and results of tests of lubrication properties; fire and radiation resistance; and thermal, oxidative, and hydrolytic stability.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

ECO2N: A TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Mixtures of Water, NaCl, and CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exponent gas: Corey (1954) k Sands: 3xlO" m ; Shales: 10" mgas saturations of approximately 60 % occur beneath the shale118 m. Gas is just beginning to reach the top shale layer at

Pruess, Karsten

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Improved Magnus Form Approximation of Saturation Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms, based on Magnus's form equations, are described that minimize the difference between several relationships between temperature and water vapor pressure at saturation that are commonly used in archiving data. The work was initiated in ...

Oleg A. Alduchov; Robert E. Eskridge

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Hydroliquefaction of Big Brown lignite in supercritical fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Big Brown lignite was liquefied in a fixed bed tube reactor. Three solvents were used in the liquefaction studies, toluene, cyclohexane and methanol. Two co-solvents, tetralin and water were used with toluene. The effects of the solvents and co-solvents were investigated. Supercritical fluid is the fluid at the temperature and pressure above its critical values. Toluene was the main supercritical fluid used in this study. Tetralin and water as co-solvents can contribute hydrogen to stabilize the free radicals produced during liquefaction reaction. The total conversion of Big Brown lignite and yield of liquid were increased. Water is not as good as tetralin in producing hydrogen, but it can increase the polarity of the solvent, which increases the solvency of supercritical fluids. The liquid product was found to consist primarily of saturated hydrocarbons. It illustrated that the free radicals were saturated by hydrogen during liquefaction. Alkylated aromatics and furans are also common chemical species present in the liquid products. The aromatic species were predominantly alkylated phenols, benzenes, indenes, pyridines and naphthalenes. At the supercritical conditions of this study, temperature and flowrate of the solvent were not important to the conversion of Big Brown lignite and yield of liquid, since supercritical fluids have gas-like viscosities with very high solubilities. To get more liquid products, the main point is to produce more free radicals from coal, inhibit the recombination of these radicals, and prevent the decomposition of these radicals to gas. Tetralin and water are good co-solvents for coal hydroliquefaction. Further research on the mechanism of water as a co-solvent in coal hydroliquefaction was recommended.

Chen, Hui

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Detector of the flowing of a fluid in a pipe and energy saving device for a hot water system using this detector  

SciTech Connect

A fluid flow sensor, comprising a tubular element having a greater diameter than and vertically mounted on a pipe for serially interconnecting two portions of this pipe. One portion is connected to the upper end of the tubular element while the other portion is connected to its lower end. A magnetic piston is slidably mounted within the tubular element and is therefore free to move along it. A by-pass conduit interconnects the lower portion of the pipe with the upper portion of the pipe. The piston moves upwardly in the tubular element when the fluid flows. Fluid flows from the portion of the pipe connected at the lower end of the tubular element to the one connected at its upper end through the by-pass. The piston moves downwardly by gravity to the lower end of the tubular element when the fluid stops flowing. A coil wound around a portion of the tubular element produces in electrical signal when the piston moves in the tubular element. The piston has a frustroconical element on each end to absorb shocks which result when the piston seats in each position. This detecting device can be mounted on a hot water supply pipe and used in combination with an electronic circuit for saving energy in operating a hot water system. The electronic circuit allows or prevents the thermostat to control the water heating apparatus.

Lawless, J.

1985-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

APS FEL Achieves Ultraviolet Saturation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has achieved "saturation" of self-amplified spontaneous emission in a mirrorless free-electron laser at a wavelength over 1000 times shorter than the previous record. This...

94

Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ionized water (DI) as drilling fluid. This procedure avoidsbeen contaminated with drilling fluids during recovery ofscheduled drilling phases to enable fluid-only sampling.

Ali, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Measurement of Water Transport from Saturated Pumice ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A thin slice of polished granite stone (about fo mm x 4 mm x 3 mm) was insened first into the cuvette, providing a support for the pumice that was ...

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Study of the Dielectric Properties of Dry and Saturated Green River Oil Shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We measured dielectric permittivity of dry and fluid-saturated Green River oil shale samples over a frequency range of 1 MHz to 1.8 GHz. Dry sample measurements were carried out between room temperature and 146 C, saturated sample measurements were carried out at room temperature. Samples obtained from the Green River formation of Wyoming and from the Anvil Points Mine in Colorado were cored both parallel and perpendicular to layering. The samples, which all had organic richness in the range of 10-45 gal/ton, showed small variations between samples and a relatively small level of anisotropy of the dielectric properties when dry. The real and imaginary part of the relative dielectric permittivity of dry rock was nearly constant over the frequency range observed, with low values for the imaginary part (loss factor). Saturation with de-ionized water and brine greatly increased the values of the real and imaginary parts of the relative permittivity, especially at the lower frequencies. Temperature effects were relatively small, with initial increases in permittivity to about 60 C, followed by slight decreases in permittivity that diminished as temperature increased. Implications of these observations for the in situ electromagnetic, or radio frequency (RF) heating of oil shale to produce oil and gas are discussed.

Sweeney, J; Roberts, J; Harben, P

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Temperature effects on oil-water relative permeabilities for unconsolidated sands  

SciTech Connect

This study presents an experimental investigation of temperature effects on relative permeabilities of oil- water systems in unconsolidated sands. The fluids used in this study were refined mineral oil and distilled water. A rate sensitivity study was done on residual oil saturation and oil and water relative permeabilities. The temperature sensitivity study of relative permeabilities was conducted in 2 parts. The first was to investigate changes in residual oil saturation with temperature where the cores were 100% saturated with oil at the start of the waterflood. The second part continued the floods for a longer time until the water-cut was virtually 100%. Under these conditions, little change in residual oil saturation was observed with temperature. A study on viscous instabilities also was performed. This verified the existence of viscous fingers during waterflooding. It also was observed that tubing volume after the core could cause fingering, resulting in lower apparent breakthrough oil recoveries.

Sufi, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

It's The Fluids SEG Honorary Lecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T.P. Water Butane CO2 #12;Fluid ­ Density 800 1000 1200FluidDensity[kg/m3] Brine CO2 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 200 400 600 Fluid Pressure [MPa] FluidDensity[kg/m Butane CO2 #12;Fluid ­ Modulus 2000 2500 3000 FluidModulus[MPa] Brine 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 500 1000 1500 Fluid Pressure [MPa] FluidModulus[MPa] Butane CO2 #12;GENERAL PHASE

99

Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1 , Xiaorong media, and to measure oil and water saturation. Although this technique has great advantages compared14. Using15 MRI, the oil secondary migration paths are scanned to measure the saturation distribution during

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Analytical model for flux saturation in sediment transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport of sediment by a fluid along the surface is responsible for dune formation, dust entrainment and for a rich diversity of patterns on the bottom of oceans, rivers, and planetary surfaces. Most previous models of sediment transport have focused on the equilibrium (or saturated) particle flux. However, the morphodynamics of sediment landscapes emerging due to surface transport of sediment is controlled by situations out-of-equilibrium. In particular, it is controlled by the saturation length characterizing the distance it takes for the particle flux to reach a new equilibrium after a change in flow conditions. The saturation of mass density of particles entrained into transport and the relaxation of particle and fluid velocities constitute the main relevant relaxation mechanisms leading to saturation of the sediment flux. Here we present a theoretical model for sediment transport which, for the first time, accounts for both these relaxation mechanisms and for the different types of sediment entrainment prevailing under different environmental conditions. Our analytical treatment allows us to derive a closed expression for the saturation length of sediment flux, which is general and can thus be applied under different physical conditions.

T. Pähtz; J. F. Kok; E. J. R. Parteli; H. J. Herrmann

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Preliminary investigation of scale formation and fluid chemistry at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemistry of geothermal, production, and injection fluids at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada, was characterized to address an ongoing scaling problem and to evaluate the effects of reinjection into the reservoir. Fluids generally followed mixing-dilution trends. Recharge to the Dixie Valley system apparently originates from local sources. The low-pressure brine and injection waters were saturated with respect to amorphous silica, which correlated with the ongoing scaling problem. Local shallow ground water contains about 15% geothermal brine mixed with regional recharge. The elevated Ca, Mg, and HCO{sub 3} content of this water suggests that carbonate precipitation may occur if shallow groundwater is reinjected. Downhole reservoir fluids are close to equilibrium with the latest vein mineral assemblage of wairakite-epidote-quartz-calcite. Reinjection of spent geothermal brine is predicted to affect the region near the wellbore differently than it does the region farther away.

Bruton, C.J.; Counce, D.; Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F.; Johnson, S.D.; Moore, J.N.; Nimz, G.

1997-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Simulation and performance analysis of basic GAX and advanced GAX cycles with ammonia/water and ammonia/water/LiBr absorption fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) and branched GAX cycles are generally considered with NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O as their working fluid. The potential consequences of using a ternary mixture of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr (advanced fluids) in the GAX and Branched GAX (advanced cycles) are discussed in this study. A modular steady state absorption simulation model(ABSIM) was used to investigate the potential of combining the above advanced cycles with the advanced fluids. ABSIM is capable of modeling varying cycle configurations with different working fluids. Performance parameters of the cycles, including coefficient of performance (COP) and heat duties, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters in the cooling mode for both the NH {sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary and the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary mixtures. High performance potential of GAX and branched GAX cycles using the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary fluid mixture was achieved especially at the high range of firing temperatures exceeding 400{degrees}F. The cooling COP`s have been improved by approximately 21% over the COP achieved with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary mixtures. These results show the potential of using advanced cycles with advanced fluid mixtures (ternary or quaternary fluid mixtures).

Zaltash, A.; Grossman, G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Displacement by SV Waves in Fluid Saturated Medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dihydroxy benzenes are of considerable interest because the stabilities of the molecular H-bond as well as the interaction between the ? charges of the benzene ring and the OH group[1]. The three isomers of di-hydroxy benzene namely, catechol, resorcinol, ... Keywords: diffusion, density, insoluble and soluble mediums

Dennis Ling Chuan Ching; Zainal Abdul Aziz

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Electrical Resistivity as an Indicator of Saturation in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir Rocks: Experimental Data and Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electrical resistivity of rock cores under conditions representative of geothermal reservoirs is strongly influenced by the state and phase (liquid/vapor) of the pore fluid. In fractured samples, phase change (vaporization/condensation) can result in resistivity changes that are more than an order of magnitude greater than those measured in intact samples. These results suggest that electrical resistivity monitoring of geothermal reservoirs may provide a useful tool for remotely detecting the movement of water and steam within fractures, the development and evolution of fracture systems and the formation of steam caps. We measured the electrical resistivity of cores of welded tuff containing fractures of various geometries to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction from the matrix. We then used the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport model (NUFT) (Nitao, 1998) to simulate the propagation of boiling fronts through the samples. The simulated saturation profiles combined with previously reported measurements of resistivity-saturation curves allow us to estimate the evolution of the sample resistivity as the boiling front propagates into the rock matrix. These simulations provide qualitative agreement with experimental measurements suggesting that our modeling approach may be used to estimate resistivity changes induced by boiling in more complex systems.

Detwiler, R L; Roberts, J J

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

105

HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF ESSENTIALLY SATURATED PEAT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory measured the hydraulic conductivity of peat samples using method ASTM D4511-00. Four samples of peat were packed into 73mm diameter plastic tubes and saturated from the bottom up with water. The columns were packed with Premier ProMoss III TBK peat to a dry density of approximately 0.16 gm/cc (10 lb/ft3). One column was packed using oven dried peat and the other 3 were packed using as delivered peat. The oven dried sample was the most difficult to saturate. All of the peat samples expanded during saturation resulting in a sample length (L) that was longer than when the sample was initially packed. Table 1 contains information related to the column packing. After saturation the hydraulic conductivity test was conducted using the apparatus shown in Figure 1. Three of the samples were tested at 2 different flow conductions, 1 high and 1 low. Table 2 and Figure 2 contain the results of the hydraulic conductivity testing. Each test was run for a minimum of 40 minutes to allow the test conditions to stabilize. The hydraulic conductivity at the end of each test is reported as the hydraulic conductivity for that test. The hydraulic conductivity of the 4 peat samples is 0.0052 {+-} 0.0009 cm/sec. This result compares well with the hydraulic conductivity measured in the pilot scale peat bed after approximately 2 months of operation. The similarity in results between the dry pack sample and moist pack samples shows the moisture content at the time of packing had a minimal effect on the hydraulic conductivity. Additionally, similarity between the results shows the test is reproducible. The hydraulic conductivity results are similar to those reported by other tests of peat samples reported in the literature.

Nichols, R

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The use of fluid inclusion gas analysis propene/propene ratios is investigated. Ratios of these species are affected by geothermal fluid temperature and oxidations state. Our purpose is to determine if analyses of these species in fluid inclusions these species to can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between

107

A Differential Pressure Instrument with Wireless Telemetry for In-Situ Measurement of Fluid Flow across Sediment-Water Boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry ...

Gardner, Alan T.

108

SRM -? Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These reference fluid formulations characterize the behavior of broad ranges of chemically similar fluids; in this way data on propane, for example ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

Richard Schultz

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Quasi-Three-Dimensional Variably Saturated Groundwater Flow Model for Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a quasi-three-dimensional, variably saturated groundwater flow model was developed by approximately dividing the three-dimensional soil water and groundwater flow into an unsaturated vertical soil water flow and a horizontal ...

Zhenghui Xie; Zhenhua Di; Zhendong Luo; Qian Ma

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

Elders, W.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Fluid Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Water temperature. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling: Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole

113

Fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery as a potential problem for the WIPP: Proceedings of a June 1995 workshop and analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designed and constructed for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The repository is sited in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin, at a depth of 655 meters, in the salt beds of the Salado Formation. The WIPP is surrounded by reserves and production of potash, crude oil and natural gas. In selecting a repository site, concerns about extensive oil field development eliminated the Mescalero Plains site in Chaves County and concerns about future waterflooding in nearby oil fields helped eliminate the Alternate II site in Lea County. Ultimately, the Los Medanos site in Eddy County was selected, relying in part on the conclusion that there were no oil reserves at the site. For oil field operations, the problem of water migrating from the injection zone, through other formations such as the Salado, and onto adjacent property has long been recognized. In 1980, the DOE intended to prohibit secondary recovery by waterflooding in one mile buffer surrounding the WIPP Site. However, the DOE relinquished the right to restrict waterflooding based on a natural resources report which maintained that there was a minimal amount of crude oil likely to exist at the WIPP site, hence waterflooding adjacent to the WIPP would be unlikely. This document presents the workshop presentations and analyses for the fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery utilizing fluid injection and their potential effects on the WIPP facility.

Silva, M.K.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Universal penetration test apparatus with fluid penetration sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A universal penetration test apparatus is described for measuring resistance of a material to a challenge fluid. The apparatus includes a pad saturated with the challenge fluid. The apparatus includes a compression assembly for compressing the material between the pad and a compression member. The apparatus also includes a sensor mechanism for automatically detecting when the challenge fluid penetrates the material. 23 figs.

Johnson, P.W.; Stampfer, J.F.; Bradley, O.D.

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modeling and Simulation of Pore Scale Multiphase Fluid Flow and Reactive Transport in Fractured and Porous Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the subsurface fluids play a critical role by transporting dissolved minerals, colloids and contaminants (sometimes over long distances), by mediating dissolution and precipitation processes and enabling chemical transformations in solution and at mineral surfaces. Although the complex geometries of fracture apertures, fracture networks and pore spaces may make it difficult to accurately predict fluid flow in saturated (single-phase) subsurface systems, well developed methods are available. The simulation of multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface is much more challenging because of the large density and/or viscosity ratios found in important applications (water/air in the vadose zone, water/oil, water/gas, gas/oil and water/oil/gas in oil reservoirs, water/air/non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in contaminated vadose zone systems and gas/molten rock in volcanic systems, for example). In addition, the complex behavior of fluid-fluid-solid contact lines, and its impact on dynamic contact angles, must also be taken into account, and coupled with the fluid flow. Pore network models and simple statistical physics based models such as the invasion percolation and diffusion-limited aggregation models have been used quite extensively. However, these models for multiphase fluid flow are based on simplified models for pore space geometries and simplified physics. Other methods such a lattice Boltzmann and lattice gas models, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods, and particle methods such as dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics are based more firmly on first principles, and they do not require simplified pore and/or fracture geometries. However, they are less (in some cases very much less) computationally efficient that pore network and statistical physics models. Recently a combination of continuum computation fluid dynamics, fluid-fluid interface tracking or capturing and simple models for the dependence of contact angles on fluid velocity at the contact line has been used to simulate multiphase fluid flow in fracture apertures, fracture networks and pore spaces. Fundamental conservation principles - conservation of momentum, and conservation of mass (or conservation of volume for incompressible fluids) and conservation of energy, as well as symmetries (Galilean invariance and isotropy) are central to the physics of fluids and the models used to simulate them. In molecular and mesoscale models observance of these conservation principles and symmetries at the microscopic level leads to macroscopic fluid dynamics that can be represented by the Navier Stokes equation. The remarkable fact that the flow of all simpe fluids, irrespective of their chemical nature, can be described by the Navier-Stokes equation is a result of these conservation principles and symmetries acting on the molecular level.

Paul Meakin; Alexandre Tartakovsky

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Water at a hydrophilic solid surface probed by ab-initio molecular dynamics: inhomogeneous thin layers of dense fluid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a microscopic model of the interface between liquid water and a hydrophilic, solid surface, as obtained from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we focused on the (100)surface of cubic SiC, a leading candidate semiconductor for bio-compatible devices. Our results show that, in the liquid in contact with the clean substrate, molecular dissociation occurs in a manner unexpectedly similar to that observed in the gas phase. After full hydroxylation takes place, the formation of a thin ({approx}3 {angstrom})interfacial layer is observed, which has higher density than bulk water and forms stable hydrogen bonds with the substrate. The liquid does not uniformly wet the surface, rather molecules preferably bind along directions parallel to the Si dimer rows. Our calculations also predict that one dimensional confinement between two hydrophilic surfaces at about 1.3 nm distance does not affect the structural and electronic properties of the whole water sample.

Cicero, G; Grossman, J; Galli, G; Catellani, A

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Techniques to Define the Hydraulic Zone of Influence of Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past, the hydraulic zone of influence (HZI) of a cooling water intake structure (CWIS) has been inferred from the results of field sampling programs. Today, however, advanced hydraulic modeling techniques can be used to define the HZI of a CWIS using personal computers. This report provides information that can be used to quantitatively or qualitatively describe the "area of influence" or HZI of a power plant CWIS, as required under new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Water Act (C...

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at theAidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling ofmineral-water-gas Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reactive-transport model for 14C was developed to test its applicability to the Aidlin geothermal system. Using TOUGHREACT, we developed a 1-D grid to evaluate the effects of water injection and subsequent water-rock-gas interaction on the compositions of the produced fluids. A dual-permeability model of the fracture-matrix system was used to describe reaction-transport processes in which the permeability of the fractures is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the rock matrix. The geochemical system included the principal minerals (K-feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, silica polymorphs) of the metagraywackes that comprise the geothermal reservoir rocks. Initial simulation results predict that the gas-phase CO2 in the reservoir will become more enriched in 14C as air-equilibrated injectate water (with a modern carbon signature) is incorporated into the system, and that these changes will precede accompanying decreases in reservoir temperature. The effects of injection on 14C in the rock matrix will be lessened somewhat because of the dissolution of matrix calcite with ''dead'' carbon.

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Embankment Loading on Saturated Coal Ash: Centrifuge Demonstration Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an embankment of coal combustion residuals or soil is built over a coal ash pond, pore water pressures can accumulate in the underlying saturated ash deposits and trigger a rapid slope failure. This report documents a scale model test completed to obtain data on the conditions that may lead to a slope failure. A 6.5-inch tall sand embankment was built on top of a 6-inch thick deposit of saturated fly ash. The strength of the fly ash was characterized using consolidated undrained triaxial ...

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Statistical analysis of liquid seepage in partially saturated heterogeneous fracture systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field evidence suggests that water flow in unsaturated fracture systems may occur along fast preferential flow paths. However, conventional macroscale continuum approaches generally predict the downward migration of water as a spatially uniform wetting front subjected to strong inhibition into the partially saturated rock matrix. One possible cause of this discrepancy may be the spatially random geometry of the fracture surfaces, and hence, the irregular fracture aperture. Therefore, a numerical model was developed in this study to investigate the effects of geometric features of natural rock fractures on liquid seepage and solute transport in 2-D planar fractures under isothermal, partially saturated conditions. The fractures were conceptualized as 2-D heterogeneous porous media that are characterized by their spatially correlated permeability fields. A statistical simulator, which uses a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, was employed to generate synthetic permeability fields. Hypothesized geometric features that are expected to be relevant for seepage behavior, such as spatially correlated asperity contacts, were considered in the SA algorithm. Most importantly, a new perturbation mechanism for SA was developed in order to consider specifically the spatial correlation near conditioning asperity contacts. Numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport were then performed in these synthetic fractures by the flow simulator TOUGH2, assuming that the effects of matrix permeability, gas phase pressure, capillary/permeability hysteresis, and molecular diffusion can be neglected. Results of flow simulation showed that liquid seepage in partially saturated fractures is characterized by localized preferential flow, along with bypassing, funneling, and localized ponding. Seepage pattern is dominated by the fraction of asperity contracts, and their shape, size, and spatial correlation. However, the correlation structure of permeability field is less important than the spatial correlation of asperity contacts. A faster breakthrough was observed in fractures subjected to higher normal stress, accompanied with a nonlinearly decreasing trend of the effective permeability. Interestingly, seepage dispersion is generally higher in fractures with intermediate fraction of asperity contacts; but it is lower for small or large fractions of asperity contacts. However, it may become higher if the ponding becomes significant. Transport simulations indicate that tracers bypass dead-end pores and travel along flow paths that have less flow resistance. Accordingly, tracer breakthrough curves generally show more spreading than breakthrough curves for water. Further analyses suggest that the log-normal time model generally fails to fit the breakthrough curves for water, but it is a good approximation for breakthrough curves for the tracer.

Liou, T.S.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy variational analysis of ions in water and channels: Field theory for primitive models of complex ionic fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy variational analysis of ions in water and channels: Field theory for primitive models EnVarA energy variational analysis that combines Hamilton's least action and Rayleigh's dissipation, and ion channels. Flows are driven by a combination of electrical and chemical potentials that depend

Liu, Chun

122

Saturated Zone Denitrification at California Dairies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Denitrification can effectively mitigate the problem of high nitrate concentrations in groundwater under dairy operations by reducing nitrate to N{sub 2} gas, at sites where biogeochemical conditions are favorable. We present results from field studies at central California dairies that document the occurrence of saturated-zone denitrification in shallow groundwater using biomolecular indicators, stable isotope compositions of nitrate, and measurements of dissolved excess N{sub 2} gas. Excess N{sub 2} concentrations provide a measure of the extent to which nitrate in groundwater has been partially or completely denitrified. Abundant excess N{sub 2} and young {sup 3}H/{sup 3}He apparent groundwater ages indicate high denitrification rates near manure lagoons where multiple lines of evidence indicate seepage of lagoon water into the groundwater system. Natural tracers of lagoon water include high chloride and dissolved organic carbon concentrations, distinctive trace organic compounds, and high groundwater {delta}{sup 18}O values (relative to other recharge sources). Proximal to the lagoons, NH{sub 4}{sup +} may be present in groundwater, but is strongly adsorbed on to sediment particles. Bubble formation in the lagoons causes the exsolution of other gases (N{sub 2}, Ar, Ne, He, etc.), which partition into the gas phase and strip the lagoon water of its dissolved gas load, providing a unique tracer of lagoon seepage in groundwater.

Singleton, M J; Esser, B K; Moran, J E; McNab, W W; Beller, H R

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

123

Evaluating water-based drill-in fluids for horizontal completions. Part 1: Results of eight extensive lab tests are presented for use when assessing and selecting these special fluids  

SciTech Connect

The use of horizontal wells to obtain more cost-effective production from unconsolidated sandstones has become very popular. Since these wells employ open hole completions, success often depends on the fluid system used during drilling and completion. A lab study of three drill-in fluid systems was performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of each. Intent of the study was not to recommend one fluid over another, but to make available the data necessary for picking the optimum fluid for a particular application. Parameters evaluated and discussed in Part 1 include rheology, lubricity, size distribution of bridging particles, API fluid loss, high-temperature fluid loss, filter cake characteristics, SEM analysis of filter cake and static breaker tests. Part 2 will describe return permeability tests. All were evaluated with 9, 10.5 and 14 ppg muds.

Ali, S.A. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Dearing, H.L. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Details Activities (61) Areas (32) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Origin of hydrothermal fluids; Mixing of hydrothermal fluids Thermal: Isotopic ratios can be used to characterize and locate subsurface thermal anomalies. Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Fluid: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in

125

Geomechanical Simulation of Fluid-Driven Fractures  

SciTech Connect

The project supported graduate students working on experimental and numerical modeling of rock fracture, with the following objectives: (a) perform laboratory testing of fluid-saturated rock; (b) develop predictive models for simulation of fracture; and (c) establish educational frameworks for geologic sequestration issues related to rock fracture. These objectives were achieved through (i) using a novel apparatus to produce faulting in a fluid-saturated rock; (ii) modeling fracture with a boundary element method; and (iii) developing curricula for training geoengineers in experimental mechanics, numerical modeling of fracture, and poroelasticity.

Makhnenko, R.; Nikolskiy, D.; Mogilevskaya, S.; Labuz, J.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal MultiphaseReactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated GeologicMedia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, and pH and Eh. Interactions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here we present two examples to illustrate applicability of the program: (1) injectivity effects of mineral scaling in a fractured geothermal reservoir and (2) CO2 disposal in a deep saline aquifer.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

ECO2M: A TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Mixtures of Water, NaCl, and CO2, Including Super- and Sub-Critical Conditions, and Phase Change Between Liquid and Gaseous CO2  

SciTech Connect

ECO2M is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.0) that was designed for applications to geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers. It includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H{sub 2}O - NaCl - CO{sub 2} mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for temperature, pressure and salinity conditions in the range of 10 C {le} T {le} 110 C, P {le} 600 bar, and salinity from zero up to full halite saturation. The fluid property correlations used in ECO2M are identical to the earlier ECO2N fluid property package, but whereas ECO2N could represent only a single CO{sub 2}-rich phase, ECO2M can describe all possible phase conditions for brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. This allows for seamless modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO{sub 2}-rich) phase, as well as two-and three-phase mixtures of aqueous, liquid CO{sub 2} and gaseous CO{sub 2} phases. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. TOUGH2/ECO2M is upwardly compatible with ECO2N and accepts ECO2N-style inputs. This report gives technical specifications of ECO2M and includes instructions for preparing input data. Code applications are illustrated by means of several sample problems, including problems that had been previously solved with TOUGH2/ECO2N.

Pruess, K.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Last Saturation Analysis of ENSO Humidity Variability in the Subtropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor tracers of last saturation were used in an atmospheric tracer transport model to evaluate ENSO variability in the generation of the dry air that defines the subtropical middle troposphere over the North Pacific. Fifteen Northern ...

John V. Hurley; Joseph Galewsky

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Saturation Hygrometer for the Measurement of Relative Humidity Between 95 and 105%  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new saturation hygrometer capable of measuring relative humidity between 95 and 105% is described. The hygrometer uses a thermally thin mirror on which condensation is controlled by limiting the exchange of ambient water vapor to condensation ...

H. E. Gerber

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fluid turbine  

SciTech Connect

A fluid turbine designed for increased power output includes an annular housing provided with a semi-spherical dome for directing incoming fluid flow to impinge on a plurality of rotor blades within the housing fixed to a vertical output shaft. An angle on the order of between 5 to 85/sup 0/, in the direction of rotation of the shaft, exists between the upper (Leading) and lower (Trailing) edges of each blade. The blades are manufactured from a plurality of aerodynamically-shaped, radially spaced ribs covered with a skin. The leading edge of each rib is curved, while the trailing edge is straight. The straight edge of the ribs in each blade approach a vertical plane through the vertical axis of the housing output shaft as the ribs progress radially inwardly towards the output shaft. The housing has fluid exit passages in its base so that deenergized fluid can be quickly flushed from the housing by the downwardly directed flow in combination with the novel blade configuration, which acts as a screw or force multiplier, to expel deenergized fluid. The airfoil shaped ribs also provide the blades with a contour for increasing the fluid velocity on the underside of the blades adjacent the fluid exit passage to aid in expelling the deenergized air while providing the turbine with both impulse and axial-flow, fluid impingement on the blades, resulting in a force vector of increased magnitude. A downwardly directed, substantially semi-cylindrical deflector frame connected to the housing blocks the path of flow of ambient fluid to create a low pressure area beneath the base to aid in continuously drawing fluid into the housing at high velocity to impinge on the rotor blades. The increased flow velocity and force on the blades along with the enhanced removal of deenergized fluid results in increased power output of the turbine.

Lebost, B.A.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heat transfer and fluid dynamics of air-water two-phase flow in micro-channels  

SciTech Connect

Heat transfer, pressure drop, and void fraction were simultaneously measured for upward heated air-water non-boiling two-phase flow in 0.51 mm ID tube to investigate thermo-hydro dynamic characteristics of two-phase flow in micro-channels. At low liquid superficial velocity j{sub l} frictional pressure drop agreed with Mishima-Hibiki's correlation, whereas agreed with Chisholm-Laird's correlation at relatively high j{sub l}. Void fraction was lower than the homogeneous model and conventional empirical correlations. To interpret the decrease of void fraction with decrease of tube diameter, a relation among the void fraction, pressure gradient and tube diameter was derived. Heat transfer coefficient fairly agreed with the data for 1.03 and 2.01 mm ID tubes when j{sub l} was relatively high. But it became lower than that for larger diameter tubes when j{sub l} was low. Analogy between heat transfer and frictional pressure drop was proved to hold roughly for the two-phase flow in micro-channel. But satisfactory relation was not obtained under the condition of low liquid superficial velocity. (author)

Kaji, Masuo; Sawai, Toru; Kagi, Yosuke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Biology-Oriented Science and Technology, Kinki University, 930 Nishi-mitani, Kinokawa, Wakayama 649-6493 (Japan); Ueda, Tadanobu [Toyota Central R and D Laboratory, Incorporated, 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cutting Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Cutting fluids for aluminum...Table 6 Cutting fluids for aluminum Type of lubricant Principal ingredients Viscosity range Application; maintenance Relative effectiveness Necessary precautions Mineral oils (fatty-additive type preferred) Mineral oil, lard, or neats-foot oil; oleic acid

133

PETROPHYSICS 217June 2011 Assessment of Residual Hydrocarbon Saturation with the Combined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of waterflooding in the Upper Spraberry sand. Fluid saturation, waterflooding efficiency, and recovery are also.1.2 Concept of Process In the Spraberry reservoir, oil is stored in a very tight matrix, with virtually allU sand and 11% IOIP for 5U sand. The effect of time on recovery profiles was investigated. Several

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

134

Self isolating high frequency saturable reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a saturable reactor and a method for decoupling the interwinding capacitance from the frequency limitations of the reactor so that the equivalent electrical circuit of the saturable reactor comprises a variable inductor. The saturable reactor comprises a plurality of physically symmetrical magnetic cores with closed loop magnetic paths and a novel method of wiring a control winding and a RF winding. The present invention additionally discloses a matching network and method for matching the impedances of a RF generator to a load. The matching network comprises a matching transformer and a saturable reactor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN)

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

135

Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam  

SciTech Connect

A major issue with in situ subsurface remediation is the ability to achieve an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or vadose zone. Delivery of amendment to the aquifer using shear thinning fluid and to the vadose zone using aqueous foam has the potential to enhance the amendment distribution into desired locations and improve the remediation. 2-D saturated flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the enhanced sweeping, contaminant removal, and amendment persistence achieved by shear thinning fluid delivery. Bio-polymer xanthan gum solution was used as the shear thinning fluid. Unsaturated 1-D column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the mitigation of contaminant mobilization, amendment uniform distribution enhancement, and lateral delivery improvement by foam delivery. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate was used as the foaming agent. It was demonstrated that the shear thinning fluid injection enhanced the fluid sweeping over a heterogeneous system and increased the delivery of remedial amendment into low-permeability zones. The persistence of the amendment distributed into the low-perm zones by the shear thinning fluid was prolonged compared to that of amendment distributed by water injection. Foam delivery of amendment was shown to mitigate the mobilization of highly mobile contaminant from sediments under vadose zone conditions. Foam delivery also achieved more uniform amendment distribution in a heterogeneous unsaturated system, and demonstrated remarkable increasing in lateral distribution of the injected liquid compared to direct liquid injection.

Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Shen, Xin; Li, Xiqing

2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

136

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

137

HYDRAULIC FLUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about hydraulic fluids. For more information, call the ATSDR Information Center at 1-888-422-8737. This fact sheet is one in a series of summaries about hazardous substances and their health effects. This information is important because this substance may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are present. HIGHLIGHTS: Exposure to hydraulic fluids occurs mainly in the workplace. Drinking certain types of hydraulic fluids can cause death in humans, and swallowing or inhaling certain types of hydraulic fluids has caused nerve damage in animals. Contact with some types of hydraulic fluids can irritate your skin or eyes. These substances have been found in at least 10 of the 1,428 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). What are hydraulic fluids? (Pronounced ?????ô????????????) Hydraulic fluids are a large group of liquids made of many kinds of chemicals. They are used in automobile automatic

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Post-processing of polymer foam tissue scaffolds with high power ultrasound: a route to increased pore interconnectivity, pore size and fluid transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We expose thick polymer foam tissue scaffolds to high power ultrasound and study its effect on the openness of the pore architecture and fluid transport through the scaffold. Our analysis is supported by measurements of fluid uptake during insonification and imaging of the scaffold microstructure via x-ray computed tomography, scanning electron microscopy and acoustic microscopy. The ultrasonic treatment is found to increase the mean pore size by over 10%. More striking is the improvement in fluid uptake: for scaffolds with only 40% water uptake via standard immersion techniques, we can routinely achieve full saturation of the scaffold over approximately one hour of exposure. These desirable modifications occur with no loss of scaffold integrity and negligible mass loss, and are optimized when the ultrasound treatment is coupled to a pre-wetting stage with ethanol. Our findings suggest that high power ultrasound is a highly targetted and efficient means to promote pore interconnectivity and fluid transport in...

Watson, N J; Reinwald, Y; White, L J; Ghaemmaghami, A M; Morgan, S P; Rose, F R A J; Povey, M J W; Parker, N G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Post-processing of polymer foam tissue scaffolds with high power ultrasound: a route to increased pore interconnectivity, pore size and fluid transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We expose thick polymer foam tissue scaffolds to high power ultrasound and study its effect on the openness of the pore architecture and fluid transport through the scaffold. Our analysis is supported by measurements of fluid uptake during insonification and imaging of the scaffold microstructure via x-ray computed tomography, scanning electron microscopy and acoustic microscopy. The ultrasonic treatment is found to increase the mean pore size by over 10%. More striking is the improvement in fluid uptake: for scaffolds with only 40% water uptake via standard immersion techniques, we can routinely achieve full saturation of the scaffold over approximately one hour of exposure. These desirable modifications occur with no loss of scaffold integrity and negligible mass loss, and are optimized when the ultrasound treatment is coupled to a pre-wetting stage with ethanol. Our findings suggest that high power ultrasound is a highly targetted and efficient means to promote pore interconnectivity and fluid transport in thick foam tissue scaffolds.

N J Watson; R K Johal; Y Reinwald; L J White; A M Ghaemmaghami; S P Morgan; F R A J Rose; M J W Povey; N G Parker

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

140

Superadiabatic Excess and Gravity Wave Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attention is called to a recent calculation of the superadiabatic excess—the ratio of wave amplitude at saturation to wave amplitude at convective instability threshold—caused by a saturated gravity wave. (This excess is also referred to as the ...

J. Weinstock

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Periodic register saturation in innermost loops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article treats register constraints in high performance codes and embedded VLIW computing, aiming to decouple register constraints from instruction scheduling. It extends the register saturation (RS) concept to periodic instruction schedules, i.e., ... Keywords: Code analysis, Code optimisation, Cyclic register allocation, Instruction level parallelism, Register saturation, Software pipelining

Sid-Ahmed-Ali Touati; Zsolt Mathe

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Applicability of the Hero turbine for energy conversion from low-quality, two-phase, inlet fluids  

SciTech Connect

The Hero turbine is frequently said to be paricularly suited for two-phase geothermal-energy conversion. Its functional simplicity makes it an obvious candidate for use of a very low-quality steam-water mixture as a working fluid. The performance characteristics for the single-phase expander derived are extended to address two options for handling the two-phase mixture in the Hero turbine. The Hero turbine is found to be best suited to fluids that are single-phase at the entrance to the turbine and to expansions that involve low enthalpy change. The turbine appears well suited to saturated liquid expansion in which the fluid becomes two-phase after entering the turbine.

Comfort, W.J. III

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development  

SciTech Connect

A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

Bill Turner

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

144

Scintillation probe with photomultiplier tube saturation indicator  

SciTech Connect

A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically an light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated. 2 figs.

Ruch, J.F.; Urban, D.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Scintillation probe with photomultiplier tube saturation indicator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically an light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated.

Ruch, Jeffrey F. (Bethel Park, PA); Urban, David J. (Glassport, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Boiler using combustible fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

1974-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

147

Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the rocks through which they migrate alters the earlier formed primary minerals and leads to the formation of secondary minerals, resulting in changes in the physical and chemical properties of the system. We have developed a comprehensive numerical simulator, TOUGHREACT, which considers nonisothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The code can be applied to problems in fundamental analysis of the hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, changes of porosity and permeability, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

Saturation Point Analysis of Moist Convective Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unified approach to the thermodynamics of cloudy air, cloud-clear air mixing processes, atmospheric thermodynamic equilibrium structure and instability is formulated, using a new concept: the Saturation Point. This permits the representation of ...

Alan K. Betts

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cloud Thermodynamic Models in Saturation Point Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One-dimensional thermodynamic models for cloud-environment mixing, evaporation into downdrafts and precipitation from updrafts are presented in a parallel treatment using convective pressure scales and saturation point coordinates. This common ...

Alan K. Betts

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Saturated Pseudoadiabats—A Noniterative Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two noniterative approximations are presented for saturated pseudoadiabats (also known as moist adiabats). One approximation determines which moist adiabat passes through a point of known pressure and temperature, such as through the lifting ...

Atoossa Bakhshaii; Roland Stull

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Convective instabilities in superposed porous and fluid layers in the presence of Coriolis forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal convection in a two-layer system consisting of a horizontal fluid layer overlying a layer of porous medium saturated with the same fluid, with uniform heating from below in the presence of Coriolis forces is investigated. The flow in porous medium ... Keywords: Brinkman model, Coriolis forces, superposed porous/fluid layers, thermal convection

Abdullah A. Abdullah; Hanadi M. Banjar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Local rheological probes for complex fluids: Application to Laponite suspensions C. Wilhelm,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the fluid viscosity on the applied stress, and a dynamical yield stress which saturates with the fluid aging . Their constitutive entities are in interaction; the competition between the different energies generates structures to ensure a Stokes flow: Re uR/v 10 2 , where v is the fluid dynamic viscosity. 2 This value of corresponds

Weeks, Eric R.

154

Solute spreading in nonstationary flows in bounded, heterogeneous unsaturated-saturated media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

three cases: transport in a mean gravity-dominated flow, in an unsaturated flow with a water table in nonstationary flows in bounded, heterogeneous unsaturated-saturated media, Water Resour. Res., 39(3), 1049, doi et al., 1991; Jury and Scotter, 1994; Harter and Yeh, 1996a, 1996b]. [3] In most of these models

Lu, Zhiming

155

Stochastic analysis of flow in a heterogeneous unsaturated-saturated system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of multiscale, nonstationary medium features. The unsaturated and saturated zones are coupled through the water table, whose position is random in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The presence of the water table zones [e.g., Dagan and Bresler, 1979; Bresler and Dagan, 1981; Andersson and Shapiro, 1983; Yeh et al

Zhang, Dongxiao

156

R fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theory of collisionless fluids is developed in a unified picture, where nonrotating figures with anisotropic random velocity component distributions and rotating figures with isotropic random velocity component distributions, make adjoints configurations to the same system. R fluids are defined and mean and rms angular velocities and mean and rms tangential velocity components are expressed, by weighting on the moment of inertia and the mass, respectively. The definition of figure rotation is extended to R fluids. The generalized tensor virial equations are formulated for R fluids and further attention is devoted to axisymmetric configurations where, for selected coordinate axes, a variation in figure rotation has to be counterbalanced by a variation in anisotropy excess and vice versa. A microscopical analysis of systematic and random motions is performed under a few general hypotheses, by reversing the sign of tangential or axial velocity components of an assigned fraction of particles, leaving the distribution function and other parameters unchanged (Meza 2002). The application of the reversion process to tangential velocity components, implies the conversion of random motion rotation kinetic energy into systematic motion rotation kinetic energy. The application of the reversion process to axial velocity components, implies the conversion of random motion translation kinetic energy into systematic motion translation kinetic energy, and the loss related to a change of reference frame is expressed in terms of systematic (imaginary) motion rotation kinetic energy. A procedure is sketched for deriving the spin parameter distribution (including imaginary rotation) from a sample of observed or simulated large-scale collisionless fluids i.e. galaxies and galaxy clusters.

R. Caimmi

2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

Effect of Working Fluid and Fluid Loading on the Performance of Rotating Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The steady state heat transfer performance of axially rotating heat pipes with methanol, ethanol and water as working fluid was measured for rotational speeds… (more)

Home, Deepayan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Analysis of the dynamics of saturation and pressure close to the wellbore for condensate reservoirs as a tool to optimize liquid production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas condensate reservoirs often exhibit a rapid decline in production with depletion. During early production, liquid dropout accumulates in the near wellbore area and this liquid dropout reduces the effective permeability to gas and thereby the well and field productivity. Our primary goal in this research is to understand the dynamics of condensate banking in the near well region of retrograde gases. We propose a relationship that can be used in determining gas oil ratios and near the wellbore saturation. The tasks accomplished in this study of gas condensate reservoir behavior include: Development of a generalized relationship, that allows us to estimate the gas-oil- ratio (GOR) and the effect condensate banking close to production wells. This simple relationship allows us to estimate GOR and condensate banking at any time by using basic data such as saturation pressure, field pressure, gas injection rates, and gas production rates. We recognize and acknowledge that further work is required in testing and improving this relation. We suggest the addition of molecular weights (or specific gravity) of the reservoir fluid to improve the correlative relationship. Comparison of field performance under a variety of production scenarios including natural depletion, gas cycling, water injection, and, the injection of different gases (methane, nitrogen and carbon dioxide). We provide a discussion of the effects of different production schemes upon saturation profiles and saturation histories, as well as the influence of various production-injection schemes on well and field productivity. We also include an analysis of the compositional changes driven by injection and the influence of these changes on reservoir performance.

Guerra Camargo, Andrea M

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Constant-pressure measurement of steam-water relative permeability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of steady-state experiments have established relative permeability curves for two-phase flow of water in a porous medium. These experiments have minimized uncertainty in pressure, heat loss, and saturation. By attempting to maintain a constant pressure gradient, the experiments have provided a baseline from which to determine the effect of temperature on relative permeability. The use of a flexible heater with an automatic control system made it possible to assume negligible phase change for the mobile fluid. X-ray computer tomography (CT) aided by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative permeability curves assume a shape similar to those obtained by Corey (1954) for the simultaneous flow of nitrogen and water. Close agreement between the curves by Satik (1998), Mahiya (1999), and this study establishes the reliability of the experimental method and instrumentation adopted in these experiments, though some differences may bear further investigation. In particular, the steam phase relative permeability appears to vary much more linearly with saturation than does the water phase relative permeability.

O'Connor, Peter A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Saturable inductor and transformer structures for magnetic pulse compression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Saturable inductor and transformer for magnetic compression of an electronic pulse, using a continuous electrical conductor looped several times around a tightly packed core of saturable inductor material.

Birx, Daniel L. (Londonderry, NH); Reginato, Louis L. (Orinda, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Stabilizing a linear systems with saturation through optimal control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 5, 2003 ... We construct a continuous feedback for a saturated system ?x(t) ... the saturated system, which is nonlinear, to an optimal control problem with ...

163

Fluid extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Generation of energy by means of a working fluid, and regeneration of a working fluid  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided of optimizing, within limits imposed by a heating medium from the surface of an ocean and a cooling medium from an ocean depth, the energy supply capability of a gaseous working fluid which is expanded from a charged high pressure level to a spent low pressure level to provide available energy, the method comprising expanding the gaseous working fluid to a spent low pressure level where the condensation temperature of the working fluid is below the minimum temperature of the cold water, and regenerating the spent working fluid by, in at least one regeneration stage, absorbing the working fluid being regenerated in an absorption stage by dissolving it in a solvent solution while cooling with the cold water, the solvent solution comprising a solvent having an initial working fluid concentration which is sufficient to provide a solution having a boiling point, after dissolving the working fluid being regenerated, which is above the minimum temperature of the cold water to permit effective absorption of the working fluid being regenerated, increasing the pressure and then evaporating the working fluid being regenerated by heating in an evaporation stage with the available hot water, feeding the evaporated working fluid and the solvent solution to a separator stage for separating the evaporated working fluid and the solvent solution, recovering the evaporated, separated working fluid, and recycling the balance of the solvent solution from the separator stage to constitute the solvent solution for the absorption stage; and an apparatus for carrying out the method.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Experimentally Measured Interfacial Area during Gas Injection into Saturated Porous Media: An Air Sparging Analogy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of interfacial area (awn) between air and subsurface liquids during air-sparging can limit the rate of site remediation. Lateral movement within porous media could be encountered during air-sparging operations when air moves along the bottom of a low-permeability lens. This study was conducted to directly measure the amount of awn between air and water flowing within a bench-scale porous flow cell during the lateral movement of air along the upper edge of the cell during air injections into an initially water-saturated flow cell. Four different cell orientations were used to evaluate the effect of air injection rates and porous media geometries on the amount of awn between fluids. Air was injected at flow rates that varied by three orders of magnitude, and for each flow cellover this range of injection rates little change in awn was noted. A wider variation in awn was observed when air moved through different regions for the different flow cell orientations. These results are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Waduge et al. (2007), who performed experiments in a larger sand-pack flow cell, and determined that air-sparging efficiency is nearly independent of flow rate but highly dependent on the porous structure. By directly measuring the awn, and showing that awn does not vary greatly with changes in injection rate, we show that the lack of improvement to remediation rates is because there is a weak dependence of the awn on the air injection rate.

Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive geochemical Transport in Variable Saturated Geologic Media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems, waste disposal sites, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. A comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator, TOUGHREACT, has been developed. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The program can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. Changes in porosity and permeability due to mineral dissolution and precipitation can be considered. Linear adsorption and decay can be included. For the purpose of future extensions, surface complexation by double layer model is coded in the program. Xu and Pruess (1998) developed a first version of a non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport model, TOUGHREACT, by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). Xu, Pruess, and their colleagues have applied the program to a variety of problems such as: (1) supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al, 2001), (2) caprock mineral alteration in a hydrothermal system (Xu and Pruess, 2001a), and (3) mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al, 2003b and 2004a). For modeling the coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes during heater tests at proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain (Nevada), Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) and Spycher et al. (2003) enhanced TOUGHREACT on (1) high temperature geochemistry, (2) mineral reactive surface area calculations, and (3) porosity and permeability changes due to mineral alteration. On the other hand, Pruess et al. (1999) updated the TOUGH2 simulator to TOUGH2 V2. The present version of TOUGHREACT was developed by introducing the work of Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) to the original work of Xu and Pruess (1998), and by replacing TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al, 1999). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of ''self-documenting'' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following different TOUGH2 fluid property or ''EOS'' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for water, or two waters with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (2) EOS2 for multiphase mixtures of water and CO{sub 2} also with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (3) EOS3 for multiphase mixtures of water and air with typical applications to vadose zone and nuclear waste disposal problems, (4) EOS4 that has the same capabilities as EOS3 but with vapor pressure lowering effects due to capillary pressure, (5) EOS9 for single phase water (Richards. equation) with typical applications to ambient reactive geochemical transport problems, (6) ECO2 for multiphase mixtures of water, CO{sub 2} and NaCl with typical applications to CO{sub 2} disposal in deep brine aquifers.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

Impact of an Exponential Profile of Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity within the ISBA LSM: Simulations over the Rhône Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on the influence of an exponential profile of saturated hydraulic conductivity, ksat, with soil depth on the water budget simulated by the Interaction Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model over the French Rhône ...

B. Decharme; H. Douville; A. Boone; F. Habets; J. Noilhan

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Definition: Fluid Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Lab Analysis Fluid Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fluid Lab Analysis Fluid lab analysis encompasses a broad array of techniques used for the analysis of water and gas samples. These analyses are used in a variety of disciplines to quantify the chemical components and properties of groundwater systems. In geothermal exploration and development, fluid analyses often provide a first look into the characteristics of a hydrothermal system, and are routinely used in ongoing monitoring of geothermal reservoirs.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Water chemistry analyses are carried out to identify and quantify the chemical components and properties of a certain water. This include pH, major cations and anions, trace elements and isotopes. Water chemistry

169

Ten iterative steps for model development and evaluation applied to Computational Fluid Dynamics for Environmental Fluid Mechanics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used to study a wide variety of complex Environmental Fluid Mechanics (EFM) processes, such as water flow and turbulent mixing of contaminants in rivers and estuaries and wind flow and air pollution ... Keywords: Air and water quality, Building aerodynamics, Environmental Fluid Mechanics, River hydraulics, Transverse mixing, Wind flow

B. Blocken; C. Gualtieri

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Polynomial Fits to Saturation Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe eighth- and sixth-order polynomial fits to Wexler's and Hyland-Wexler's saturation-vapor-pressure expressions. Fits are provided in both least-squares and relative-error norms. Error analysis is presented. The authors show ...

Piotr J. Flatau; Robert L. Walko; William R. Cotton

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Session 2A Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials  

Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials • State of the art ... – Novel methods for liquid permeability measurement of saturated ...

172

Fascinating Fluids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mostly water, arguably the most interesting compound in the universe. What is fine sand? It is a solid, but it can behave like a liquid, flowing yet maintaining its volume....

173

Colloid-Facilitated Cs Transport through Water-Saturated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be welded. Some Tri-Party Agreement milestones completed in 2002 were related to work on Hanford tanks. #12 paragraphs. Solid waste may originate from work on the Hanford Site or from sources offsite, with contributions from CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.; S.M. Stoller Corporation; Fluor Hanford, Inc. and its

Flury, Markus

174

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Some surprises in the transport of miscible fluids in the presence of a second immiscible phase  

SciTech Connect

Displacements were conducted in Berea cores to gain insight into the mechanism of tertiary oil displacement and propagation by a micellar slug. Contrary to expectation, the first oil mobilized by micellar fluid was among the first oil (instead of the last oil) to be produced, giving the appearance of either viscous fingering or of unusually large dispersion. To eliminate the possibility of unfavorable mobility ratios caused by oil/water/surfactant interaction, we conducted several runs in which an injected hydrocarbon displaced another hydrocarbon, initially at residual saturation. In other experiments, water (the wetting phase) at irreducible saturation was displaced by a distinguishable injected aqueous phase. Injected hydrocarbon appeared in the produced fluids immediately after oil breakthrough, yielding behavior similar to the micellar-slug experiments. Even with a favorable viscosity ratio of less than 0.01, the apparent dispersion was huge. However, mixing zones in the wetting-phase displacements were quite normal and similar to those observed for single-phase flow. Nonwetting-phase fronts (injected hydrocarbon displacing resident hydrocarbon) are smeared much more than wetting-phase fronts because the entrance of hydrocarbon into smaller water-filled pore throats is delayed until the capillary entrance pressure is overcome by differences in the flowing oil and water pressure gradients. Oil might not be displaced from the smaller pores until long after oil breakthrough. Nonwetting-phase dispersion, which occurs in many EOR processes, can be expected to be one or two orders of magnitude greater than dispersion measured in singlephase-flow experiments. Entrance of the wetting phase, however, is not delayed; hence, wetting-phase mixing zones are short.

Jones, S.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evaluation of the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, and effective fracture length  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-permeability gas wells often produce less than predicted after a fracture treatment. One of the reasons for this is that fracture lengths calculated after stimulation are often less than designed lengths. While actual fracture lengths may be shorter due to fracture growth out of zone, improper proppant settling, or proppant flowback, short calculated fracture lengths can also result from incorrect analysis techniques. It is known that fracturing fluid that remains in the fracture and formation after a hydraulic fracture treatment can decrease the productivity of a gas well by reducing the relative permeability to gas in the region invaded by this fluid. However, the relationships between fracture fluid cleanup, effective fracture length, and well productivity are not fully understood. In this work I used reservoir simulation to determine the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, effective fracture length, and well productivity. I simulated water saturation and pressure profiles around a propped fracture, tracked gas production along the length of the propped fracture, and quantified the effective fracture length (i.e., the fracture length under single-phase flow conditions that gives similar performance as for multiphase flow conditions), the "cleanup" fracture length (i.e., the fracture length corresponding to 90% cumulative gas flow rate into the fracture), and the "apparent" fracture length (i.e., the fracture length where the ratio of multiphase to single-phase gas entry rate profiles is unity). This study shows that the proppant pack is generally cleaned up and the cleanup lengths are close to designed lengths in relatively short times. Although gas is entering along entire fracture, fracturing fluid remains in the formation near the fracture. The water saturation distribution affects the gas entry rate profile, which determines the effective fracture length. Subtle changes in the gas rate entry profile can result in significant changes in effective fracture length. The results I derived from this work are consistent with prior work, namely that greater fracture conductivity results in more effective well cleanup and longer effective fracture lengths versus time. This study provides better explanation of mechanisms that affect fracturing fluid cleanup, effective fracture length, and well productivity than previous work.

Lolon, Elyezer P.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Report on variation of electrical conductivity during steam injection in unconsolidated sand saturated with a salt solution  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical electrical methods are useful in evaluating the performance of certain classes of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations and also remediation operations for contaminant spills. Electrical resistivity is sensitive to the concentration of ionic species in solution in fluids present in the subsurface zone. Such fluids are displaced during oil recovery operations and contaminant remediation. If the resistivity of the displacing fluid differs from the in situ fluid, then a geophysical method for detecting resistivity variations may be capable of tracking the advance of the displacing fluid. This report presents the results of experiments designed to determine the variations in resistivity that occur when steam is injected into a homogeneous, fully-saturated sand. These experiments were simple, one-dimensional laboratory steam injection experiments. They were performed using a glass tube filled with a tightly-packed sand and fitted with an injection port at one end and an exit port at the other In each experiment, the sand pack was initially saturated with a brine and then steam was introduced at one end of the tube. Analytic solutions for the steam front velocity, steam temperature, steam distribution, salt concentration profile, and liquid saturation are presented and are used with appropriate correlations of electrical conductivity to describe the observed behavior. The results of these experiments should provide experimental justification for the electrical conductivity variations that are calculated from the analytic solutions. In addition, the experiments may yield new information regarding features of the data that may not result from the analytical modelling.

Vaughan, P. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; Udell, K.S. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Wilt, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If water is used as a drilling fluid or in hydraulic packerfrom above or the drilling fluid. Little is known about theFluids in the Upper Continental Crust – Results from the German Continental Deep Drilling

Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Extended Longitudinal Scaling: direct evidence of saturation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiparticle production of charged particles at high energies exhibit the phenomenon of Limiting Fragmentation. Furthermore, the region in rapidity over which the production of particles appears to be independent of energy, increases with energy. It is argued that this phenomenon, known as Extended Longitudinal Scaling, is a direct manifestation of some kind of saturation, akin to that in the Color Glass Condensate picture of particle production.

Wit Busza

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Oxidative weathering chemical migration under variably saturated conditions and supergene copper enrichment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transport of oxygen gas from the land surface through an unsaturated zone has a strong influence on oxidative weathering processes. Oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), one of the most common naturally occurring minerals, is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. Here we present a detailed numerical model of supergene copper enrichment that involves the oxidative weathering of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}), and acidification that causes mobilization of metals in the unsaturated zone, with subsequent formation of enriched ore deposits of chalcocite (CuS) and covellite (Cu{sub 2}S) in the reducing conditions below the water table. We examine and identify some significant conceptual and computational issues regarding the oxidative weathering processes through the modeling tool. The dissolution of gaseous oxygen induced by the oxidation reduces oxygen partial pressure, as well as the total pressure of the gas phase. As a result, the gas flow is modified, then the liquid phase flow. Results indicate that this reaction effect on the fluid flow may not be important under ambient conditions, and gas diffusion can be a more important mechanism for oxygen supply than gas or liquid advection. Acidification, mobilization of metals, and alteration of primary minerals mostly take place in unsaturated zone (oxidizing), while precipitation of secondary minerals mainly occurs in saturated zone (reducing). The water table may be considered as an interface between oxidizing and reducing zones. Moving water table due to change of infiltration results in moving oxidizing zone and redistributing aqueous chemical constitutes and secondary mineral deposits. The oxidative weathering processes are difficult to model numerically, because concentrations of redox sensitive chemical species such as O{sub 2}(aq), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and HS{sup -} may change over tens of orders of magnitude between oxidizing and reducing conditions. In order to simulate substantial reaction progress over geologic time, one can benefit from the quasi-stationary state (QSS) approximation. A significant saving of computing time using QSS is demonstrated through the example. In addition, changes in porosity and permeability due to mineral dissolution and precipitation are also addressed in some degree. Even though oxidative weathering is sensitive to many factors, this work demonstrates that our model provides a comprehensive suite of process modeling capabilities, which could serve as a prototype for oxidative weathering processes with broad significance for geoscientific, engineering, and environmental applications.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, K.; Brimhall, G.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Predictions of Saturation Ratio for Cloud Microphysical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The saturation development equation is solved analytically to give a solution that is more general than the existing analytical solution. This analytical solution provides accurate predictions of the saturation ratio and allows the use of ...

Jen-Ping Chen

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Fluid catalytic cracking is an important step in producing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (much as water makes sand into quicksand). Because the catalyst is fluid, it can circulate around the FCC, moving between reactor and regenerator vessels ...

183

Modeling Fluid Flow and Electrical Resistivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase change of pore fluid (boiling/condensing) in rock cores under conditions representative of geothermal reservoirs results in alterations of the electrical resistivity of the samples. In fractured samples, phase change can result in resistivity changes that are more than an order of magnitude greater than those measured in intact samples. These results suggest that electrical resistivity monitoring may provide a useful tool for monitoring the movement of water and steam within fractured geothermal reservoirs. We measured the electrical resistivity of cores of welded tuff containing fractures of various geometries to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. We then used the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport model (NUFT) (Nitao, 1998) to simulate the propagation of boiling fronts through the samples. The simulated saturation profiles combined with previously reported measurements of resistivity-saturation curves allow us to estimate the evolution of the sample resistivity as the boiling front propagates into the rock matrix. These simulations provide qualitative agreement with experimental measurements suggesting that our modeling approach may be used to estimate resistivity changes induced by boiling in more complex systems.

Detwiler, R L; Roberts, J J; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Mass transport of volatile organic compounds between the saturated and vadose zones. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in the saturated zone are transported into the vadose zone primarily by gaseous phase diffusion. If the saturated zone is remediated, VOCs present in the vadose zone may become a secondary source of contamination for the groundwater. The amount of VOCs that remain in the vadose zone is dependent on site hydrology, soil properties, and the chemical properties of the contaminants. The purpose of this study was to determine what conditions caused VOC concentrations in the vadose zone to significantly recontaminate the saturated zone. A one-dimensional numerical model was developed to investigate the transport of a VOC, trichioroethylene, between the saturated and vadose zones under a variety of conditions. The model featured steady-state unsaturated water flow and transient contaminant transport. Transport mechanisms included aqueous phase advection-dispersion and gaseous phase diffusion. Partitioning between the water, gas, and soil compartments were modeled as equilibrium processes. Sensitivity analyses were performed on several variables including soil type (homogeneous and heterogeneous profiles), water infiltration rate and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant rate, and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant in the presence of heterogeneous soils, low infiltration rates and deep vadose zones.

Harner, M.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Saturated hydraulic conductivity determined by on ground mono-offset Ground-Penetrating Radar inside a single ring infiltrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study we show how to use GPR data acquired along the infiltration of water inside a single ring infiltrometer to inverse the saturated hydraulic conductivity. We used Hydrus-1D to simulate the water infiltration. We generated water content profiles at each time step of infiltration, based on a particular value of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, knowing the other van Genuchten parameters. Water content profiles were converted to dielectric permittivity profiles using the Complex Refractive Index Method relation. We then used the GprMax suite of programs to generate radargrams and to follow the wetting front using arrival time of electromagnetic waves recorded by a Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR). Theoretically, the 1D time convolution between reflectivity and GPR signal at any infiltration time step is related to the peak of the reflected amplitude recorded in the corresponding trace in the radargram. We used this relation ship to invert the saturated hydraulic conductivity for constant and fallin...

Léger, Emmanuel; Coquet, Yves

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A Particle-Water Based Model for Water Retention Hysteresis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A particle-water discrete element-based approach to describe water movement in partially saturated granular media is presented and tested. Water potential is governed by both capillary bridges, dominant at low saturations, and pressure of entrapped air, dominant at high saturations. The approach captures the hysteresis of water retention during wetting and drainage by introducing local evolution of liquid-solid contact angles at the level of pores and grains. Next, extensive comparisons against experimental data are presented. While this is made without involving any fitting parameters, the method demonstrates relative high success by achieving a correlation coefficient of at least 82%, and mostly above 90%.

Yixiang Gan; Federico Maggi; Giuseppe Buscarnera; Itai Einav

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

187

SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT  

SciTech Connect

This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical analysis (FEHM) computer code, (FEHM V2.20, STN: 10086-2.20-00) (LANL 2003 [DIRS 161725]) and is described in Section 6.4 of this report. FEHM is a three-dimensional (3-D), finite-volume, finite-element, heat and mass flow-and-transport code. This report documents the features and capabilities of the site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the SZ at Yucca Mountain in support of the TSPA-LA. Correlative flow-model calculations using FEHM are carried out and documented in the model report ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model independent of the transport processes and supplied as a part of the output package from the flow model, which is then used as inputs to the transport model. Several SZ analysis model reports provide information and data needed as feed-ins for this report, and this report in turn provides technical product outputs that feed into other SZ reports. The details of inputs to the site-scale transport model are provided in Section 4.

S. KELLER

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

Relationships between gas-liquid interfacial surface area, liquid saturation, and light transmission in variably saturated porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relationships between gas-liquid interfacial surface area, liquid saturation, and light transmission in variably saturated porous media Abstract Liquid saturation and gas-liquid interfacial area the specific gas-liquid interfacial area from the area under the primarydrainage branch of the Seff -h

Weisbrod, Noam

189

Preferential mode of gas invasion in sediments : grain-scale model of coupled multiphase fluid flow and sediment mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a discrete element model for simulating, at the grain scale, gas migration in brine-saturated deformable media. We rigorously account for the presence of two fluids in the pore space by incorporating forces on ...

Jain, Antone Kumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fluid transport container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fluid transport container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

DeRoos, Bradley G. (41 James St., Sequim, WA 98382); Downing, Jr., John P. (260 Kala Heights Dr., Port Townsand, WA 98368); Neal, Michael P. (921 Amberly Pl., Columbus, OH 43220)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Acoustic Emission in a Fluid Saturated Hetergeneous Porous Layer with Application to Hydraulic Fracture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

responses during hydraulic fracturing, and aid developmentFracture Monitoring Hydraulic fracturing is a method forfluids" used for hydraulic fracturing, the above frequencies

Nelson, J.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport in variably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dissolution and precipitation. Here we present a comprehensive modeling approach and numerical methods

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Acoustic Emission in a Fluid Saturated Hetergeneous Porous Layer with Application to Hydraulic Fracture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and High Speed Rail, Transportation Research Board, Nationalfrom Rail Transportation Systems, Transportation Research

Nelson, J.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Some surprises in the transport of miscible fluids in the presence of a second immiscible phase  

SciTech Connect

Displacements were conducted in Berea cores to gain insight into the mechanism of tertiary oil displacement and propagation by a micellar slug. Contrary to expectation, the first-displaced oil was among the first-produced oil, giving the appearance of either viscous fingering or of unusually large dispersion. To eliminate the possibility of unfavorable mobility ratios due to oil-water-surfactant interaction, the authors conducted several runs in which an injected hydrocarbon displaced another hydrocarbon, initially at residual saturation. In other experiments, water (the wetting phase) at irreducible saturation was displaced by a distinguishable injected aqueous phase. Injected hydrocarbon appeared in the produced fluids immediately after oil breakthrough, yielding similar behavior to the micellar slug experiments. Even with a favorable viscosity ratio of less than 0.01, the apparent dispersion was huge. However, mixing zones in the wetting-phase displacements were quite normal, and similar to those observed for single-phase flow. Nonwetting-phase fronts (injected hydrocarbon displacing resident hydrocarbon) are smeared much more than wetting-phase fronts because entrance of hydrocarbon into smaller water-filled pore throats is delayed until the capillary entrance pressure is overcome by differences in the flowing oil and water pressure gradients. Oil may not be displaced from the smaller pores until long after oil breakthrough. Nonwetting-phase dispersion, which occurs in many EOR processes, can be expected to be one or two orders of magnitude greater than dispersion measured in single-phase-flow experiments. Entrance of the wetting phase, however, is not delayed; hence, wetting-phase mixing zones are short.

Jones, S.C.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole fluid sampling is typically performed to monitor water quality, study recharge and flow in groundwater systems, and evaluate resource potential of geothermal reservoirs. Analysis of both the liquid and gas fractions of the reservoir fluid allows for detailed characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of the subsurface hydrothermal system. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

197

Environmentally safe fluid extractor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

Sungaila, Zenon F. (Orland Park, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Drilling Fluid Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart...Table 8 Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart Corrosion cause Primary source Identification Major corrosion forms Remedies Oxygen Atmosphere, mud conditioning, equipment, oxidizing

199

Fluid Suspensions & Emulsions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Suspensions & Emulsions. Summary: Our primary interest is protein ... protein solutions? 1. Health & Safety. There is ongoing ...

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range kg/yr Cl sources and sinks Water or rock mass mol/kgtemperature at the source of fluid-rock reactions, asto identify the fluid-rock reactions at source. In addition,

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Structure and Dynamics of Forsterite-scCO2/H2O Interfaces as a Function of Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of forsterite surfaces in contact with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) fluids of varying water content were performed to determine the partition of water between the scCO2 fluid and the mineral surface, the nature of CO2 and H2O bonding at the interface, and the regions of the interface that may be conducive to HxCO3(2-x)- formation. Calculations of the free energy of the associative adsorption of water onto the (010) forsterite surface from the scCO2 phase indicated that the formation of a water film up to three-monolayer thick can be exothermic even for water contents below the water saturation concentration of the scCO2 fluid. In MD simulations of scCO2/H2O mixtures in contact with the (010) forsterite surface, H2O was found to readily displace CO2 at the surface and, therefore, CO2 directly contacted the surface only for water coverages below two monolayers. For thicker water films, a two-monolayer hydration layer formed that CO2 could not penetrate. Simulations of the hydroxylated (010) surface and of the (011) surface suggested that this conclusion can be extended to forsterite surfaces with different surface structures and/or compositions. The density, diffusion, and degree of hydration of CO2 as well as the extent of CO2/H2O mixing at the interface were all predicted to depend strongly on the thickness of the water-rich film, i.e., on the water content of the scCO2 fluid.

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Weare, John H.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Distribution of fluid phases within the steam zone in steam injection processes  

SciTech Connect

The saturation distribution of steam, water, and oil within the steam zone in a steam injection process at constant injection rates is examined. It is shown theoretically that for typical values of injection parameters the oil saturation in the steam zone rapidly reaches its residual value at steam zone conditions. This result, which corroborates previous experimental evidence, is a consequence of the relatively fast changes in phase saturations compared to the rate of the advance of the steam front. Explicit expressions for the steam saturation distribution are obtained. It is shown that the average steam saturation is a slightly decreasing function of time and approaches a limiting value which is a nearly constant fraction of the steam saturation at the injection point. This result provides theoretical justification for the often made assumption of constant average steam saturation in steam injection calculations.

Yortsos, Y.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Spinning fluid cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of a spinning fluid in a flat cosmological model is investigated. The space-time is itself generated by the spinning fluid which is characterized by an energy-momentum tensor consisting a sum of the usual perfect-fluid energy-momentum tensor and some Belinfante-Rosenfeld tensors. It is shown that the equations of motion admit a solution for which the fluid four-velocity and four-momentum are not co-linear in general. The momentum and spin densities of the fluid are expressed in terms of the scale factor.

Morteza Mohseni

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

204

Spinning fluid cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of a spinning fluid in a flat cosmological model is investigated. The space-time is itself generated by the spinning fluid which is characterized by an energy-momentum tensor consisting a sum of the usual perfect-fluid energy-momentum tensor and some Belinfante-Rosenfeld tensors. It is shown that the equations of motion admit a solution for which the fluid four-velocity and four-momentum are not co-linear in general. The momentum and spin densities of the fluid are expressed in terms of the scale factor.

Mohseni, Morteza

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Project Drum Inlet: explosive excavation in saturated sand  

SciTech Connect

Seasonal storms during February of 1971 completely closed the Drum Inlet navigation channel through the Outer Banks off the North Carolina coast. This channel is highly useful to commercial and sport fishing industries in the Carteret County vicinity of North Carolina, and is vital to maintenance of the ecological balance in the inland Core Sound waters. To reopen Drum Inlet, an alignment about 2.1 miles south of the original location was selected. A contract dredge excavated a channel from the inland Core Sound waterway to and part way through the Outer Banks. The final 385-ft-long section of sand separating the Core Sound from the Atlantic Ocean was excavated with large explosive charges, This report describes the explosive excavation of that portion of the channel. Twenty-two separate canisters, each containing 1 ton of aluminized ammonium-nitrate slurry blasting agent, were emplaced in two rows. All charges were detonated simultaneously at 1327 hours, 23 Decembcr 1971. The detonation successfully removed the sand barrier, forming a continuous channel over 80 ft in width. This channel subsequently washed out to a width of about 1000 ft and was used:is an access route to the Raleigh Bay fishing grounds. The Drum Inlet project demonstrated the practicality of explosive channel excavation in saturated sand under the special conditions encountered at this site. (auth)

Snell, C.M.; Gillespie, R.H.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Spinning fluids reactor  

SciTech Connect

A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Dependence of waterflood remaining oil saturation on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters in mixed-wet turbidite sands  

SciTech Connect

The dependence of waterflood oil recovery on relative permeability, capillary pressure, and reservoir parameters was investigated by numerical simulation. The relative permeability and capillary pressure curves were based on laboratory measurements on unconsolidated sands. The water-wet case is based on the assumption that the system is water-wet and measurements were made with refined oil. The mixed-wet case assumed that the system is mixed-wet and restored-state measurements were made with crude oil. The reservoir model was a prototype turbidite sand with a range of thickness and permeability values. The economic oil recovery was based on an economic limit water cut of 50%. The remaining oil saturation (ROS) in the swept region for the water-wet cases was close to the residual oil saturation. The ROS of the mixed-wet cases ranged from low values near the residual oil saturation to far above the residual oil saturation. It is dependent on the reservoir parameters that govern (1) the vertical film surface drainage of oil by gravity, (2) accumulation of a high oil saturation and thus a high relative permeability under the caprock, and (3) up-dip migration of the oil that accumulated under the caprock. The dependence on the reservoir parameters can be summarized by dimensionless groups. There is a dimensionless time for the vertical displacement of oil by gravity. The accumulation of a high oil saturation under the caprock is dependent on the ratio of the capillary transition zone and the sand thickness. The updip migration is dependent on a combination of the gravity number and the endpoint mobility ratio.

Hirasaki, G.J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1996 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present when the thermal plume was emplaced. Dilution of the thermal waters occurred above and below the plume producing strong gradients in their compositions. Comparison of mineral and fluid inclusion based temperatures demonstrates that cooling has occurred along the margins of the thermal system but that the interior of the system

209

Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

Mehrdad Massoudi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Microwave fluid flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

Billeter, Thomas R. (Richland, WA); Philipp, Lee D. (Richland, WA); Schemmel, Richard R. (Lynchburg, VA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

An overview of instability and fingering during immiscible fluid flow in porous and fractured media  

SciTech Connect

Wetting front instability is an important phenomenon affecting fluid flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils and rocks. It causes the development of fingers which travel faster than would a uniform front and thus bypass much of the medium. Water saturation and solute concentration in such fingers tend to be higher than in the surrounding medium. During infiltration, fingering may cause unexpectedly rapid arrival of water and solute at the water-table. This notwithstanding, most models of subsurface flow and transport ignore instability and fingering. In this report, we survey the literature to assess the extent to which this may or may not be justified. Our overview covers experiments, theoretical studies, and computer simulations of instability and fingering during immiscible two-phase flow and transport, with emphasis on infiltration into soils and fractured rocks. Our description of instability in an ideal fracture (Hele-Shaw cell) includes an extension of existing theory to fractures and interfaces having arbitrary orientations in space. Our discussion of instability in porous media includes a slight but important correction of existing theory for the case of an inclined interface. We conclude by outlining some potential directions for future research. Among these, we single out the effect of soil and rock heterogeneities on instability and preferential flow as meriting special attention in the context of nuclear waste storage in unsaturated media.

Chen, G.; Neuman, S.P. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources; Taniguchi, M. [Nara Univ. of Education (Japan). Dept. of Earth Sciences

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Complex Fluids Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... applications in energy, sustainability, electronics and medicine. As these materials are typically in the fluid state during their production or end-use ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

213

Active control of the resistive wall mode with power saturation  

SciTech Connect

An analytic model of non-linear feedback stabilization of the resistive wall mode is presented. The non-linearity comes from either the current or the voltage saturation of the control coil power supply. For the so-called flux-to-current control, the current saturation of active coils always results in the loss of control. On the contrary, the flux-to-voltage control scheme tolerates certain degree of the voltage saturation. The minimal voltage limit is calculated, below which the control will be lost.

Li Li; Liu Yue [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Liu Yueqiang [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Prediction of core saturation instability at an HVDC converter  

SciTech Connect

Core saturation instability has occurred on several HVDC schemes resulting from interactions between second harmonic and dc quantities (voltages and currents) on the ac side of the converter and fundamental frequency quantities on the dc side of the converter. The instability can be reinforced by unbalanced saturation of the converter transformers. The paper presents an analytical method which can be used to quickly screen ac and dc system operating conditions to predict where core saturation instability is likely to occur. Analytical results have been confirmed using the digital transients simulation program PSCAD/EMTDC.

Burton, R.S. [Teshmont Consultants, Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Fuchshuber, C.F. [Alberta Power Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Woodford, D.A. [Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Gole, A.M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350°C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350°C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earth’s crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and/or injected fluids is critical to predict important chemical behaviors affecting fluid flow, such as mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. We successfully achieved the project goal and objectives by demonstrating the ability of our modeling technology to correctly predict the complex pH dependent solution chemistry of the Al3+ cation and its hydrolysis species: Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)30, and Al(OH)4- as well as the solubility of common aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals in aqueous brines containing components (Na, K, Cl) commonly dominating hydrothermal fluids. In the sodium chloride system, where experimental data for model parameterization are most plentiful, the model extends to 300°C. Determining the stability fields of aluminum species that control the solubility of aluminum-containing minerals as a function of temperature and composition has been a major objective of research in hydrothermal chemistry.

Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NY); Walsh, Michael M. (Fairfield, CT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Thermodynamics of Mixed Stratocumulus Layers: Saturation Point Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saturation point (SP) diagrams and a circulation model are used to analyze the thermodynamics of mixed stratocumulus layers, and develop conceptual tools for observational and parametric analyses. These models show the relation between SP ...

Alan K. Betts

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A New Formulation for the Bowen Ratio over Saturated Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical expressions are presented for calculating the Bowen ratio, Bo = Hs/HL, from a quantity Bo* that is derived primarily from the surface temperature Ts and the assumption that the near-surface air is saturated (but not supersaturated) ...

Edgar L. Andreas; Beniamin A. Cash

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are performed in order to investigate the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on fluid recovery and matrix depletion in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The model used is that of a well producing at a constant bottomhole pressure from a two-phase fractured reservoir. The results obtained have received a complex fracture-matrix interaction due to the thermodynamics of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures. Although the matrix initially contributes fluids (liquid and gas) to the fractures, later on, the flow directions reverse and the fractures backflow fluids into the matrix. The amount of backflow depends primarily upon the flowing gas saturation in the fractures; the lower the flowing gas saturation in the fractures the more backflow. It is shown that the recoverable fluid reserves depend strongly on the amount of CO/sub 2/ present in the reservoir system.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Gaulke, S.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Thermal-Structural Design of a Water Shield For Surface Reactor Missions  

SciTech Connect

Water shielding is an attractive option for an affordable lunar surface fission reactor program. The attractiveness of the water shielding option arises from the relative ease of proto-typing and ground testing, the relatively low development effort needed, as well as the fabrication and operating experience with stainless steel and water. The most significant limitation in using a water shield is temperature: to prevent the formation of voids and the consequent loss of cooling, the water temperature has to be maintained below the saturation temperature corresponding to the shield pressure. This paper examines natural convection for a prototypic water shield design using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX-5 as well as analytical modeling. The results show that natural convection is adequate to keep the water well-mixed. The results also show that for the above-ground configuration, shield surface and water temperatures during lunar day conditions are high enough to require shield pressures up to 2.5 atm to prevent void formation. For the buried configuration, a set of ammonia heat pipes attached to the shield outer wall can be used to maintain water temperatures within acceptable limits. Overall the results show that water shielding is feasible for lunar surface applications. The results of the CFD analyses can also be used to guide development of testing plans for shield thermal testing. (authors)

Sadasivan, Pratap; Kapernick, Richard J.; Poston, David I. [D-5 Nuclear Systems Design Group MS K575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Harmonics from SVC transformer saturation with direct current offset  

SciTech Connect

Circulation of direct current in transformer windings can cause significant transformer saturation and harmonic generation. This problem may be experienced by static var compensators with anti-parallel thyristor arrangement. This paper presents a technique to analyze the harmonic distortions caused by transformer saturation with direct current offset. The technique is used to investigate the harmonic generation from the transformer of a static var compensator to be installed in the B.C. Hydro system.

Xu, W.; Martinich, T.G.; Sawada, J.H.; Mansour, Y. (British Columbia Hydro, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Supercritical Fluid Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In supercritical fluid extraction, many options are available for achieving and controlling the desired selectivity, which is extremely sensitive to variations in pressure, temperature, and choice of solvent. The ability of supercritical fluids to vaporize relatively nonvolatile compounds at moderate temperatures can reduce the energy requirements compared to distillation and liquid extraction.

Johnston, K. P.; Flarsheim, W. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

MAX Fluid Dynamics facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAX Fluid Dynamics facility MAX Fluid Dynamics facility Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr MAX Fluid Dynamics facility Providing high resolution data for development of computational tools that model fluid flow and heat transfer within complex systems such as the core of a nuclear reactor. 1 2 3 4 5 Hot and cold air jets are mixed within a glass tank while laser-based anemometers and a high-speed infrared camera characterize fluid flow and heat transfer behavior. Click on image to view larger size image.

224

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, Marshall G. (Woodside, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, M.G.

1984-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured and porous media, and (5) porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure changes owing to mineral precipitation/dissolution (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2000, 2001; Spycher et al., 2003a). Subsequently, TOUGH2 V2 was released with additional EOS modules and features (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT includes all of the previous extensions to the original version, along with the replacement of the original TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). TOUGHREACT has been applied to a wide variety of problems, some of which are included as examples, such as: (1) Supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al., 2001); (2) Mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems (Xu and Pruess, 2001a; Xu et al., 2004b; Dobson et al., 2004); (3) Mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al., 2003b and 2004a); (4) Coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in boiling unsaturated tuff for the proposed nuclear waste emplacement site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2001; Sonnenthal and Spycher, 2000; Spycher et al., 2003a, b; Xu et al., 2001); (5) Modeling of mineral precipitation/dissolution in plug-flow and fracture-flow experiments under boiling conditions (Dobson et al., 2003); (6) Calcite precipitation in the vadose zone as a function of net infiltration (Xu et al., 2003); and (7) Stable isotope fractionation in unsaturated zone pore water and vapor (Singleton et al., 2004). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of 'self-documenting' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as a self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have the manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following TOUGH2 fluid property or 'EOS' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine recharge for the system Notes Thirty-nine water samples were collected from the Coso geothermal system and vicinity and were analyzed for major chemical constituents and deltaD and delta18O. Non-thermal ground waters from the Coso Range were found to be isotopically heavier than non-thermal ground waters from the Sierra Nevada to the west. The deltaD value for the deep thermal water at Coso is

229

Isotopic Analysis Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1997 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Identify the source of chlorine Notes The 36Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples have been measured. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic

230

A Comparison of Saturation Pressure Differences and GOES VAS Estimates to Surface Observations of Cloudiness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saturation pressure differences, a measure of parcel saturation, are calculated from upper-air soundings and compared to manual surface observations of cloudiness. The saturation pressure level p* (more commonly referred to as the lifted ...

Randall J. Alliss; Sethu Raman

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Film boiling of saturated liquid flowing upward through a heated tube : high vapor quality range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Film boiling of saturated liquid flowing upward through a uniformly heated tube has been studied for the case in which pure saturated liquid enters the tube and nearly saturated vapor is discharged. Since a previous study ...

Laverty, W. F.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A sampling-based Bayesian model for gas saturation estimationusing seismic AVA and marine CSEM data  

SciTech Connect

We develop a sampling-based Bayesian model to jointly invertseismic amplitude versus angles (AVA) and marine controlled-sourceelectromagnetic (CSEM) data for layered reservoir models. The porosityand fluid saturation in each layer of the reservoir, the seismic P- andS-wave velocity and density in the layers below and above the reservoir,and the electrical conductivity of the overburden are considered asrandom variables. Pre-stack seismic AVA data in a selected time windowand real and quadrature components of the recorded electrical field areconsidered as data. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplingmethods to obtain a large number of samples from the joint posteriordistribution function. Using those samples, we obtain not only estimatesof each unknown variable, but also its uncertainty information. Thedeveloped method is applied to both synthetic and field data to explorethe combined use of seismic AVA and EM data for gas saturationestimation. Results show that the developed method is effective for jointinversion, and the incorporation of CSEM data reduces uncertainty influid saturation estimation, when compared to results from inversion ofAVA data only.

Chen, Jinsong; Hoversten, Michael; Vasco, Don; Rubin, Yoram; Hou,Zhangshuan

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Effect of Initial Oil Saturation on In-Situ Combustion Performance of a Canadian Bitumen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Situ Combustion (ISC) is a very complex thermal recovery process that is strongly affected by the chemical composition and physical properties of reservoir rock and fluids. Stability of the process depends on the amount of heat continuously generated from the chemical reactions between fuel formed during ISC and injected oxygen. Heat generation depends on the amount of fuel formed, which, in turn, is affected by initial oil saturation (IOS). Thus, in this study, ISC process dynamics were investigated at various saturations on 7.5 °API Peace River bitumen, under 3.4 l/min air injection rate. Through one-dimensional combustion tube experiments higher combustion front temperatures were observed for increased IOS. The degree of bitumen upgrading was determined in terms of viscosity and API gravity changes. Correlations for hydrogen-carbon ratio, air requirement, consumed fuel, and combustion front velocity were obtained. Good burning characteristics of Peace River bitumen resulted in stable self-sustained combustion with 26.01% IOS. However, an experiment with 13.39% IOS failed because of insufficient fuel generation. Furthermore, X-Ray cross-sectional images were taken along the combustion tube after each run to support and enhance the interpretation of experimental results. Particularly, fluctuations in concentrations of produced gas composition were explained with computed tomography (CT) data.

Aleksandrov, Denis

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Two-phase flow in regionally saturated fractured rock near excavations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic characterization for potential nuclear waste repositories relies upon data obtained from testing in excavations. The Simulated Drift Experiment in the Stripa Mine in Sweden, a fractured granitic formation below the water table, investigated excavation effects on hydrologic response. Measured water inflow to the drift at atmospheric pressure was nine times less than the value predicted from the inflow to boreholes with pressure held at 2.7 bars. This flow reduction may be due to dissolved gas that comes out of solution at pressures below 2.7 bars, creating a two-phase regime. To investigate this possibility, theoretical studies of flow through fractures when the water is super-saturated with respect to dissolved gas are carried out, using a simple analytical solution followed by a numerical model which relaxes some of the simplifying assumptions. Laboratory experiments that simulate degassing in transparent fracture replicas are conducted to test the assumptions used in the theoretical studies.

Geller, J.T.; Doughty, C.; Long, J.C.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TRACING...

236

FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

Subhash Shah

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Determining temperature limits of drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A capillary three tube viscometer has been designed which allows the measurement of rheological properties of time dependent non-Newtonian fluids in laminar flow at high temperture and pressure. The objective of this investigation is to determine the temperature stability of clay-water suspensions containing various drilling fluid additives. The additives studied consisted of viscosifiers, filtrate reducers, and chemical thinners. The temperature range studied is from room temperature to 550{sup 0}F. The system pressure is consistently maintained above the vapor pressure. The Bentonite and water standardized base mud used is equivalent to a 25 ppB fluid. Stabilization of the base mud is necessary to obtain steady state laminar flow conditions and to obtain reliable temperature thinning effects with each temperature interval under investigation. Generally the temperature levels are maintained for one hour until 550{sup 0}F is attained. The last interval is then maintained until system fluid degradation occurs. Rheological measurements are obtained from differential pressure transducers located in a three diameter tube test section and externally at ambient conditions from a Baroid Rotational Viscometer. The power law model for non-Newtonian fluids is used to correlate the data.

Thuren, J.B.; Chenevert, M.E.; Huang, W.T.W.; Szymanski, E.; Arkeketa, P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A three-dimensional laboratory steam injection model allowing in situ saturation measurements  

SciTech Connect

The CT imaging technique together with temperature and pressure measurements were used to follow the steam propagation during steam and steam foam injection experiments in a three dimensional laboratory steam injection model. The advantages and disadvantages of different geometries were examined to find out which could best represent radial and gravity override flows and also fit the dimensions of the scanning field of the CT scanner. During experiments, steam was injected continuously at a constant rate into the water saturated model and CT scans were taken at six different cross sections of the model. Pressure and temperature data were collected with time at three different levels in the model. During steam injection experiments, the saturations obtained by CT matched well with the temperature data. That is, the steam override as observed by temperature data was also clearly seen on the CT pictures. During the runs where foam was present, the saturation distributions obtained from CT pictures showed a piston like displacement. However, the temperature distributions were different depending on the type of steam foam process used. The results clearly show that the pressure/temperature data alone are not sufficient to study steam foam in the presence of non-condensible gas.

Demiral, B.M.R.; Pettit, P.A.; Castanier, L.M.; Brigham, W.E.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Properly designed underbalanced drilling fluids can limit formation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling fluids for underbalanced operations require careful design and testing to ensure they do not damage sensitive formations. In addition to hole cleaning and lubrication functions, these fluids may be needed as kill fluids during emergencies. PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. used a systematic approach in developing and field testing a nondamaging drilling fluid. It was for use in underbalanced operations in the Glauconitic sandstone in the Westerose gas field in Alberta. A lab study was initiated to develop and test a non-damaging water-based drilling fluid for the horizontal well pilot project. The need to develop an inexpensive, nondamaging drilling fluid was previously identified during underbalanced drilling operations in the Weyburn field in southeastern Saskatchewan. A non-damaging fluid is required for hole cleaning, for lubrication of the mud motor, and for use as a kill fluid during emergencies. In addition, a nondamaging fluid is required when drilling with a conventional rig because pressure surges during connections and trips may result in the well being exposed to short periods of near balanced or overbalanced conditions. Without the protection of a filter cake, the drilling fluid will leak off into the formation, causing damage. The amount of damage is related to the rate of leak off and depth of invasion, which are directly proportional to the permeability to the fluid.

Churcher, P.L.; Yurkiw, F.J. [PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

240

Supercritical fluid extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Encapsulated breaker for aqueous polymeric fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persulfates are commonly used as breakers for aqueous fluids viscosified with guar or cellulose derivatives. These breakers are necessary to minimize permeability damage to proppant packs at temperatures where there is little thermal degradation of the polymers. Unfortunately, dissolved persulfates are much too reactive, even at moderate temperatures (140 to 200{degrees} F), to be used at concentrations sufficient to degrade concentrated, high-molecular-weight polymers thoroughly. Technology described in this paper was used to produce a delayed breaker. The breaker is prepared by encapsulating ammonium persulfate (APS) with a water-resistant coating. The coating shields the fluid from the breaker so that high breaker concentrations can be added to the fluid without causing the premature loss of fluid properties, such as viscosity or fluid-loss control. Critical factors in the design of encapsulated breakers (such as coating barrier properties, release mechanisms, and reactive chemical properties) are discussed. The effects of encapsulated breaker on fluid rheology were compared for several encapsulated persulfates.

Gulbis, J.; King, M.T.; Hawkins, G.W.; Brannon, H.D. (Dowell Schlumberger (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method currently being developed for use in geothermal systems to identify fractures and fluid types. This paper is the third in a series of papers on the development of FIS. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Previously we showed that FIS analyses identify fluid types and

243

Application of Cutting Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...is transferred to the drill by a rotating gland and is forced directly into the cutting zone. The fluid flowing from the hole assists in chip removal. Oil-hole drills have become very popular in

244

Basic fluid system trainer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, a trainer mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

Semans, J.P.; Johnson, P.G.; LeBoeuf, R.F. Jr.; Kromka, J.A.; Goron, R.H.; Hay, G.D.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Basic fluid system trainer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

Semans, Joseph P. (Uniontown, PA); Johnson, Peter G. (Pittsburgh, PA); LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F. (Clairton, PA); Kromka, Joseph A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goron, Ronald H. (Connellsville, PA); Hay, George D. (Venetia, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Phoresis in fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a unified theory of phoretic phenomena in single-component fluids. Simple formulas are given for the phoretic velocities of small inert force-free non-Brownian particles migrating through otherwise ...

Brenner, Howard

247

Corrosion tests in Hawaiian geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exposure tests were conductd in binary geothermal brine on the island of Hawaii. The steam which flashes from the high pressure, high temperature water as it is brought to ambient pressure contains substantial amounts of H{sub 2}S. In the absence of oxygen this steam is only moderately aggressive but in the aerated state it is highly aggressive to carbon steels and copper alloys. The liquid after flasing is intermediately aggressive. The Hawaiian fluid is unique in chemistry and corrosion behavior; its corrosiveness is relatively mild for a geothermal fluid falling close to the Iceland-type resources. 24 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Larsen-Basse, J.; Lam, Kam-Fai

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

249

Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

MEASUREMENT OF INTERFACIAL TENSION IN FLUID-FLUID SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interfacial tension at fluid-fluid interfaces is a reflection of the excess energy associated with unsaturated in parts per million concentration (27). DYNAMIC INTERFACIAL TENSION MEASUREMENTS In fluid-fluid systems, detergency, foam or froth generation, and stability (3). In these pro- cesses, dynamic interfacial tensions

Loh, Watson

251

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) To determine if analyses of fluid propene and propane species in fluid inclusions can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. 2) To evaluate the geology and thermal history of the East Flank, in order to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydro-fracturing. Notes 1) Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between producing and the non-producing

252

Saturation of fidelity in the atom-optics kicked rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the quantum fidelity is accessible to cold atom experiments for a large class of evolutions in periodical potentials, properly taking into account the experimental initial conditions of the atomic ensemble. We prove analytically that, at the fundamental quantum resonances of the atom-optics kicked rotor, the fidelity saturates at a constant, time-independent value after a small number of kicks. The latter saturation arises from the bulk of the atomic ensemble, whilst for the resonantly accelerated atoms the fidelity is predicted to decay slowly according to a power law.

Sandro Wimberger; Andreas Buchleitner

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NY); Walsh, Michael M. (Fairfield, CT)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement.

255

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Sierra Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

256

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Rose Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

257

Lecture notes Ideal fluid mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involves energy loss--such fluids are known as viscous fluids--we will not consider them here. Some fluids of the basic equations underlying the dynamics of ideal fluids is based on three basic principles (see Chorin. Conservation of energy, energy is neither created nor destroyed. In turn these principles generate the: 1

Malham, Simon J.A.

258

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure to crude oil in the presence of an initial brine saturation can render rocks mixed-wet. Subsequent exposure to components of synthetic oil-based drilling fluids can alter the wetting toward less water-wet or more oil-wet conditions. Mixing of the non-aromatic base oils used in synthetic oil-based muds (SBM) with an asphaltic crude oil can destabilize asphaltenes and make cores less water-wet. Wetting changes can also occur due to contact with the surfactants used in SBM formulations to emulsify water and make the rock cuttings oil-wet. Reservoir cores drilled with SBMs, therefore, show wetting properties much different from the reservoir wetting conditions, invalidating laboratory core analysis using SBM contaminated cores. Core cleaning is required in order to remove all the drilling mud contaminants. In theory, core wettability can then be restored to reservoir wetting conditions by exposure to brine and crude oil. The efficiency of core cleaning of SBM contaminated cores has been explored in this study. A new core cleaning procedure was developed aimed to remove the adsorbed asphaltenes and emulsifiers from the contaminated Berea sandstone cores. Sodium hydroxide was introduced into the cleaning process in order to create a strongly alkaline condition. The high pH environment in the pore spaces changed the electrical charges of both basic and acidic functional groups, reducing the attractive interactions between adsorbing materials and the rock surface. In cores, flow-through and extraction methods were investigated. The effectiveness of the cleaning procedure was assessed by spontaneous imbibition tests and Amott wettability measurements. Test results indicating that introduction of sodium hydroxide played a key role in removing adsorbed materials were confirmed by contact angle measurements on similarly treated mica surfaces. Cleaning of the contaminated cores reversed their wettability from oil-wet to strongly water-wet as demonstrated by spontaneous imbibition rates and Amott wettability indices.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Saturating time-delay transformer for overcurrent protection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical loads connected to d-c supplies are protected from damage by overcurrent in the case of a load fault by connecting in series with the load a saturating transformer that detects a load fault and limits the fault current to a safe level for a period long enough to correct the fault or else disconnect the power supply.

Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Saturating time-delay transformer for overcurrent protection. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical loads connected to dc supplies are protected from damage by overcurrent in the case of a load fault by connecting in series with the load a saturating transformer that detects a load fault and limits the fault current to a safe level for a period long enough to correct the fault or else disconnect the power supply.

Praeg, W.F.

1975-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

TAE SATURATION OF ALPHA PARTICLE DRIVEN INSTABILITY IN TFTR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TAE SATURATION OF ALPHA PARTICLE DRIVEN INSTABILITY IN TFTR N. N. Gorelenkovy, Y. Chen, R. B. White. In this paper we apply a recently developed nonlinear theory of kinetic instabilities [5] to calculate calculation had been added to allow an accurate numerical integration of Eq.(14) over the phase space

262

"Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids” Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

263

Universal fluid droplet ejector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal interdroplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications.

Lee, Eric R. (Redwood City, CA); Perl, Martin L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Evaluation of commercially available geothermal drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of geothermal drilling in the United States has revealed that serious problems are being encountered with corrosion and degradation of drilling fluids in high temperature wells. The best high temperature drilling fluids that could be formulated from commercially available materials were obtained from the five largest mud companies. These included samples of 9 and 18 lb/gal water muds and 18 lb/gal oil muds. Over 4,000 tests were conducted on these muds to evaluate their performance at high temperature. This included testing at temperatures to 550/sup 0/F and pressures to 15,000 psi. These tests revealed that most of the water muds had high viscosity, high filtration rates and poor corrosivity characteristics at temperatures above 350/sup 0/F. Although the oil muds performed better than water muds at high temperatures, some problems were encountered with viscosity at temperatures above 450/sup 0/F and with filtration at temperatures above 500/sup 0/F. Generally the corrosivity characteristics of the oil muds were much better than those of the water muds. Overall, oil muds have better temperature stability than water muds but their use is often limited because of problems with surface pollution, contamination of water zones and reservoir damage. Biodegradable oil mud systems would overcome some of these limitations.

Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; McDonald, W.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

MOLECULAR DESIGN OF COLLOIDS IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The environmentally benign, non-toxic, non-flammable fluids water and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the two most abundant and inexpensive solvents on earth. Emulsions of these fluids are of interest in many industrial processes, as well as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Until recently, formation of these emulsions required stabilization with fluorinated surfactants, which are expensive and often not environmentally friendly. In this work we overcame this severe limitation by developing a fundamental understanding of the properties of surfactants the CO2-water interface and using this knowledge to design and characterize emulsions stabilized with either hydrocarbon-based surfactants or nanoparticle stabilizers. We also discovered a new concept of electrostatic stabilization for CO2-based emulsions and colloids. Finally, we were able to translate our earlier work on the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires from high temperatures and pressures to lower temperatures and ambient pressure to make the chemistry much more accessible.

Keith P. Johnston

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

266

Groundwater modeling: Application of a multiphase fluid flow model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating installation restoration program sites. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research examined a two-dimensional numerical model, VALOR, which can simulate multiphase fluid flow in soils and groundwater, and evaluated the applicability of the model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating IRP sites. Model sensitivity analyses were conducted to study the influence of grid sizes, soil types, and organic release rates on the simulated migration of both light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The VALOR model was applied to a case study of a JP-4 release at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The finer grid sizes provide the most accurate definition of NAPL distribution. The soil type and release rate sensitivity analyses demonstrate that NAPL migrates quicker through coarse sands than fine sand and clay. The light NAPL ponds at the water table and spreads laterally. The dense NAPL migrates through the subsurface and ponds at the aquifer bottom. The fast organic release simulations predict wider vertical pathways of migration. The slow organic release simulations predict higher light NAPL saturation at the water table. The case study indicates that within limits, VALOR may be useful for assessing NAPL distribution, estimating contaminated soil volumes, and evaluating remediation alternatives.... Groundwater modeling, Non-aqueous Phase Liquids: NAPL, Multiphase fluid flow model, Installation Restoration Program, IRP.

Scott, D.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production  

SciTech Connect

Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

269

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

Residual oil saturation determination. Wilmington micellar-polymer project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The City of Long Beach, California conducted a program to obtain residual oil saturation (ROS) data in the HX/sub a/ Sand, Fault Block VB, Wilmington Field. This program utilized many complementary techniques for determining the ROS in a watered-out unconsolidated sand, typical of many reservoirs in the California Coastal Province. This program was to be performed in two stages. The first, Phase 1, was intended to determine the ROS in an area which had been flooded out during the course of a peripheral waterflood and to make a comparative analysis of current methods for determination of in-situ oil in place. The second stage, Phase 2 of the ROS program, was intended to measure the ROS after tertiary recovery by a micellar-polymer flood; however, the second phase was not carried out for lack of funds. This report describes the diagnostic tools and techniques which have been used to establish ROS. It then presents a comparative analysis of the results obtained using the different techniques. Inasmuch as the determination of in-situ oil saturation is directly dependent upon the in-situ value for porosity, it is required that the pore volume as a fraction of the reservoir rock be determined before the residual oil equation can be solved. Because of this, much of the study necessarily was concerned with measurement of porosity of the unconsolidated sand. The method finally used to obtain a very good core recovery in this highly unconsolidated sand is described. Present oil saturation and oil content of the HX/sub a/ sand in the Pilot is now believed to be better defined. This conclusion is supported by results obtained for electrical log analysis, analysis of full sized native state cores run under stress conditions, plug core analysis under stressed conditions and a Single-Well Tracer Survey. 15 references, 18 figures, 16 tables.

Staub, H.L.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Recovery of Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids from Contaminated Soil by CO2-Supersaturated Water Injection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supersaturated water injection (SWI) is a novel remediation technology which is able to remove entrapped residual NAPLs from saturated porous media by both volatilization (partitioning… (more)

Li, Meichun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

EOR: well logs sharpen focus on residual saturation. Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of what the enhanced recovery specialist must know about the reservoir under consideration can be measured, calculated, or deduced from well logging data. Appropriate well logging procedures for this type of formation evaluation would include resistivity, radioactivity, dielectric constant, and acoustic well logs. This work describes the principles and procedures for assessing residual oil saturation of a subsurface formation using these methods. The study explains what is actually being measured and compared when well logging data are obtained and processed.

Frederick, R.O.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nonlinear mechanisms for drift wave saturation and induced particle transport  

SciTech Connect

A detailed theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves is presented. In previous studies it was shown that, in the nonlinearly saturated phase of the evolution, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this paper, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows: The saturation level is determined by a balance between the electron and ion fluxes. The ion flux is small for levels of the potential below an E {times} B-trapping threshold and increases sharply once this threshold is crossed. Due to the presence of resonant electrons, the electron flux has a much smoother dependence on the potential. In the 2-1/2-dimensional ( pseudo-3D'') geometry, the electrons are accelerated away from the resonance as they diffuse spatially, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. Collisions and three-dimensional effects can repopulate the resonance thereby increasing the value of the particle flux. 30 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

Dimits, A.M. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA). Lab. for Plasma Research); Lee, W.W. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References

275

Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Experimental Properties of Fluids Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Properties of Fluids Group, Physical and Chemical Properties Division of the Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, NIST.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

of 1 ) United States Patent 5,158,704 Fulton ,   et al. October 27, 1992 Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Self-similar Breakup of Near-inviscid Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithms that model the formation of droplets by dripping and jetting, [4, 10]. However, given that these simulations usually contain several free param- eters, other standards are desirable for further parametric validations, including the breakup angle... dripped 3into the reservoir and the liquid was recirculated by the pump. The working fluids consisted of tri-distilled water and 99.9% ethanol and the experiments were carried out at 21o C. Fluid density, viscosity and surface tension were measured...

Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Castrejon-Pita, A.A.; Hinch, E.J.; Lister, J.R.; Hutchings, I.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Production of MHD fluid  

SciTech Connect

A hot gaseous fluid of low ash content, suitable for use in open-cycle MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) power generation, is produced by means of a three-stage process comprising (1) partial combustion of a fossil fuel to produce a hot gaseous product comprising CO.sub.2 CO, and H.sub.2 O, (2) reformation of the gaseous product from stage (1) by means of a fluidized char bed, whereby CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O are converted to CO and H.sub.2, and (3) combustion of CO and H.sub.2 from stage (2) to produce a low ash-content fluid (flue gas) comprising CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O and having a temperature of about 4000.degree. to 5000.degree.F.

Lacey, James J. (Library, PA); Kurtzrock, Roy C. (Bethel Park, PA); Bienstock, Daniel (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Water cooled steam jet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Drilling fluids: Where should research dollars be spent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article discusses the question of where to apply research dollars in the field of drilling fluids which is gravely impacted by environmental concerns. In fact, environmental regulations are the driving force in determining the thrust of drilling fluids research. For example, use of oil-base fluids offshore have, for all practical purposes, been precluded by high disposal costs since offshore disposal has been prohibited. Consequently it must be determined if a water-base mud can be developed that has all or most of the advantages of an oil-base mud.

Sauber

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fundamental study of CO2-H2O-mineral interactions for carbon sequestration, with emphasis on the nature of the supercritical fluid-mineral interface.  

SciTech Connect

In the supercritical CO2-water-mineral systems relevant to subsurface CO2 sequestration, interfacial processes at the supercritical fluid-mineral interface will strongly affect core- and reservoir-scale hydrologic properties. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that water films will form on mineral surfaces in supercritical CO2, but will be thinner than those that form in vadose zone environments at any given matric potential. The theoretical model presented here allows assessment of water saturation as a function of matric potential, a critical step for evaluating relative permeabilities the CO2 sequestration environment. The experimental water adsorption studies, using Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy methods, confirm the major conclusions of the adsorption/condensation model. Additional data provided by the FTIR study is that CO2 intercalation into clays, if it occurs, does not involve carbonate or bicarbonate formation, or significant restriction of CO2 mobility. We have shown that the water film that forms in supercritical CO2 is reactive with common rock-forming minerals, including albite, orthoclase, labradorite, and muscovite. The experimental data indicate that reactivity is a function of water film thickness; at an activity of water of 0.9, the greatest extent of reaction in scCO2 occurred in areas (step edges, surface pits) where capillary condensation thickened the water films. This suggests that dissolution/precipitation reactions may occur preferentially in small pores and pore throats, where it may have a disproportionately large effect on rock hydrologic properties. Finally, a theoretical model is presented here that describes the formation and movement of CO2 ganglia in porous media, allowing assessment of the effect of pore size and structural heterogeneity on capillary trapping efficiency. The model results also suggest possible engineering approaches for optimizing trapping capacity and for monitoring ganglion formation in the subsurface.

Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Heath, Jason E.; Wang, Yifeng; Matteo, Edward N.; Meserole, Stephen P.; Tallant, David Robert

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Standard Reference Fluid Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... III. Equation of state. Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data 54: 3141-3180. Transport Properties of Water/Steam. The ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates  

SciTech Connect

Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fluid bed material transfer method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

Pinske, Jr., Edward E. (Akron, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Existence and flow behavior of gas at low saturation in geopressured formations. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first geopressured brine well tested for the Department of Energy produced gas and brine at a ratio far above the solution ratio for the gas in that brine. One explanation advanced was that the geopressured formation contained gas at a low saturation, and that this gas flowed into the well during the test. This hypothesis is examined and found to be untenable based on evidence from well logs, flow tests and thermodynamics, and on currently accepted concepts for migration and accumulation of petroleum. The probable explanation for the observed high gas/water ratios is shown to be a thin, tight gas-bearing layer in the case of one sand and an updip gas cap in the case of the second and tested.

Matthews, C.S.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Kyle Gluesenkamp Building Equipment Group, ETSD gluesenkampk@ornl.gov 865-241-2952 April 3, 2013 CRADA - GE Development of High Performance Residential Gas Water Heater Image courtesy John Wilkes 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Absorption technology could greatly boost water heater efficiency, but faces barriers of high first cost and working fluid challenges. Impact of Project: Energy factor of gas storage water

292

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Kyle Gluesenkamp Building Equipment Group, ETSD gluesenkampk@ornl.gov 865-241-2952 April 3, 2013 CRADA - GE Development of High Performance Residential Gas Water Heater Image courtesy John Wilkes 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Absorption technology could greatly boost water heater efficiency, but faces barriers of high first cost and working fluid challenges. Impact of Project: Energy factor of gas storage water

293

A TOUGH2 equation-of-state module for the simulation of two-phase flow of air, water, and a miscible gelling liquid  

SciTech Connect

The injection of grout into the subsurface can be used to encapsulate contaminated regions of an aquifer, or to form underground barriers for the isolation of contaminant sources and to prevent the spreading of existing plumes. This requires identifying grouts, or barrier fluids, which when injected into the subsurface exhibit a large increase in viscosity and eventually solidify, sealing the permeable zones in the aquifer. Simulation and modeling analysis are indispensable tools for designing the injection and predicting the performance of the barrier. In order to model flow and transport in such systems, the thermophysical properties of the fluid mixtures have to be provided, and the governing mass- and energy-balance equations for multiphase flow in porous media have to be solved numerically. The equation-of-state module EOS11 described herein is an extension of the EOS7 module of the TOUGH2 code for flow of saline water and air. In the modeling approach, the chemical grout is treated as a miscible fluid the viscosity of which is a function of time and concentration of the gelling agent in the pore water. If a certain high viscosity is reached and the movement of the grout plume ceases, the gel is assumed to solidify, leading to a new porous medium with changed soil characteristics, i.e. reduced porosity and permeability, increased capillary strength for a given water content, and changed initial saturation distribution.

Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Saturation properties and liquid-gas phase transition of nucleus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saturation properties and liquid-gas phase transition of nucleus are analysed in the framework of Hatree-Fock theory. We modify Hill-Wheller formula with a finite-size-effect parameter by fitting the zero-temperature properties of nucleus. Employing Gogny effective interaction and phenomenological expression of Coulomb energy, we give the critical temperature of liquid-gas phase transition of nucleus being about 12 MeV, which agrees with the result extracted from heavy-ion collision experiments. It is pointed out that a phenomenological formula of surface energy of hot nucleus is not avaliable in the region where nucleon density is far away from the normal density.

Fu-Guang Cao; Shan-de Yang

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

Elliptic flow from pQCD + saturation + hydro model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have previously predicted multiplicities and transverse momentum spectra of hadrons for the most central LHC Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5.5$ TeV using initial state for hydrodynamic evolution from pQCD + final state saturation model. By considering binary collision and wounded nucleon profiles we extend these studies to non-central collisions, and predict the $p_{T}$ dependence of minimum bias $v_{2}$ for pions at the LHC. For protons we also show how the $p_{T}$ dependence of $v_2$ changes from RHIC to the LHC.

K. J. Eskola; H. Niemi; P. V. Ruuskanen

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Elliptic flow from pQCD + saturation + hydro model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have previously predicted multiplicities and transverse momentum spectra of hadrons for the most central LHC Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5.5$ TeV using initial state for hydrodynamic evolution from pQCD + final state saturation model. By considering binary collision and wounded nucleon profiles we extend these studies to non-central collisions, and predict the $p_{T}$ dependence of minimum bias $v_{2}$ for pions at the LHC. For protons we also show how the $p_{T}$ dependence of $v_2$ changes from RHIC to the LHC.

Eskola, K J; Ruuskanen, P V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Pumping Fluid Condensation in Oil Diffusion Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condensation conditions of the motive fluid in an oil diffusion pump are considered with particular attention to the backstreaming problem. The backstreaming rate is correlated with the temperature of the “cold caps” surrounding the pump nozzle and it is demonstrated that an upper temperature limit exists near 200?°F where such devices cease to function effectively. The effect of “oleophobic” surfaces on cold caps and baffles is discussed. Conditions existing at the inlet of diffusion pumps and in baffles do not warrant attempts to introduce dropwise condensation. The condensation coefficient of pumping vapor at the temperature of the water cooled wall and with the flow rates used at the top nozzle appears to be very close to unity. The usefulness of creep barriers with modern pumping fluids and trap designs is judged to be questionable.

M. H. Hablanian

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Modeling subsidence due to geothermal fluid production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, liquid dominated geothermal systems hold the maximum promise for exploiting geothermal energy in the United States. The principal characteristic of such systems is that most of the heat is transferred by flowing water, which also controls subsurface fluid pressures and stress changes. The reduction in pore pressures brought about by geothermal fluid extraction is potentially capable of causing appreciable deformation of the reservoir rocks leading to displacements at the land surface. In order to foresee the pattern and magnitude of potential ground displacements in and around producing liquid dominated geothermal fields, a numerical model has been developed. Conceptually, the simulator combines conductive and convective heat transfer in a general three dimensional heterogeneous porous medium with a one-dimensional deformation of the reservoir rocks. The capabilities of the model and its potential applicability to field cases are illustrated with examples considering the effects of temperature and pressure dependent properties, material heterogeneities and previous stress history.

Lippmann, M.J.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

State-of-the-art in coalbed methane drilling fluids  

SciTech Connect

The production of methane from wet coalbeds is often associated with the production of significant amounts of water. While producing water is necessary to desorb the methane from the coal, the damage from the drilling fluids used is difficult to assess, because the gas production follows weeks to months after the well is drilled. Commonly asked questions include the following: What are the important parameters for drilling an organic reservoir rock that is both the source and the trap for the methane? Has the drilling fluid affected the gas production? Are the cleats plugged? Does the 'filtercake' have an impact on the flow of water and gas? Are stimulation techniques compatible with the drilling fluids used? This paper describes the development of a unique drilling fluid to drill coalbed methane wells with a special emphasis on horizontal applications. The fluid design incorporates products to match the delicate surface chemistry on the coal, a matting system to provide both borehole stability and minimize fluid losses to the cleats, and a breaker method of removing the matting system once drilling is completed. This paper also discusses how coal geology impacts drilling planning, drilling practices, the choice of drilling fluid, and completion/stimulation techniques for Upper Cretaceous Mannville-type coals drilled within the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A focus on horizontal coalbed methane (CBM) wells is presented. Field results from three horizontal wells are discussed, two of which were drilled with the new drilling fluid system. The wells demonstrated exceptional stability in coal for lengths to 1000 m, controlled drilling rates and ease of running slotted liners. Methods for, and results of, placing the breaker in the horizontal wells are covered in depth.

Baltoiu, L.V.; Warren, B.K.; Natras, T.A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

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301

A nonlocal model for fluid-structure interaction with applications in hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling important engineering problems related to flow-induced damage (in the context of hydraulic fracturing among others) depends critically on characterizing the interaction of porous media and interstitial fluid flow. This work presents a new formulation for incorporating the effects of pore pressure in a nonlocal representation of solid mechanics. The result is a framework for modeling fluid-structure interaction problems with the discontinuity capturing advantages of an integral based formulation. A number of numerical examples are used to show that the proposed formulation can be applied to measure the effect of leak-off during hydraulic fracturing as well as modeling consolidation of fluid saturated rock and surface subsidence caused by fluid extraction from a geologic reservoir. The formulation incorporates the effect of pore pressure in the constitutive description of the porous material in a way that is appropriate for nonlinear materials, easily implemented in existing codes, straightforward in i...

Turner, Daniel Z

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. Analyses are in progress on inclusions from the Salton Sea, Valles Caldera, Geysers, and Coso geothermal systems. Author(s): Mckibben, M. A.

303

Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulation of Pore-Scale Multiphase Fluid Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiphase fluid flow through porous media involves complex fluid dynamics, and it is difficult to model such complex behavior, on the pore scale, using grid-based continuum models. In this paper, the application of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a relatively new mesoscale method, to the simulation of pore-scale multiphase fluid flows under a variety of flow conditions is described. We demonstrate that the conventional DPD method using purely repulsive conservative (nondissipative) particle-particle interactions is capable of modeling single-phase flow fields in saturated porous media. In order to simulate unsaturated multiphase flow through porous media, we applied a modified model for the conservative particle-particle interactions that combines short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions. This form for the conservative particle-particle interactions allows the behavior of multiphase systems consisting of gases, liquids, and solids to be simulated. We also demonstrated that the flow of both wetting and nonwetting fluids through porous media can be simulated by controlling the ratios between the fluid-fluid and fluid-solid (fluid-wall) interparticle interaction strengths.

Paul Meakin; Hai Huang; Moubin Liu

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Hydrology and geochemistry of the uranium mill tailings pile at Riverton, Wyoming. Part II. History matching. [Mathematical simulation of the observed fluid potentials within the tailings, and the observed distribution of various chemical species within and around the mill tailings  

SciTech Connect

In Part I of this series of two reports the observed fluid potential and geochemical characteristics in and around the inactive uranium mill tailings pile at Riverton, Wyoming were presented. The prupose of the present work is to attempt to simulate field observations using mathematical models. The results of the studies have not only helped identify the physicochemical mechanisms govering contaminant migration around the inactive mill tailings pile in Riverton, but also have indicated the feasibility of quantifying these mechanisms with the help of newly developed mathematical models. Much work needs to be done to validate and benchmark these models. The history-matching effort on hand involves the mathematical simulation of the observed fluid potentials within the tailings, and the observed distribution of various chemical species within and around the inactive uranium mill tailings. The simulation problem involves consideration of transient fluid flow and transient, reactive chemical transport in a variably saturated ground water system with time-dependent boundary conditions. 15 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

Narasimhan, T.N.; White, A.F.; Tokunaga, T.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

SATURATION LEVELS FOR WHITE-LIGHT FLARES OF FLARE STARS: VARIATION OF MINIMUM FLARE DURATION FOR SATURATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taking into account results obtained from models and from statistical analyses of obtained parameters, we discuss flare activity levels and flare characteristics of five UV Ceti stars. We present the parameters of unpublished flares detected over two years of observations of V1005 Ori. We compare parameters of the U-band flares detected over several seasons of observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, V1054 Oph, and V1005 Ori. Flare frequencies calculated for all program stars and maximum energy levels of the flares are compared, and we consider which is the most correct parameter as an indicator of flare activity levels. Using the One Phase Exponential Association function, the distributions of flare equivalent duration versus flare total duration are modeled for each program star. We use the Independent Samples t-Test in the statistical analyses of the parameters obtained from the models. The results reveal some properties of flare processes occurring on the surfaces of UV Ceti type stars. (1) Flare energies cannot be higher than a specific value regardless of the length of the flare total duration. This must be a saturation level for white-light flares occurring in flare processes observed in the U band. Thus, for the first time it is shown that white-light flares have a saturation in a specific energy range. (2) The span values, which are the difference between the equivalent durations of flares with the shortest and longest total durations, are almost equal for each star. (3) The half-life values, minimum flare durations for saturation, increase toward the later spectral types. (4) Both maximum total durations and maximum rise times computed from the observed flares decrease toward the later spectral types among the UV Ceti stars. According to the maximum energy levels obtained from the models, both EV Lac and EQ Peg are more active than the other three program stars, while AD Leo is the most active flare star according to the flare frequencies.

Dal, H. A.; Evren, S., E-mail: ali.dal@ege.edu.tr [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, University of Ege, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

FLUID MODERATED REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor which utilizes fissionable fuel elements in rod form immersed in a moderator or heavy water and a means of circulating the heavy water so that it may also function as a coolant to remove the heat generated by the fission of the fuel are described. In this design, the clad fuel elements are held in vertical tubes immersed in heavy water in a tank. The water is circulated in a closed system by entering near the tops of the tubes, passing downward through the tubes over the fuel elements and out into the tank, where it is drawn off at the bottom, passed through heat exchangers to give up its heat and then returned to the tops of the tubes for recirculation.

Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

1957-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ultrasonic fluid quality sensor system  

SciTech Connect

A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ultrasonic Fluid Quality Sensor System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

Establishing a Quantitative Functional Relationship between Capillary Pressure Saturation and Interfacial Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to continue our collaborative research focused on advanced technologies for subsurface contamination problems. Our approach combines new multi-phase flow theory, novel laboratory experiments, and non-traditional computational simulators to investigate practical approaches to include interfacial areas in descriptions of subsurface contaminant transport and remediation. Because all inter-phase mass transfer occurs at fluid-fluid interfaces, and it is this inter-phase mass transfer that leads to the difficult, long-term ground-water contamination problems, it is critical to include interfacial behavior in the problem description. This is currently lacking in all standard models of complex ground-water contamination problems. In our earlier project, we developed tools appropriate for inclusion of interfacial areas under equilibrium conditions. These include advanced laboratory techniques and targeted computational experiments that validated certain key theoretical conjecture s. However, it has become clear that to include interfacial behavior fully into a description of the multi-phase flow and contamination problems, the fully dynamic case must be considered. Therefore, we need to develop both experimental and computational tools that can capture the dynamic nature of interfacial movements. Development and application of such tools will allow the theory to be evaluated, and will lead to significant improvements in our understanding of complex subsurface contamination problems, thereby allowing us to develop and evaluate improved remediation technologies.

Carlo Montemagno

2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

Radionuclide Migration Experiments in Tuff Blocks/Underunsaturated and Saturated Conditions at a Scale of Up to 1 Metre  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To complement migration experiments with non-radioactive tracers in the Busted Butte experimental facility (BBTF) at the Nevada Test Site, an exploratory migration experiment has been performed under unsaturated conditions in a {approx}0.3m x {approx}0.3m x {approx}0.3m block of tuff. Longer term migration experiments, up to 600 days, under unsaturated and saturated conditions in {approx}1 m3 blocks of tuff have recently been completed. Na-fluorescein, 3H (as tritiated water), 22Na, 60Co, 95mTc and/or 99Tc (as the pertechnetate anion), 137Cs, and 237Np were used as tracers in all three experiments. Under unsaturated conditions, Tc is transported slightly faster than 3H, while under saturated conditions, the chemical conditions became highly reducing, leading to significant retardation of Tc along the flow field. If chemically reducing conditions can be demonstrated to exist in the saturated zone downstream from the proposed repository, the geological formations underlying the proposed repository horizon can potentially act as a geological barrier to the transport of some multivalent radionuclides.

Vandergraaf, T. T.; Drew, D. J.; Ticknor, K. V.; Hamon, C. J.; Seddon, W. A.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

312

Laboratory and Field Measurements of Electrical Resistivity to Determine Saturation and Detect Fractures in a Heated Rock Mass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of intact and fractured representative geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to infer saturation and fracture location in a large-scale field test. Measurements were performed to simulate test conditions with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures to 145 C. Measurements presented are a first step toward making the search for fractures using electrical methods quantitatively. Intact samples showed a gradual resistivity increase when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, while fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling. The resistivity change is greatest for samples with the most exposed surface area. Analysis of a field test provided the opportunity to evaluate fracture detection using electrical methods at a large scale. Interpretation of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) images of resistivity contrasts, aided by laboratory derived resistivity-saturation-temperature relationships, indicates that dynamic saturation changes in a heated rock mass are observable and that fractures experiencing drying or resaturation can be identified. The same techniques can be used to locate fractures in geothermal reservoirs using electrical field methods.

Roberts, J J; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

313

MOLTEN SALT HEAT TRANSFER FLUID  

thermal energy storage tanks Sandia has developed a heat transfer fluid (HTF) for use at elevated temperatures that has a lower freezing point

314

Interaction, compatibilities and long-term environmental fate of deep-well-injected EOR fluids and/or waste fluids with reservoir fluids and rocks - state-of-the-art. [206 references  

SciTech Connect

The state-of-the-art of environmental research of injected enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and/or waste fluids is presented with respect to (1) interactions and compatibilities with reservoir fluids and rocks, and (2) their long-term environmental fate. Major environmental impacts associated with EOR are: (1) possible contamination of surface and groundwater, and (2) possible contamination of land. Although the report focuses on EOR fluids, many other liquid wastes also are considered. When EOR chemicals and/or waste fluids are injected into deep wells for oil recovery or disposal, they may pose environmental problems unless the injection process, oil recovery process, or waste disposal process is carefully planned and executed. This report discusses injection waters, water compatibilities, formation rocks with emphasis on clay minerals, corrosion, bacterial problems, EOR operations, waste fluid injection operations, injection well design, radioactive wastes, transport and fate processes, and mathematical models. 206 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Collins, G.; Kayser, M.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

316

Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Integrated mineralogical and fluid inclusion study of the Coso geothermal systems, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems on the margins of the Basin and Range province that is associated with recent volcanic activity. This system, which is developed entirely in fractured granitic and metamorphic rocks, consists of a well-defined thermal plume that originates in the southern part of the field and then flows upward and laterally to the north. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present

317

Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documentation Page Documentation Page 1. Report No. DE - FC 21 - 92MC29077 2. 3. Recipient's Accession No. 5. Report Date August 31, 2000 4. Title and Subtitle Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility 6. 7. Author(s) The University of Oklahoma 8. Performing Organization Rept. No. 10. Project/Task/Work Unit No. 9. Performing Organization Name and Address The University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center T301 100 E Boyd St Norman, OK 73019 11. Contract (C) or Grant (G) No. DOE:DE FC21 92 MC29077 13. Type of Report & Period Covered Final Report 09 30 92 - 03 31 00 12. Sponsoring Organization Name and Address US Dept of Energy - FETL 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26505 14. 15. Supplementary Notes Several technical papers were prepared and presented at various Society of Petroleum Engineers Conferences and US

318

Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea East Rift Zone geothermal area, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea East Rift Zone geothermal area, Hawaii Abstract Heating and freezing data were obtained for fluid inclusions in hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and anhydrite from several depths in three scientific observation holes drilled along the lower East Rift Zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Compositions of the inclusion fluids range from dilute meteoric water to highly modified sea water concentrated by boiling. Comparison of measured drill-hole temperatures with fluid-inclusion homogenization-temperature (Th) data indicates that only about 15% of the

319

Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion.

J. Conca

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

320

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Isotopic compositions were determined for hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and siderite from core samples of the Newberry 2 drill hole, Oregon. The Δ15O values for these minerals decrease with increasing temperatures. The values indicate that these hydrothermal minerals precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with water currently present in the reservoirs. The Δ18O values of quartz and calcite from the andesite and basalt flows (700-932 m) have isotopic values which require that the equilibrated water Δ18O values increase slightly (- 11.3 to -9.2‰) with

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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321

Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily Applications Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily Applications February 16, 2011 - 5:14pm Addthis At left, highly turbulent behavior as water flows into (clear) oil. At right, all turbulence is suppressed by using cornstarch. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Public Domain At left, highly turbulent behavior as water flows into (clear) oil. At right, all turbulence is suppressed by using cornstarch. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Public Domain Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science Bachelor kitchens are rarely known for their cleanliness. One reason is

322

Diffusion coefficient of trona in water  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the diffusion coefficient of trona in water. The diffusion coefficient of trona from saturated solution in water was measured to be 1.167 *10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2//s with a standard devition of 6.2% at 25/degree/C.30 10/sup 9/ refs.

Mehta, G.D.; Jain, S.C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Comparative analysis of remaining oil saturation in waterflood patterns based on analytical modeling and simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In assessing the economic viability of a waterflood project, a key parameter is the remaining oil saturation (ROS) within each pattern unit. This information helps in identifying the areas with the highest ROS and thus potential for further development. While special core analysis, log-inject-log, and thermal-decay time-log-evaluation techniques are available, they provide only single-point values and a snapshot in time near a wellbore. Also, they can quickly add up to an expensive program. The analytical areal distribution method estimates ROS in a waterflood pattern unit from material balance calculations using well injection and production data with no pressure information required. Well production and injection volumes are routinely measured in oilfield operations, making the method very attractive. The areal distribution technique estimates two major uncertainties: vertical loss of injected water into nontarget areas or areal loss into surrounding patterns, and injected water for gas fill-up. However, developers tested it only in low-pressure conditions, which are increasingly rare in oilfield operations. The main purpose of my research, then, was to verify whether or not the areal distribution method is valid in higher pressure conditions. Simulation of various waterflood patterns confirmed that the areal distribution method with its estimated ROS is capable of precise estimation of actual ROS, but at high pressures it requires consideration of pressure data in addition to injection and production data.

Azimov, Anar Etibar

324

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compounds have been designed under this contract that can be used to trace water that has been injected into vapor-dominated and two-phase geothermal fields. Increased knowledge of the injection flow is provided by the tracers, and this augments the power that can be produced. Details on the stability and use of these tracers are included in this report.

Michael C. Adams Greg Nash

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Effect of GOR, Temperature, and Initial Water Saturation on Solution-Gas Drive in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Oil Reservoirs G.-Q. Tang,* SPE, and A. Firoozabadi, SPE, Reservoir Engineering Research Inst. (RERI) Summary We efficiency may be the result of high oil viscosity. From a practical point of view for reservoir engineering of Petroleum Engineers This paper (SPE 71499) was first presented at the 2001 SPE Annual Technical Conference

Firoozabadi, Abbas

326

Transdisciplinary Fluid Integration Research Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environment Reality-Coupled Computation Energy Dynamics Integrated Visual Informatics Super-Real-Time Medical of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, in April 2003. The next generation transdisciplinary research Research focus is to advance utilization of Computer Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for solving engineering problems

Obayashi, Shigeru

327

Fracturing fluids -- then and now  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fracturing fluid provides the means by which the hydraulic fracturing process can take place. All applications of well stimulation by fracturing must include selection of fracturing fluid in the initial phases of fracture design and treatment planning. Fracturing fluid has two important purposes: (1) to provide sufficient viscosity to suspend and transport proppant deep into the created fracture system and (2) to decompose, or break, chemically to a low viscosity to allow flowback of a major part of the fluid to the surface for fracture cleanup after the treatment is completed. Because of the importance of its rheological properties and behavior in the fracture under reservoir conditions during (and immediately after) the treatment, service company research laboratories have spent millions of dollars on R and D of fracturing fluids.

Jennings, A.R. Jr. [Enhanced Well Stimulation Inc., Plano, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Device to convert the energy of a fluid in motion  

SciTech Connect

A device is disclosed to convert wave energy into mechanical energy, comprises a buoyant structure whose upper portion is in the region of wave action but whose lower section is below the region of wave action, so that the water adjacent the upper and lower sections of the structure has vertical movement relative to itself. This relative movement is used to rotate a vertical shaft having radially extending horizontal axles on which panels are pivotally mounted. Ballast and/or floats are used to impose on the panels a bias tending to maintain them horizontal. The relative movement of the water is used to impel fluid vertically relative to the panels in alternatingly opposite directions; and the bias imposed by the ballast and/or floats thus causes a planing wing action of the panels which impels the shaft in rotation in one direction regardless of the direction of the movement of the impelling fluid. The floating structure can rise and fall with the waves, in which case the blade are disposed at the lower end of the device, in the still water; or the device can be stationary in the water, in which case the blades are subject to a fluid such as the water itself or air impelled by the water, at the upper end of the device.

de la Roche Kerandraon, O.; Guillaume, P.; Paroldi, D.

1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

329

Fluid flow monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention comprises a fluid sampling system which allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped up into a sampling jet of venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decrease, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodicially leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, E.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

Houck, E.D.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Design features and equilibrium flash modeling of direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchangers for use with geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Baseline and preliminary tests of a 500 kW pilot plant were conducted during 1980. The DCHX evaporator, which combines an equilibrium-flash boiler with a countercurrent preheater, met and exceeded the performance of its predecessors, the volumetric and surface type boilers, although only its essential features had been installed. Additional tests to be conducted during 1981 are designed to improve overall tower performance and to create modular designs for a 20-foot diameter column, thereby replacing the plurality of DCHX units otherwise required for commercial-size (>50 MWe) installations. For the preheater-boiler combination, the recommended criterion of performance is the classical steam distillation efficiency, E/sub v/, defined as the ratio of the partial pressure actually exerted by the hydrocarbon to its saturation pressure at the vapor exit temperature. As presently installed, the 500 kW DCHX unit typically generates a working-fluid vapor composed of 5 mole % water and 95% isobutane at 415 psia and 254.2/sup 0/F bubble point. E/sub v/ is 87.6%. However, with the additional improvements planned, 95% should be attainable.

Rapier, P.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Available Technologies: Heat-powered Water Pump and Purifier  

Berkeley Lab engineer Leif Steinhour has developed a heat-powered pump that purifies water while moving the fluid. The technology requires no moving ...

336

Physical and numerical modeling of the external fluid mechanics of OTEC pilot plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examined the near field external fluid mechanics of symmetrical OTEC pilot plant designs (20-80 MWe) under realistic deep water conditions. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of different plant ...

Singarella, Paul N.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine which reservoir model best matches the isotope data. Notes 1) Chemical and light-stable isotope data are presented for water samples from the Raft River geothermal area and nearby. On the basis of chemical character, as defined by a trilinear plot of per cent milliequivalents, and light-stable isotope data, the waters in the geothermal area can be divided into waters that have and have not mixed with cold water. 2) Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic

338

Particle sorter comprising a fluid displacer in a closed-loop fluid circuit  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein are methods and devices utilizing a fluid displacer in a closed-loop fluid circuit.

Perroud, Thomas D. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Kamlesh D. (Dublin, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

Monomers from Renewable Resources: C-H Functionalization of Saturated Fatty Acids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Saturated fatty acids were used to prepare renewable monomers and polymers. For instance, the alpha-acidity of these fatty acid esters was used to synthesize malonate… (more)

Kolb, Nicolai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

CT imaging techniques for two-phase and three-phase in-situ saturation measurements  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this research is to use the SUPRI 3D steam injection laboratory model to establish a reliable method for 3-phase in-situ saturation measurements, and thereafter investigate the mechanism of steamflood at residual oil saturation. Demiral et al. designed and constructed a three dimensional laboratory model that can be used to measure temperature, pressure and heat loss data. The model is also designed so that its construction materials are not a limiting factor for CT scanning. We have used this model for our study. In this study, we saturated the model with mineral oil, and carried out waterflood until residual oil saturation. Steamflood was then carried out. A leak appeared at the bottom of the model. Despite this problem, the saturation results, obtained by using 2-phase and 3-phase saturation equations and obtained from the Cat scanner, were compared with the saturations obtained from material balance. The errors thus obtained were compared with those obtained by an error analysis carried out on the saturation equations. This report gives details of the experimental procedures, the data acquisition and data processing computer programs, and the analysis of a steamflood experiment carried out at residual oil saturation.

Sharma, B.C.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Reaction of Si(111) Surface with Saturated Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

Reaction of Si(111) surface with saturated hydrocarbon such as methane (CH{sub 4}) and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) was carried out in a gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE). After carbonization, structures formed on the surface were observed by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Structures transition formed on the surface were 7x7, {delta}-7x7, 1x1, and SiC structures. In the case of CH{sub 4}, the Si surfaces were carbonized at 800 deg. C for 120 min (7.2x10{sup 4} L) with a W-filament of 2800 deg. C, and SiC layers were obtained. In the case of C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, the mixture of 7x7 and SiC structure was observed. Decomposition of hydrocarbon was characterized in quadrupole mass spectroscopy (QMS) measurements. An atomic force microscopy (AFM) image of the mixture of 7x7 and SiC shows a wandering shape. Whereas, the SiC layer shows a regular step. This result seems to be related to the different in the amount of CH{sub 3} molecules on the surface.

Suryana, Risa [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebelas Maret University Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A Kentingan Surakarta 57126 (Indonesia); Nakahara, Hitoshi; Saito, Yahachi [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ichimiya, Ayahiko [Department of Mathematical and Physical Science, Faculty of Science, Japan Women's University Mejirodai 2-8-1, Tokyo 112-8681 (Japan)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

Elliptic flow orientation, saturation and low $p_t$ behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider general model with factorization between macroscopic flow and matter decay distribution. We show universality of $p_t^2$ behavior of elliptic flow at small $p_t$ for identified final particles in the symmetric nucleus collision. At high $p_t$ we compare non-relativistic and relativistic models for boosted decay distribution. In the relativistic models with distribution having power-like tail we show existence of elliptic flow saturation. This means that the elliptic flow value $v_2$ tend to constant at high $p_t$. We discuss the importance of determination of elliptic flow orientation which can help us to compare different models. For example, we introduce potential expansion model which can reproduce azimuthal asymmetry but based on the assumption that there are only cold strong forces and no thermalization. This model show opposite sign of elliptic flow orientation in comparison with thermal model. We also show that at small $p_t$ sign of elliptic flow can change due to sign of second derivative of decay distribution. This fact tell us that we must more carefully link elliptic flow sign and properties of the model.

V. A. Abramovsky; A. V. Popov

2003-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Diffraction, Saturation and pp Cross Sections at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from the large hadron collider (LHC) show that no available Monte Carlo simulation incorporates our pre-LHC knowledge of soft and hard diffraction in a way that could be reliably extrapolated to LHC energies. As a simulation is needed to establish triggers, perform underlying event corrections and calculate acceptances, the lack of a robust simulation affects all measurements at the LHC. Particularly affected are the measurements of processes with large diffractive rapidity gaps, which constitute about one quarter of the inelastic cross section. In this paper, a previously described phenomenological model based on a saturation effect observed in single diffraction dissociation in pre-LHC data, validated by its successful application to several diffractive processes, is used to predict the total and total-inelastic proton-proton cross sections at the LHC. The prediction for the total-inelastic cross section at a center of mass collision energy of 7 TeV is compared with recent results from ATLAS and CMS.

Konstantin Goulianos

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Transport of Explosive Residue Surrogates in Saturated Porous Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Defense operational ranges may become contaminated by particles of explosives residues (ER) as a result of low-order detonations of munitions. The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which particles of ER could migrate through columns of sandy sediment, representing model aquifer materials. Transport experiments were conducted in saturated columns (2 x 20 cm) packed with different grain sizes of clean sand or glass beads. Fine particles (approximately 2 to 50 {mu}m) of 2,6-dinitrotoluene (DNT) were used as a surrogate for ER. DNT particles were applied to the top 1 cm of sand or beads in the columns, and the columns were subsequently leached with artificial groundwater solutions. DNT migration occurred as both dissolved and particulate phases. Concentration differences between unfiltered and filtered samples indicate that particulate DNT accounted for up to 41% of the mass recovered in effluent samples. Proportionally, more particulate than dissolved DNT was recovered in effluent solutions from columns with larger grain sizes, while total concentrations of DNT in effluent were inversely related to grain size. Of the total DNT mass applied to the uppermost layer of the column, <3% was recovered in the effluent with the bulk remaining in the top 2 cm of the column. Our results suggest there is some potential for subsurface migration of ER particles and that most of the particles will be retained over relatively short transport distances.

Lavoie, Bethsheba [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; McKay, Larry Donald [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of boiling water in sub-hundred micron channel  

SciTech Connect

The current work focuses on the pressure drop, heat transfer and stability in two phase flow in microchannels with hydraulic diameter of less than one hundred microns. Experiments were conducted in smooth microchannels of hydraulic diameter of 45, 65 {mu}m, and a rough microchannel of hydraulic diameter of 70 {mu}m, with deionised water as the working fluid. The local saturation pressure and temperature vary substantially over the length of the channel. In order to correctly predict the local saturation temperature and subsequently the heat transfer characteristics, numerical techniques have been used in conjunction with the conventional two phase pressure drop models. The Lockhart-Martinelli (liquid-laminar, vapour-laminar) model is found to predict the two phase pressure drop data within 20%. The instability in two phase flow is quantified; it is found that microchannels of smaller hydraulic diameter have lesser instabilities as compared to their larger counterparts. The experiments also suggest that surface characteristics strongly affect flow stability in the two phase flow regime. The effect of hydraulic diameter and surface characteristics on the flow characteristics and stability in two phase flow is seldom reported, and is of considerable practical relevance. (author)

Bhide, R.R.; Singh, S.G.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Duttagupta, S.P.; Agrawal, Amit [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

Rüdiger Franke; et al.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Metal chelate process to remove pollutants from fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to improved methods using an organic iron chelate to remove pollutants from fluids, such as flue gas. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process to remove NO[sub x] and optionally SO[sub 2] from a fluid using a metal ion (Fe[sup 2+]) chelate wherein the ligand is a dimercapto compound wherein the --SH groups are attached to adjacent carbon atoms (HS--C--C--SH) or (SH--C--CCSH) and contain a polar functional group so that the ligand of DMC chelate is water soluble. Alternatively, the DMC is covalently attached to a water insoluble substrate such as a polymer or resin, e.g., polystyrene. The chelate is regenerated using electroreduction or a chemical additive. The dimercapto compound bonded to a water insoluble substrate is also useful to lower the concentration or remove hazardous metal ions from an aqueous solution. 26 figures.

Chang, S.G.T.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

348

Feasibility Study – Using a Solar Evaporator to Reduce the Metalworking Fluid (MWF) Waste Stream  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar evaporator was designed, built, and operated to reduce the water-based metalworking fluid waste stream. The evaporator was setup in Waste Management’s barrel lot inside one of the confinement areas. The unit processed three batches of waste fluid during the prototype testing. Initial tests removed 13% of the fluid waste stream. Subsequent modifications to the collector improved the rate to almost 20% per week. Evaluation of the risk during operation showed that even a small spill when associated with precipitation, and the unit placement within a confinement area, gave it the potential to contaminate more fluid that what it could save.

Lazarus, Lloyd

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mobile element into the networking infrastructure.Our fluid infrastructure design saves significant energy inIntelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks Aman

Kansal, Aman; Somasundara, Arun; Jea, David C; Srivastava, Mani B; Estrin, D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks Amanto develop a fluid infrastructure: mobile components arebuilt into the system infrastructure for enabling specific

Aman Kansal; Arun Somasundara; David Jea; Mani Srivastava; Deborah Estrin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fluid bed adsorption of carbon dioxide on immobilized polyethyenimine (PEI): kinetic analysis and breakthrough behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) by immobilized polyethylenimine (PEI) on mesoporous silica was investigated in a fluid bed. The tests were performed to determine breakthrough behavior with varying bed temperature, flow rates and feed concentrations. Experimental breakthrough curves were analyzed using a theoretical 1D model developed by Bohart and Adams. The results showed that Bohart-Adams model was suitable for the normal description of breakthrough curve for the temperature ranges of 40-90{degree}C. The maximum capacity increased with temperature up to 70{degree}C and then decreased. The adsorption rate constant exhibited a negative temperature dependence decreasing as the temperature increased. Parameters characteristic of a fluid bed adsorber were inferred from these breakthrough curves including the breakthrough time, saturation time, critical reactor length, and length of mass transfer zone LMTZ. These parameters can be used to design fluid bed adsorption system without resolving the mechanistic contributions of dispersion, mixing, and intraparticle diffusion.

Monazam, Esmail R.; Spenik,, James; Shadle, Lawrence J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Improved Measurements of the Ice Water Content in Cirrus Using a Total-Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes an improved method for the measurement of the ice water content (IWC) of cirrus cloud using a total water content probe. A previous version of this technique assumed that the air in cloud-containing regions was saturated with ...

Philip R. A. Brown; Peter N. Francis

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore  

SciTech Connect

{sup 4}He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk {sup 4}He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} at 21 C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) to 3.0 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (150 C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of {sup 4}He{sub water} for matrix porosity ({approx}3%) and tortuosity ({approx}6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) and 1 x 10{sup -7} (120 C), effectively isolating pore fluid {sup 4}He from the {sup 4}He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that <6% of helium initially dissolved in pore fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 {+-} 0.4% (SD, n=4) and mudstones 3.1 {+-} 0.8% (SD, n=4).

Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B.M.

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

{sup 4}He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk {sup 4}He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} at 21 C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) to 3.0 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (150 C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of {sup 4}He{sub water} for matrix porosity ({approx}3%) and tortuosity ({approx}6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) and 1 x 10{sup -7} (120 C), effectively isolating pore fluid {sup 4}He from the {sup 4}He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 {+-} 0.4% (SD, n=4) and mudstones 3.1 {+-} 0.8% (SD, n=4).

Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B.M.

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fluid Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Fluid Imaging 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Fluid Imaging Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Fluid Imaging Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

356

Nonlinear Fluid Dynamics from Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black branes in AdS5 appear in a four parameter family labeled by their velocity and temperature. Promoting these parameters to Goldstone modes or collective coordinate fields -- arbitrary functions of the coordinates on the boundary of AdS5 -- we use Einstein's equations together with regularity requirements and boundary conditions to determine their dynamics. The resultant equations turn out to be those of boundary fluid dynamics, with specific values for fluid parameters. Our analysis is perturbative in the boundary derivative expansion but is valid for arbitrary amplitudes. Our work may be regarded as a derivation of the nonlinear equations of boundary fluid dynamics from gravity. As a concrete application we find an explicit expression for the expansion of this fluid stress tensor including terms up to second order in the derivative expansion.

Sayantani Bhattacharyya; Veronika E Hubeny; Shiraz Minwalla; Mukund Rangamani

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

Visually simulating realistic fluid motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis we investigate various methods for visually simulating fluid flow. The focus is on implementing effective fluid simulation within an interactive animation system. Two implementations have been developed based on derivations and simplifications of the Navier-Stokes' equations. The first implementation is the most accurate and follows the physics of fluid dynamics more closely. However, the high computation times incurred by this implementation make it inappropriate as an interactive method. The second approach is not as accurate as the first one, however it incurs lower computation times. This second method is only able to model a subset of the total fluid behavior. The second method has been integrated into an interactive modeling and animation environment. Several examples are included.

Naithani, Priyanka

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Deferring trust in fluid replication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile nodes rely on external services to provide safety, sharing, and additional resources. Unfortunately, as mobile nodes move through the networking infrastructure, the costs of accessing servers change. Fluid replication allows mobile clients to ...

Brian D. Noble; Ben Fleis; Landon P. Cox

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Bio-inspired fluid locomotion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed several novel methods of locomotion at low Reynolds number, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids: Robosnails 1 and 2, which operate on a lubrication layer, and the three-link swimmer which moves ...

Chan, Brian, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Preliminary evaluation of fluid chemistry in the East Mesa KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the major problems needing consideration when bringing a geothermal field into production is the anticipation and control of mineral precipitation in both the producing formations and production equipment. Prediction of the chemical interactions between natural multicomponent thermal fluids and the minerals comprising a producing formation can be accomplished by the study of equilibrium models approximating the natural system. Models are constructed from theoretically and experimentally derived thermodynamic data for the involved minerals and aqueous species. This equilibrium modeling approach was applied to the rock-water system at the East Mesa geothermal area in the Imperial Valley of California. Results of petrographic and fluid analyses are given. (JGB)

Hoagland, J.R.

1976-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after {approx}30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been incorporated into the modeling. In this case, an initially small population of slow growing sulfate reducers is active from the initiation of biostimulation. Three-dimensional, variably saturated flow modeling was used to address impacts of a falling water table during acetate injection. These impacts included a significant reduction in aquifer saturated thickness and isolation of residual reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted in higher concentrations of TEAP products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions; however, the ranges were sufficiently small to preserve general trends. Large computer memory and high computational performance were required to simulate the detailed coupled process models for multiple biogeochemical components in highly resolved heterogeneous materials for the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior. In this case, a highly-scalable subsurface simulator operating on 128 processor cores for 12 hours was used to simulate each realization. An equivalent simulation without parallel processing would have taken 60 days, assuming sufficient memory was available.

Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Coupling water and smoke to thin deformable and rigid shells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel method for solid/fluid coupling that can treat infinitesimally thin solids modeled by a lower dimensional triangulated surface. Since classical solid/fluid coupling algorithms rasterize the solid body onto the fluid grid, an entirely ... Keywords: cloth, rigid bodies, shells, smoke, water

Eran Guendelman; Andrew Selle; Frank Losasso; Ronald Fedkiw

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modem-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modem vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum temperatures and salinities ranged from 440 C and 44 wt. percent NaCl equivalent in the biotite hornfels adjacent to the pluton to 305 C and 5 wt. percent NaCl equivalent at distances of 1730 m from the intrusive contact. The major, minor, and noble gas compositions of fluid inclusions in the hydrothermally altered rocks were integrated with microthermometric and mineralogic data to determine their sources and the effects of mixing and boiling. Major and minor gaseous species were released from the inclusions by crushing or thermal decrepitation; noble gases were released by crushing. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The analyses document the presence of magmatic, crustal, and meteoric components in the trapped fluids. Hydrothermal fluids present during the liquid-dominated phase of the system contained gaseous species derived mainly from crustal and magmatic sources. At The Geysers, N-2/Ar ratios greater than 525 and He-3/He-4 ratios of 6-10.7 Ra are diagnostic of a magmatic component. Crustal gas has CO2/CH4 ratios less than 4, N-2/Ar ratios between 45 and 525, and low 3He/4He ratios (0.5 Ra). Meteoric fluids have CO2/CH4 ratios greater than 4 and N2/Ar ratios between 38 (air-saturated water) and 84 (air). However, N-2/Ar ratios between 15 and 110 can result from boiling. Ratios less than 15 reflect the incorporation of N-2 into NH3-bearing clay minerals. In the central Geysers, the incursion of meteoric fluids occurred during the transition from the liquid- to vapor-dominated regime. Variations in the relative CH4, CO2, and H-2 contents of the gas analyses demonstrate that boiling took place under open-system conditions. The gas data indicate that the inclusions have remained closed to the diffusion of He and H-2 since their formation.

Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Colloid Transport and Deposition in Water-Saturated and Unsaturated Sand and Yucca Mountain Tuff: Effect of Ionic Strength and Moisture Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colloid-aided radionuclide transport has been considered a potentially important mechanism for the candidate spent fuel and high level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain. This mechanism, however, has not been treated in Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) until recently. Even then there has been little discussion of possible colloid retention in the unsaturated zone. This report summarizes investigations of potential colloid retention in sand and Yucca Mountain tuff as a fun...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

365

Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Surface water sampling of hot and cold spring discharges has traditionally

366

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Spectra of Reciprocal Transmission: Generalization to Saturated Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of Munk et al. (1981), relating spectra of ocean sound-speed and water-particle velocity to observable acoustic spectra are applicable only in the geometrical optics region. It is shown that analogous formulas that are valid in the ...

Stanley M. Flatté

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Saturation of the lower-hybrid-drift instability by mode coupling  

SciTech Connect

A nonlinear mode-coupling theory of the lower-hybrid-drift instability is presented. It is found that the instability saturates by transferring energy from the growing, long wavelength modes to the damped, short wavelength modes. The saturation energy, mean square of the potential fluctuations, and diffusion coefficient are calculated self-consistently.

Drake, J.F.; Guzdar, P.N.; Huba, J.D.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Saturation of the parametric decay instability near the lower hybrid frequency  

SciTech Connect

The nonlinear evolution and saturation of parametrically excited lower hybrid waves are studied numerically by solving the corresponding weak turbulence wave kinetic equation. The saturation level and the effective collision frequency $nu$/sub f/ are obtained as functions of pump power. (auth)

Chen, L.; Berger, R.L.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Computer simulation of underground blast response of pile in saturated soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper treats the blast response of a pile foundation in saturated sand using explicit nonlinear finite element analysis, considering complex material behavior of soil and soil-pile interaction. Blast wave propagation in the soil is studied and the ... Keywords: Numerical simulation, Pile foundation, Saturated soil, Underground explosion

L. B. Jayasinghe; D. P. Thambiratnam; N. Perera; J. H. A. R. Jayasooriya

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Technical communique: Stability analysis for digital filters with multiple saturation nonlinearities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new stability criterion for digital filters with multiple saturation nonlinearities is presented in the form of a linear matrix inequality. Numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the results obtained. Keywords: Digital filters, Nonlinear systems, Saturation nonlinearity, Stability

Tao Shen; Zhugang Yuan; Xiaohong Wang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Formulation, Implementation and Validation of a Two-Fluid model in a Fuel Cell CFD Code  

SciTech Connect

Water management is one of the main challenges in PEM Fuel Cells. While water is essential for membrane electrical conductivity, excess liquid water leads to ooding of catalyst layers. Despite the fact that accurate prediction of two-phase transport is key for optimal water management, understanding of the two-phase transport in fuel cells is relatively poor. Wang et. al. [1], [2] have studied the two-phase transport in the channel and diffusion layer separately using a multiphase mixture model. The model fails to accurately predict saturation values for high humidity inlet streams. Nguyen et. al. [3] developed a two-dimensional, two-phase, isothermal, isobaric, steady state model of the catalyst and gas diffusion layers. The model neglects any liquid in the channel. Djilali et. al. [4] developed a three-dimensional two-phase multicomponent model. The model is an improvement over previous models, but neglects drag between the liquid and the gas phases in the channel. In this work, we present a comprehensive two- fluid model relevant to fuel cells. Models for two-phase transport through Channel, Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) and Channel-GDL interface, are discussed. In the channel, the gas and liquid pressures are assumed to be same. The surface tension effects in the channel are incorporated using the continuum surface force (CSF) model. The force at the surface is expressed as a volumetric body force and added as a source to the momentum equation. In the GDL, the gas and liquid are assumed to be at different pressures. The difference in the pressures (capillary pressure) is calculated using an empirical correlations. At the Channel-GDL interface, the wall adhesion affects need to be taken into account. SIMPLE-type methods recast the continuity equation into a pressure-correction equation, the solution of which then provides corrections for velocities and pressures. However, in the two-fluid model, the presence of two phasic continuity equations gives more freedom and more complications. A general approach would be to form a mixture continuity equation by linearly combining the phasic continuity equations using appropriate weighting factors. Analogous to mixture equation for pressure correction, a difference equation is used for the volume/phase fraction by taking the difference between the phasic continuity equations. The relative advantages of the above mentioned algorithmic variants for computing pressure correction and volume fractions are discussed and quantitatively assessed. Preliminary model validation is done for each component of the fuel cell. The two-phase transport in the channel is validated using empirical correlations. Transport in the GDL is validated against results obtained from LBM and VOF simulation techniques. The Channel-GDL interface transport will be validated against experiment and empirical correlation of droplet detachment at the interface. References [1] Y. Wang S. Basu and C.Y. Wang. Modeling two-phase flow in pem fuel cell channels. J. Power Sources, 179:603{617, 2008. [2] P. K. Sinha and C. Y. Wang. Liquid water transport in a mixed-wet gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Chem. Eng. Sci., 63:1081-1091, 2008. [3] Guangyu Lin and Trung Van Nguyen. A two-dimensional two-phase model of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 153(2):A372{A382, 2006. [4] T. Berning and N. Djilali. A 3d, multiphase, multicomponent model of the cathode and anode of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 150(12):A1589{A1598, 2003.

Kunal Jain, Vernon Cole, Sanjiv Kumar and N. Vaidya

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Heat transfer in porous media with fluid phase changes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A one-dimensional experimental apparatus was built to study the heat pipe phenomenon. Basically, it consists of a 25 cm long, 2.5 cm I.D. Lexane tube packed with Ottawa sand. The two ends of the tube were subjected to different tempratures, i.e., one above the boiling temperature and the other below. The tube was well insulated so that a uniform one-dimensional heat flux could pass through the sand pack. Presence of the heat pipe phenomenon was confirmed by the temperature and saturation profiles of the sand pack at the final steady state condition. A one-dimensional steady state theory to describe the experiment has been developed which shows the functional dependence of the heat pipe phenomenon on liquid saturation gradient, capillary pressure, permeability, fluid viscosity, latent heat, heat flux and gravity. Influence of the heat pipe phenomenon on wellbore heat losses was studied by use of a two-phase two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate computer model.

Su, H.J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Abstract The Valles caldera in New Mexico hosts a high-temperature geothermal system, which is manifested in a number of hot springs discharging in and around the caldera. In order to determine the fluid pathways and the origin of chloride in this system, we measured 36Cl/Cl ratios in waters from high-temperature drill holes and from surface springs in this region. The waters fall into two general categories: recent meteoric water samples with low Cl- concentrations (< 10 mg/L) and relatively high 36Cl/Cl ratios

375

Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA); Harris, Robert V. (Pasco, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ultracentrifuge for separating fluid mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. A centrifuge for the separation of fluid mixtures having light and heavy fractions comprising a cylindrical rotor, disc type end-plugs closing the ends of the rotor, means for mounting said rotor for rotation about its cylindrical axis, a housing member enclosing the rotor, a vacuum chamber in said housing about the central portion of the rotor, a collection chamber at each end of the housing, the innermost side of which is substantially formed by the outer face of the end-plug, means for preventing flow of the fluid from the collection chambers to said vacuum chamber, at least one of said end-plugs having a plurality of holes therethrough communicating between the collection chamber adjacent thereto and the inside of the rotor to induce countercurrent flow of the fluid in the centrifuge, means for feeding fluid to be processed into the centrifuge, means communicating with the collection chambers to extract the light and heavy separated fractions of the fluid, and means for rotating the rotor.

Lowry, Ralph A. (Charlottesville, VA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRILLING FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24-month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid's behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a ''removable filtercake'' has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed.

David B. Burnett

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for modeling fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media.flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fluid dynamics of bacterial turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-sustained turbulent structures have been observed in a wide range of living fluids, yet no quantitative theory exists to explain their properties. We report experiments on active turbulence in highly concentrated 3D suspensions of Bacillus subtilis and compare them with a minimal fourth-order vector-field theory for incompressible bacterial dynamics. Velocimetry of bacteria and surrounding fluid, determined by imaging cells and tracking colloidal tracers, yields consistent results for velocity statistics and correlations over two orders of magnitude in kinetic energy, revealing a decrease of fluid memory with increasing swimming activity and linear scaling between energy and enstrophy. The best-fit model parameters allow for quantitative agreement with experimental data.

Jörn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Henricus H. Wensink; Markus Bär; Raymond E. Goldstein

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fluid-filled bomb-disrupting apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for disarming improvised bombs are disclosed. The apparatus comprises a fluid-filled bottle or container made of plastic or another soft material which contains a fixed or adjustable, preferably sheet explosive. The charge is fired centrally at its apex and can be adjusted to propel a fluid projectile that is broad or narrow, depending upon how it is set up. In one embodiment, the sheet explosive is adjustable so as to correlate the performance of the fluid projectile to the disarming needs for the improvised explosive device (IED). Common materials such as plastic water bottles or larger containers can be used, with the sheet explosive or other explosive material configured in a general chevron-shape to target the projectile toward the target. In another embodiment, a thin disk of metal is conformably mounted with the exterior of the container and radially aligned with the direction of fire of the fluid projectile. Depending on the configuration and the amount of explosive and fluid used, a projectile is fired at the target that has sufficient energy to penetrate rigid enclosures from fairly long stand-off and yet is focused enough to be targeted to specific portions of the IED for disablement.

Cherry, Christopher R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al{sup 0}, as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al{sup 0} are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction.

Bodenan, F., E-mail: f.bodenan@brgm.f [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France); Guyonnet, D.; Piantone, P.; Blanc, P. [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Liquid CO2 Displacement of Water in a Dual-Permeability Pore Network Micromodel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permeability contrasts exist in multilayer geological formations under consideration for carbon sequestration. To improve our understanding of heterogeneous pore-scale displacements, liquid CO2 (LCO2) - water displacement was evaluated in a pore network micromodel with two distinct permeability zones. Due to the low viscosity ratio (logM = -1.1), unstable displacement occurred at all injection rates over two orders of magnitude. LCO2 displaced water only in the high permeability zone at low injection rates with the mechanism shifting from capillary fingering to viscous fingering with increasing flow rate. At high injection rates, LCO2 displaced water in the low permeability zone with capillary fingering as the dominant mechanism. LCO2 saturation (SLCO2) as a function of injection rate was quantified using fluorescent microscopy. In all experiments, more than 50% of LCO2 resided in the active flowpaths, and this fraction increased as displacement transitioned from capillary to viscous fingering. A continuum-scale two-phase flow model with independently determined fluid and hydraulic parameters was used to predict SLCO2 in the dual-permeability field. Agreement with the micromodel experiments was obtained for low injection rates. However, the numerical model does not account for the unstable viscous fingering processes observed experimentally at higher rates and hence overestimated SLCO2.

Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Grate, Jay W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Warner, Marvin G.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Low temperature barrier wellbores formed using water flushing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming an opening for a low temperature well is described. The method includes drilling an opening in a formation. Water is introduced into the opening to displace drilling fluid or indigenous gas in the formation adjacent to a portion of the opening. Water is produced from the opening. A low temperature fluid is applied to the opening.

McKinzie, II; John, Billy [Houston, TX; Keltner, Thomas Joseph [Spring, TX

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

Wellbottom fluid implosion treatment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for inducing implosion shock forces on perforation traversing earth formations with fluid pressure where an implosion tool is selected relative to a shut in well pressure and a tubing pressure to have a large and small area piston relationship in a well tool so that at a predetermined tubing pressure the pistons move a sufficient distance to open an implosion valve which permits a sudden release of well fluid pressure into the tubing string and produces an implosion force on the perforations. A pressure gauge on the well tool records tubing pressure and well pressure as a function of time.

Brieger, Emmet F. (HC 67 Box 58, Nogal, NM 88341)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Holographic plasma and anyonic fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use alternative quantisation of the $D3/D5$ system to explore properties of a strongly coupled charged plasma and strongly coupled anyonic fluids. The $S$-transform of the $D3/D5$ system is used as a model for charged matter interacting with a U(1) gauge field in the large coupling regime, and we compute the dispersion relationship of the propagating electromagnetic modes as the density and temperature are changed. A more general $SL(2,\\mathbb{Z})$ transformation gives a strongly interacting anyonic fluid, and we study its transport properties as we change the statistics of the anyons and the background magnetic field.

Daniel K. Brattan; Gilad Lifschytz

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

386

Structure and electronic properties of saturated and unsaturated gallium nitride nanotubes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atomic and electronic structures of saturated and unsaturated GaN nanotubes along the [001] direction with (100) lateral facets are studied using first-principles calculations. Atomic relaxation of nanotubes shows that appreciable distortion occurs in the unsaturated nanotubes. All the nanotubes considered, including saturated and unsaturated ones, exhibit semiconducting, with a direct band gap. Surface states arisen from the threefold-coordinated N and Ga atoms at the lateral facets exist inside the bulk-like band gap. When the nanotubes saturated with hydrogen, these dangling bond bands are removed from the band gap, but the band gap decreases with increasing the wall thickness of the nanotubes.

Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Shengjie; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

Directed flow fluid rinse trough  

SciTech Connect

Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs.

Kempka, Steven N. (9504 Lona La., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Walters, Robert N. (11872 LaGrange St., Boise, ID 83709)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

PDM performance Test Results and Preliminary Analysis: Incompressible and Compressible Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three, small diameter, Moineau, positive displacement (drilling) motors (PDMs) were dynamometer tested using water, air-water mist, air-water foam, and aerated water. The motors included (1) a 1.5-inch OD, single-lobe mud motor; (2) a 1.69-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe mud motor; and (3) a 1.75-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe air motor. This paper describes the test apparatus, procedures, data analysis, and results. Incompressible and compressible fluid performance are compared; linear performance, predicted by a positive displacement motor model, is identified where it occurs. Preliminary results and conclusions are (1) the performance of all three motors is accurately modeled using a two-variable, linear model for incompressible fluid and (2) the model was not successfully adapted to model compressible fluid performance.

Dreesen, D.S.; Gruenhagan, E.; Cohen, J.C.; Moran, D.W.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Mapping steam and water flow in petroleum reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 5 years, we have applied high-resolution geophysical methods (crosswell seismic and electromagnetics (EM), and passive seismic) to map and characterize petroleum reservoirs in the San Joaquin Valley and to monitor changes during secondary recovery operations. The two techniques provide complementary information. Seismic data reveal the reservoir structure, whereas EM measurements are more sensitive to the pore fluid distribution. Seismic surveys at the south Belridge field were used to map fracture generation and monitor formation changes due to the onset of steam flooding. Early results show possible sensitivity to changes in gas saturation caused by the steam flooding. Crosswell EM surveys were applied at a shallow pilot at Lost Hills for reservoir characterization and steamflood monitoring. Images made from baselines data clearly show the distribution of the target oil sands; repeated surveys during the steam flood allowed us to identify the boundaries of the steam chest and to accurately predict breakthrough. Applications of the EM techniques in steel-cased wells are at an early stage, but preliminary results at Lost Hills show sensitivity to formation resistivity in a water-flood pilot. Finally, passive seismic surveys during hydrofracture operations measured events corelatable in frequency content and magnitude with the size and orientation of induced fractures.

Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Daley, T.; Peterson, J.; Majer, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Murer, A.S. [Mobil Exploration and Producing US (United States); Johnston, R.M. [SPE, CalResources LLC (United States); Klonsky, L. [Chevron USA Production Co. (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Saturation of the Internal Tides and Induced Mixing in the Abyssal Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing effort to develop a parameterization of wave-induced abyssal mixing, the authors derive an heuristic model for nonlinear wave breaking and energy dissipation associated with internal tides. Then the saturation and ...

Caroline J. Muller; Oliver Bühler

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nonlinear Saturation of Baroclinic Instability. Part III: Bounds on the Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rigorous upper bounds are derived on the saturation amplitude of baroclinic instability in the two-layer model. The bounds apply to the eddy energy and are obtained by appealing to a finite amplitude conservation law for the disturbance ...

Theodore G. Shepherd

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Soliton formation and saturation of decay instability of an electromagnetic wave into two plasma waves  

SciTech Connect

The soliton formation with its detuning of the resonance is shown to be an important saturation mechanism for the two-plasmon decay instability at the quarter critical density in laser-irradiated plasmas.

Chen, H.H.; Liu, C.S.

1977-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach  

SciTech Connect

Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be irreversible. Helgeson's pioneering approach was given a more formal kinetic basis (including the introduction of real time rather than reaction progress as the independent variable) in subsequent studies (Lasaga 1981; Aagaard and Helgeson 1982; Lasaga 1984). The reaction path approach can be used to describe chemical processes in a batch or closed system (e.g., a laboratory beaker), but such systems are of limited interest in the Earth sciences where the driving force for most reactions is transport. Lichtner (1988) clarified the application of the reaction path models to water-rock interaction involving transport by demonstrating that they could be used to describe pure advective transport through porous media. By adopting a reference frame which followed the fluid packet as it moved through the medium, the reaction progress variable could be thought of as travel time instead. Multi-component reactive transport models that could treat any combination of transport and biogeochemical processes date back to the early 1980s. Berner and his students applied continuum reactive transport models to describe processes taking place during the early diagenesis of marine sediments (Berner 1980). Lichtner (1985) outlined much of the basic theory for a continuum model for multicomponent reactive transport. Yeh and Tripathi (1989) also presented the theoretical and numerical basis for the treatment of reactive contaminant transport. Steefel and Lasaga (1994) presented a reactive flow and transport model for nonisothermal, kinetically-controlled water-rock interaction and fracture sealing in hydrothermal systems based on simultaneous numerical solution of both reaction and transport This chapter begins with a review of the important transport processes that affect or even control fluid-rock interaction. This is followed by a general introduction to the governing equations for reactive transport, which are broadly applicable to both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of fluid-rock interactions. This framework is expanded through a discussion of specific topics that are the f

Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Gluon saturation in dijet production in p-Pb collisions at Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study saturation effects in the production of dijets in p-p and p-Pb collisions using the framework of high energy factorization. We focus on central-forward jet configurations, which allow for probing gluon density at low longitudinal momentum fraction. We find significant suppression of the central-forward jet decorrelations in p-Pb compared to p-p, which we attribute to saturation of gluon density in nuclei.

Krzysztof Kutak; Sebastian Sapeta

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

395

Direct contact condensation of immiscible fluids in packed beds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study of a film type direct contact heat exchanger using immiscible fluids is made. Laboratory experiments were conducted on a R-113-water system using both 2.5 cm Berl saddles and 3.2 cm spheres as packing, in a 14.6 cm diameter column. The configuration was counter flow, with the vapor phase entering at the base of the column, and condensing on the laminar water film that coated the packing surface. Packing height, water temperature and both water and vapor flow rates were varied in obtaining heat transfer data. These and other packed bed heat transfer data published in the literature were reduced and correlated to yield a relationship between the Stanton number and the important vessel operating parameters.

Thomas, K.D.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Testing of Crystallization Temperature of a New Working Fluid for Absorption Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

Lithium bromide/water (LiBr/water) absorption systems are potential candidates for absorption heat pump water heating applications since they have been widely commercialized for cooling applications. One drawback to LiBr/water absorption water heater systems is that they are unable to operate at typical water heating temperatures due to solution crystallization hazards. Binary or ternary mixtures, serving as working fluids, were reported (Ally, 1988; Herold et al., 1991; Iyoki and Uemura, 1981; Yasuhide Nemoto et al., 2010; Zogg et al., 2005) to help improve the absorption performance or avoid crystallization of absorption heat pump systems. A recent development (De Lucas et al., 2007) investigated the use of a ternary mixture of aqueous mixture of lithium bromide and sodium formate (CHO2Na). The new working fluid composition maintains a ratio of LiBr/CHO2Na of 2 by weight. This new working fluid is a potential competitor to aqueous LiBr solution in absorption system due to higher water vapor absorption rates and lower generation temperature needed (De Lucas et al., 2004). There exists data on equilibrium performance and other physical properties of this new working fluid. However, there is no available data on crystallization behavior. Crystallization temperature is crucial for the design of absorption heat pump water heater in order to avoid crystallization hazards during operation. We have therefore conducted a systematic study to explore the crystallization temperature of LiBr/CHO2Na water solution and compared it against aqueous LiBr solutions. These results were then used to evaluate the feasibility of using the new working fluid in water heating applications showing limited potential.

Wang, Kai [ORNL; Kisari, Padmaja [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Biphase Turbine Tests on Process Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Biphase turbine is a device for effectively producing shaft power from two-phase (liquid and gas) pressure let-downs and for separating the resulting phases. No other device is currently available for simultaneously performing these tasks. The performance of the Biphase turbine and its advantages over single-phase, energy-conversion devices has been demonstrated with subscale and commercial scale steam/water (geothermal wellhead) operations. Its development and application to two-phase process streams is now being pursued and is the subject of this paper. The two-phase working fluid may be a single component, two-phase stream, as in a steam/ water combination, or it may be a multicomponent, two-phase process stream which may also include foam and/or entrained solids. Performance data from initial tests using a subscale Biphase turbine on a two-phase, expanding, gas-cleaning application (Selexol/C02 mixture) are presented. Turbine designs for tests scheduled for gas/oil wellhead applications are described.

Helgeson, N. L.; Maddox, J. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of EnhancedGeothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation is used to evaluate mass flow and heatextraction rates from enhanced geothermal injection-production systemsthat are operated using either CO2 or water as heat transmission fluid.For a model system patterned after the European hot dry rock experimentat Soultz, we find significantly greater heat extraction rates for CO2 ascompared to water. The strong dependence of CO2 mobility (=density/viscosity) upon temperature and pressure may lead to unusualproduction behavior, where heat extraction rates can actually increasefor a time, even as the reservoir is subject to thermaldepletion.

Pruess, Karsten

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

399

Shock-Induced Transformation of Liquid Deuterium into a Metallic Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of shock velocity and optical reflectance at 1064, 808, and 404 nm of a high pressure shock front propagating through liquid deuterium show a continuous increase in reflectance from below 10% and saturating at {approx}(40-60)% in the range of shock velocities from 12 to 20 {mu}m/ns (pressure range 17-50 GPa). The high optical reflectance is evidence that the shocked deuterium reaches a conducting state characteristic of a metallic fluid. Above 20 {mu}m/ns shock velocity (50 GPa pressure) reflectance is constant indicating that the transformation is substantially complete. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Da Silva, L. B.; Gold, D. M.; Cauble, R.; Wallace, R. J.; Foord, M. E.; Hammel, B. A.

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

400

Imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved imaging techniques were used to study the dynamics of fluid flow and trapping at various scales in porous media. Two-phase and three-phase floods were performed and monitored by computed tomography (CT) scanning and/or nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) microscopy. Permeability-porosity correlations obtained from image analysis were combined with porosity distributions from CT scanning to generate spatial permeability distributions within the core which were used in simulations of two-phase floods. Simulation-derived saturation distributions of two-phase processes showed very good agreement with the CT measured values.

Tomutsa, L.; Doughty, D.; Brinkmeyer, A.; Mahmood, S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water saturation fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Fraser E. Goff, Charles O. Grigsby, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce, Andrea Kron (1981) Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff,_Et_Al.,_1981)&oldid=692519

402

Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with graphite nanoparticles and carbon nanotube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid media such as oil or water, and a selected effective amount of carbon nanomaterials necessary to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fluid. One of the preferred carbon nanomaterials is a high thermal conductivity graphite, exceeding that of the neat fluid to be dispersed therein in thermal conductivity, and ground, milled, or naturally prepared with mean particle size less than 500 nm, and preferably less than 200 nm, and most preferably less than 100 nm. The graphite is dispersed in the fluid by one or more of various methods, including ultrasonication, milling, and chemical dispersion. Carbon nanotubes with graphitic structure is another preferred source of carbon nanomaterial, although other carbon nanomaterials are acceptable. To confer long term stability, the use of one or more chemical dispersants is preferred. The thermal conductivity enhancement, compared to the fluid without carbon nanomaterial, is proportional to the amount of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and/or graphite) added.

Zhang, Zhiqiang (Lexington, KY); Lockwood, Frances E. (Georgetown, KY)

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Useful for a whole variety of particular reservoir characterization goals, i.e.: "Isotopic values for the thermal waters become lighter with distance eastward from Casa Diablo, suggesting dilution with nonthermal ground waters from more easterly sources. In the Casa Diablo area, the effects of near-surface boiling cause the observed isotopic shift (along the line

404

The use of fluid geochemistry to indicate reservoir processes at Cerro Prieto, MX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regular chemical sampling and analysis of fluids produced from the hot-water geothermal system of Cerro Prieto, Mexico has provided early warning of reservoir processes. The changes in chloride concentration, sodium to potassium ratio and measured fluid enthalpy are shown in the figures for wells M-5, M-26, M-21A, and M-11 of the Cerro Prieto field. The concentration of chloride, a ''conservative'' constituent, is characteristic of different water masses and is affected by a change of water source, by mixing of waters and by boiling and steam loss but not by reaction with rock minerals. The ratio of sodium to potassium is a temperature-sensitive geothermal index resulting from rock-water reaction and is not affected by boiling and steam loss or by mixing of water masses provided these processes occur at constant temperature. The enthalpy is related to the fluid temperature and to boiling in the aquifer with ''excess'' steam entering the well. These indices provide a reasonably complete picture of major reservoir processes occurring in hot water system. Silica analyses have not been reliable from Cerro Prieto but should be used in addition to Na/K as a temperature indicator. Analysis of fluids from a producing geothermal field must of course include other constituents for study of environmental effects, scaling, corrosion, etc.

Truesdell, Alfred H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

WITTEKIND WD

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

406

Environmentally Acceptable Transformer Fluids: An Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report offers information about the physical, dielectric, chemical, and environmental properties of transformer fluids and their operational impacts. Companies can use this information to choose environmentally acceptable green fluids.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

408

EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS A REPORT SUBMITTED;Abstract A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous ow of steam and water in porous media with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeability for steam phase

Stanford University

409

EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF STEAM-WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF STEAM-WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT calculations. X-ray computer tomography (CT) aided by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. The measured steam-water relative permeability curves assume a shape similar to those obtained by Corey (1954

Stanford University

410

Graphene Compositions And Drilling Fluids Derived Therefrom ...  

Drilling fluids comprising graphenes and nanoplatelet additives and methods for production thereof are disclosed. Graphene includes graphite oxide, graphene oxide ...

411

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drilling activity completely ceased. Of these, 65 bores account for about 95 percent of the total fluid

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Attrition Resistant Catalyst Materials for Fluid Bed ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Attrition Resistant Catalyst Materials for Fluid Bed Applications National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Contact NREL About This ...

413

Ultrasonic fluid densitometer for process control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses at least one pair of transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within a material wedge. A temperature sensor is provided to monitor the temperature of the wedge material. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface and comparing a transducer voltage and wedge material temperature to a tabulation as a function of density.

Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States) Evans (Charles) and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Average Soil Water Retention Curves Measured by Neutron Radiography  

SciTech Connect

Water retention curves are essential for understanding the hydrologic behavior of partially-saturated porous media and modeling flow transport processes within the vadose zone. In this paper we report direct measurements of the main drying and wetting branches of the average water retention function obtained using 2-dimensional neutron radiography. Flint sand columns were saturated with water and then drained under quasi-equilibrium conditions using a hanging water column setup. Digital images (2048 x 2048 pixels) of the transmitted flux of neutrons were acquired at each imposed matric potential (~10-15 matric potential values per experiment) at the NCNR BT-2 neutron imaging beam line. Volumetric water contents were calculated on a pixel by pixel basis using Beer-Lambert s law after taking into account beam hardening and geometric corrections. To remove scattering effects at high water contents the volumetric water contents were normalized (to give relative saturations) by dividing the drying and wetting sequences of images by the images obtained at saturation and satiation, respectively. The resulting pixel values were then averaged and combined with information on the imposed basal matric potentials to give average water retention curves. The average relative saturations obtained by neutron radiography showed an approximate one-to-one relationship with the average values measured volumetrically using the hanging water column setup. There were no significant differences (at p < 0.05) between the parameters of the van Genuchten equation fitted to the average neutron radiography data and those estimated from replicated hanging water column data. Our results indicate that neutron imaging is a very effective tool for quantifying the average water retention curve.

Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Horita, Juske [Texas Tech University (TTU); Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Wavelet Turbulence for Fluid Simulation Theodore Kim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the running time. We instead propose an algorithm that generates small-scale fluid de- tail procedurally. We of the key results of Kolmogorov the- ory is that the energy spectrum of a turbulent fluid approaches a five spectra [Perrier et al. 1995], and the sub- stitution is common in fluid dynamics [Farge et al. 1996

California at Santa Barbara, University of

417

Two Fluid Shear-Free Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shear-free composite fluids are constructed from two Letelier rotated unaligned perfect fluids. The component fluid parameters necessary to construct a shear-free composite are investigated. A metric in the Stephani-Barnes solution family and a simple stationary metric are discussed.

J. P. Krisch; E. N. Glass

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

418

Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

Grindley, Thomas (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Method of separating organic contaminants from fluid feedstreams with polyphosphazene membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for separating polar hydrocarbons from a fluid feedstream. The fluid feedstream is flowed across a first surface of a polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane. At least one polar hydrocarbon from the fluid feedstream permeates through the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane to a second opposed surface of the semipermeable membrane. Then the permeated polar hydrocarbon is removed from the second opposed surface of the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane. Outstanding and unexpected separation selectivities on the order of 10,000 were obtained for methylene chloride when a methylene chloride in water feedstream was flowed across the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane in the invented method.

McCaffrey, R.R.; Cummings, D.G.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Evolution of the Geysers (US) - Data From Fluid-Inclusion Microthermometry and Gas Geochemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers, California, is the site of an active hydrothermal system that initially developed between about 1.5 and 2 Ma in response to intrusion of a hypabyssal granitic pluton. Mineralogic and fluid-inclusion data demonstrate that the present vapor-dominated regime evolved from an earlier and more extensive, liquid-dominated hydrothermal system. Circulation of these early fluids produced veins characterized by tourmaline and/or biotite {+-} actinolite {+-} clinopyroxene within the pluton and adjacent biotite-rich hornfels, actinolite {+-} ferroaxinite {+-} epidote, and epidote {+-} chlorite {+-} wairakite within the intermediate parts of the thermal system, and calcite in the outer parts. Potassium feldspar and quartz are present in all assemblages. Maximum pressure-corrected homogenization temperatures and apparent salinities of fluid-inclusions in these veins range from 440 C and 44 weight percent NaCl equivalent within the hornfels (<600 m from the pluton) to 325 C and 5 weight percent NaCl equivalent at approximately 1500 m from the intrusion. We suggest that the shallow, moderate-salinity fluids are crustal waters modified by water-rock interactions and that the high-salinity fluids are magmatic brines. The formation of vapor-dominated conditions is reflected in the abrupt appearance of low salinity (0.0 to 0.4 weight percent NaCl equivalent) fluid inclusions with homogenization temperatures near 265 C. These inclusion fluids are thought to represent steam condensate formed as the liquid-dominated system boiled off.

Moore, J.N.; Hulen, J.B.; Norman, D.I.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Solvent extraction of methane from simulated geopressured-geothermal fluids: sub-pilot test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extraction of methane dissolved in 15 wt % sodium chloride solution at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi has been demonstrated using n-hexadecane as the solvent in a sub-pilot scale extraction column operated in a continuous, countercurrent flow mode. Greater than 90% recovery of methane was obtained with solvent/brine mass flow ratios in the range of .040 to .045. The height of an ideal stage in this experimental Elgin-type spray column is estimated to be 1.5 ft. Application of this process on actual geopressured fluids is technically feasible, and when combined with direct drive injection disposal is economically attractive. Design and operation of a methane saturated-brine supply system to provide simulated geopressured fluid continuously at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi are also described.

Quong, R.; Otsuki, H.H.; Locke, F.E.

1982-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

422

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Previous and current attempts to develop EGS in the U.S., Japan, Europe and Australia have all employed water as a heat transmission fluid. Water has many properties that make it a favorable medium for heat extraction, but it also has serious drawbacks. The use of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) instead of water as heat extraction fluid was suggested by Donald Brown of Los Alamos National Laboratory as a "game changing" alternative that can avoid the problems of aqueous fluids, make heretofore inaccessible energy resources available for human use, and provide ancillary benefits by using and storing CO2.

423

Fall 2011 ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics ENG ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fall 2011 ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics ENG ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics Instructor: M. S. Howe EMA 218 mshowe@bu.edu This course is intended to consolidate your knowledge of fluid mechanics specialized courses on fluid mechanics, acoustics and aeroacoustics. Outline syllabus: Equations of motion

424

A three-dimensional laboratory steam injection model allowing in situ saturation measurements. [Comparing steam injection and steam foam injection with nitrogen and without nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

The CT imaging technique together with temperature and pressure measurements were used to follow the steam propagation during steam and steam foam injection experiments in a three dimensional laboratory steam injection model. The advantages and disadvantages of different geometries were examined to find out which could best represent radial and gravity override flows and also fit the dimensions of the scanning field of the CT scanner. During experiments, steam was injected continuously at a constant rate into the water saturated model and CT scans were taken at six different cross sections of the model. Pressure and temperature data were collected with time at three different levels in the model. During steam injection experiments, the saturations obtained by CT matched well with the temperature data. That is, the steam override as observed by temperature data was also clearly seen on the CT pictures. During the runs where foam was present, the saturation distributions obtained from CT pictures showed a piston like displacement. However, the temperature distributions were di