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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration...

2

Field Sampling Report -Water 2005 SFEI PRISM-Methods Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phase extraction). 2. Collect water samples from five sites for analysis of total chlorpyrifos and total remained in possession of Mr. Salop stored on wet ice / blue ice overnight. April 14, 2005 0730-0845 Mr. Salop stored on wet ice / blue ice overnight. April 15, 2005 0800-1130 Mr. Salop delivered appropriate

3

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

4

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

5

Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Van Soest, Van Soest, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions. The helium isotopic compositions of fluids produced from the Dixie Valley geothermal field range from 0.70 to 0.76 Ra, are among the highest values in the valley, and indicate that _7.5% of the total helium is derived from the mantle. A lack of recent volcanics or other potential sources requires flow

6

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/TUB/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Tuba City, Arizona November 2013 RIN 13085553 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..............................................................7 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist ...........................................................11

7

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

8

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Riverton, Wyoming, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11

9

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sampling at the Sampling at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site September 2013 LMS/SBS/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

10

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Old and New Rifle, Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites August 2013 LMS/RFN/RFO/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Rifle, Colorado August 2013 RIN 13065380 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ........................................................5 Sample Location Map, Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ..........................................................6 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

11

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and October 2013 and October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site ................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

12

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal field, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of steam pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption and desorption runs were made in order to investigate the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were made on the same rock samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there was no direct correlation between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The hysteresis decreased significantly at 250 C. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption, rather than capillary condensation, is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11 Sampling Quality Control Assessment ......................................................................................18

14

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Surface water sampling of hot and cold spring discharges has traditionally

16

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

information documented on the field data sheets? Yes 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? NA Sample chilling was not required....

17

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

field procedures? Yes List any Program Directives or other documents, SOPs, instructions. Work Order Letter dated May 1, 2013. Program Directive SHL 2013 01. 2. Were the sampling...

18

Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Sampling page? For detailed information on Field Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Sampling Add.png Add a new Field Sampling Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G [×] Gas Sampling‎ 3 pages W [×] Water Sampling‎ 2 pages Pages in category "Field Sampling" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. G Gas Sampling R Rock Sampling S Soil Sampling W Water Sampling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Sampling&oldid=689818" Category: Field Techniques

19

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

was not identified at many groundwater locations. 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? Yes 19. Were water levels measured...

20

Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1. Is the SAP the primary document directing field procedures? Yes List any Program Directives or other documents, SOPs, instructions. Work Order letter dated June 28, 2013. 2....

22

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1. Is the SAP the primary document directing field procedures? Yes List any Program Directives or other documents, SOPs, instructions. Work Order letter dated August 22, 2013, and...

23

Definition: Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a...

24

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2003.04.02 - 2003.09.02 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water, and energy varies with climate, soil, and land management, in ways 1) that influence the CO2 flux and planetary boundary layer CO2 concentration in ARM CART and 2) that we can model and predict. This activity repeated portable flux system measurements that we performed in spring 2002, by continuing measurements of the spatial heterogeneity of carbon, water, and energy fluxes in fields surrounding the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF).

25

Definition: Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Water Sampling Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or...

26

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2006.01.01 - 2006.12.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. In an extension of our earlier work on crop systems, we investigated the effects of burning on the cycles of carbon, water, and energy in an example of grazed land of the Southern Great Plains. In collaboration with Dr. Herman Mayeux, of the USDA Grazing

27

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2004.04.15 - 2004.12.15 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. Models predicting fluxes for un-irrigated agriculture were posed with the challenge of characterizing the onset and severity of plant water stress. We conducted a study that quantified the spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations in land

28

Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) Exploration Activity Details Location...

29

Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Water-Gas Sampling (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples) Redirect page Jump to: navigation,...

30

Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water-Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water-Gas Sampling edit Details Activities (21) Areas (18) Regions (1)...

31

Boiling Water Reactor Sampling Summary: 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents boiling water reactor (BWR) sampling practices for key reactor water and feedwater parameters. It includes information on analysis methods, sampling frequencies, and compliance with the recommended sampling frequencies in BWRVIP-190: BWR Vessels and Internals Project, BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines 2008 Revision (EPRI report 1016579).

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

Definition: Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Sampling Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Field Sampling Systematic field sampling is critical for reliable characterize a geothermal resource. Some of the physical and chemical properties of rock samples can be estimated by visual inspection, but accurate determination of these properties requires detailed laboratory analysis. Surface or subsurface fluid sampling is also routinely performed to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a hydrothermal system. Combinations of these sampling techniques have traditionally been used to obtain important information used to determine whether or not a viable power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed at a prospect. Soil sampling is a less commonly used method for exploration of

33

Category:Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

34

Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

35

Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration...

36

Water Sampling At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Heber Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

37

Water Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date...

38

Water Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lualualei Valley Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not...

39

Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Field Sampling Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland (Figure 1. 1). Since World War II activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) (predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center [AEC]). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA -environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in data were collected to model, groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today.

Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry, 1985) Exploration Activity...

42

Water-Gas Samples (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified...

43

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters B. Sparn, L. Earle, D. Christensen, J. Maguire, and E. Wilson National Renewable Energy Laboratory C.E. Hancock Mountain Energy...

44

News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results May 11, 2012 - 3:25pm Addthis News Contact: Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov Laboratory results indicate water from the alternative water supply system is safe for residents to drink The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that residential drinking water testing from an alternative water supply system in Riverton, Wyoming, confirmed the water is safe. Results from ater samples collected on May 3, 2012, show that uranium levels at 0.0001 milligrams per liter, well below the drinking water standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. "We take the issue of potential water contamination very seriously and

45

Water Sampling At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Wood, Water Sampling At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Alvord Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from

46

Water Sampling At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wood, Water Sampling At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Beowawe Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from

47

Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992)...

48

Water Sampling At Little Valley Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Little Valley Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location...

49

Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Rao, Et Al....  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity...

50

Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration...

51

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Naturita UMTRA Project processing site in the spring of 1994. No water sampling was performed during 1993 at either the Naturita processing site (NAT-01) or the Dry Flats disposal site (NAT-12). Results of previous water sampling at the Naturita processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated as a result of uranium processing activities. Baseline ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Dry Flats disposal site. Water sampling activities scheduled for April 1994 include preconstruction sampling of selected monitor wells at the processing site, surface water sampling of the San Miguel River, sampling of several springs/seeps in the vicinity of the disposal site, and sampling of two monitor wells in Coke Oven Valley. The monitor well locations provide sampling points to characterize ground water quality and flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been updated to reflect constituents related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation. Water sampling will be conducted annually at minimum during the period of construction activities.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1977-1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date 1977 - 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hydrogeologic investigation of Coso hot springs was conducted by field examination of geologic rock units and springs and other features of hydrologic significance and sampling of waters for chemical analysis; determination of the local Coso Hot Springs and regional groundwater hydrology, including consideration of recharge, discharge, movement, and water quality; determination of the possible impact of large-scale

53

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface remedial action will be completed at the Grand Junction processing site during the summer of 1994. Results of 1993 water sampling indicate that ground water flow conditions and ground water quality at the processing site have remained relatively constant with time. Uranium concentrations in ground water continue to exceed the maximum concentration limits, providing the best indication of the extent of contaminated ground water. Evaluation of surface water quality of the Colorado River indicate no impact from uranium processing activities. No compliance monitoring at the Cheney disposal site has been proposed because ground water in the Dakota Sandstone (uppermost aquifer) is classified as limited-use (Class 111) and because the disposal cell is hydrogeologically isolated from the uppermost aquifer. The following water sampling and water level monitoring activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (i) Semiannual (early summer and late fall) sampling of six existing monitor wells at the former Grand Junction processing site. Analytical results from this sampling will be used to continue characterizing hydrogeochemical trends in background ground water quality and in the contaminated ground water area resulting from source term (tailings) removal. (ii) Water level monitoring of approximately three proposed monitor wells projected to be installed in the alluvium at the processing site in September 1994. Data loggers will be installed in these wells, and water levels will be electronically monitored six times a day. These long-term, continuous ground water level data will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site. Water level and water quality data eventually will be used in future ground water modeling to establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Grand Junction processing site. Modeling results will be used to help demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the Mascot home, an abandoned property that was extensively renovated. Several efficiency upgrades were integrated into this home, of particular interest, a unique water heater (a Navien CR240-A). Field monitoring was performed to determine the in-use efficiency of the hybrid condensing water heater. The results were compared to the unit's rated efficiency. This unit is Energy Star qualified and one of the most efficient gas water heaters currently available on the market.

Maguire, J.; Earle, L.; Booten, C.; Hancock, C. E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Surface remedial action will be completed at the Falls City, Texas, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in the spring of 1994. Results of water sampling activity from 1989 to 1993 indicate that ground water contamination occurs primarily in the Deweesville/Conquista aquifer (the uppermost aquifer) and that the contamination migrates along four distinct contaminant plumes. Contaminated ground water from some wells in these regions has significantly elevated levels of aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, sulfate, and uranium. Contamination in the Dilworth aquifer was identified in monitor well 977 and in monitor well 833 at the southern edge of former tailings pile 4. There is no evidence that surface water quality in Tordilla and Scared Dog Creeks is impacted by tailings seepage. The following water sampling activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (1) Ground water sampling from 15 monitor wells to monitor the migration of the four major contaminant plumes within the Deweesville/Conquista aquifer. (2) Ground water sampling from five monitor wells to monitor contaminated and background ground water quality conditions in the Dilworth aquifer. Because of disposal cell construction activities, all plume monitor wells screened in the Dilworth aquifer were abandoned. No surface water locations are proposed for sampling. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the Deweesville/Conquista aquifer downgradient of the disposal cell. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents currently related to uranium processing activities and natural uranium mineralization. Water sampling is normally conducted biannually in late summer and midwinter.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order to evaluate the relationship between these features and structures that control geothermal fluid flow. Notes Water from six hot springs/seeps (out of some 20 seasonal discharges identified, with hot spring temperatures ranging from 39.1-81.6°C and cold seep temperatures between 5-7°C) and playa groundwaters were sampled and

57

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a standard field monitoring protocol for evaluating the installed performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in residential buildings. The report is organized to be consistent with the chronology of field test planning and execution. Research questions are identified first, followed by a discussion of analysis methods, and then the details of measuring the required information are laid out. A field validation of the protocol at a house near the NREL campus is included for reference.

Sparn, B.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.; Wilson, E.; Hancock, E.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Chemical analysis of groundwater from Mokapu was severely restricted by the absence of drilled wells; the only groundwater sources present were five shallow, brackish ponds, Chemical data indicated that all of the ponds consisted of seawater diluted by varying amounts of fresh surface water; no thermal alteration was revealed by the water chemistry (Table 2). Available temperature and water chemistry data on the Koolau caldera area were also assessed as part of the Mokapu study. The results of this analysis (Table

59

UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Lakeview, Oregon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide background, guidance, and justification for water sampling activities for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) processing and disposal sites. This water sampling and analysis plan will form the basis for groundwater sampling and analysis work orders (WSAWO) to be implemented during 1993. Monitoring at the former Lakeview processing site is for characterization purposes and in preparation for the risk assessment, scheduled for the fall of 1993. Compliance monitoring was conducted at the disposal site. Details of the sampling plan are discussed in Section 5.0.

Not Available

1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

60

Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007  

SciTech Connect

This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

T. Haney R. VanHorn

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Abstract There are 1000 thermal springs in Nevada for which a location is known, but for which there are no available temperature (or chemical) measurements. Although many of these sites are within known geothermal areas and are located near springs for which temperature and/or geochemical data are available for one of the springs, many of these sites are not so located and require evaluation before the geothermal potential of the area can be assessed. In order to begin filling in data gaps, water sampling commenced in 2002 when over 70 analyses were obtained from springs with previously

62

Effect of sample conditioning on the water absorption of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the bottom surface of the sample to liquid water and ... of curvature, R is the universal gas constant, and T ... The sand used was natural river sand with a ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Value of Information from Water Sampling in Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bayesian decision framework is used to determine the value of information from water sampling with respect to alternative pollution abatement strategies. The critical low stream flow months of August 1966-77 for a New England river basin are ...

Kevin M. Moore; Bernard J. Morzuch

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into heating,...

65

RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin?, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin? (N,N,N?,N? tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid determination of {sup 210}Po.

Maxwell, S.

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

66

Capacity degradation of field-tested silica gel samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) have begun preliminary studies to quantify the effect of contamination of silica gel used in dehumidification processes of desiccant cooling systems. Sorption capacity degradation of field tested samples was measured, and the source of degradation was quantified using surface analysis experimental methods.

Penney, T.R.; Pesaran, A.A.; Thomas, T.M.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Vapor IOP 2000.09.18 - 2000.10.08 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb Data Availability Yes For data sets, see below. Description Scientific hypothesis: 1. Microwave radiometer (MWR) observations of the 22 GHz water vapor line can accurately constrain the total column amount of water vapor (assuming a calibration accuracy of 0.5 degC or better, which translates into 0.35 mm PWV). 2. Continuous profiling by Raman lidar provides a stable reference for handling sampling problems and observes a fixed column directly above the site only requiring a single height- independent calibration factor. 3. Agreement between the salt-bath calibrated in-situ probes, chilled

68

Water Sampling At Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002) Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two. Our results indicate that

69

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

70

Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) International Geothermal Area, New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

71

Water Sampling At Hot Lake Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Lake Area (Wood, 2002) Hot Lake Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Hot Lake Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Lake Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

72

Water Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mt Rainier Area (Frank, 1995) Water Sampling At Mt Rainier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Rainier Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples collected during field investigations in 1982-1985 (Frank, 1985), whereas

73

Water Sampling At Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Mickey Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from

74

Water Sampling At Umpqua Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Umpqua Hot Springs Area (Wood, Umpqua Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Umpqua Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from

75

Molecular mean field theory for liquid water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attractive bonding interactions between molecules typically have inherent conservation laws which influence the statistical properties of such systems in terms of corresponding sum rules. We considered lattice water as an example and enunciated the consequences of the sum rule through a general computational procedure called "Molecular mean field" theory. Fluctuations about mean field are computed and many of the liquid properties have been deduced and compared with Monte Carlo simulation, molecular dynamics and experimental results. Large correlation lengths are seen to be a consequence of the sum rule in liquid phase. Long range Coulomb interactions are shown to have minor effects on our results.

Jampa Maruthi Pradeep Kanth; Ramesh Anishetty

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

Water Sampling At Kauai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Area (Thomas, 1986) Kauai Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Kauai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kauai Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Groundwater geochemical data compiled for Kauai during the preliminary assessment identified a few very weak water chemistry anomalies, and although these anomalies could be interpreted to be the result of residual heat associated with Kauai's late-stage volcanism, the great age of this activity as well as the absence of any other detectable thermal effects suggests that this is very unlikely. References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

77

Water Sampling At Crane Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Crane Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Crane Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

78

Water Sampling At Mccredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mccredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Mccredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mccredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccredie Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

79

Water Sampling At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

80

Water Sampling At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wood, 2002) Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Breitenbush Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Water Sampling At Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wood, 2002) Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

82

Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation Jeff Maguire, Lieko Earle, and Chuck Booten National Renewable Energy Laboratory C.E. Hancock Mountain Energy Partnership Produced under direction of the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement CRD-05-168 and Task No WR49.3000. Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52234 October 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

83

Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness...

84

Water Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness...

85

Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not...

86

Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not...

87

RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY WATER AND URINE SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2008 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2008. A new rapid column separation method was used for analysis of actinides and {sup 90}Sr the NRIP 2008 emergency water and urine samples. Significant method improvements were applied to reduce analytical times. As a result, much faster analysis times were achieved, less than 3 hours for determination of {sup 90}Sr and 3-4 hours for actinides. This represents a 25%-33% improvement in analysis times from NRIP 2007 and a {approx}100% improvement compared to NRIP 2006 report times. Column flow rates were increased by a factor of two, with no significant adverse impact on the method performance. Larger sample aliquots, shorter count times, faster cerium fluoride microprecipitation and streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation were also employed. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and {sup 90}Sr analyses for NRIP 2008 emergency urine samples. High levels of potential matrix interferences may be present in emergency samples and rugged methods are essential. Extremely high levels of {sup 210}Po were found to have an adverse effect on the uranium results for the NRIP-08 urine samples, while uranium results for NRIP-08 water samples were not affected. This problem, which was not observed for NRIP-06 or NRIP-07 urine samples, was resolved by using an enhanced {sup 210}Po removal step, which will be described.

Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

88

Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC and Water Heater HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research

89

Asotin Creek ISCO Water Sample Data Summary: Water Year 2002, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pomeroy Ranger District operates 3 automated water samplers (ISCOs) in the Asotin Creek drainage in cooperation with the Asotin Model Watershed. The samplers are located on Asotin Creek: Asotin Creek at the mouth, Asotin Creek at Koch site, and South Fork Asotin Creek above the forks. At the end of Water Year (WY) 2001 we decided to sample from Oct. 1 through June 30 of each water year. This decision was based on the difficulty of obtaining good low flow samples, since the shallow depth of water often meant that instrument intakes were on the bed of the river and samples were contaminated with bed sediments. The greatest portion of suspended sediment is transported during the higher flows of fall and especially during the spring snow runoff period, and sampling the shorter season should allow characterization of the sediment load of the river. The ISCO water samplers collected a daily composite sample of 4 samples per day into one bottle at 6-hour intervals until late March when they were reprogrammed to collect 3 samples per day at 8-hour intervals. This was done to reduce battery use since battery failure had become an ongoing problem. The water is picked up on 24-day cycles and brought to the Forest Service Water Lab in Pendleton, OR. The samples are analyzed for total suspended solids (TSS), conductivity, and turbidity. A total dissolved solids value is estimated based on conductivity. The USGS gage, Asotin Creek at the mouth, No.13335050 has been discontinued and there are no discharge records available for this period.

Peterson, Stacia

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This water sampling and analysis plan describes planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Salt Lake City, Utah. This plan identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring of ground water, sediments, and surface waters at monitoring stations on the site.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

> > : , - ' and Precipitation Collected in - Connection with Calibration-Test Flaring of Gas From Test Well, - I August 15-October 13, 197,0,, Project Rulison-8, 197 1 HGS 9 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Federal center, Denver, Colorado 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER SAMPLES FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IN CONNECTION WITH CALIBRATION-TEST FLARING OF GAS FROM TEST WELL, AUGUST.15-OCTDBER 13, 1970 PROJECT RULISON Hans C. Claassen and Paul T. Voegeli, Sr. CONTENTS Page Introduction..................... ................................... 1 Results.

92

Water Sampling At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy range from field mapping and water sampling; detailed mapping, to low angle sun photo interpretations, trenching, to 3-D seismic interpretations and modeling. References Michael Lazaro, Chris Page, Andy Tiedeman, Andrew Sabin, Steve Bjornstad, Steve Alm, David Meade, Jeff Shoffner, Kevin Mitchell, Bob Crowder, Greg Halsey (2010) United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne

93

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface remediation was completed at the former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, in 1990. Residual radioactive materials (contaminated soil and debris) were removed and disposed of at Union Carbide Corporation`s (Umetco) nearby Gas Hills Title 2 facility. Ground water in the surficial and semiconfined aquifers (known collectively as the `uppermost aquifer`) below the former mill and tailings site has been contaminated. No contamination has been detected in the deeper, confined sandstone aquifer. The contaminant plume extends off site to the south and east. The plume is constrained by surface wetlands and small streams to the east and west of the site and by the Little Wind River to the south. Fifteen monitor wells installed in 1993 were sampled to better define the contaminant plume and to provide additional water quality data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples also were collected from domestic wells in response to a request by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in January 1994. No contamination attributable to the former uranium milling operations have ever been detected in any of the domestic wells used for potable supplies.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in Simulated and Field Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Instrument Scientist: Ovidiu Garlea General Structure Analysis System3009-S3015 (2005) #12;Sample Handling 23 Special Thanks to the HFIR sample environment team: Chris

95

Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

97

TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

Atkinson, R.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Evaluation of EPA Region IV Standard Operating Procedures for decontamination of field equipment when sampling for volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination procedures for use at CERCLA sites where the US Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region IV is the lead agency are specified in their Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) document. Under certain circumstances, the objectives of proper decontamination can be obtained without utilizing the full procedure as specified in the SOP. Because some treatment methods may introduce low levels of organic constituents into water (e.g., chlorination), the use of treated potable water would actually have an adverse effect on the decontamination procedure compared to the use of an untreated potable supply. Certified organic-free water, the cost of which ranges from five dollars per gallon to over sixty dollars per gallon may also be unnecessary in some cases. Distilled water samples from seven different suppliers (at a cost of less than a dollar per gallon) were analyzed for Target Compound List (TCL) volatile, organic compounds (VOCs) or benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Fifty of the samples analyzed for BTEX contained no detectable amounts of these compounds, and twenty-six of the samples analyzed for TCL VOCs contained no detectable concentration. The use of solvent rinses may cause false positives during sampling. Field experiments have shown that isopropanol may degrade to acetone under some circumstances. In many cases, particularly when sampling ground water or decontaminating drilling equipment, the elimination of this step should not adversely affect sample quality. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Brice, D.A. (Westinghouse Materials Co. of Ohio, Cincinnati, OH (USA). Feed Materials Production Center); Kelley, M.E. (Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Vapor IOP 1996.09.10 - 1996.09.30 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb For data sets, see below. Summary SCHEDULE This IOP will be conducted from September 10 - 30, 1996 (coincident with the Fall ARM-UAV IOP). Instruments that do not require supervision will be operated continuously during this period. Instruments that do require supervision are presently planned to be operated for 8-hour periods each day. Because it is necessary to cover as broad a range of environmental conditions as possible, the daily 8-hour period will be shifted across the diurnal cycle as deemed appropriate during the IOP (but will be maintained as a contiguous 8-hour block).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Water Vapor Fields Deduced from METEOSAT-1 Water Vapor Channel Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasi-operational process for the determination of water vapor fields from METEPSAT-1 water vapor channel data is described. Each count of the WV picture is replaced by the corresponding mean relative humidity value using both the calibration ...

M. M. Poc; M. Roulleau

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Enhanced Translational Dynamics of Water under Electric Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High resolution quasielastic neutron scattering measurements have been used to study the effects of applied electric field on the dynamics of water molecules confined in the pores of folded silica sheet material FSM-12 with an average pore diameter (apd) of 16 Angstroms. In the absence of field, there is a significant slowing down of the water molecule diffusion as the temperature is lowered, in agreement with previous observations. The application of a moderate electric field of 2.5 kV/mm remarkably enhances the translational diffusion of water molecules. We interpret this as being due to a disruption of the hydrogen bonding by the electric field. This new observation suggests that existing theories valid at large electric field strengths may have to be corrected at moderate fields.

Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Wada, Nobuo [Nagoya University, Japan; Inagaki, S [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs. Inc.; Fukushima, Y [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs. Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

An automatic water management system for large-scale rice paddy fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic water management system for large-scale paddy fields has been developed. The purposes of that are to supply the paddy fields with water or drain water from that automatically, to decrease water consumption, and to have a good harvest. To ... Keywords: estimating mean water level, optimal water allocation, paddy field, predict field consumption, prediction of growth stages, water level control

Teruji Sekozawa

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

384 Power plant waste water sampling and analysis plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the 384 Power House Sampling and Analysis Plan. The Plan describes sampling methods, locations, frequency, analytes, and stream descriptions. The effluent streams from 384, were characterized in 1989, in support of the Stream Specific Report (WHC-EP-0342, Addendum 1).

Hagerty, K.J.; Knotek, H.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Water-Gas Samples At International Geothermal Area, Mexico (Norman...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

106

Guidelines for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Water Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers are being installed on coal-fired power plants in response to federal and state air pollution regulations limiting sulfur dioxide emissions. FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous waste stream that contains metals adsorbed from flue gas. At the same time, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is reviewing, and may tighten, water discharge limits on trace metals. Collection of accurate data on the trace metal composition of FGD water discharges is therefore esse...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

107

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site  

SciTech Connect

Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

None

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details...

110

Water Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity...

111

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

112

Water-Gas Samples At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

113

Water-Gas Samples At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Colado...

114

Water-Gas Samples At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Water-Gas Samples At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

115

Water-Gas Samples At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Gabbs...

116

Water-Gas Samples At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass...

117

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

G. L. Schwendiman

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

118

Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A full comparison of these analyses with those of other groundwater from the Twenty-Nine Palms/Joshua/Johnson Valley/Yucca Valley areas may indicate an enhanced mixing component, or it may show that these waters are simply consistent with most other groundwater in the region. Given the apparent gross immaturity of the waters sampled here, it is difficult to even estimate an order of magnitude of a geothermal component to these fluids,

119

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Belfield and Bowman Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in the spring of 1996. Water sampling was conducted in 1993 at both the Belfield processing site and the Bowman processing/disposal site. Results of the sampling at both sites indicate that ground water conditions have remained relatively stable over time. Water sampling activities are not scheduled for 1994 because ground water conditions at the two sites are relatively stable, the 1993 sampling was comprehensive, and surface remediation activities are not scheduled to start until 1996. The next water sampling event is scheduled before the start of remedial activities and will include sampling selected monitor wells at both sites and several domestic wells in the vicinity.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Ground water and oil field waste sites: a study in Vermilion Parish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water samples were obtained from 128 private water wells surrounding eight oil field waste sites in Vermilion Parish. The specimens were analyzed for five heavy metals: barium, arsenic, chromium, lead, and cadmium. Half of the specimens were then analyzed for 16 volatile organic compounds. A blood sample was obtained from healthy adults drinking water from the wells tested for volatile organic compounds and this blood sample was also analyzed for volatile organic compounds. None of the water samples had levels of heavy metals or volatile organic compounds that exceeded the National Primary Drinking Water Standards. Barium levels in excess of 250 parts per billion suggested that styrene, toluene, and chloroform might be present. Blood levels of volatile organic compounds were significantly higher than could be accounted for by water consumption with levels in smokers significantly higher than in nonsmokers. These data suggest that as yet there is no contamination of ground water supplies around these sites. Volatile organic accumulation in humans probably occurs from a respiratory rather than from an oral route.

Rainey, J.M.; Groves, F.D.; DeLeon, I.R.; Joubert, P.E. (LSU School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

122

Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

123

Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

124

Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 300 samples were collected from within and adjacent to the Lake City caldera. All specimens consist of single hand samples, approximately 1 kg in size. Care was taken to avoid oxidized or weathered rocks. Twenty

125

DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY AND FIELD DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization was done over a two day period in June 2011, and confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

Colloidal gold nanoparticle probe-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of chromium ions in water and serum samples  

SciTech Connect

An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using gold nanoparticles coated with monoclonal antibody (McAb) for the detection of chromium ions (Cr) in water and serum samples was developed, optimized, and validated. Gold nanoparticles coated with affinity- purified monoclonal antibodies against isothiocyanobenzyl-EDTA (iEDTA)-chelated Cr3+ were used as the detecting reagent in this completive immunoassay-based one- step test strip. The ICA was investigated to measure chromium speciation in water samples. Chromium standard samples of 0-80 ng/mL in water were determined by the test strips. The results showed that the visual lowest detection limit (LDL) of the test strip was 50.0 ng/mL. A portable colorimetric lateral flow reader was used for the quantification of Cr. The results indicated that the linear range of the ICA with colorimetric detection was 5-80 ng/mL. The ICA was also validated for the detection of chromium ions in serum samples. The test trips showed high stability in that they could be stored at at 37 C for at least 12 weeks without significant loss of activity. The test strip also showed good selectivity for Cr detection with negligible interference from other heavy metals. Because of its low cost and short testing time (within 5 min), the test strip is especially suitable for on-site large- scale screening of Cr-polluted water samples, biomonitoring of Cr exposure, and many other field applications.

Liu, Xi; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Fu, Qiang-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Hui; Lin, Yuehe

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Water Sampling Activity Date 1973 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. Notes One hundred twenty-four of 380 hot springs and wells in the central and southern parts of Idaho were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of

128

Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Water Sampling At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

129

Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling  

SciTech Connect

Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

131

Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring(tm), A.O. Smith Voltex(r), and Stiebel Eltron Accelera(r)300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

Shapiro, C.; Puttagunta, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Detailed chemical and isotopic studies not only help quantify the discharge, but also may provide additional insight to subsurface conditions. For example, CO2-rich groundwaters that are cold and dilute may be a general indicator that a volcano contains a pressurized gas cap. Shallow depths. References William C. Evans, Michael L. Sorey, Andrea C. Cook, B. Mack Kennedy, David L. Shuster, Elizabeth M. Colvard, Lloyd D. White, Mark A. Huebner

133

Repeated Nucleation of a Supercooled Water Sample that Contains Silver Iodide Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been carried out on the kinetics of ice nucleation at constant temperature in a sample of supercooled water containing particles of silver iodide. An automatic apparatus was used to record the various times that elapse before ...

Bernard Vonnegut; Mark Baldwin

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Collection of Water Samples from an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle for Tracer Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact water sampler rated to full ocean depth has been deployed from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to enable oceanographic tracer measurements. Techniques developed to allow the instrument to collect up to 49 samples of sufficient ...

Paul A. Dodd; Martin R. Price; Karen J. Heywood; Miles Pebody

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems Title Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and...

136

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Planned, routine ground water sampling activities for calendar year 1995 to 1997 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Naturita, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, sampling frequency, and specific rationale for each routine monitoring station at the site. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

An Axial-Flow Cyclone for Aircraft-Based Cloud Water Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new aircraft-based cloud water collection system has been developed to provide samples of cloud water for chemical analysis. The collection system makes use of centrifugal separation in an axial-flow cyclone to remove cloud drops from the ...

Derek J. Straub; Jeffrey L. Collett Jr.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Non-invasive Field Measurements of Soil Water Content Using a Pulsed 14 MeV Neutron Generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current techniques of soil water content measurement are invasive and labor-intensive. Here, we demonstrate that an in situ soil carbon (C) analyzer with a multi-elemental analysis capability, developed for studies of terrestrial C sequestration, can be used concurrently to non-invasively measure the water content of large-volume ({approx}0.3 m{sup 3}) soil samples. Our objectives were to investigate the correlations of the hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) signals with water to the changes in the soil water content in laboratory experiments, and in an agricultural field. Implementing prompt gamma neutron activation analyses we showed that in the field, the signal from the H nucleus better indicates the soil water content than does that from the O nucleus. Using a field calibration, we were able to use the H signal to estimate a minimum detectable change of {approx}2% volumetric water in a 0-30 cm depth of soil.

Mitra S.; Wielopolski L.; Omonode, R.; Novak, J.; Frederick, J.; Chan, A.

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References T. E. C. Keith, J. M. Thompson, R. A. Hutchinson, L. D. White (1992) Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Valley_Of_Ten_Thousand_Smokes_Region_Area_(Keith,_Et_Al.,_1992)&oldid=386869" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities

140

Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 192°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Teels_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=388168

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 162°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Rhodes_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=387552"

142

Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Fraser Goff (1995) Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Mt_St_Helens_Area_(Shevenell_%26_Goff,_1995)&oldid=389549" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

143

Water Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, Water Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Studies of groundwater and coastal spring- sources that have identified thermal fluids on the lower East Rift Zone date back to the early part of this century (Guppy, 1906). More recent investigations of temperature and groundwater chemistry were performed for the HGP geoscience program (Macdonald, 1977; McMurtry et al., 1977; Epp and Halunen, 1979). Epp and Halunen (1979) identified several warm water wells, one having a temperature in excess of 90degrees C, and coastal springs in lower Puna; temperature profiles obtained by this study indicated that in some

144

Using Absolute Humidity and Radiochemical Analyses of Water Vapor Samples to Correct Underestimated Atmospheric Tritium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) emits a wide variety of radioactive air contaminants. An extensive ambient air monitoring network, known as AIRNET, is operated on-site and in surrounding communities to estimate radioactive doses to the public. As part of this monitoring network, water vapor is sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These water vapor samples are collected every two weeks by absorbing the water vapor in the sampled air with silica gel and then radiochemically analyzing the water for tritium. The data have consistently indicated that LANL emissions cause a small, but measurable impact on local concentrations of tritium. In early 1998, while trying to independently verify the presumed 100% water vapor collection efficiency, the author found that this efficiency was normally lower and reached a minimum of 10 to 20% in the middle of summer. This inefficient collection was discovered by comparing absolute humidity (g/m{sup 3}) calculated from relative humidity and temperature to the amount of water vapor collected by the silica gel per cubic meter of air sampled. Subsequent experiments confirmed that the elevated temperature inside the louvered housing was high enough to reduce the capacity of the silica gel by more than half. In addition, their experiments also demonstrated that, even under optimal conditions, there is not enough silica gel present in the sampling canister to absorb all of the moisture during the higher humidity periods. However, there is a solution to this problem. Ambient tritium concentrations have been recalculated by using the absolute humidity values and the tritium analyses. These recalculated tritium concentrations were two to three times higher than previously reported. Future tritium concentrations will also be determined in the same manner. Finally, the water vapor collection process will be changed by relocating the sampling canister outside the housing to increase collection efficiency and, therefore, comparability to the true ambient concentrations of tritium.

Eberhart, C.F.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the groundwater sampling and water level monitoring that will be conducted to evaluate contaminations in the Snake River Plain Aquifer entering and leaving the Idaho National Laboratory. The sampling and monitoring locations were selected to meet the data quality objectives detailed in this plan. Data for the Snake River Plain Aquifer obtained under this plan will be evaluated in the Operable Unit 10-08 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study report and will be used to support the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide groundwater model.

M. S. Roddy

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Water Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this paper, we present and evaluate a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3_, SO42_, Cl_, and F_ in rivers draining YNP for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). These solutes were chosen because they are likely derived in part, from the magmatic volatiles CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF (Symonds et al., 2001). Weekly to monthly sampling enables the examination of spatial and temporal patterns

147

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The objective of the study was to expand knowledge of Nevada's geothermal resource potential by providing new geochemical data from springs in less studied geothermal areas and to refine geochemical data from springs for which only incomplete data were available. This work fills in gaps in publicly available geochemical data, thereby enabling comprehensive evaluation of Nevada's geothermal resource potential.

148

Water Sampling At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

149

RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF {sup 228}Ra IN WATER SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in natural water samples has been developed at the SRNL/EBL (Savannah River National Lab/ Environmental Bioassay Laboratory) that can be used for emergency response or routine samples. While gamma spectrometry can be employed with sufficient detection limits to determine {sup 228}Ra in solid samples (via {sup 228}Ac) , radiochemical methods that employ gas flow proportional counting techniques typically provide lower MDA (Minimal Detectable Activity) levels for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in water samples. Most radiochemical methods for {sup 228}Ra collect and purify {sup 228}Ra and allow for {sup 228}Ac daughter ingrowth for ~36 hours. In this new SRNL/EBL approach, {sup 228}Ac is collected and purified from the water sample without waiting to eliminate this delay. The sample preparation requires only about 4 hours so that {sup 228}Ra assay results on water samples can be achieved in 90%), followed by rapid cation exchange removal of calcium. Lead, bismuth, uranium, thorium and protactinium isotopes are also removed by the cation exchange separation. {sup 228}Ac is eluted from the cation resin directly onto a DGA Resin cartridge attached to the bottom of the cation column to purify {sup 228}Ac. DGA Resin also removes lead and bismuth isotopes, along with Sr isotopes and {sup 90}Y. La is used to determine {sup 228}Ac chemical yield via ICP-MS, but {sup 133}Ba can also be used instead if ICP-MS assay is not available. Unlike some older methods, no lead or strontium holdback carriers or continual readjustment of sample pH is required.

Maxwell, S.

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

150

RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF {sup 228}Ra IN WATER SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in natural water samples has been developed at the SRNL/EBL (Savannah River National Lab/ Environmental Bioassay Laboratory) that can be used for emergency response or routine samples. While gamma spectrometry can be employed with sufficient detection limits to determine {sup 228}Ra in solid samples (via {sup 228}Ac) , radiochemical methods that employ gas flow proportional counting techniques typically provide lower MDA (Minimal Detectable Activity) levels for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in water samples. Most radiochemical methods for {sup 228}Ra collect and purify {sup 228}Ra and allow for {sup 228}Ac daughter ingrowth for ~36 hours. In this new SRNL/EBL approach, {sup 228}Ac is collected and purified from the water sample without waiting to eliminate this delay. The sample preparation requires only about 4 hours so that {sup 228}Ra assay results on water samples can be achieved in < 6 hours. The method uses a rapid calcium carbonate precipitation enhanced with a small amount of phosphate added to enhance chemical yields (typically >90%), followed by rapid cation exchange removal of calcium. Lead, bismuth, uranium, thorium and protactinium isotopes are also removed by the cation exchange separation. {sup 228}Ac is eluted from the cation resin directly onto a DGA Resin cartridge attached to the bottom of the cation column to purify {sup 228}Ac. DGA Resin also removes lead and bismuth isotopes, along with Sr isotopes and {sup 90}Y. La is used to determine {sup 228}Ac chemical yield via ICP-MS, but {sup 133}Ba can also be used instead if ICP-MS assay is not available. Unlike some older methods, no lead or strontium holdback carriers or continual readjustment of sample pH is required.

Maxwell, S.

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Sampling Considerations for Monitoring Corrosion Products in the Reactor Coolant System in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemistry sampling of the reactor coolant system (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) can provide significant information regarding the health of the primary system. Timely detection of increased corrosion product concentrations will aid in evaluating any risks associated with the onset of an axial offset anomaly, increased shutdown releases, increased out-of-core dose rates, or increased personnel doses. This report provides recommendations for improved RCS sampling.

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

152

Seasonal Variations in the Vertically Integrated Water Vapor Transport Fields over the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal mean fields of precipitable water and the zonal and meridional components of the vertically integrated atmospheric water vapor transport fields are calculated from five years of Southern Hemisphere data (1 September 1973 through 31 ...

David A. Howarth

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Quality control of chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples must meet certain levels of accuracy and reliability to be useful for identifying geochemical processes in hydrothermal systems. Quality control is largely a concern for the analytical laboratory, but the geochemist or reservoir engineer using the chemical data must also be concerned with analytical quality. To test accuracy and reliability of analyses available from laboratories, splits of seven water samples were sent to four stable-isotope laboratories, and splits of five water samples were sent to four chemical laboratories. The analyses of each sample were compared among laboratories, and the differences in analyses were evaluated using criteria developed for this comparison. Isotopic compositions were considered reliable if they deviated from mean values by less than 2{per_thousand}, for hydrogen and by less than 0.15{per_thousand}, for oxygen. Concentrations of each chemical component were considered reliable if they differed from mean values by less than 10%. Chemical analyses were examined for internal consistency by calculating the error in ionic charge balance and the error between ionic charge and electrical conductivity. To be considered internally consistent, chemical analyses must have less than 5% error in charge balance and less than 10% error in conductivity balance. Three isotope laboratories gave consistent compositions of all samples. No chemical laboratory gave consistent analyses of all samples. Recommendations are made that provide the user of isotopic and chemical data with the ability to better evaluate the quality of analyses.

Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Literature review on aerosol-sampling devices for respiratory field studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the first phase of a Respirator Field Performance Factor project for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration/Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a critical review of the literature available on respirator protection studies was completed. Little information was available on experimental conditions, and when the information was available, each study was different in how the aerosol measurements were made and in which parameters were controlled. Under these conditions it is difficult to compare results obtained from different investigators. The literature was also surveyed for characteristics desirable in an aerosol-sampling inlet in order to representatively sample respirable particles. Available ambient aerosol samplers were critically reviewed for their performance characteristics. Recommendations are made to avoid the pitfalls present in many respirator field studies and to help standardize these studies. 57 references, 30 figures, 9 tables.

Sutcliffe, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

Gay, G.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Laser-driven shock experiments in pre-compressed water: Implications for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets  

SciTech Connect

Laser-driven shock compression of pre-compressed water (up to 1 GPa precompression) produces high-pressure, -temperature conditions in the water inducing two optical phenomena: opacity and reflectivity in the initially transparent water. The onset of reflectivity at infrared wavelengths can be interpreted as a semi-conductor to electronic conductor transition in water and is found at pressures above {approx}130 GPa for single-shocked samples pre-compressed to 1 GPa. This electronic conduction provides an additional contribution to the conductivity required for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets like Uranus and Neptune.

Lee, K; Benedetti, L R; Jeanloz, R; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Moon, S J; Mackinnon, A; Henry, E; Koenig, M; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Collins, G W

2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas Samples Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1). References David Norman, Nigel Blarney, Lynne Kurilovitch (2002) New

158

Summary report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir (which is considered part of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir System), and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Results of this study indicated that the levels of contamination in the samples from the Watts Bar and Melton Hill Reservoir sites did not pose a threat to human health. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. Eleven of the sampling sites were selected based on existence of pollutant discharge permits, known locations of hazardous waste sites, and knowledge of past practices. The twelfth sample site was selected as a relatively less contaminated reference site for comparison purposes.

Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

160

Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Adsorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and radiometric geophysical surveys were carried out in conjunction with geologic mapping to test the application of these ground-based techniques to geothermal exploration at three prospects in Nevada by Henkle Jr. et al. in 2005. Mercury soil vapor surveys were not widely used in geothermal exploration in the western US at the time, although the association of mercury vapors with geothermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Excess water production diagnosis in oil fields using ensemble classifiers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In hydrocarbon production, more often than not, oil is produced commingled with water. As long as the water production rate is below the economic level (more)

Rabiei, Minou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Decontaminate Effect of Paddy Field on Waste Water from Fish Pond under Different Residence Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater from aquiculture contains usefu1 nutrients for plant, such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Drainage of the wastewater resulted in eutrophication of water body. The nutrients in wastewater from fish pond was assimilated and utilized by paddy field. ... Keywords: Decontaminate effect, Fishpond, Paddy field, Water cycle, Water quality

Shun-Yao Jiang, Jian-Qiang Zhu, Gu Li, Qi-Xia Wu, Yuan Zhou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) provides the basis for ground water sampling at the Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site during fiscal year 1994. It identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring locations and will be updated annually. The Ambrosia Lake site is in McKinley County, New Mexico, about 40 kilometers (km) (25 miles [mi]) north of Grants, New Mexico, and 1.6 km (1 mi) east of New Mexico Highway 509 (Figure 1.1). The town closest to the tailings pile is San Mateo, about 16 km ( 10 mi) southeast (Figure 1.2). The former mill and tailings pile are in Section 28, and two holding ponds are in Section 33, Township 14 North, Range 9 West. The site is shown on the US Geological Survey (USGS) map (USGS, 1980). The site is approximately 2100 meters (m) (7000 feet [ft]) above sea level.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Field Comparison of the Sampling Efficacy of Two Smear Media: Cotton Fiber and Kraft Paper  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two materials were compared in field tests at the Defense Waste Processing Facility: kraft paper (a strong, brown paper made from wood pulp prepared with a sodium sulfate solution) and cotton fiber. Based on a sampling of forty-six pairs of smears, the cotton fiber smears provide a greater sensitivity. The cotton fiber smears collected an average of forty-four percent more beta activity than the kraft paper smears and twenty-nine percent more alpha activity. Results show a greater sensitivity with cotton fiber over kraft paper at the 95 percent confidence level. Regulatory requirements for smear materials are vague. The data demonstrate that the difference in sensitivity of smear materials could lead to a large difference in reported results that are subsequently used for meeting shipping regulations or evaluating workplace contamination levels.

Hogue, M.G.

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

166

FIELD-DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

Methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of aqueous spent fuel storage basins and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials were developed to assess the corrosion potential of a basin. this assessment can then be used to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to ascertain if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations and assist in evaluating general storage basin operations. The test kit was developed based on the identification of key physical, chemical and microbiological parameters identified using a review of the scientific and basin operations literature. The parameters were used to design bench scale test cells for additional corrosion analyses, and then tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters. The tools were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The sampling kit consisted of a total organic carbon analyzer, an YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

167

Rapid Method for Ra-226 and Ra-228 in Water Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement of radium isotopes in natural waters is important for oceanographic studies and for public health reasons. Ra-226 (1620 year half-life) is one of the most toxic of the long-lived alpha emitters present in the environment due to its long life and its tendency to concentrate in bones, which increases the internal radiation dose of individuals. The analysis of radium-226 and radium-228 in natural waters can be tedious and time-consuming. Different sample preparation methods are often required to prepare Ra-226 and Ra-228 for separate analyses. A rapid method has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory that effectively separates both Ra-226 and Ra-228 (via Ac-228) for assay. This method uses MnO{sub 2} Resin from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) to preconcentrate Ra-226 and Ra-228 rapidly from water samples, along with Ba-133 tracer. DGA Resin{reg_sign} (Eichrom) and Ln-Resin{reg_sign} (Eichrom) are employed in tandem to prepare Ra-226 for assay by alpha spectrometry and to determine Ra-228 via the measurement of Ac-228 by gas proportional counting. After preconcentration, the manganese dioxide is dissolved from the resin and passed through stacked Ln-Resin-DGA Resin cartridges that remove uranium and thorium interferences and retain Ac-228 on DGA Resin. The eluate that passed through this column is evaporated, redissolved in a lower acidity and passed through Ln-Resin again to further remove interferences before performing a barium sulfate microprecipitation. The Ac-228 is stripped from the resin, collected using cerium fluoride microprecipitation and counted by gas proportional counting. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

Maxwell, Sherrod, L. III

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Vapor IOP Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Water Vapor IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb For data sets, see below. Summary The Water Vapor IOP was conducted as a follow-up to a predecessor IOP on water vapor held in September 1996. This IOP relied heavily on both ground-based guest and CART instrumentation and in-situ aircraft and tethered sonde/kite measurements. Primary operational hours were from 6 p.m. Central until at least midnight, with aircraft support normally from about 9 p.m. until midnight when available. However, many daytime measurements were made to support this IOP. The first Water Vapor IOP primarily concentrated on the atmosphere's lowest

169

Hazard surveillance for workplace magnetic fields. 1: Walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient field magnitude; 2: Field characteristics from waveform measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent epidemiologic research has suggested that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) may be associated with leukemia, brain cancer, spontaneous abortions, and Alzheimer`s disease. A walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient ELF-MF levels was developed for use in conducting occupational hazard surveillance. This survey was designed to determine the range of MF levels at different industrial facilities so they could be categorized by MF levels and identified for possible subsequent personal exposure assessments. Industries were selected based on their annual electric power consumption in accordance with the hypothesis that large power consumers would have higher ambient MFs when compared with lower power consumers. Sixty-two facilities within thirteen 2-digit Standard Industrial Classifications (SIC) were selected based on their willingness to participate. A traditional industrial hygiene walkaround survey was conducted to identify MF sources, with a special emphasis on work stations.

Methner, M.M.; Bowman, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM-FIRE Water Vapor Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Order Data Browell, Edward LASE Order Data Gutman, Seth GPS Order Data Richardson, Scott Chilled Mirror Order Data Sachse, G. Water Vapor Order Data Schmidlin, Francis CM Sondes...

171

Area G perimeter surface-soil and single-stage water sampling: Environmental surveillance for fiscal year 95. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

ESH-19 personnel collected soil and single-stage water samples around the perimeter of Area G at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during FY 95 to characterize possible radionuclide movement out of Area G through surface water and entrained sediment runoff. Soil samples were analyzed for tritium, total uranium, isotopic plutonium, americium-241, and cesium-137. The single-stage water samples were analyzed for tritium and plutonium isotopes. All radiochemical data was compared with analogous samples collected during FY 93 and 94 and reported in LA-12986 and LA-13165-PR. Six surface soils were also submitted for metal analyses. These data were included with similar data generated for soil samples collected during FY 94 and compared with metals in background samples collected at the Area G expansion area.

Childs, M.; Conrad, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWater Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations govCampaignsWater Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations 2002.04.01 - 2002.06.30 Lead Scientist : Marvin Wesely For data sets, see below. Description The U.S. DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) is a 3-year feasibility investigation focused on accurately evaluating the water cycle components and using stable isotopes as an effective tool in doing so. The study area is primarily the Whitewater subbasin in the Walnut River Watershed in southeastern Kansas. Two intensive observations periods are planned, this first one in April to June 2002 and a second currently scheduled for December 2002 to February 2003. Observations will be made of precipitation

173

On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device comprising the measurement of local displacements (Hall effect transducers) and suction (High capacity transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content/resistivity calibration curves of an intact natural unsaturated loess from Northern France extracted by block sampling at two depths (1 and 3.3 m) were carefully determined, showing good accuracy and repeatability. The validity of two models giving the resistivity of unsaturated soils with respect to their water content was examined.

Munoz-Castelblanco, Jos; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Cui, Yu-Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure  

SciTech Connect

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

Bill Wilborn, NNSA /NFO; Kathryn Knapp, NNSA /NFO; Irene Farnham, N-I; Sam Marutzky, N-I

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP 2004.03.09 - 2004.04.09 Lead Scientist : Ed Westwater Data Availability http://www.etl.noaa.gov/programs/2004/wviop/data will contain quicklooks of all of the data. For data sets, see below. Summary During the IOP, the Ground-based Scanning Radiometer of NOAA/ETL, and the ARM MicroWave Radiometer and Microwave Profiler, yielded excellent data over a range of conditions. In all, angular-scanned and calibrated radiometric data from 22.345 to 380 GHz were taken. The Precipitable Water Vapor varied about an order of magnitude from 1 to 10 mm, and surface temperatures varied from about -10 to -40 deg. Celcius. Vaisala RS90

176

Observations from the field: Solar domestic hot water installation recommendations  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) was ten years old in 1984. Constant contact has been maintained between the Center and solar businesses selling and installing domestic hot water systems in Florida and throughout the Southern states of the Caribbean. FSEC has thus had the opportunity to visit or discuss thousands of DHW system installations with homeowners and installers. This paper provides an overview of lessons learned and some of the resulting installation recommendations for direct, open-loop domestic hot water systems.

Cromer, C.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

Haszeldine, Stuart

178

Determining an optimal sampling frequency for measuring bulk temporal changes in ground-water quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process, statistical methods are used to determine an optimal sampling and analysis plan. When the DQO decision rule for instituting remedial actions is based on a critical change in water quality, the monitoring program design must ensure that this change can be detected and measured with a specified confidence. Usually the focus is on the change at a single monitoring location and the process is limited to addressing the uncertainty inherent in the analytical methods and the variability at that location. However, new strategies that permit ranking the waste sites and prioritizing remedial activities require the means for assessing overall changes for small regions over time, where both spatial and temporal variability exist and where the uncertainty associated with these variations far exceeds measurement error. Two new methods for assessing these overall changes have been developed and are demonstrated by application to a waste disposal site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These methods incorporate historical data where available and allow the user to either test the statistical significance of a linear trend or of an annual change compared to a baseline year for a group of water quality wells.

Moline, G.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Wright, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2011 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2011 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2011 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2011) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental, LLC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2010 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2010 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2010 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2010 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2010) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD IMPLEMENTATION OF AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR HEADSPACE GAS SAMPLING OF TRANSURANIC WASTE DRUMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast, safe, and cost-effective method for obtaining headspace gas samples has been developed and implemented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A sample port is installed directly into a drum lid using a pneumatic driver, allowing sampling with a side-port needle. Testing has shown that the sample port can be installed with no release of radioactive material. Use of this system at LANL has significantly reduced the time required for sampling, and eliminates the need for many safety precautions previously used. The system has significantly improved productivity and lowered radiation exposure and cost.

Polley, M.; Ankrom, J.; Wickland, T.; Warren, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

Method Evaluation And Field Sample Measurements For The Rate Of Movement Of The Oxidation Front In Saltstone  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to develop and evaluate a series of methods and validate their capability to measure differences in oxidized versus reduced saltstone. Validated methods were then applied to samples cured under field conditions to simulate Performance Assessment (PA) needs for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Four analytical approaches were evaluated using laboratory-cured saltstone samples. These methods were X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), chemical redox indicators, and thin-section leaching methods. XAS and thin-section leaching methods were validated as viable methods for studying oxidation movement in saltstone. Each method used samples that were spiked with chromium (Cr) as a tracer for oxidation of the saltstone. The two methods were subsequently applied to field-cured samples containing chromium to characterize the oxidation state of chromium as a function of distance from the exposed air/cementitious material surface.

Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Kaplan, D. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Stefanko, D. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Spencer, W. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Hatfield, A. [Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Arai, Y. [Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

SURVEY OF LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYON FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION AND RADIOASSAY TESTS RUN ON SEWER-WATER SAMPLES AND WATER AND SOIL SAMPLES TAKEN FROM LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYONS  

SciTech Connect

Chemical sewers and sanitary lines draining the Tech Area, D. P. Site, CMR-12 Laundry, and surrounding residential areas flow into Pueblo and Los Alamos Canyon streams. In order to determine the extent and sources of radioactive contamination in these localities, fluid samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from the ground surrounding the sewer exits, and water and soil samples from selected spots in or near each of the two canyon streams were collected and analyzed for polonium and . plutonium. (W.D.M.)

Kingsley, W.H.; Fox, A.; Tribby, J.F.

1947-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Near-field effects of asteroid impacts in deep water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our previous work has shown that ocean impacts of asteroids below 500 m in diameter do not produce devastating long-distance tsunamis. Nevertheless, a significant portion of the ocean lies close enough to land that near-field effects may prove to be the greatest danger from asteroid impacts in the ocean. Crown splashes and central jets that rise up many kilometres into the atmosphere can produce, upon their collapse, highly non-linear breaking waves that could devastate shorelines within a hundred kilometres of the impact site. We present illustrative calculations, in two and three dimensions, of such impacts for a range of asteroid sizes and impact angles. We find that, as for land impacts, the greatest dangers from oceanic impacts are the short-term near-field, and long-term atmospheric effects.

Gisler, Galen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gittings, Micheal L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Analytical Data Report of Water Samples Collected For I-129 Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This is an analytical data report for samples received from the central plateau contractor. The samples were analyzed for iodine-129.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

Field evaluation of sampling methods for pressurized geothermal liquids, gases, and suspended solids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many different sampling methods were tested and compared for collecting samples for measurement of brine chemistry, gases, and suspended solids from pressurized geothermal systems. The tests were conducted on the 6-2 wellhead and a test loop at the Department of Energy's Geothermal Test Facility at East Mesa, California. The recommended methods for single-phase liquid or single-phase steam (with gases) are presented, together with detailed procedures. The results of testing methods for sampling two phase liquid-steam systems showed significant errors can result. It was recommended that two-phase flowing wells be directed to a full flow separator and the single-phase liquid and single-phase steam sampled separately using the recommended methods.

Shannon, D.W.; Cole, M.W.; DeMonia, D.D.; Divine, J.R.; Jensen, G.A.; Kindle, C.H.; Koski, O.H.; Smith, R.P.; Woodruff, E.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Laboratory and Field Evaluation of Four Heat Pump Water Heater Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water heating represents the second-largest load in residential buildings in the United States, and also a large load in many commercial and industrial buildings. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) continues research on heat pump water heater (HPWH) systems, which provide high-efficiency electric water heating using the heat pump cycle. In this study, four systems, representing both residential and commercial applications, were tested in the laboratory and/or in the field. An A.O. Smith ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

189

Study of Low Temperature Baking Effect on Field Emission on Nb Samples Treated by BEP, EP, and BCP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field emission is still one of the major obstacles facing Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) community for allowing Nb SRF cavities to reach routinely accelerating gradient of 35 MV/m that is required for the international linear collider. Nowadays, the well know low temperature backing at 120 oC for 48 hours is a common procedure used in the SRF community to improve the high field Q slope. However, some cavity production data have showed that the low temperature baking may induce field emission for cavities treated by EP. On the other hand, an earlier study of field emission on Nb flat samples treated by BCP showed an opposite conclusion. In this presentation, the preliminary measurements of Nb flat samples treated by BEP, EP, and BCP via our unique home-made scanning field emission microscope before and after the low temperature baking are reported. Some correlations between surface smoothness and the number of the observed field emitters were found. The observed experimental results can be understood, at least partially, by a simple model that involves the change of the thickness of the pent-oxide layer on Nb surfaces.

Andy Wu, Song Jin, Robert Rimmer, Xiang Yang Lu, K. Zhao, Laura MacIntyre, Robert Ike

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Simulation of water flow and solute transport in free-drainage lysimeters and field soils with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation of water flow and solute transport in free-drainage lysimeters and field soils with heterogeneous structures H. M. ABDOU & M. FLURY Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Center for Multiphase for studying the fate and transport of chemicals in soil. Large-scale field lysimeters are used to assess

Flury, Markus

191

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems Title Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4985E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Lutz, James D., Peter J. Biermayer, and Derek A. King Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Document Number LBNL-4985E Pagination 29 Date Published January 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-4985E Abstract This paper provides an overview of the pilot phase of a field study to determine the feasibility of a method of directly measuring the waste of water and energy caused by current hot water distribution systems (HWDS) in California residences using wireless sensor network technologies. The experience gained in the pilot phase study using wireless sensor networks demonstrates that it is clearly feasible to use this technology for measuring water and gas flows and temperatures.The goal was to demonstrate a method to reliably collect water flow and temperature data from every indoorhot water end use point, at the water heater in one second intervals when water was flowing. The overall success of the pilot phase study indicates that this technique can work. However, the pilot phase study did reveal shortcomings in many areas. The recommendations in this paper address those shortcomings and provide ways to improve the outcomes of any follow-on field study. The project's tasks were to test and evaluate the proposed hardware, installation protocols, data collection, and processing procedures. The techniques developed in this project provide a way to accurately measure temperature and flow of indoor water use events at one second resolution. The technologies used in this pilot phase study are viable for use in a larger field study to determine the energy and water efficiency of hot water distribution systems in California homes. The lessons learned from this experience will improve procedures, programming and wireless sensor network specifications.

192

Dynamics of the fast component of nano-confined water under electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the diffusion of water molecules confined in the pores of folded silica materials (FSM-12 with average pore diameter of $\\sim$ 16 \\AA), measured by means of quasielastic neutron scattering using the cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS). The goal is to investigate the effect of electric field on the previously observed fast component of nano-confined water. The measurements were taken at temperatures between 220 K and 245 K, and at two electric field values, 0 kV/mm and 2 kV/mm. Similar to the recently observed electric field induced enhancement of the slow translational motion of confined water, there is a an equally important impact of the field on the faster diffusion.

S. O. Diallo; E. Mamontov; A. Podlesnyak; G. Ehlers; N. Wada; S. Inagaki; Y. Fukushima

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Dynamics of the fast component of nano-confined water under electric field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the diffusion of water molecules confined in the pores of folded silica materials (FSM-12 with average pore diameter of $\\sim$ 16 \\AA), measured by means of quasielastic neutron scattering using the cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS). The goal is to investigate the effect of electric field on the previously observed fast component of nano-confined water. The measurements were taken at temperatures between 220 K and 245 K, and at two electric field values, 0 kV/mm and 2 kV/mm. Similar to the recently observed electric field induced enhancement of the slow translational motion of confined water, there is a an equally important impact of the field on the faster diffusion.

Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Podlesnyak, Andrey A [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Wada, Nobuo [Nagoya University, Japan; Inagaki, S [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs. Inc.; Fukushima, Y [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs. Inc.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Sampling Requirements for the Surface Wind Field over the Tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moored wind measurements at near-equatorial locations along 110W, 125W, 140W, 170W, and 165E are used to investigate the space-time variability of the tropical Pacific wind field. These measurements complement previous studies that relied on ...

L. J. Mangum; S. P. Hayes; L. D. Stratton

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Sampling and Analytical Plan Guidance for Water Characterization of Coal-Fired Steam Electric Utility Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US EPA recently announced its intentions to conduct a two-year study to determine whether the Steam Electric Categorical Effluent Guidelines should be revised. This report provides sampling plan guidance designed to assist the EPA in developing a sampling program and site-specific sampling plans to characterize a coal-fired facility's wastewater, to include some sampling processes used by EPRI in past coal-fired wastewater characterization studies, and to assist EPA in ensuring data quality during it...

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

Field Monitoring of a Geothermal Heat Pump Water Heater: Unicoi County High School, Erwin, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A geothermal heat pump water heater (HPWH) system -- installed to preheat water entering a 250-gallon gas-fired water heater (GWH) at a Tennessee high school -- reduced water-heating costs by 34 percent per year, compared to the base case GWH system. This report provides results from field monitoring of the geothermal HPWH system, tested in three distinct operating modes for five months. The program goal was to assess the energy and economic benefits of the GWH system with and without the geothermal HPWH...

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Visualizing microbial pollution in Santa Monica Bay with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and through field-testing a rapid, robust, field-portable water detection sensing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hic Information Systems (GIS) and Through Field - testing aEngineering, UCLA Introduction: GIS and rapid detection:water quality characterizi ng GIS is a powerful mapping tool

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Development of a Method for the Detection of Aleutian Mink Disease Virus in Water Samples.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) causes significant loss to the mink industry in Nova Scotia (NS). Contaminated water is a speculated virus source therefore my (more)

Larsen, Sophie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Field sampling and analysis plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This field sampling and analysis (S & A) plan has been developed as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The S & A plan has been written in support of the remedial investigation (RI) plan for WAG 2 (ORNL 1990). WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), White Oak Creek embayment (WOCE) on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment (Fig. 1.1). The WOC system is the surface drainage for the major ORNL WAGs and has been exposed to a diversity of contaminants from operations and waste disposal activities in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 acts as a conduit through which hydrologic fluxes carry contaminants from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This document describes the following: an overview of the RI plan, background information for the WAG 2 system, and objectives of the S & A plan; the scope and implementation of the first 2 years of effort of the S & A plan and includes recent information about contaminants of concern, organization of S & A activities, interactions with other programs, and quality assurance specific to the S & A activities; provides details of the field sampling plans for sediment, surface water, groundwater, and biota, respectively; and describes the sample tracking and records management plan.

Boston, H.L.; Ashwood, T.L.; Borders, D.M.; Chidambariah, V.; Downing, D.J.; Fontaine, T.A.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Miller, D.E.; Moore, G.K.; Suter, G.W.; Tardiff, M.F.; Watts, J.A.; Wickliff, D.S.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Design and testing of a deep sea formation water and temeperature sampling probe for the Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ocean Drilling Program is an international research consortium dedicated to exploring the structure and history of earth beneath the oceans. The program receives funds from the National Science Foundation and 18 member countries. Texas A&M University serves as the science operator, drill ship operator, and Gulf Coast Core Repository. The objective of the program is to learn about the geological makeup of the ocean floor and develop a better understanding of how it was formed. Fluid and temperature samples are one means of determining the chemistry of the formation. In order to obtain quality samples a tool must probe into the formation approximately 18 inches and capture a small volume of fluid and record temperatures. The Ocean Drilling Program has developed two such probes, the IPOD in situ Pore Water Sampling Probe (PWS) and the Water Sample and Temperature Probe (WSTP). These probes return samples at near in situ conditions; however, fluid samples typically encounter a pressure drop as they enter the tool. Samples collected using these probes are suspected of giving questionable results due to possible gas/fluid separation as the sample experiences a pressure drop upon entering the probe. Fluid returned at formation pressure is hoped to give scientist a more accurate picture of the formation conditions and allow comparison between samples returned at formation pressure and those returned under partial pressure. The objective of this project was to design, test, and manufacture a probe that would consistently-return fluid and temperature samples at in situ conditions, The project was broken down into two stages, namely the design stage and the testing and manufacturing stage. The design stage was governed by a regimented design methodology. Steps included in the methodology were 1) Need Analysis, 2) Conceptual Design, 3) Conceptual Design Evaluation, and 4) Embodiment Design. The manufacturing and testing stage of the project consisted of full sample system testing and supervision of the manufacturing process. the result of the design process was a sampling system that combined a back pressure piston and metering valve. Full testing of this sampling system showed the sampling system allowed sampling of formation fluid with minimal pressure drop between the formation and the probe. Favorable results of the sampling system allowed for the development of a new probe tip configuration, as well as, a new modularized electronics section. Machine drawings were generated for all components of the tool. Components were then fabricated by a local machine shop. All components under went quality inspection and were then assembled. Full scale testing at the Ocean Drilling Programs Annex is the next step. If successful, the probe is to undergo sea trials in October of 1995.

Fisseler, Patrick James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies Title Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4830E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Lutz, James D., Renaldi, Alexander B. Lekov, Yining Qin, and Moya Melody Document Number LBNL-4830E Pagination 26 Date Published 05/2011 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This report describes data regarding hot water draw patterns that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory obtained from 10 studies. The report describes our purposes in collecting the data; the ways in which we managed, cleaned, and analyzed the data; and the results of our data analysis. We found that daily hot water use is highly variable both among residences and within the same residence. We also found that the distributions of daily hot water use are not symmetrical normal distributions. Thus we used median, not average, values to characterize typical daily hot water use. This report presents summary information that illustrates the results of our data collection and some initial analysis.

203

Field Sampling Plan for the Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 Remedial Action, Phase IV  

SciTech Connect

This Field Sampling Plan outlines the collection and analysis of samples in support of Phase IV of the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 remedial action. Phase IV addresses the remedial actions to areas with the potential for unexploded ordnance at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. The remedial action consists of removal and disposal of ordnance by high-order detonation, followed by sampling to determine the extent, if any, of soil that might have been contaminated by the detonation activities associated with the disposal of ordnance during the Phase IV activities and explosives during the Phase II activities.

R. Wells

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Volume 2, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

J-Field encompasses about 460 acres at the southern end of the Gunpowder Neck Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of APG (Figure 2.1). Since World War II, the Edgewood Area of APG has been used to develop, manufacture, test, and destroy chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). For the purposes of this project, J-Field has been divided into eight geographic areas or facilities that are designated as areas of concern (AOCs): the Toxic Burning Pits (TBP), the White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP), the Riot Control Burning Pit (RCP), the Robins Point Demolition Ground (RPDG), the Robins Point Tower Site (RPTS), the South Beach Demolition Ground (SBDG), the South Beach Trench (SBT), and the Prototype Building (PB). The scope of this project is to conduct a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and ecological risk assessment to evaluate the impacts of past disposal activities at the J-Field site. Sampling for the RI will be carried out in three stages (I, II, and III) as detailed in the FSP. A phased approach will be used for the J-Field ecological risk assessment (ERA).

Prasad, S.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

206

Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

207

Water-Gas Samples At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

208

Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

209

Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

210

Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

Farhadi, Leila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Evaluation of Liquid Water Measuring Instruments in Cold Clouds Sampled during FIRE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid water measurements from the Rosemount icing detector (RICE), Particle Measuring Systems (PMS) forward scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP), and Johnsonwilliams and King hot-wire probes used on the NCAR King Air aircraft are evaluated for ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Larry M. Miloshevich

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is in McKinley County, New Mexico. As part of UMTRA surface remediation, residual radioactive materials were consolidated on the site in a disposal cell that was completed July 1995. The need for ground water monitoring was evaluated and found not to be necessary beyond the completion of the remedial action because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer is classified as limited use.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Synoptic disturbances found in precipitable water fields north of equatorial Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origin and structure of tropical synoptic scale aphics. precipitable water (PWI anomalies estimated from TOVS satellite observations are analyzed as they propagate eastward across northern Africa during MAM 1988. Previous studies, accomplished by Mackey (1996), determined the location and season for the strongest and most coherent 3 to 8 day filtered PW signal. NCEP/NCAR reanalysis (2.50 resolution) provides data for a use study analysis of seven prominent anomalous PW events during the period. Six case wind field composite analysis is accomplished with both actual winds and reduced shear winds (zonal mean removed at each latitude band). Case study analysis revealed a doppler shifted propagating Rossby Wave (k = 6, c =-5 m/sec) at 500hPa and 250hPa that moved onto the west African coast imbedded within a mean zonal flow of approximately 17 m/sec. The wave then moved east across the continent at approximately 12 m/sec near 20ON. The wave's associated cusp-like feature adverts deep tropical moisture northward, resulting in Mackey's PW anomaly. Analysis of potential vorticity, specific humidity, temperature, and wind field composites at 850hPa, 500hPa and 250hPa fit well within the range of Rossby wave structure. Descriptive statistical analysis established confidence intervals for the composites at two resolutions within the localized grid (20OW to 40oE 00 to 30ON). A sample structure of the anomalies is displayed for each variable found to be statistically significant. The strongest correlation between observed PW and analyzed specific humidity and temperature is observed at 500mb and 250mb. Composite analysis of specific humidity and the appropriate standard deviation field supports this finding. PW amounts much greater than the climate mean state over the Gulf of Guinea are found within the PW anomaly structure, indicating an additional moisture source, possibly convection enhanced by the wave passage. 850mb upward vertical motion is also found to be slightly enhanced due to the anomalous flow associated with the wave passage. An empirical model is provided showing a four stage development of the PW anomalies during the five primary days of their life cycle and days prior.

Patla, Jason Eddy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 1 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN, TENNESSEE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 22, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses. The comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ? 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty. The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties. Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. A comparison of split sample results, using the DER equation, indicates one set with a DER greater than 3. A DER of 3.1 is calculated for gross alpha results from ORAU sample 5198W0003 and NFS sample MCU-310212003. The ORAU result is 0.98 0.30 pCi/L (value 2 sigma) compared to the NFS result of -0.08 0.60 pCi/L. Relatively high DER values are not unexpected for low (e.g., background) analyte concentrations analyzed by separate laboratories, as is the case here. It is noted, however, NFS uncertainties are at least twice the ORAU uncertainties, which contributes to the elevated DER value. Differences in ORAU and NFS minimum detectable activities are even more pronounced. comparison of ORAU and NFS split samples produces reasonably consistent results for low (e.g., background) concentrations.

David A. King, CHP, PMP

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Climatology of Tropospheric Zonal-Mean Water Vapor Fields and Fluxes in Isentropic Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on reanalysis data for the years 19802001 from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-40 data), a climatology of tropospheric zonal-mean water vapor fields and fluxes in isentropic coordinates is presented. In the ...

Tapio Schneider; Karen L. Smith; Paul A. OGorman; Christopher C. Walker

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Autonomous Above-Water Radiance Measurements from an Offshore Platform: A Field Assessment Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An autonomous system for making above-water radiance measurements has been produced by adding a new measurement scenario to a CIMEL CE-318 sun photometer. The new system, called the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Photometer ...

G. Zibordi; S. B. Hooker; J. F. Berthon; D. D'Alimonte

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Extension of Studies with 3M Empore TM and Selentec MAG *SEP SM Technologies for Improved Radionuclide Field Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Technology Center is evaluating new field sampling methodologies to more easily determine concentrations of radionuclides in aqueous systems. One methodology studied makes use of 3M EmporeTM disks. The disks are composed of selective resins embedded in a Teflon support. The disks remove the ion of interest from aqueous solutions when the solution is passed through the disk. The disk can then be counted directly to quantify the isotope of interest. Four types of disks were studied during this work: for the extraction of technetium (two types), cesium, plutonium, and strontium. A sampler has been developed for automated, unattended, in situ use of the EmporeTM disks.

Beals, D.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bibler, J.P.; Brooks, D.A.

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Sample of Very Young Field L Dwarfs and Implications for the Brown Dwarf "Lithium Test" at Early Ages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a large sample of optical spectra of late-type dwarfs, we identify a subset of late-M through L field dwarfs that, because of the presence of low-gravity features in their spectra, are believed to be unusually young. From a combined sample of 303 field L dwarfs, we find observationally that 7.6+/-1.6% are younger than 100 Myr. This percentage is in agreement with theoretical predictions once observing biases are taken into account. We find that these young L dwarfs tend to fall in the southern hemisphere (Dec < 0 deg) and may be previously unrecognized, low-mass members of nearby, young associations like Tucana-Horologium, TW Hydrae, beta Pictoris, and AB Doradus. We use a homogeneously observed sample of roughly one hundred and fifty 6300-10000 Angstrom spectra of L and T dwarfs taken with the Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer at the W. M. Keck Observatory to examine the strength of the 6708-A Li I line as a function of spectral type and further corroborate the trends noted by Kirkpatrick et al. (2000). We use our low-gravity spectra to investigate the strength of the Li I line as a function of age. The data weakly suggest that for early- to mid-L dwarfs the line strength reaches a maximum for a few 100 Myr, whereas for much older (few Gyr) and much younger (<100 Myr) L dwarfs the line is weaker or undetectable. We show that a weakening of lithium at lower gravities is predicted by model atmosphere calculations, an effect partially corroborated by existing observational data. Larger samples containing L dwarfs of well determined ages are needed to further test this empirically. If verified, this result would reinforce the caveat first cited in Kirkpatrick et al. (2006) that the lithium test should be used with caution when attempting to confirm the substellar nature of the youngest brown dwarfs.

J. Davy Kirkpatrick; Kelle L. Cruz; Travis S. Barman; Adam J. Burgasser; Dagny L. Looper; C. G. Tinney; Christopher R. Gelino; Patrick J. Lowrance; James Liebert; John M. Carpenter; Lynne A. Hillenbrand; John R. Stauffer

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

Not Available

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH ,  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for obtaining a flux-limited sample of Ly{alpha} emitters from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data. We show that the multiple GALEX grism images can be converted into a three-dimensional (two spatial axes and one wavelength axis) data cube. The wavelength slices may then be treated as narrowband images and searched for emission-line galaxies. For the GALEX NUV grism data, the method provides a Ly{alpha} flux-limited sample over the redshift range z = 0.67-1.16. We test the method on the Chandra Deep Field South field, where we find 28 Ly{alpha} emitters with faint continuum magnitudes (NUV > 22) that are not present in the GALEX pipeline sample. We measure the completeness by adding artificial emitters and measuring the fraction recovered. We find that we have an 80% completeness above a Ly{alpha} flux of 10{sup -15} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We use the UV spectra and the available X-ray data and optical spectra to estimate the fraction of active galactic nuclei in the selection. We report the first detection of a giant Ly{alpha} blob at z < 1, though we find that these objects are much less common at z = 1 than at z = 3. Finally, we compute limits on the z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} luminosity function and confirm that there is a dramatic evolution in the luminosity function over the redshift range z = 0-1.

Barger, A. J.; Wold, I. G. B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cowie, L. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components of Tankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products: Test Procedures for Water Heaters; Final Rule,"Testing of Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance," DavisInc. , "T-K2 Instantaneous Water Heater Installation Manual

Lutz, Jim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Minimization of Pressurized Water Reactor Radiation Fields through Fuel Deposit Engineering: Deposit Property Evaluation and Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide an initial assessment of the options for modification of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary side corrosion product deposits (crud) to minimize the incorporation of activated crud into out-of-core surfaces, thus reducing the intensity of out-of-core radiation fields. This report summarizes the current knowledge of PWR fuel crud characteristics, including crystallographic structure (crystal habits), and buildup mechanisms. The report also reviews the ...

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

225

Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington. [Measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water logs  

SciTech Connect

Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content. (auth)

Marjaniemi, D.K.; Robins, J.W.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Fabrication of silicon field emission tips for vacuum microelectronics by KOH/Alcohol/Water etching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fabrication of sharp silicon tips for field emission cathodes by KOH/Alcohol/Water (KAW) solution was investigated. The KOH/Alcohol/Water solution was found to work better and easier than the Ethylene-Diamine/Pyrocathechol/Water solution in etching silicon tips. It etched the (100) silicon surface more slowly, but in a more controllable manor. The resulting tips were usually very uniform and pretty sharp in most studies. Actually, there were some systems showing non-uniform etching behavior. However, we were able to demonstrate that the uniformity could be improved by shifting the reaction from mass transfer controlled to chemical kinetics controlled. Such technique could allow us to fabricate uniform silicon cones even in a very primitive apparatus with non-uniform mass transfer. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Hui, W.C.; Hee, E.; Ciarlo, D.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

228

Sampling and analysis of water from Upper Three Runs and its wetlands near Tank 16 and the Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

In April and September 1993, sampling was conducted to characterize the Upper Three Runs (UTR) wetland waters near the Mixed Waste Management Facility to determine if contaminants migrating from MWMF are outcropping into the floodplain wetlands. For the spring sampling event, 37 wetlands and five stream water samples were collected. Thirty-six wetland and six stream water samples were collected for the fall sampling event. Background seepline and stream water samples were also collected for both sampling events. All samples were analyzed for RCRA Appendix IX volatiles, inorganics appearing on the Target Analyte List, tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and gross radiological activity. Most of the analytical data for both the spring and fall sampling events were reported as below method detection limits. The primary exceptions were the routine water quality indicators (e.g., turbidity, alkalinity, total suspended solids, etc.), iron, manganese, and tritium. During the spring, cadmium, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, potassium-40, ruthenium-106, and trichloroethylene were also detected above the MCLs from at least one location. A secondary objective of this project was to identify any UTR wetland water quality impacts resulting from leaks from Tank 16 located at the H-Area Tank Farm.

Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Options for Shielding Tokamak Cooling Water Electrical Components against High Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) Instrumentation and Control (I&C) components of ITER will be located in areas of relatively high magnetic fields. Previous tests on electrical and I&C components have indicated that shielding will be required to protect these components from such magnetic fields. To accomplish this, studies were performed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) in support of the TCWS Design project with the intent of identifying an optimal solution for shielding I&C components. This report presents a summary of these studies and presents design options for providing magnetic shielding to ITER TCWS I&C components and electrical equipment that are susceptible to the magnetic fields present.

Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Michael, Smith [AREVA Federal Services LLC; Kim, Seokho H [ORNL; Charles, Neumeyer [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Thermal and hydraulic analyses of TFTR cooling water system and magnetic field coils  

SciTech Connect

The TFTR toroidal field coils, ohmic heating, hybrid and equilibrium field coils are cooled by water from the machine area cooling water system. The system has the following major equipment and capacities: flow rate of 3600 gpm; ballast tank volume of 5500 gal; pumps of 70.4 m head; chiller refrigeration rating of 3300 tons and connecting pipe of 45.7 cm I.D. The performance of the closed loop system was analyzed and found to be adequate for the thermal loads. The field coils were analyzed with detailed thermal and hydraulic models, including a simulation of the complete water cooling loop. Under the nominal operating mode of one second of toroidal field flat top time and 300 seconds of pulse cycle time, the maximum temperature for the TF coils is 53/sup 0/C; for the OH coils 46/sup 0/C and for the EF coils 39/sup 0/C, which are well below the coil design limit of 120/sup 0/C. The maximum TF coil coolant temperature is 33/sup 0/C which is below the coolant design limit of 100/sup 0/C. The overall pressure loss of the system is below 6.89 x 10/sup 5/ Pa (100 psi). With the given chiller refrigeration capacity, the TF coils can be operated to yield up to 4 seconds of flat top time. The TF coils can be operated on a steady state basis at up to 20% of the pulsed duty design current rating of 7.32 kA/coil (36.6 kA/conductor).

Lee, A.Y.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study to determine waste of water and energy in residential30 percent. The average waste of energy in the hot water ispaper examines the waste of water and energy associated with

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding the waste of energy and water in residentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in ResidentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Water-equivalent dosimeter array for small-field external beam radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing complexity of dose patterns external beam radiotherapy, there is a great need for new types of dosimeters. We studied the first prototype of a new dosimeter array consisting of water-equivalent plastic scintillating fibers for dose measurement in external beam radiotherapy. We found that this array allows precise, rapid dose evaluation of small photon fields. Starting with a dosimeter system constructed with a single scintillating fiber coupled to a clear optical fiber and read using a charge coupled device camera, we looked at the dosimeter's spatial resolution under small radiation fields and angular dependence. Afterward, we analyzed the camera's light collection to determine the maximum array size that could be built. Finally, we developed a prototype made of ten scintillating fiber detectors to study the behavior and precision of this system in simple dosimetric situations. The scintillation detector showed no measurable angular dependence. Comparison of the scintillation detector and a small-volume ion chamber showed agreement except for 1x1 and 0.5x5.0 cm{sup 2} fields where the output factor measured by the scintillator was higher. The actual field of view of the camera could accept more than 4000 scintillating fiber detectors simultaneously. Evaluation of the dose profile and depth dose curve using a prototype with ten scintillating fiber detectors showed precise, rapid dose evaluation even with placement of more than 75 optical fibers in the field to simulate what would happen in a larger array. We concluded that this scintillating fiber dosimeter array is a valuable tool for dose measurement in external beam radiotherapy. It possesses the qualities necessary to evaluate small and irregular fields with various incident angles such as those encountered in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy.

Archambault, Louis; Beddar, A. Sam; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, 77030 (United States) and Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, 77030 (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec City (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field, Colombia. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to achieve these objectives. The experimental study consisted of injecting reconstituted gas into a cell containing sand and "live" San Francisco oil. Experimental runs were made with injection of (i) the two field gases and their 50-50 mixture, (ii) the two field gases enriched with propane, and (iii) WAG with the two field gases enriched with propane. Produced oil volume, density, and viscosity; and produced gas volume and composition were measured and analyzed. A 1D 7-component compositional simulation model of the laboratory injection cell and its contents was developed. After a satisfactory history-match of the results of a WAG run, the prediction runs were made using the gas that gave the highest oil recovery in the experiments, (5:100 mass ratio of propane:Balcon gas). Oil production results from simulation were obtained for a range of WAG cycles and gas injection rate. The main results of the study may be summarized as follows. For all cases studied, the lowest oil recovery is obtained with injection of San Francisco gas, (60% of original oil-in-place OOIP), and the highest oil recovery (84% OOIP) is obtained with a WAG 7.5-7.5 (cycle of 7.5 minutes water injection followed by 7.5 minutes of gas injection at 872 ml/min). This approximately corresponds to WAG 20-20 in the field (20 days water injection followed by 20 days gas injection at 6.8 MMSCF/D). Results clearly indicate increase in oil recovery with volume of the gas injected. Lastly, of the three injection schemes studied, WAG injection with propane-enriched gas gives the highest oil recovery. This study is based on the one-dimensional displacement of oil. The three-dimensional aspects and other reservoir complexities that adversely affect oil recovery in reality have not been considered. A 3D reservoir simulation study is therefore recommended together with an economic evaluation of the cases before any decision can be made to implement any of the gas or WAG injection schemes.

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sampling Rate and Ozone Interference for Passive Deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure Samplers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of Formaldehyde and Acetaldehyde Investigation of Formaldehyde and Acetaldehyde Sampling Rate and Ozone Interference for Passive Deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure Samplers Nasim A. Mullen, Marion L. Russell, Melissa M. Lunden, Brett C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California, USA August 2013 Funding was provided by the California Energy Commission through Contract 500-09-042, by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building America Program under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Agreement I-PHI-01070; and by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Environments Division through

237

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Natural Gas Analysis LMG-01 NA Gas Chromatography Carbon-14 and Tritium LMG-03 Combustion Liquid Scintillation Counting Data Qualifier Summary None of the analytical results...

238

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

is to be expected as selenium levels are typically elevated in sediments of the Mancos Shale in the area. * Uranium concentrations remain below the MCL of 0.044 mgL in wells 0731...

239

Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

Evans, S.K.

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

Lico, M.S.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Wright, V.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)  

SciTech Connect

There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ nor lab-based spectroscopy yielded even semi-quantitative SOC predictions. There was little SOC variability to explain across the eight fields, and on-the-go VisNIR was not able to capture the subtle SOC variability in these Montana soils. With more variation in soil clay content compared to SOC, both lab and on-the-go VisNIR showed better explanatory power. There are several potential explanations for poor on-the-go predictive accuracy: soil heterogeneity, field moisture, consistent sample presentation, and a difference between the spatial support of on-the-go measurements and soil samples collected for laboratory analyses. Though the current configuration of a commercially available on-the-go VisNIR system allows for rapid field scanning, on-the-go soil processing (i.e. drying, crushing, and sieving) could improve soil carbon predictions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging elemental analysis technology with the potential to provide rapid, accurate and precise analysis of soil constituents, such as carbon, in situ across landscapes. The research team evaluated the accuracy of LIBS for measuring soil profile carbon in field-moist, intact soil cores simulating conditions that might be encountered by a probe-mounted LIBS instrument measuring soil profile carbon in situ. Over the course of three experiments, more than120 intact soil cores from eight north central Montana wheat fields and the Washington State University (WSU) Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA were interrogated with LIBS for rapid total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), and SOC determination. Partial least squares regression models were derived and independently validated at field- and regional scales. Researchers obtained the best LIBS validation predictions for IC followed by TC and SOC. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is fundamentally an elemental analysis technique, yet LIBS PLS2 models appeared to discriminate IC from TC. Regression coefficients from initial models suggested a reliance upon stoichiometric relationships between carbon (247.8 nm) and other elements

Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ nor lab-based spectroscopy yielded even semi-quantitative SOC predictions. There was little SOC variability to explain across the eight fields, and on-the-go VisNIR was not able to capture the subtle SOC variability in these Montana soils. With more variation in soil clay content compared to SOC, both lab and on-the-go VisNIR showed better explanatory power. There are several potential explanations for poor on-the-go predictive accuracy: soil heterogeneity, field moisture, consistent sample presentation, and a difference between the spatial support of on-the-go measurements and soil samples collected for laboratory analyses. Though the current configuration of a commercially available on-the-go VisNIR system allows for rapid field scanning, on-the-go soil processing (i.e. drying, crushing, and sieving) could improve soil carbon predictions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging elemental analysis technology with the potential to provide rapid, accurate and precise analysis of soil constituents, such as carbon, in situ across landscapes. The research team evaluated the accuracy of LIBS for measuring soil profile carbon in field-moist, intact soil cores simulating conditions that might be encountered by a probe-mounted LIBS instrument measuring soil profile carbon in situ. Over the course of three experiments, more than120 intact soil cores from eight north central Montana wheat fields and the Washington State University (WSU) Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA were interrogated with LIBS for rapid total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), and SOC determination. Partial least squares regression models were derived and independently validated at field- and regional scales. Researchers obtained the best LIBS validation predictions for IC followed by TC and SOC. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is fundamentally an elemental analysis technique, yet LIBS PLS2 models appeared to discriminate IC from TC. Regression coefficients from initial models suggested a reliance upon stoichiometric relationships between carbon (247.8 nm) and other elements

Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the shower only. The wasted energy is the difference betweenLBNL-5115E Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Showercalculate the water and energy wasted during shower events

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Numerical simulations of turbulent flow fields caused by spraying of water on large releases of hydrogen fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of water sprays in absorbing HF releases was recently demonstrated in extended laboratory and field tests. In this paper, computer simulations are presented of the Hawk, Nevada Test Site, series of field tests. The model used, HFSPRAY, is a Eulerean/Lagrangian model which simulates the momentum, mass and energy interactions between a water spray and a turbulent plume of HF in air; the model can predict the flow velocities, temperature, water vapor, and HF concentration fields in two-dimensional large- geometries for spraying in any direction, (i.e., down-flow, inclined-down-flow, up-flow, and co-current horizontal flow). The model was validated against recent data on spraying of water on large releases of HF. 17 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Schatz, K.W. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Expert Meeting Report: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploring the Disconnect Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems M. Hoeschele and E. Weitzel Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) May 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

248

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Alba field - middle Eocene deep-water channel in U. K. North Sea  

SciTech Connect

The Alba field is located in the Witch Ground graben between the Fladen Ground spur to the north and the Renee Ridge to the south, entirely in UKCS Block 16/26. In 1985, oil was discovered in the middle Eocene sands of the Horda formation at a depth of 6100 ft subsea. Twelve additional wells, including sidetracks, have been drilled appraise the discovery. This drilling indicates the Alba field is a stratigraphic trap covering an area of 3600 ac. The Alba sands represent a brief interruption in the hemipelagic sedimentation that dominated this part of the Witch Ground graben during the middle Eocene. Sediment was supplied intermittently from a shelf area to the northwest into a deep-water environment. Well correlations, seismic facies analysis, and core analysis indicate that these sands were deposited as part of a constructional channel/levee complex within a mud-rich, shelf-sourced submarine fan system. The cap and the updip and lateral seals to the reservoir are shale. The Alba reservoir is predominantly a homogeneous, fine-grained, unconsolidated sand. The average reservoir porosity is 33% and the average permeability is 2.8 darcys. Oil in place is estimated to be 1.1 billion bbl of 20/degrees/ API crude.

Winter, S.R.; Bretthauer, H.H.; Mattingly, G.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Design, Construction, and Field Testing of a Prototype Mobile Vault Water Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vaults and manholes provide access to underground electric distribution equipment in many areas. These structures can accumulate water through storm water runoff or ground water seepage. The water must be removed before maintenance work can proceed. This report presents results of a project to design, construct, and test a mobile treatment system to manage vault waters.

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water also is used by dishwashers and clothes washers. Hotand water efficient dishwashers and clothes washers. Thepeople clotheswasher dishwasher showers city state bathubs

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Field Evaluation of Wedgewire Screens for Protecting Early Life Stages of Fish at Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wedgewire screens are designed to minimize entrainment and impingement of aquatic organisms at power plant cooling water intake structures (CWIS). This report presents the results of a field study evaluating the effectiveness of cylindrical wedgewire screens for protecting the early life stages (eggs and larvae) of fish at cooling water intakes. The study examines multiple screen design parameters and hydraulic conditions in the Chesapeake Bay with a variety of estuarine species. Information in this repo...

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

A sample of mJy radio sources at 1.4 GHz in the Lynx and Hercules fields - I. Radio imaging, multicolour photometry and spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the goal of identifying high redshift radio galaxies with FRI classification, here are presented high resolution, wide-field radio observations, near infra-red and optical imaging and multi-object spectroscopy of two fields of the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey. These fields, Hercules.1 and Lynx.2, contain a complete sample of 81 radio sources with S(1.4 GHz) > 0.5 mJy within 0.6 square degrees. This sample will form the basis for a study of the population and cosmic evolution of high redshift, low power, FRI radio sources which will be presented in Paper II. Currently, the host galaxy identification fraction is 86% with 11 sources remaining unidentified at a level of r > 25.2 mag (Hercules; 4 sources) or r > 24.4 mag (Lynx; 7 sources) or K > 20 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts have been determined for 49% of the sample and photometric redshift estimates are presented for the remainder of the sample.

Rigby, E E; Best, P N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A sample of mJy radio sources at 1.4 GHz in the Lynx and Hercules fields - I. Radio imaging, multicolour photometry and spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the goal of identifying high redshift radio galaxies with FRI classification, here are presented high resolution, wide-field radio observations, near infra-red and optical imaging and multi-object spectroscopy of two fields of the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey. These fields, Hercules.1 and Lynx.2, contain a complete sample of 81 radio sources with S(1.4 GHz) > 0.5 mJy within 0.6 square degrees. This sample will form the basis for a study of the population and cosmic evolution of high redshift, low power, FRI radio sources which will be presented in Paper II. Currently, the host galaxy identification fraction is 86% with 11 sources remaining unidentified at a level of r > 25.2 mag (Hercules; 4 sources) or r > 24.4 mag (Lynx; 7 sources) or K > 20 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts have been determined for 49% of the sample and photometric redshift estimates are presented for the remainder of the sample.

E. E. Rigby; I. A. Snellen; P. N. Best

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Additional Reserve Recovery Using New Polymer Treatment on High Water Oil Ratio Wells in Alameda Field, Kingman County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Flooding process, like a polymer treatment, as a tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery process can be a very good solution based on the condition of this field and its low cost compared to the drilling of new wells. It is an improved water flooding method in which high molecular-weight (macro-size molecules) and water-soluble polymers are added to the injection water to improve the mobility ratio by enhancing the viscosity of the water and by reducing permeability in invaded zones during the process. In other words, it can improve the sweep efficiency by reducing the water mobility. This polymer treatment can be performed on the same active oil producer well rather than on an injector well in the existence of strong water drive in the formation. Some parameters must be considered before any polymer job is performed such as: formation temperature, permeability, oil gravity and viscosity, location and formation thickness of the well, amount of remaining recoverable oil, fluid levels, well productivity, water oil ratio (WOR) and existence of water drive. This improved oil recovery technique has been used widely and has significant potential to extend reservoir life by increasing the oil production and decreasing the water cut. This new technology has the greatest potential in reservoirs that are moderately heterogeneous, contain moderately viscous oils, and have adverse water-oil mobility ratios. For example, many wells in Kansas's Arbuckle formation had similar treatments and we have seen very effective results. In addition, there were previous polymer treatments conducted by Texaco in Alameda Field on a number of wells throughout the Viola-Simpson formation in the early 70's. Most of the treatments proved to be very successful.

James Spillane

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

257

Method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H (tritium) concentrations of xylem waters and subsurface waters using time series sampling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H concentrations of xylem and subsurface waters using time series sampling, insulating sampling chambers, and combined .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O, .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and .sup.3 H concentration data on transpired water. The method involves collecting water samples transpired from living plants and correcting the measured isotopic compositions of oxygen (.sup.18 O/.sup.16 O) and hydrogen (.sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and/or .sup.3 H concentrations) to account for evaporative isotopic fractionation in the leafy material of the plant.

Smith, Brian (1126 Delaware St., Berkeley, CA 94702); Menchaca, Leticia (1126 Delaware St., Berkeley, CA 94702)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Energy variational analysis of ions in water and channels: Field theory for primitive models of complex ionic fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy variational analysis of ions in water and channels: Field theory for primitive models EnVarA energy variational analysis that combines Hamilton's least action and Rayleigh's dissipation, and ion channels. Flows are driven by a combination of electrical and chemical potentials that depend

Liu, Chun

259

First-Order Structure Function Analysis of Statistical Scale Invariance in the AIRS-Observed Water Vapor Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power-law scale dependence, or scaling, of first-order structure functions of the tropospheric water vapor field between 58S and 58N is investigated using observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Power-law scale dependence ...

Kyle G. Pressel; William D. Collins

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Field study of gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions: Protective Barrier Program Status Reprt - FY 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) are collaborating on a field study of the effects of gravel admixtures on plant growth and soil water storage in protective barriers. Protective barriers are engineered earthern covers designed to prevent water, plants, and animals from contacting buried waste and transporting contaminants to groundwater or the land surface. Some of the proposed designs include gravel admixtures or gravel mulches on the barrier surface to control soil loss by wind and runoff. The purpose of this study is to measure, in a field setting, the influence of surface gravel additions on soil water storage and plant cover. The study plots are located northwest of the Yakima Gate in the McGee Ranch old field. Here we report the status of work completed in FY 1989 on the creation of a data management system, a test of water application uniformity, field calibration of neutron moisture gages, and an analysis of the response of plants to various combinations of gravel admixtures and increased rainfall. 23 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.; Thiede, M.E.; Kemp, C.J.; Cadwell, L.L. Link, S.O.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Choosing and Using Safe Water Technologies: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achieving Safe Water Behaviors in Kenya 2.1 Study DesignWater in Rural Western Kenya: Cluster Randomized Controlled263291. (KARI), Kibos Station Kenya Agricultural Research

Luoto, Jill Emily

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advanced Heat Pump Water Heating Technology: Testing Commercial and Residential Systems in the Laboratory and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) provide electric water heating at a much greater overall efficiency than conventional electric resistance systems. In the residential market, approximately half of all water heaters are electric resistance; these systems can be replaced by HPWHs in most applications with expected savings of 30%60%. In commercial applications, most systems presently use natural gas or another fuel in direct combustion. Emerging HPWH systems are now able to provide water heating ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Green Bank Telescope observations of the water masers of NGC 3079: accretion disk magnetic field and maser scintillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations of the 22 GHz water megamasers in the circumnuclear disk of NGC 3079 obtained with the Green Bank Telescope. The data are analyzed for circular polarization due to the Zeeman-induced splitting of the water maser lines. No circular polarization is detected and we derive a 1 sigma upper limit of 11 mG for the toroidal magnetic field at ~0.64 pc from the central black hole. This is the tightest upper limit for the magnetic field around a black hole to date. We use the magnetic field limit to derive an estimate of the mass accretion onto the central black hole. In addition to the polarimetric results, we present an observation of rapid variability in the maser lines, which we explain as weak interstellar scintillation. From the scintillation parameters, we estimate an intrinsic size of the mostly saturated maser features of ~12 microarcseconds. This is consistent with models assuming a thick, clumpy accretion disk.

W. H. T. Vlemmings; H. E. Bignall; P. J. Diamond

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Report on the analysis of field data relating to the reliability of solar hot water systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utilities are overseeing the installations of thousand of solar hot water (SHW) systems. Utility planners have begun to ask for quantitative measures of the expected lifetimes of these systems so that they can properly forecast their loads. This report, which augments a 2009 reliability analysis effort by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), addresses this need. Additional reliability data have been collected, added to the existing database, and analyzed. The results are presented. Additionally, formal reliability theory is described, including the bathtub curve, which is the most common model to characterize the lifetime reliability character of systems, and for predicting failures in the field. Reliability theory is used to assess the SNL reliability database. This assessment shows that the database is heavily weighted with data that describe the reliability of SHW systems early in their lives, during the warranty period. But it contains few measured data to describe the ends of SHW systems lives. End-of-life data are the most critical ones to define sufficiently the reliability of SHW systems in order to answer the questions that the utilities pose. Several ideas are presented for collecting the required data, including photometric analysis of aerial photographs of installed collectors, statistical and neural network analysis of energy bills from solar homes, and the development of simple algorithms to allow conventional SHW controllers to announce system failures and record the details of the event, similar to how aircraft black box recorders perform. Some information is also presented about public expectations for the longevity of a SHW system, information that is useful in developing reliability goals.

Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Central U.S. Atmospheric Water and Energy Budgets Adjusted for Diurnal Sampling Biases Using Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water and energy budgets of the atmospheric column over the Mississippi River basin are estimated using 18 yr (197693) of twice-daily radiosonde observations, top-of-atmosphere net radiation estimates from the Earth Radiation Budget ...

Hideki Kanamaru; Guido D. Salvucci; Dara Entekhabi

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Expert Meeting Report: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Water heating represents a major residential energy end use, especially in highly efficient homes where space conditioning loads and energy use has been significantly reduced. Future efforts to reduce water heating energy use requires the development of an improved understanding of equipment performance, as well as recognizing system interactions related to the distribution system and the fixture use characteristics. By bringing together a group of water heating experts, we hope to advance the shared knowledge on key water heating performance issues and identify additional data needs that will further this critical research area.

Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

HVAC and water heating system field test experiences at the Tennessee Energy Conservation in Housing (TECH) complex  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TECH complex has been utilized since 1976 as a field test site for several novel and conventional space conditioning and water heating systems. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar space heating systems (hydronic and air), parallel and series solar assisted heat pumps, air-type solar heating with off-peak storage, passive solar heating, two conventional air-to-air heat pumps, an air-to-air heat pump with desuperheater water heater, and horizontal coil and multiple shallow vertical coil ground-coupled heat pumps. System descriptions and test results are presented as well as performance observations.

Baxter, V.D.; McGraw, B.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014  

SciTech Connect

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

none,

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

200-DV-1OU Sediment and Pore Water Analysis and Report for Samples at Borehole C8096  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an analytical data report for sediment samples received at 200-DV-1 OU. On August 30, 2011 sediment samples were received from 200-DV-1 OU Borehole C8096 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Integrated Water Vapor Field and Multiscale Variations over China from GPS Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor plays a key role in the global hydrologic cycle and in climatic change. However, the distribution and variability of water vapor in the troposphere are not understood wellin particular, in China with the complex Tibetan Plateau and ...

Shuanggen Jin; Z. Li; J. Cho

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

HAP sampling at Tidd PFBC  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to sample process streams of the Tidd PFBC plant and to characterize the HAPs associated with those various process streams. The data are comparable to HAP data collected by DOE and EPRI studies at conventional coal-fired utility plants. Twelve sampling locations throughout Tidd PFBC plant were selected to characterize the HAPs in the plant cycle. Sampling was conducted at the input and output of the combustor, before and after the hot gas clean-up (HGCU) and before and after the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Seven solid process streams were sampled including coal and sorbent to the PFBC unit and ash from the PFBC bed and ash collection devices. Service water which is mixed with the coal to make coal paste was the only liquid process stream sampled. The four gas stream samples collected were the inlets and outlets of the HGCU and ESP. Lists are presented for field sampling requirements for gas streams; coal sorbent, and service water; and ash samples. Lists of elements and compounds (inorganic, organic, and radioactive) are also included. The samples have been collected and are being analyzed.

Mudd, M.J.; Dal Porto, P.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The former YS-860 Firing Ranges are located at the eastern end of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant outside the primary facility fence line and west of Scarboro Road within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. A decision has been made by the US Department of Energy to conduct a removal action of lead-contaminated soils at this site as part of early source actions within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. This non-time critical removal action of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the YS-860 Firing Ranges is being conducted as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 action. These actions are consistent with the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. The removal action will focus on the excavation of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the shooting range berms, transportation of the material to a permitted treatment facility for disposal, demolition and land filling of a concrete trench and asphalt pathways at the site, and grading and revegetating of the entire site. This report is the field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges. The field sampling and analysis plan addresses environmental sampling for lead after the removal of lead-contaminated soil from the target berm area. The objective of this sampling plan is to obtain sufficient analytical data to confirm that the removal action excavation has successfully reduced lead levels in soil to below the action level of 1,400 micrograms/g.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Analysis of Data from a Downhole Oil/Water Separator Field Trial in East Texas  

SciTech Connect

Downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology is available to separate oil from produced water at the bottom of an oil well. Produced water can be injected directly to a disposal formation rather than lifting it to the surface, treating it there, and reinjecting it. Because of a lack of detailed performance data on DOWS systems, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided funding to secure DOWS performance data. A large U.S. oil and gas operator offered to share its data with Argonne National Laboratory. This report summarizes data from the DOWS installation in eastern Texas.

Veil, John A.; Layne, Arthur Langhus

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

275

Verification of numerical models for hydrothermal plume water through field measurements at TAG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrothermal vents discharge superheated, mineral rich water into our oceans, thereby providing a habitat for exotic chemosynthetic biological communities. Hydrothermal fluids are convected upwards until they cool and reach ...

Wichers, Sacha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Large Field Erected and Packaged High Temperature Water (HTW) Generators for Coal Firing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the paper is to disseminate information on the energy savings possible with High Temperature Water (HTW) for heating and industrial process application and to provide information on coal fired HTW generator design and availability.

Boushell, C. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Low-Level Water Vapor Fields from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) Split Window Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple physical algorithm is developed which calculates the water vapor content of the lower troposphere from the 11 and 12 ?m (split window) channels on the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) on the Geostationary Operational Environmental ...

Dennis Chesters; Louis W. Uccellini; Wayne D. Robinson

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A novel Monte Carlo algorithm for polarizable force fields: Application to a fluctuating charge model for water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this Monte Carlo algorithm for polarizable force fields, the fluctuating charges are treated as special degrees of freedom subject to a secondary low-temperature thermostat in close analogy to the extended Lagrangian formalism commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations of such systems. The algorithm is applied to Berne{close_quote}s SPC-FQ (simple point charge{endash}fluctuating charge) model for water. The robustness of the algorithm with respect to the temperature of the secondary thermostat and to the fraction of fluctuating-charge moves is investigated. With the new algorithm, the cost of Monte Carlo simulations using fluctuating-charge force fields increases by less than an order of magnitude compared to simulations using the parent fixed-charge force fields. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Martin, M.G.; Chen, B.; Siepmann, J.I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St. SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Field Testing of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Analyzers Measuring Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prevalent methods for making high-accuracy tower-based measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio, notably nondispersive infrared spectroscopy (NDIR), require frequent system calibration and sample drying. Wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down ...

Scott J. Richardson; Natasha L. Miles; Kenneth J. Davis; Eric R. Crosson; Chris W. Rella; Arlyn E. Andrews

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

On the Structure of the Velocity Field over Progressive Mechanically-Generated Water Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of the velocity field over a propagating wave of fixed frequency is examined. The vertical and horizontal velocities were measured in a transformed Eulerian wave-following frame of reference in a wind-wave research facility at ...

Yiannis Alex Papadimitrakis; En Yun Hsu; Robert L. Street

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

282

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

Maerefat, Nicida L. (Sugar Land, TX); Parmeswar, Ravi (Marlton, NJ); Brinkmeyer, Alan D. (Tulsa, OK); Honarpour, Mehdi (Bartlesville, OK)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nondestructive Evaluation: Boiling Water Reactor Bottom Head Drain Line Examination - Field Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes newly developed technology for the examination of the boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel drain line. The technology targets the examination of the elbow and piping section deemed most susceptible to flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) attack. The technology developed includes a remotely operated sensor manipulator and an ultrasound data acquisition system to perform thickness measurements throughout the affected components.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric ice formation induced by particles with complex chemical and physical properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in Los Angeles and Mexico City are presented. Using a vapour controlled cooling system equipped with an optical microscopy, the range of onset conditions for ice nucleation and water uptake by the collected particles was determined as a function of temperature (200{273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) up to water saturation. Three distinctly different types of authentic atmospheric particles were investigated including soot particles associated with organics/inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn containing inorganic particles apportioned to anthropogenic emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption ne structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, signicant differences in water uptake and immersion freezing effciencies of the different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, the particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation effciencies and formed ice at RHice values well below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data show that the chemical composition of these eld{collected particles plays an important role in determining water uptake and immersion freezing. Heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coeffcients, cumulative ice nuclei (IN) spectrum, and IN activated fraction for deposition ice nucleation are derived. The presented ice nucleation data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine particles comprising of various chemical and physical properties exhibit distinctly different ice nucleation effciencies and can serve as effcient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed phase clouds. This indicates a potential link between human activities and cloud formation, and thus climate.

Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias R.; Gilles, Marry K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

Ketelle R.H.

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

ORIGINAL ARTICLE On the origin of oil-field water in the Biyang Depression of China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sources and migration path- ways of oil/gas reservoirs. Such an effort is very useful for exploration Springer-Verlag 2008 Abstract We have surveyed groundwater samples col- lected from oil and gas reservoirs of energy requires more efficient recovery of oil and gas from reservoirs and better understanding of oil

Zhan, Hongbin

287

ANALYZING STAR CLUSTER POPULATIONS WITH STOCHASTIC MODELS: THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 SAMPLE OF CLUSTERS IN M83  

SciTech Connect

The majority of clusters in the universe have masses well below 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. Hence, their integrated fluxes and colors can be affected by the presence or absence of a few bright stars introduced by stochastic sampling of the stellar mass function. Specific methods are being developed to extend the analysis of cluster energy distributions into the low-mass regime. In this paper, we apply such a method to real observations of star clusters, in the nearby spiral galaxy M83. We reassess the ages and masses of a sample of 1242 clusters for which UBVIH{alpha} fluxes were obtained from observations with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Synthetic clusters with known properties are used to characterize the limitations of the method (valid range and resolution in age and mass, method artifacts). The ensemble of color predictions of the discrete cluster models are in good agreement with the distribution of observed colors. We emphasize the important role of the H{alpha} data in the assessment of the fraction of young objects, particularly in breaking the age-extinction degeneracy that hampers an analysis based on UBVI data only. We find the mass distribution of the cluster sample to follow a power law of index -2.1 {+-} 0.2, and the distribution of ages a power law of index -1.0 {+-} 0.2 for log (M/ M{sub Sun }) > 3.5, and ages between 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 9} yr. An extension of our main method, which makes full use of the probability distributions of age and mass obtained for the individual clusters of the sample, is explored. It produces similar power-law slopes and will deserve further investigation. Although the properties derived for individual clusters significantly differ from those obtained with traditional, non-stochastic models in about 30% of the objects, the first-order aspect of the age and mass distributions is similar to those obtained previously for this M83 sample in the range of overlap of the studies. We extend the power-law description to lower masses with better mass and age resolution and without most of the artifacts produced by the classical method.

Fouesneau, Morgan; Lancon, Ariane [Observatoire astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Chandar, Rupali [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Whitmore, Bradley C., E-mail: morgan.fouesneau@astro.u-strasbg.fr [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provided onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 11 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions was conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute partially supported the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. During the course of this project, MTR has sold thirteen commercial units related to the field test technology. Revenue generated from new business is already more than four times the research dollars invested in this process by DOE. The process is ready for broader commercialization and the expectation is to pursue the commercialization plans developed during this project, including collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provides onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 13 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Solar-collector field experimental tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar-collection field subsystem of the solar-powered desalination pilot project located at Yanbu in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has been operated successfully for two years. It has been demonstrated that during a one-year period, the solar-collector field can, on the average, provide about 2500 kWh of thermal energy a day for days with a daily insolation total greater than 4000 Wh/m/sup 2/. This is a yearlong solar-collector field average efficiency of 22.5%. In Yanbu, from October 1, 1985, until September 30, 1986, there were only 21 days (5.8%) when the daily direct-normal insolation was less than the mid-60% to 70% range with a peak output of 51 kW per solar collector. It has also been demonstrated that the Power Kinetics, Inc., square-dish solar collector has a problem due to the fixed aperture (outboard focus) that seriously hurts the performance of the solar collector during the summer months at this latitude. A location at latitudes greater than +-35/degree/ would see greatly improved daylong summer performance. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Zimmerman, J.C.; Al-Abbadi, N.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normally in tight gas sands, water production is not a problem but in such low permeability reservoirs it is difficult to produce gas at commercial flow rates. Since water is more viscous than gas, very little water is normally produced in low permeability reservoirs. The production of large volumes of water from tight gas sands, say 50-100 bbls of water per MMcf of gas constitutes a cause for concern. High water production (>200 bbls of water per MMcf of gas) has been observed in the low permeability Cotton Valley sands in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields of North Louisiana. This research evaluates water production in the above tight gas sands using field data provided by Matador Resource, a member of the Crisman Institute in Texas A&M university. The research is aimed at providing realistic reservoir scenarios of excess water production in tight gas sands. Log analysis, property trends and well production profiles have been used in establishing the different scenarios. The reservoir simulation results and the production trends show a possible water source from faults and fractures connecting the Travis Peak/Smackover sands to the Cotton Valley sands. An improved understanding of the reservoir would help in further field development.

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Subsurface monitoring of reservoir pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and water content at the CAES Field Experiment, Pittsfield, Illinois: system design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This subsurface-instrumentation design has been developed for the first Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) field experiment to be performed in porous media. Energy storage will be accomplished by alternating the injection and withdrawal of compressed air in a confined sandstone aquifer near Pittsfield, Illinois. The overall experiment objective is to characterize the reservoir's geochemical and thermohydraulic response to imposed CAES conditions. Specific experiment objectives require monitoring: air-bubble development; thermal development; cyclic pressure response; reservoir dehydration; and water coning. Supporting these objectives, four parameters will be continuously monitored at depth in the reservoir. They are: temperature; pressure; pore-air relative humidity; and pore-water content. Reservoir temperatures and pressures will range to maximum values approaching 200/sup 0/C and 300 psi, respectively. Both pore-air relative humidity and pore-water content will range from approx. 0 to 100%. This report discusses: instrumentation design; sensor and sensor system calibration; field installation and testing; and instrument-system operation. No comprehensive off-the-shelf instrument package exists to adequately monitor CAES reservoir parameters at depth. The best available sensors were selected and adapted for use under expected ranges of reservoir conditions. The instrumentation design criteria required: suitable sensor accuracy; continuous monitoring capability; redundancy; maximum sensor integrity; contingency planning; and minimum cost-information ratio. Three wells will be instrumented: the injection/withdrawal (I/W) well and the two instrument wells. Sensors will be deployed by wireline suspension in both open and backfilled (with sand) wellbores. The sensors deployed in the I/W well will be retrievable; the instrument-well sensors will not.

Hostetler, D.D.; Childs, S.W.; Phillips, S.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; R. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala

2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

296

Potential effects of maternal contribution on egg and larva population dynamics of striped bass: Integrated individual-based model and directed field sampling  

SciTech Connect

We have used a bioenergetically-driven, individual-based model (IBM) of striped bass as a framework for synthesizing available information on population biology and quantifying, in a relative sense, factors that potentially affect year class success. The IBM has been configured to simulate environmental conditions experienced by several striped bass populations; i.e., in the Potomac River, MD; in Hudson River, NY; in the Santee-Cooper River System, SC, and; in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River System CA. These sites represent extremes in the geographic distribution and thus, environmental variability of striped bass spawning. At each location, data describing the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the spawning population and nursery area are being collected and synthesized by means of a prioritized, directed field sampling program that is organized by the individual-based recruitment model. Here, we employ the striped bass IBM configured for the Potomac River, MD from spawning into the larval period to evaluate the potential for maternal contribution to affect larva survival and growth. Model simulations in which the size distribution and spawning day of females are altered indicate that larva survival is enhanced (3.3-fold increase) when a high fraction of females in the spawning population are large. Larva stage duration also is less ({bar X} = 18.4 d and 22.2 d) when large and small females, respectively, are mothers in simulations. Although inconclusive, these preliminary results for Potomac River striped bass suggest that the effects of female size, timing of spawning nad maternal contribution on recruitment dynamics potentially are important and illustrate our approach to the study of recruitment in striped bass. We hope to use the model, field collections and management alternatives that vary from site to site, in an iterative manner for some time to come. 54 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Cowan, J.H., Jr. (Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Field test of a generic method for the sampling and analysis of halogenated hydrocarbons listed in title III of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990. Report for January 1992-December 1993  

SciTech Connect

To validate a new source test method for EPA use, the performance of the sampling and analytical methodology for the chemicals of interest must be established and demonstrated through field tests at sources similar to those of interest. Validation studies for measuring volatile and semi-volatile halogenated organics were undertaken in two different studies. Repeated sampling runs of the Volatile Organic Sample Train (VOST; SW-846 Sampling Method 0030 with Analytical Method 5041) and Semi-Volatile Organic Sample Train (Semi-VOST; SW-846 Method 0010 with Analytical Method 8270) were collected at two source locations. Quadruple sampling trains were used in each run, with two of the trains being spiked with standards. For the VOST method, the results of the two field studies were consistent with laboratory tests. For the Semi-VOST method, consistent results were obtained in the laboratory study and one of the field tests. At the second field site, the Semi-VOST data were inadequate because of problems encountered in preparation of the samples for analysis.

McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Rice, J.; Merrill, R.G.; Jackson, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration for Ways to Reduce Operating Costs for Small Producers Project: 08123-10 April 30, 2012 Loy Sneary, President Robin Dahlheim, Sales Gulf Coast Green Energy 1801 7th St, Ste 230 Bay City, TX 77414 RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Gulf Coast Green Energy as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO

299

Permeability enhancement due to cold water injection: A Case Study at the Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pressure transient buildup and falloff data from 3 wells at the Los Azufres geothermal field have been evaluated to determine the extent to which cold water infection increases the permeability of the near-bore reservoir formation. Simultaneous analysis of the buildup and falloff data provides estimates of the permeability-thickness of the reservoir, the skin factor of the well, and the degree of permeability enhancement in the region behind the thermal front. Estimates of permeability enhancement range from a factor of 4 to 9, for a temperature change of about 150{degree}C. The permeability enhancement is attributed to thermally induced contraction and stress-cracking of the formation. 9 refs., 18 figs.

Benson, S.M.; Daggett, J.; Ortiz, J.; Iglesias, E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Estimating abundance of killer whales in the nearshore waters of the Gulf of Alaska and Aleutian Islands using line transect sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only for a few populations for which extensive longitudinal data are available, with little quantitative data from more remote regions. Line transect ship surveys were conducted in July and August of 2001-2003 in coastal waters of the western Gulf of Alaska and the Aleutian Islands. Conventional (CDS) and Multiple Covariate Distance Sampling (MCDS) methods were used to estimate abundance of different killer whale ecotypes, which were distinguished based upon morphological and genetic data. Abundance was calculated separately for two datasets that differed in the method by which killer whale group size data were obtained. Initial group size (IGS) data corresponded to estimates of group size at the time of first sighting and post-encounter group size (PEGS) corresponded to estimates made after closely approaching sighted groups. Resident-type (fish-eating) killer whales were more abundant than the transient-type (mammal-eating). Abundance estimates of resident killer whales (991 [95 % CI = 379-2585] [IGS] and 1587 [95 % CI = 608-4140] [PEGS]), were at least four times greater than those of transient killer whales (200 [95 % CI = 81-488] [IGS] and 251 [95 % CI = 97-644] whales [PEGS]). The IGS estimate of abundance is preferred for resident killer whales because the estimate based on PEGS data may show an upward bias. The PEGS estimate of abundance

Alexandre N. Zerbini; Janice M. Waite; John W. Durban; Rick Leduc; Marilyn E. Dahlheim; Paul R. Wade

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

303

Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific recommendations are presented relative to the application of the technique, including ways to mitigate and manage potential sources of error.

He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/MBR system to remove carboxylates and BTEX from produced water in a field trial. Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide a better understanding of each component of the SMZ/VPB and SMZ/MBR process. Laboratory VPB studies were designed to address the issue of influent variability and periodic operation (see DE-FC26-02NT15461). These experiments examined multiple influent loading cycles and variable concentration loadings that simulate air sparging as the regeneration option for the SMZ system. Two pilot studies were conducted at a produced water processing facility near Farmington, New Mexico. The first field test evaluated SMZ adsorption, SMZ regeneration, VPB buffering, and VPB performance, and the second test focused on MBR and SMZ/MBR operation. The design of the field studies were based on the results from the previous field tests and laboratory studies. Both of the biological treatment systems were capable of removing the BTEX constituents in the laboratory and in the field over a range of operating conditions. For the VPB, separation of the BTEX constituents from the saline aqueous phase yielded high removal efficiencies. However, carboxylates remained in the aqueous phase and were not removed in the combined VPB/SMZ system. In contrast, the MBR was capable of directly treating the saline produced water and simultaneously removing the BTEX and carboxylate constituents. The major limitation of the MBR system is the potential for membrane fouling, particularly when the system is treating produced water under field conditions. The combined process was able to effectively pretreat water for reverse osmosis treatment and subsequent downstream reuse options including utilization in power generation facilities. The specific conclusions that can be drawn from this study are summarized.

Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sampling Soil  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as absorbents.

306

Field Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Strobe Lights for Preventing Impingement of Fish at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that the location, design, construction, and capacity of a cooling water intake structure reflect the "best technology available" for minimizing adverse environmental impacts, such as impingement of fish on intake screens. In the Southeast U.S., over 90% of fish impinged on cooling-water intake screens of thermal power stations are threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense) or gizzard shad (D. cepedianum). Much of this impingement occurs in winter coincident with c...

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

C. Champollion Atm. Res. Version 1 14/05/04 GPS Water Vapour Tomography: Preliminary results from the ESCOMPTE Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

obtained with a time windows of 30min intervals and input data evaluation every 15 min. The optimal grid of available measurements. The GPS has proved its capacity to measure the integrated water vapour at zenith water vapour in the line of sight of the GPS satellite. These observations can be used to study the 3D

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

308

Databases and Archives of Air, Soil, Water, Food, Tissue, and Bone Samples for Radioactive Fallout Measurements from the National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Please note that all of the programs discussed here and on pages linked from here have been terminated and the information presented is out of date. The laboratory's name was changed in 2009 to NUSTL from EML. Also, EML is no longer the custodian of the physical sample archives listed in these databases. The samples and databases are maintained at DOE's New Brunswick Laboratory.

309

Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Infrared Spectroscopy and Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics of Liquid Water from Centroid Molecular Dynamics with an Ab Initio-Based Force Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A molecular-level description of the unique properties of hydrogen-bond networks is critical for understanding many fundamental physico-chemical processes in aqueous environments. In this article a novel simulation approach, combining an ab-initio based force field for water with a quantum treatment of the nuclear motion, is applied to investigate hydrogen-bond dynamics in liquid water with a specific focus on the relationship of these dynamics to vibrational spectroscopy. Linear and nonlinear infrared (IR) spectra are calculated for liquid water, HOD in D2O and HOD in H2O and discussed in the context of the results obtained using other approaches that have been employed in studies of water dynamics. A comparison between the calculated spectra and the available experimental data yields an overall good agreement, indicating the accuracy of the present simulation approach in describing the properties of liquid water at ambient conditions. Possible improvements on the representation of the underlying water interactions as well as the treatment of the molecular motion at the quantum-mechanical level are also discussed. This research was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences, US Department of Energy. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy.

Paesani, Francesco; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Voth, Gregory A.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Water Vapor Structure Displacements from Cloud-Free Meteosat Scenes and Their Interpretation for the Wind Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of water vapor (WV) images taken by satellite-borne radiometers has become an essential source of data in modern meteorology. The analysis of structure displacements within sections of WV images is an effective way to get ...

G. Bche; H. Karbstein; A. Kummer; H. Fischer

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Anthrax Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthrax Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs Phillip N. Price, Kristina Hamachi, Jennifer McWilliams, and Michael D. Sohn Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 September 12, 2008 This work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, Homeland Security under the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH1123. Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 1.1 How much sampling is needed to decide if a building is safe? . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Sampling Nomogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 How many characterization samples should be taken? . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 What decontamination method should be used? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Post-decontamination sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.5 What are rules of thumb for cost and effort? . . . . . . . . . . . .

313

Enhanced oil recovery using water as a driving fluid - 10. field applications of surfactant/polymer flooding  

SciTech Connect

Selection of a suitable reservoir, studies required to support a field application, pilot testing, minifield tests and a review of field applications to date are discussed. It is concluded that surfactant/polymer flooding has a greater potential than other chemical flood processes to mobilize and recover waterflood residual oil. However, the process is complex and costly and requires the utmost in technical expertise and economic incentives to be made to work profitably. 9 refs.

Mungan, N.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Optimization of Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Crud Characteristics for Reducing Radiation Fields: Evaluation of BWR Fuel Crud Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel crud formation and its properties are the combined result of many factors, including corrosion product input, zinc addition rates, reactor coolant chemistry, and fuel and core design. Crud deposition may impact fuel performance as well as radiation field generation. Many projects have evaluated changes in fuel crud properties resulting from changing reactor coolant chemistry. However, the desired crud properties for both good fuel performance and mitigation of radiation field source term are ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

Microsoft Word - Appendix C SW Samples.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Results for Surface Water Samples, Analytical Results for Surface Water Samples, January 2000 through April 2011 This page intentionally left blank Upstream -- SW00-01 a _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 04/18/00 07/17/00 10/20/00 04/17/01 07/11/01 10/09/01 04/07/05 10/05/05 04/28/06 10/02/06 04/11/07 10/08/07 04/09/08 g _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity c mg/L -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Alkalinity b mg/L 196 130 263 218 196 98 145 202 228 183 227 186 213

316

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

317

Sampling box  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004-2011) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004-2011) Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004-2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004-2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Groundwater Sampling Activity Date 2004 - 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Collect new water chemistry data on geothermal field Notes From mid-2004 to present, US Geothermal Inc. has collected geochemical data from geothermal and monitoring wells in the field, as well as other shallow wells in the area. An additional sampling program was completed in July 2010 to measure a wider range of trace elements and key water isotopes (δ18O, δD, and 3H (Tritium)) in the field. The data indicate that the

319

Sampling diffusive transition paths  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Field Testing of Behavioral Barriers for Fish Exclusion at Cooling-Water Intake Systems, Ontario Hydro Pickering Nuclear Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on site-specific considerations, behavioral barriers such as sound and lights may be more effective, less expensive, and more environmentally suitable for excluding fish from power plant intakes than physical barriers. Specifically, field tests at Ontario Hydro's Pickering station on Lake Ontario indicated that behavioral barriers excluded alewife, an important prey species in the Great Lakes.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

Michael W. Rose

2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

322

Measuring Total Dissolved Methylmercury: Comparison of a Novel Method With a Standard Method for Extracting and Quantitating Methylmercury in Stream Water Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In most environmental systems, mercury (Hg) occurs in one or more of the following distinct chemical forms: elemental (Hg0), divalent (Hg2+), monomethyl (MMHg), methyl (MeHg), and dimethyl (DMHg). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) standard method of measuring dissolved MMHg uses distillation to extract MeHg from freshwater samples in preparation for Hg speciation analysis by aqueous ethylation and gas chromatography. Recently, a novel method of Hg ...

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

323

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Reservoir characterization of the Upper and Lower Repetto reservoirs of the Santa Clara field-federal waters, offshore California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the characterization of the Upper and Lower Repetto reservoirs of the Santa Clara field, which lies seven miles offshore of Ventura County, California. The approaches that we adopted for this reservoir characterization are based on the analysis of field production data. These reservoir characterization approaches include: The application of the Fetkovich/McCray decline type curve to estimate original oil-in-place, drainage area, flow capacity, and a skin factor for each well. This approach requires converting the field production data for each well to dimensionless decline flowrate, dimensionless rate integral, and dimensionless rate integral-derivative functions. These functions are then simultaneously plotted against dimensionless decline time so that a unique match of these plots can be obtained using the Fetkovich/McCray decline type curve (in this research, data conversion and type curve matching are performed using a software package). The analysis of plots of reciprocal production rate versus material balance time to estimate "movable" or recoverable oil reserves. This new material balance approach is used in conjunction with a semi-analytical method of graphical analysis (pressure drop normalized rate versus cumulative oil production), which also provides estimates of recoverable oil reserves. Together, these plotting techniques provide good estimates of the estimated ultimate recovery for each well. Our approaches for the analysis of field production data allow us to provide recovery factors for each well (using our estimates of original oil-in-place and estimated ultimate recovery). Furthermore, we were able to generate maps of original oil-in-place, estimated ultimate recovery, flow capacity, and permeability for both the Upper and Lower Repetto reservoirs.

Roco, Craig Emmitt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

326

Field and Laboratory Study of a Ground-Coupled Water Source Heat Pump with an Integral Enthalpy Exchange System for Classrooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School classroom space-conditioning equipment in hot and humid climates is often excessively burdened by the requirement to dehumidify incoming air to maintain proper thermal comfort and air quality. To that end, application of new or modified technologies is needed to increase the dehumidification abilities of equipment without compromising energy efficiency or the need for fresh ventilation air. To study the effectiveness of integrated heat pump and enthalpy exchange equipment, a nominal 4-ton water-source heat pump, coupled with a geothermal water loop and incorporating a forced fresh-air enthalpy exchange system was installed in a typical middle school classroom in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This project is a joint effort among Oak Ridge School District, Tennessee Valley Authority, Energy Office of the State of Tennessee, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The retrofit classroom, along with a similar baseline classroom (employing a water source heat pump supplied by a boiler/cooling tower loop), were instrumented with an Internet-based system to control and monitor performance, efficiency, and a variety of air states. Those include classroom air, outdoor air, semi-conditioned fresh air, and supply air. Particular attention was dedicated to the humidity content and the carbon dioxide content of conditioned space (classroom) air and to the intake rate of forced fresh air. This field study builds on a previous laboratory study of a water-source heat pump coupled to an enthalpy recovery system. The laboratory work showed good potential for reducing the moisture load from forced ventilation air. At simulated outdoor conditions of 90F (32.2C) and 90% RH, the enthalpy recovery wheel in the nominal 2-ton system was able to capture and exhaust 9.9 lb of moisture that would otherwise have to be handled solely by the cooling coil.

Domitrovic, R.; Hayzen, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.; Chen, F. C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water Final Scientific Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents, that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic

Joseph R. Bidwell, Ph.D.; Jonathan C. Fisher; Naomi L. Cooper

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Appendix A, Field Sampling Data and Appendix B, Field Reduced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Skip to main content Energy.gov Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Search form Search Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Services Electricity...

330

Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers Title Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde...

331

Geochemistry and petrology of surface samples, six boreholes and brines from the Salton Sea geothermal field: A natural analog of a nuclear waste repository in salt: Report No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cuttings from six wells in the Salton Sea geothermal field, and rocks at outcrop that are correlative in age with those encountered at depth in the wells were analyzed in detail. Mineralogy, petrography, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, instrumental neutron activation analysis, fission track radiography, oxygen and stable carbon isotopic, uranium-thorium series disequilibrium, and fluid inclusion analyses are reported. Where fluids were being produced from wells, brine chemistry as well as stable isotope and uranium-thorium series analyses are reported. Particular attention has been paid to defining zones of fluid-rock interaction in which analyses of coexisting geothermal reservoir brine and hydrothermally altered sediments could be acquired. A wide span of temperatures, from surficial to greater than 300/degree/C, and salinities ranging from relatively dilute ground waters up to brines of 25 wt% total dissolved solids, span a range of environments that might be encountered in a waste repository in salt. Progressive hydrothermal alteration, mineral formation and element mobility are documented in the data presented. 52 refs., 25 figs., 49 tabs.

Not Available

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

Clague, David S. (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, Elizabeth K. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Irvine, CA)

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

333

Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

Clague, David S. (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, Elizabeth K. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Irvine, CA)

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

Micropyrolyzer for chemical analysis of liquid and solid samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micropyrolyzer has applications to pyrolysis, heated chemistry, and thermal desorption from liquid or solid samples. The micropyrolyzer can be fabricated from semiconductor materials and metals using standard integrated circuit technologies. The micropyrolyzer enables very small volume samples of less than 3 microliters and high sample heating rates of greater than 20.degree. C. per millisecond. A portable analyzer for the field analysis of liquid and solid samples can be realized when the micropyrolyzer is combined with a chemical preconcentrator, chemical separator, and chemical detector. Such a portable analyzer can be used in a variety of government and industrial applications, such as non-proliferation monitoring, chemical and biological warfare detection, industrial process control, water and air quality monitoring, and industrial hygiene.

Mowry, Curtis D. (Albuquerque, NM); Morgan, Catherine H. (Ann Arbor, MI); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

336

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

337

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

338

Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR and SNS instruments. It will be available in the near future for SNS sample

339

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD THE NEXT STEP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, the groundwater monitoring activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been very "people intensive." Approximately 1500 wells are sampled each year by field personnel or "samplers." These individuals have been issued pre-printed forms showing information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from 2 official electronic databases: the Hanford Well information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and other personnel posted the collected information onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. A pilot project for automating this extremely tedious process was lauched in 2008. Initially, the automation was focused on water-level measurements. Now, the effort is being extended to automate the meta-data associated with collecting groundwater samples. The project allowed electronic forms produced in the field by samplers to be used in a work flow process where the data is transferred to the database and electronic form is filed in managed records - thus eliminating manually completed forms. Elimating the manual forms and streamlining the data entry not only improved the accuracy of the information recorded, but also enhanced the efficiency and sampling capacity of field office personnel.

CONNELL CW; CONLEY SF; HILDEBRAND RD; CUNNINGHAM DE; R_D_Doug_Hildebrand@rl.gov; DeVon_E_Cunningham@rl.gov

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

SPC/E Water Reference Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SPC/E Water Reference Calculations - Ewald Summation. In ... 5. Sample Configurations of SPC/E Water Molecules. Four ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers Title Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mullen, Nasim A., Marion L. Russell, Melissa M. Lunden, and Brett C. Singer Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 80 Pagination 184-189 Date Published 12/2013 Keywords aldehyde; exposure; indoor air quality; passive sampler; residential Abstract This study investigated formaldehyde and acetaldehyde passive sampling rates and ozone interference for the DNPH-based Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure sampler. Previous studies have shown that ozone interferes with active sampling by this cartridge. Our study included one laboratory and six field experiments conducted in Northern California homes. Passive sampling rates of 1.10 ± 0.09 and 0.86 ± 0.10 mL/min determined for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are lower than previously reported. In a controlled laboratory experiment there were small, statistically insignificant impacts of subsequent ozone exposure on formaldehyde and acetaldehyde mass passively collected on the samplers. This sampler is inexpensive, easy to deploy and to transport by mail, and has a high sampling capacity when used passively; it is suitable for a wide-range of monitoring applications. However, the passive sampling rate remains in question given the internally consistent, but different results obtained in our study and the previous study.

342

BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River Bend Nuclear Power Station, a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant, experienced fuel defects during Cycle 11. The failed fuel pins were identified during the subsequent refueling outage. To assist analysis of the fuel failure root cause, crud flake deposit samples were collected for analyses. Results on the morphology and distribution of chemical elements in four tenacious crud flakes that are associated with the fuel failures are reported in EPRI report 1009733, BWR Fuel Deposit Sample EvaluationRiv...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

Installation Restoration Program. Remedial investigation report. Site 1. Fire Training Area. Volk Field Air National Guard Base, Camp Douglas, Wi. Volume 2. Final remedial investigation report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II of this report contains data tables and field notes of information gathered from the sampling of soils and ground water. Hydrocarbons and aromatic volatile organics are among the contaminants listed.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sample page | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sample page Sample page Jump to: navigation, search This page has been rated 13[1][2] on the scale of awesomness. This page is awesome! The above text is generated by the SampleTemplate. Try editing it and changing the level of awesomeness to see the template react. Hint: It says something different depending on whether or not the page is at least 5 awesome. This page is related to the following topics[3][4]: References Sample pages Help pages Additional Info Name Sample page Awesomeness 13 Topics (raw) References; Sample pages; Help pages; References ↑ Francis C. Monastero. 2002. An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso geothermal field in southern California. GRC Bulletin. . ↑ EPRI. 12/12/2012. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine

345

System for treating produced water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method were used to treat produced water. Field-testing demonstrated the removal of contaminants from produced water from oil and gas wells.

Sullivan, Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Lynn (Austin, TX); Kinney, Kerry (Austin, TX); Bowman, Robert S. (Lemitar, NM); Kwon, Soondong (Kyungbuk, KR)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Fluid Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Water temperature. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling: Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole

347

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Coumbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCHs Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCHs Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Guidelines for sampling and analyzing solutions from aquifer thermal-energy-storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful aquifer storage and retrieval of energy in the form of heated or chilled water require that the engineered system be compatible with the natural ground-water system. The composition of the ground water must be well known to predict and avoid potential problems that heating or cooling the water may create for operation of the plant. This paper presents a set of guidelines for sampling and analyzing solutions from simulated or real groundwater energy storage systems. Sampling guidelines include methods for flushing wells of stagnant water and monitoring selective solution parameters (pH, Eh, temperature or conductivity) as indicators of the efficiency of flushing. Certain unstable groundwater parameters (temperature, pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity) should be measured onsite. It is recommended that alkalinity, sulfide, and ammonia determinations be done within 24 hr of sampling. In addition to these field measurements, samples of the ground water should be filtered, preserved, and stored for laboratory analysis of major cations, anions, trace metals, organic and inorganic carbon and certain redox couples (Fe/sup 2 +//Fe/sup 3 +/ and As/sup 3 +//As/sup 5 +/). The final results of the analysis should be verified by computing the cation-anion balance and comparing measured conductivity with the solution analysis.

Deutsch, W.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Acceptance sampling methods for sample results verification  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes a statistical sampling method for use during the sample results verification portion of the validation of data packages. In particular, this method was derived specifically for the validation of data packages for metals target analyte analysis performed under United States Environmental Protection Agency Contract Laboratory Program protocols, where sample results verification can be quite time consuming. The purpose of such a statistical method is to provide options in addition to the ``all or nothing`` options that currently exist for sample results verification. The proposed method allows the amount of data validated during the sample results verification process to be based on a balance between risks and the cost of inspection.

Jesse, C.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility_Cities Table of the Water TAP Database Field NameWater andWaste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in

Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Magnetometry with entangled atomic samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theory for the estimation of a scalar or a vector magnetic field by its influence on an ensemble of trapped spin polarized atoms. The atoms interact off-resonantly with a continuous laser field, and the measurement of the polarization rotation of the probe light, induced by the dispersive atom-light coupling, leads to spin-squeezing of the atomic sample which enables an estimate of the magnetic field which is more precise than that expected from standard counting statistics. For polarized light and polarized atoms, a description of the non-classical components of the collective spin angular momentum for the atoms and the collective Stokes vectors of the light-field in terms of effective gaussian position and momentum variables is practically exact. The gaussian formalism describes the dynamics of the system very effectively and accounts explicitly for the back-action on the atoms due to measurement and for the estimate of the magnetic field. Multi-component magnetic fields are estimated by the measurement of suitably chosen atomic observables and precision and efficiency is gained by dividing the atomic gas in two or more samples which are entangled by the dispersive atom-light interaction.

Vivi Petersen; Lars Bojer Madsen; Klaus Molmer

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 | Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 Who Should Attend This course is mandatory for: SLAC employees and non-employees who need unescorted access to SSRL or LCLS...

354

Program or Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office : Project Title and 1.0. No.: Location: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Office of Legacy Management Surface Water and Groundwater Sampling Near the Naturita, Colorado Title I Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Processing Site. LM # 09-12 . Naturita, Colorado Proposed Action or Project Description : DOE proposes to sample water from nine different locations in an area near the former Naturita processing site to assess the extent of groundwater contamination and the effectiveness of existing institutional controls . The area under evaluation is located on private property about 3 miles northwest of the town of Naturita . Water samples would be taken from three surface water locations and six groundwater locations. For five of the groundwater sampling locations a Geoprobe rig

355

Comparison of Factors Affecting Water Transfer in a Cultivated Paleotropical Grass (Brachiaria decumbens Stapf) Field and a Neotropical Savanna during the Dry Season of the Orinoco Lowlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partitioning of available energy into sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat exchange was simultaneously measured in a closed Brachiaria field and an open neotropical savanna during the dry season of the Orinoco lowlands. These communities, differing ...

J. J. San Jos; N. Nikonova; R. Bracho

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

NELSEN LA

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised "Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines" to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Groundwater Sampling Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Groundwater_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689261"

359

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689258

360

On Deep-Water Renewals in Indian Arm, British Columbia: Sensitivity to the Production of Turbulent Kinetic Energy Caused by Horizontal Variations in the Flow Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional (i.e., laterally averaged) numerical model of the circulation in Burrard Inlet and Indian Arm near British Columbia, Canada, is used to examine the sensitivity of deep-water renewal events in Indian Arm to the turbulent mixing ...

Michael W. Stacey; S. Pond

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Monitored natural attenuation of manufactured gas plant tar mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water: a 14-year field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site 24 was the subject of a 14-year (5110-day) study of a ground water plume created by the disposal of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar into a shallow sandy aquifer approximately 25 years prior to the study. The ground water plume in 1988 extended from a well-defined source area to a distance of approximately 400 m down gradient. A system of monitoring wells was installed along six transects that ran perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the plume centerline. The MGP tar source was removed from the site in 1991 and a 14-year ground water monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study commenced. The program measured the dissolved mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) periodically over time, which decreased significantly over the 14-year period. Naphthalene decreased to less than 99% of the original dissolved mass, with mass degradation rates of 0.30 per year (half-life 2.3 years). Bulk attenuation rate constants for plume centerline concentrations over time ranged from 0.33 {+-} 0.09 per year (half-life 2.3 {+-} 0.8 years) for toluene and 0.45 {+-} 0.06 per year (half-life 1.6 {+-} 0.2 years) for naphthalene. The hydrogeologic setting at Site 24, having a sandy aquifer, shallow water table, clay confining layer, and aerobic conditions, was ideal for demonstrating MNA. However, these results demonstrate that MNA is a viable remedial strategy for ground water at sites impacted by MAHs and PAHs after the original source is removed, stabilized, or contained.

Neuhauser, E.F.; Ripp, J.A.; Azzolina, N.A.; Madsen, E.L.; Mauro, D.M.; Taylor, T. [Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC, Green Bay, WI (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Water quality and business aspects of sachet-vended water in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial water quality analyses were conducted on 15 samples of factory-produced sachet water and 15 samples of hand-tied sachet water, sold in Tamale, Ghana. The tests included the membrane filtration (MF) test using ...

Okioga, Teshamulwa (Teshamulwa Irene)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Water quality and business aspects of sachet-vended water in Tamale, Ghana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Microbial water quality analyses were conducted on 15 samples of factory-produced sachet water and 15 samples of hand-tied sachet water, sold in Tamale, Ghana. The (more)

Okioga, Teshamulwa (Teshamulwa Irene)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A comparison of microseismicity induced by gel-proppant-and water-injected hydraulic fractures, Carthage Cotton Valley gas field, East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-precision location technique to improve the image resolution of a hydraulic fracture treatment in a tight gas sand, another thick (~ 450-600 m) interval of productive, tight-gas sands interbedded with mudstones (Dutton in the Carthage Cotton Valley gas field of east Texas. Gas is produced from multiple, low-permeability sands

365

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units. Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland: Volume 8  

SciTech Connect

This study`s objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (75 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care.

Schulz, R.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ridky, R.W. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Geology; O`Donnell, E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Field Evaluation of Debris Handling and Sediment Clogging of a 2.0-mm Fine-Mesh Traveling Water Screen at the Hawthorn Power Plant, Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an evaluation of the field performance of a fine-mesh (2.0-mm) traveling water screen (TWS) in a debris- and sediment-laden river. Fine-mesh overlay panels were installed on one intake screen at Kansas City Power and Light's Hawthorn Generating Station on the Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri. Its operation relative to an adjoining coarse-mesh (9.5-mm) screen was evaluated over a nearly 22-month period from December 2009 through August 2011.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

Rain sampling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

368

Quality Reference Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peer-reviewed fats and oils related performance-based control samples for lab quality assurance and quality control. Quality Reference Samples Certified Reference Materials (CRM) aocs certified Certified Reference Materials chemists CRM fat fats lab labo

369

What's In My Water?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

You can learn about the quality of your water by sending a sample to a laboratory for analysis. This publication will help you understand the lab report by explaining the properties, components and contaminants often found in water. It describes the sources of water contaminants, problems that can be caused by those contaminants, suggestions for correcting problems, and the safe levels of each contaminant in water for household use, for irrigation and for livestock.

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Sampling community structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel method, based on concepts from expander graphs, to sample communities in networks. We show that our sampling method, unlike previous techniques, produces subgraphs representative of community structure in the original network. These ... Keywords: clustering, community detection, complex networks, graphs, sampling, social networks

Arun S. Maiya; Tanya Y. Berger-Wolf

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Effect of immiscible liquid contaminants on P-wave transmission through natural aquifer samples  

SciTech Connect

We performed core-scale laboratory experiments to examine the effect of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants on P-wave velocity and attenuation in heterogeneous media. This work is part of a larger project to develop crosswell seismic methods for minimally invasive NAPL detection. The test site is the former DOE Pinellas Plant in Florida, which has known NAPL contamination in the surficial aquifer. Field measurements revealed a zone of anomalously high seismic attenuation, which may be due to lithology and/or contaminants (NAPL or gas phase). Intact core was obtained from the field site, and P-wave transmission was measured by the pulse-transmission technique with a 500 kHz transducer. Two types of samples were tested: a clean fine sand from the upper portion of the surficial aquifer, and clayey-silty sand with shell fragments and phosphate nodules from the lower portion. Either NAPL trichloroethene or toluene was injected into the initially water-saturated sample. Maximum NAPL saturations ranged from 30 to 50% of the pore space. P-wave velocity varied by approximately 4% among the water-saturated samples, while velocities decreased by 5 to 9% in samples at maximum NAPL saturation compared to water-saturated conditions. The clay and silt fraction as well as the larger scatterers in the clayey-silty sands apparently caused greater P-wave attenuation compared to the clean sand. The presence of NAPLs caused a 34 to 54% decrease in amplitudes of the first arrival. The central frequency of the transmitted energy ranged from 85 to 200 kHz, and was sensitive to both grain texture and presence of NAPL. The results are consistent with previous trends observed in homogeneous sand packs. More data will be acquired to interpret P-wave tomograms from crosswell field measurements, determine the cause of high attenuation observed in the field data and evaluate the sensitivity of seismic methods for NAPL detection.

Geller, Jil T.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

ARM - Field Campaign - PGS Validatation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPGS Validatation govCampaignsPGS Validatation Related Campaigns Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2008.01.01, Fischer, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : PGS Validatation 2009.03.01 - 2010.02.28 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description The focus of this project was the prediction of landscape-scale fluxes of CO2, water, and sensible heat that drive variations in carbon cycle and regional climate (e.g., cloud formation and precipitation). Variation in these fluxes, caused by land use, management, and changing climate, requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales.

373

Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Resources Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) If you will be working with any samples or reagents that are significantly toxic, reactive, corrosive, flammable, or otherwise especially hazardous, we may require an approved SOP before you can begin work. Examples: Reagents with an NFPA Rating of 3 or 4 in any category, nanomaterials, heavy metals, pyrophoric materials, water reactive materials. BLANK SOP SSRL BLANK SOP LCLS Ordering Chemicals

374

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines - Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

FANS - Sample Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... result of neutrons with incident energies higher than ... between the sample position and the detector bank. ... 60 to 300 seconds per energy point and ...

376

FANS - Sample Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This is achieved by placing a cadmium shield between the sample position and the detector bank. In order to place the ...

377

Beacon Project - Unpredictable Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... or undetected tampering), with the random number generator used for sampling can lead to erroneous estimates of the percentage of faulty parts. ...

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

378

Decoupled Sampling for Real-Time Graphics Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose decoupled sampling, an approach that decouples shading from visibility sampling in order to enable motion blur and depth-of-field at reduced cost. More generally, it enables extensions of modern real-time graphics ...

Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan

2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Rapid-Sampling Vertical Profiler: An Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of the Rapid-Sampling Vertical Profiler, which was developed for sampling the hydrophysical fields in the upper ocean from a moving vessel, shows that the instrument is useful for near-microscale measurements of temperature and ...

D. R. Caldwell; T. M. Dillon; J. N. Moum

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hubble Space Telescope hot Jupiter Transmission Spectral Survey: detection of water in HAT-P-1b from Wide Field Camera 3 near-infrared spatial scan observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared transmission spectroscopy of the transiting hot-Jupiter HAT-P-1b. We observed one transit with Wide Field Camera 3 using the G141 low-resolution grism to cover the wavelength range 1.087- 1.678 {\\mu}m. These time series observations were taken with the newly available spatial scan mode that increases the duty cycle by nearly a factor of two, thus improving the resulting photometric precision of the data. We measure a planet-to-star radius ratio of Rp/R*=0.11709+/-0.00038 in the white light curve with the centre of transit occurring at 2456114.345+/-0.000133 (JD). We achieve S/N levels per exposure of 1840 (0.061%) at a resolution of {\\Delta\\lambda}=19.2nm (R~70) in the 1.1173 - 1.6549{\\mu}m spectral region, providing the precision necessary to probe the transmission spectrum of the planet at close to the resolution limit of the instrument. We compute the transmission spectrum using both single target and differential photometry with similar results. The resultan...

Wakeford, H R; Deming, D; Gibson, N P; Fortney, J J; Burrows, A S; Ballester, G; Nikolov, N; Aigrain, S; Henry, G; Knutson, H; Etangs, A Lecavelier des; Pont, F; Showman, A P; Vidal-Madjar, A; Zahnle, K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sampling system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Water Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to see the operation than have us explain it. Basically, most treatment plants remove the solid material and use living organisms and chlorine to clean up the water. Steve Sample...

383

2003 CBECS Sample Design  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technical Information > Sample Design Technical Information > Sample Design How the Survey Was Conducted 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Sample Design Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted quadrennially by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The survey is based upon a sample of commercial buildings selected according to the sample design requirements described below. A “building,” as opposed to an “establishment,” is the basic unit of analysis for the CBECS because the building is the energy-consuming unit. The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey conducted since 1979

384

Sample Changes and Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sample and Model Issues Sample and Model Issues Summary Our comprehensive review of the EIA 914 has confirmed that discrepancies can arise between estimates for December of one year and January of the next. These are most evident for Texas estimates between December 2008 and January 2009. Reports now available from HPDI show that production for all the companies we sampled in both 2008 and 2009 rose by about 60 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) in January and that total production in Texas rose by a similar amount. Our estimate was a decrease of 360 MMcf/d. Why the difference? Computationally, EIA-914 estimates depend on two factors: * Reports from the companies in the survey sample * An expansion factor to estimate total production from the sample's reported

385

Biological sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

Murphy, Gloria A. (French Camp, CA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

Sample push out fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

Biernat, John L.

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

387

Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Treaty verification sample analysis program analytical results: UNSCOM 65 samples. Final report, December 1993-January 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nineteen samples from the United Nations Special Commission 65 on Iraq (UNSCOM 65) were analyzed for chemical warfare (CW) related compounds using a variety of highly sophisticated spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. The samples consisted of six water, six soil, two vegetation, one cloth, one wood, and two mortar shell crosscut sections. No sulfur or nitrogen mustards, Lewsite, or any of their degradation products were detected. No nerve agents were observed, and no tin was detected precluding the presence of stannic chloride, a component of NC, a World War I choking agent. Diethyl phosphoric acid was unambiguously identified in three water samples, and ethyl phosphoric acid was tentatively identified, at very low levels, in one water sample. These phosphoric acids are degradation products of Amiton, many commercially available pesticides, as well as Tabun, and impurities in munitions-grade Tabun. No definitive conclusions concerning the source of these two chemicals could be drawn from the analytical results.

Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Bossle, P.C.; Durst, H.D.; Ellzy, M.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

SNS Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment Operations Group SNS Sample Environment Operations Group from left to right: (left to right): Bekki Mills, Mark Loguillo, Saad Elorfi, Randy Sexton, Leland Robbins, Matt Rucker, Cory Fletcher, Todd Sherline, Hans-Jochen Lauter, Ken Kroll The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research

390

HFIR Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Sample Environment HFIR Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to HFIR to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The online Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR instruments. Contact HFIR Team Leader Chris Redmon Resources Sample Environment Equipment Database

391

Purge water management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Purge water management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nutrients are available. Blowdown - the water discharged from a boiler or cooling tower to dispose and explains the procedures the owner/operator intends to take to perform assessment monitoring. Attenuation procedures. Equipotential Line - a line in a two-dimensional ground-water flow field such that the total

Soerens, Thomas

394

Computer Science Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science Sample Occupations COMPUTER OPERATIONS Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager DESIGN & MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING Coder CAD Computer Applications Engineers Computer Research Scientist Computer

Ronquist, Fredrik

395

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS  

SciTech Connect

Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

396

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on July 6 and 7, 2010. Additionally, a water sample was obtained at one well known as the 29-6 Water Hole, several miles west of the Gasbuggy site. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. The one water well sample was analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

Larson, L.L.

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

399

Sampling Characteristics from Isobaric Floats in a Convective Eddy Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the recent Labrador Sea Deep Convection Experiment, numerous isobaric floats were deployed. Interpretation of the quasi-Lagrangian measurements from these floats requires an understanding of any biases that may be introduced by the ...

Sonya Legg; James C. McWilliams

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a 2-week shakedown period. December 2001 to present: One system deployed at base of CF tower. Description To provide validation data for the PGS equipment that has been deployed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Disconnect Switch: laboratory testing and analysis of field aged samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work reported in this technical update is part of an ongoing Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) effort to improve the balance of station equipment life management; this report presents results of investigations of issues, typical problems, and utility maintenance needs concerning substation high-voltage disconnect and grounding switches.This project phase included a needs assessment and research roadmap development to identify and address maintenance and other life ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Inspection/Sampling Schedule | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection/Sampling Schedule Inspection/Sampling Schedule Inspection/Sampling Schedule Site Inspection and Water Sampling Schedules Note: The following schedules are subject to change without prior notice and will be updated periodically. Site Name Inspection Date Sampling Week Ambrosia Lake, NM, Disposal Site August 18, 2014 November 20, 2013 Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site August 18, 2014 November 20, 2013 January 28, 2014 May 12, 2014 Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS), PR, Decommissioned Reactor Site Next event 2017 Burrell, PA, Disposal Site December 9, 2013 November 20, 2013 Canonsburg, PA, Disposal Site December 9, 2013 November 19, 2013 Durango, CO, Disposal Site May 19, 2014 June 2, 2014 Durango, CO, Processing Site N/A June 2, 2014 September 1, 2014 Edgemont, SD, Disposal Site June 23, 2014 N/A

403

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention comprises a fluid sampling system which allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped up into a sampling jet of venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decrease, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodicially leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, E.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

Houck, E.D.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

406

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

407

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

None

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Viscous sludge sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

Beitel, George A. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

WATER FOR LIFE Module on Life in the Water and the Water Sanitation Process Created for SPICE GK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water for Life module which includes topic areas on bacterial life in the water, water borne pathogens, and water sanitation. Students will be exposed to and learn about the importance of water to life on earth, the concerns with water borne pathogens worldwide, and processes of water sanitation. Lesson 1 We Need Clean Water. Students are introduced to terminology and basic facts on water sanitation and water borne pathogens in order to provide a purpose as to why we should study water quality. Lesson 2 What is in that water? Bacterial load and Water Quality Experiment. In this lesson students conduct an experiment in which they measure the bacterial load (amount of bacteria) in 4 different types of water and examine the effect of UV disinfection on the water samples bacterial populations. Lesson 3 Water Sanitation Article and Research Essay. Students gain background knowledge from reading an article on water sanitation. They will

Program Elisa Livengood; Carmella Osteen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

ANNULAR IMPACTOR SAMPLING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-rate air sampler capable of sampling alphaemitting particles as small as 0.5 microns is described. The device is a cylindrical shaped cup that fits in front of a suction tube and which has sticky grease coating along its base. Suction forces contaminated air against the periodically monitored particle absorbing grease.

Tait, G.W.C.

1959-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Networked Aquatic Sampling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system for field operation Wireless 802.11b based networkOperation Continuous real time data acquisition and logging of pertinent environmental parameters WirelessOperation Network of 10 static nodes and 1 robotic boat AODV based ad-hoc 802.11b wireless

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The {sub 36}Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The {sub 36}Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field.

Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art chemistry programs help to ensure the continued operation of open cooling water systems while mitigating corrosion and fouling mechanisms. This document, Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline, prepared by a committee of industry experts, reflects field and laboratory data on corrosion and fouling issues of open cooling systems.BackgroundService Water System Chemical Addition Guideline (Electric Power Research Institute ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

Template:SampleTemplate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Template Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Template:SampleTemplate Jump to: navigation, search This is the SampleTemplate template. It is designed for use by Sample Pages. To define a test page, please use this form. Parameters Awesomeness - The numeric level of awesomeness that your test page will achieve. Topics - Topics this page discusses. (semicolon delimited) Note: References for the above parameters are generated automatically by the ReferenceForValue template and can be seen using the ShowRefFieldsButton. Dependencies Template:Cite Template:ReferenceForValue Widget:ShowRefFieldsButton Usage It should be invoked using the corresponding form.

416

ITOUGH2 sample problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a collection of ITOUGH2 sample problems. It complements the ITOUGH2 User`s Guide [Finsterle, 1997a], and the ITOUGH2 Command Reference [Finsterle, 1997b]. ITOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase flow in fractured and porous media [Preuss, 1987, 1991a]. The report ITOUGH2 User`s Guide [Finsterle, 1997a] describes the inverse modeling framework and provides the theoretical background. The report ITOUGH2 Command Reference [Finsterle, 1997b] contains the syntax of all ITOUGH2 commands. This report describes a variety of sample problems solved by ITOUGH2. Table 1.1 contains a short description of the seven sample problems discussed in this report. The TOUGH2 equation-of-state (EOS) module that needs to be linked to ITOUGH2 is also indicated. Each sample problem focuses on a few selected issues shown in Table 1.2. ITOUGH2 input features and the usage of program options are described. Furthermore, interpretations of selected inverse modeling results are given. Problem 1 is a multipart tutorial, describing basic ITOUGH2 input files for the main ITOUGH2 application modes; no interpretation of results is given. Problem 2 focuses on non-uniqueness, residual analysis, and correlation structure. Problem 3 illustrates a variety of parameter and observation types, and describes parameter selection strategies. Problem 4 compares the performance of minimization algorithms and discusses model identification. Problem 5 explains how to set up a combined inversion of steady-state and transient data. Problem 6 provides a detailed residual and error analysis. Finally, Problem 7 illustrates how the estimation of model-related parameters may help compensate for errors in that model.

Finsterle, S.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole fluid sampling is typically performed to monitor water quality, study recharge and flow in groundwater systems, and evaluate resource potential of geothermal reservoirs. Analysis of both the liquid and gas fractions of the reservoir fluid allows for detailed characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of the subsurface hydrothermal system. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

418

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Chemical & Sample Prep  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical & Sample Preparation Chemical & Sample Preparation For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Chemical and Sample Preparation Laboratory responsible: Monika Hartl | hartl@lanl.gov | 505.665.2375 Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions For questions regarding shipping procedures, contact Lujan Center Experiment Coordinator: Leilani Conradson | leilani@lanl.gov | 505.665.9505 Chemistry Laboratories High-Pressure Laboratory X-ray Laboratory Spectroscopy Laboratory Clean Room Glove box - He atmosphere High-purity water Diamond anvils Rotating anode generators (reflectometry, residual stress, powder diffraction) Zeiss microscope (with fluorescence abilities) Tube and box furnaces Ultrasonic bath ZAP-cell (for in situ diffraction at high P) Infrared spectrometer Brewster angle microscope

419

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 16H ANNULUS SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na{sub 8}(Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, gibbsite, hydrated sodium bicarbonate, and muscovite. Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate approximately 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and {approx}1/3 of the {sup 99}Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The preliminary data on the oxalic acid leaching test indicate the three acid contacts at 45 C dissolved from {approx}34-47% of the solids. The somewhat higher dissolution found in the oxalic acid leaching test versus the water leaching test might be offset by the tendency of the oxalic acid solutions to take on a gel-like consistency. The filtered solids left behind after three oxalic acid contacts were sticky and formed large clumps after drying. These two observations could indicate potential processing difficulties with solutions and solids from oxalic acid leaching. The gel formation might be avoided by using larger volumes of the acid. Further testing would be recommended before using oxalic acid to dissolve the Tank 16H annulus waste to ensure no processing difficulties are encountered in the full scale process.

Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Field investigation at the Faultless Site Central Nevada Test Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of groundwater monitoring at non-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear test sites raised questions about the potential for radionuclide migration from the Faultless event and how to best monitor for such migration. With its long standing interest in the Faultless area and background in Nevada hydrogeology, the Desert Research Institute conducted a field investigation in FY92 to address the following issues: The status of chimney infilling (which determines the potential for migration); the best level(s) from which to collect samples from the nearby monitoring wells, HTH-1 and HTH-2; the status of hydraulic heads in the monitoring well area following records of sustained elevated post-shot heads. The field investigation was conducted from July 27 to 31 and August 4 to 7, 1992. Temperature and electrical conductivity logging were performed in HTH-1, HTH-2, and UC-1-P-2SR. Water samples were collected from HTH-1 and HTH-2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) also collected samples during the July trip, including samples from UC-1-P-2SR. This report presents the data gathered during these field excursions and some preliminary conclusions. Full interpretation of the data in light of the issues listed above is planned for FY93.

Chapman, J.B.; Mihevc, T.M.; Lyles, B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water sampling field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NID Copper Sample Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

423

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Drexel University is conducting research with the overall objective of developing technologies to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. The goal of this research is to develop a scale-prevention technology based on a novel filtration method and an integrated system of physical water treatment in an effort to reduce the amount of water needed for cooling tower blowdown. This objective is being pursued under two coordinated, National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research and development projects. In both projects, pulsed electrical fields are employed to promote the precipitation and removal of mineral deposits from power plant cooling water, thereby allowing the water to be recirculated for longer periods of time before fresh makeup water has to be introduced into the cooling water system.

424

NID Copper Sample Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A reservoir management study of a mature oil field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated geological, petrophysical and reservoir engineering review was performed for a mature, producing oil field. Like many older fields, important data are missing or were not collected. The techniques used in this thesis may be applied to other mature oil fields to make sound engineering and business decisions. I interpreted the geological structure and stratigaphy of the salt dome oil field. Structure, isopach and cross-sectional maps were constructed. Depositional environments of the producing horizons were identified. Potential for additional reserves was assessed. Well logs, core data, water resistivity and produced fluids data were analyzed. Average values of porosity, permeability, and oil saturation were determined for the field. Potential reserves behind casing were identified. Based on the revised geological and petrophysical data, the original oil in place was estimated from volumetrics to be 42.3 MMSTB. Cumulative oil production was determined for the first time since 1963. The field, individual reservoir, and individual well production performances were reviewed. Initial production histories of more than 220 wells were documented. I collected wellhead fluid samples and analyzed oil gravity and viscosity. Other fluid properties were estimated from correlations. Pressure data from the field was collated and analyzed. Primary production mechanisms and aquifer influx were estimated by reviewing early producing history and performing material balance calculations. Water influx was calculated. The performances of analogous salt dome reservoirs were compared to that of the field. All past well stimulations were reviewed and suggestions made for better implementation. Water injection in the field was reviewed. Problems of implementation and reservoir response were identified. The best areas in the field for waterflooding were identified and analyzed with an analytical model. Based on existing development, the oil ultimate recovery is estimated to be 14.4 MMSTB or 34.0 % of original oil in place. To determine whether oil recovery can be improved, incremental, after tax economic analysis was applied to several schemes. Infill drilling, hydraulic fracturing and waterflooding were analyzed. A course of action to maximize economic return is outlined for the field. Hydraulic fracturing appears to be the most viable technique to improve oil production from the field.

Peruzzi, Tave

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1977  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.Thermograph record of intake water at Pacific Gas andtemperatures and water samples at the intake pipe to their

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems Speaker(s): James Lutz Date: October 18, 2011 -...

428

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems Title Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events:...

429

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas...

430

Bivariate Conditional Sampling of Moisture Flux over a Tropical Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New applications of conditional sampling using the bivariate joint frequency distribution (JFD) and conditional mean distribution (CMD) are introduced to analyze time series of water vapor flux obtained from aircraft gust-probe vertical velocity ...

Robert L. Grossman

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Method and apparatus for sampling low-yield wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for collecting a sample from a low-yield well or perched aquifer includes a pump and a controller responsive to water level sensors for filling a sample reservoir. The controller activates the pump to fill the reservoir when the water level in the well reaches a high level as indicated by the sensor. The controller deactivates the pump when the water level reaches a lower level as indicated by the sensors. The pump continuously activates and deactivates the pump until the sample reservoir is filled with a desired volume, as indicated by a reservoir sensor. At the beginning of each activation cycle, the controller optionally can select to purge an initial quantity of water prior to filling the sample reservoir. The reservoir can be substantially devoid of air and the pump is a low volumetric flow rate pump. Both the pump and the reservoir can be located either inside or outside the well.

Last, George V. (Richland, WA); Lanigan, David C. (Kennewick, WA)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Program or Field Office:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

site activities and seismic survey at Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico. LM #01 site activities and seismic survey at Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico. LM #01 -12 Location: Gnome-Coach Site, Eddy County, New Mexico Proposed Action or Project Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for monitoring contaminant levels in groundwater from three groundwater monitoring wells at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site. Two of the wells contain elevated levels of radionuclides and these samples are managed in accordance with the DOE Investigation-Derived Waste Plan. Activities related to the groundwater monitoring program include installing water access tubes and obtaining water levels each time the wells are sampled. Some or all of the wells would have a new well box installed and/or the well head would be modified. The top well casing would be surveyed. A potential future action may include downloading transducers. DOE

433

Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

434

Fluid sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis.

Yeamans, David R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and Precipitation Collected October Conjunction With the First Production Test, Project Rulison-9, HGSlO DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image...

436

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Sample Environment at SNAP | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Environment at SNAP Sample Environment at SNAP Sample Mass Calculator Bulk Modulus (GPa) Density (g/cm3) Volume (mm3) Sample Mass Needed (mg) Custom Values NaCl 24.4 2.17 87.1 171.888 MnO 148.0 5.37 87.1 354.256 V 160.0 6.00 87.1 388.104 CoO 180.0 6.44 87.1 402.766 Bi 31.0 9.78 87.1 767.770 Sample Geometry Click below for illustration of sample shapes for use in the Paris-Edinburgh press Volume (mm3) Double-toroid, encapsulated 16.8 Double-toroid, non-encapsulated 31.1 Single-toroid, encapsulated 55.5 Single-toroid, non-encapsulated 87.1 Graphite furnace 68.1 If you see NaN in the "Sample Mass Needed (mg)" field, then one of your entries probably contains non-numeric data or is not a valid number, for example, entering 3.9.0 (double decimal points)

438

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Molokai Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Due to the very small potential market on the island of Molokai for geothermal energy, only a limited effort was made to confirm a resource in the identified PGRA. An attempt was made to locate the (now abandoned) water well that was reported to have encountered warm saline fluids. The well was located but had caved in above the water table and thus no water sampling was possible. Temperature measurements in the open portion of the well were performed, but no temperatures significantly above ambient were

439

Program or Field Office:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location: Location: u.s. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Office of Legacy Management Routine site activities at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal