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1

DOE/EA-1444: Environmental Assessment for the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond (September 2002)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 DOE/EA-1444 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For the Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2002 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade facilities and infrastructure at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV, through acquisition of a 5-acre

2

Finding of No Significant Impact/Construction of a New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, and Storm-Water Retention Pond  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEW OFFICE BUILDING, CHILD-CARE FACILITY, PARKING GARAGE, NEW OFFICE BUILDING, CHILD-CARE FACILITY, PARKING GARAGE, AND STORM- WATER RETENTION POND AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FaNS I) SUMMARY: The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1444, to analyze the potential environmental consequences of a major facilities construction effort at the Morgantown, West Virginia, campus of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Within the existing NETL site, the DOE would construct a new 3-story office building with 48,000 ft2 of usable office space, sufficient to accommodate approximately 135 employees. Existing parking space lost to the proposed new office building would be replaced by construction of a 3-level parking garage plus the addition of one or more new paved parking areas. Several

3

Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

Paller, M.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Using mathematical modelling to inform on the ability of stormwater ponds to improve the water quality of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a retention pond's permanent pool of water provides the sort of conditions that allows pollutants to degrade that is achieved by the mixing of the inflow with the water in the permanent pool; and (b) how sensitive) that is based on the following equation that describes the conservation of volume of water: dV dt ¼ Qi 2 Qo ð1?

Heal, Kate

5

Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); ECLille, LML, BP 48, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8107, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Davy, C.A., E-mail: catherine.davy@ec-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); ECLille, LML, BP 48, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8107, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean [Andra, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, F-92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FA17 Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document. If a fish species which consumes small natural foods is grown, such as the bluegill or golden shiner, then pond fertilization can increase the production of these fish. Fertilizers provide nutrients

Watson, Craig A.

7

Catfish Ponds for Recreation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catfish ponds can provide enjoyable outdoor recreation as well as excellent food fish. This publication explains pond preparation, stocking, feeding, water quality, off-flavor, harvesting, fish diseases, and controlling pond pests....

Masser, Michael P.; Steinbach, Don W.; Higginbotham, Billy

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

40 CFR 265 interim-status ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond, located in the southwestern part of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials may have been discharged to the pond. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to determine if hazardous chemicals are moving out of the pond. This plan describes the location of new wells for the monitoring system, how the wells are to be completed, the data to be collected, and how those data can be used to determine the source and extent of any ground-water contamination from the 2101-M pond. Four new wells are planned, one upgradient and three downgradient. 35 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Dudziak, S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Selecting a Method for Sealing Ponds in Florida1 Dorota Z. Haman, Allen G. Smajstrla, Fedro S. Zazueta, and Gary A. Clark2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

257) or, as some retention ponds in south Florida, created by building a dike around a water storage in South Florida are required on all new agricultural developments for runoff control, water quality control and a recharge of the shallow aquifer. In some cases, water from these ponds is also reused

Watson, Craig A.

10

Brackish water pond culture of fishes and their use as biological monitors of the water quality of thermal effluent from a power station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designed temperature change (bT) in the cooling water is 11. 1 C. Ponds Adjacent to the discharge canal are 25 ponds (Fig. 2); 16 ponds were used in this study. Each pond had 0. 1 ha suxface area and was 82. 3 m long, 12. 2 m wide, 1. 5 m deep... FIANT CEGAR RAVOU TRINITY BAY ~ 0 . . 000 ?' 8 OGLl II 0 Kll 0 'll El 9'll . 0 LI 0 GALVESTON BAY ll 'll ' I E RA 5 90 MAF AREA GULF OF MEXICO 9 SG Figure 1. --Map showing location of power plant and research facilities. DRAINAGE...

Kaehler, Todd

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Farm Ponds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Farm Ponds Farm Ponds Nature Bulletin No. 410-A March 13, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FARM PONDS Since colonial times, farmers have been scooping out reservoirs or damming small watercourses to impound water for their livestock or satisfy a hankering for a private fishing hole. Such a pond was usually too shallow and was rarely fenced. In hot weather, cattle stood belly- deep in the water and hogs wallowed in the shallows. The shores were trampled bare of vegetation. It served as a swimming place for a flock of tame ducks and the youngsters of the family but, other than bullheads, a few fish could live in it. In most cases the dam was made of earth dug with a team and "slip scraper" to deepen the hole, without a proper spillway for the overflow during heavy rains. As a result, or because of holes tunneled through them by muskrats and crawfish, these dams eventually washed out. A number of them in our Palos preserves, built by early settlers, have been enlarged, provided with adequate spillways, and serve as harbors for fish and wildlife.

12

Ground water impact assessment report for the 216-B-3 Pond system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground water impact assessments were required for a number of liquid effluent receiving sites according to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestones M-17-00A and M-17-00B, as agreed upon by the US Department of Energy. This report is one of the last three assessments required and addresses the impact of continued discharge of uncontaminated wastewater to the 216-B-3C expansion lobe of the B Pond system in the 200 East Area until June 1997. Evaluation of past and projected effluent volumes and composition, geohydrology of the receiving site, and contaminant plume distribution patterns, combined with ground water modeling, were used to assess both changes in ground water flow regime and contaminant-related impacts.

Johnson, V.G.; Law, A.G.; Reidel, S.P.; Evelo, S.D.; Barnett, D.B.; Sweeney, M.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Halite depositional facies in a solar salt pond: A key to interpreting physical energy and water depth in ancient deposits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subaqueous deposits of aragonite, gypsum, and halite are accumulating in shallow solar salt ponds constructed in the Pekelmeer, a sea-level salina on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Several halite facies are deposited in the crystallizer ponds in response to difference in water depth and wave energy. Cumulate halite, which originates as floating rafts, is present only along the protected, upwind margins of ponds where low-energy conditions foster their formation and preservation. Cornet crystals with peculiar mushroom- and mortarboard-shaped caps precipitate in centimetre-deep brine sheets within a couple of metres of the upwind or low-energy margins. Downwind from these margins, cornet and chevron halite precipitate on the pond floors in water depths ranging from a few centimetres to {approximately} 60 cm. Halite pisoids with radial-concentric structure are precipitated in the swash zone along downwind high-energy shorelines where they form pebbly beaches. This study suggests that primary halite facies are energy and/or depth dependent and that some primary features, if preserved in ancient halite deposits, can be used to infer physical energy conditions, subenvironments such as low- to high-energy shorelines, and extremely shallow water depths in ancient evaporite basins.

Handford, C.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A first approach study on the desalination of sea water using heat transformers powered by solar ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In many emerging countries over the past few years some phenomena, such as a better welfare state, industrial growth and a development in agriculture, led to a significant increasing of the demand concerning fresh water. In order to face this ever-growing demand, one of the possible solutions to counterbalance the lack of water resources, is the desalination of sea water. For this specific goal solar energy, as a resource, is the process which has more reliance since it allows a low-cost production of desalted water (without using any valuable energy resources such as fossil fuels) and in a complete respect of the environment. This first study has the purpose to analyze from an energetic perspective whether it is possible or not to reach process temperatures over 100C, through the use of solar ponds and heat transformers, in order to produce desalinated water. The final aim of this work is to quantify the surface of solar ponds needed to a production (expressed in cubic meters) of desalinated water. An absorption heat transformer is a thermal machine that while extracting heat from a source (at an available temperature) is able to ennoble a portion of the heat collected/obtained, making it available at higher temperatures. This process occurs at the expenses of the remaining portion of heat whose temperature degrades by lowering its values. The portion of heat will be then transferred to a thermal well. Hence an absorption heat transformer can use the solar energy stored in solar ponds as an energy source at an average temperature. Process temperatures which are higher than 100C for a whole year can take place only under certain chained conditions such as: source temperature with steady values during the entire season obtainable through solar ponds; condensation process occurring at sufficiently low temperatures through the use of sea water; exertion of heat transformers. The heat which is usually available at these temperatures could be used for common thermal processes during the desalination of seawater. In this work we want to demonstrate that it is possible, energetically speaking, to produce desalinated water by exploiting the solar energy stored in solar ponds and the technology of absorption heat transformers. We can notice how for every m3 of desalinated water produced in one day we need ponds with an area ranging between 1000 and 4000m2, this depends on the amount of heat flux drawn. The analysis we carried out represents a first attempt to face this kind of problem. In future studies we will examine both technical and economic feasibility.

F. Salata; M. Coppi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Radiological Control of Water in Reactor Pond of MR Reactor in NRC 'Kurchatov Institute', During Dismantling Work - 13462  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of the activity and radionuclide composition of water from the MR reactor pond for ?,?,?-ray radionuclides was made. To solve this problem we use a wide range of laboratory equipment: gamma spectrometric complex, beta spectrometric complex, vacuum alpha spectrometer, and spectrometric complex with liquid scintillator. The water from MR reactor pond contains: Cs-137 (2,6*10{sup 2} Bq/g), Co-60(1,8 Bq/g), Sr-90 (1,0*10{sup 2} Bq/g), H-3 (7,0*10{sup 3} Bq/g), and components of nuclear fuel (U-232,U-234,U-235,U-236,U-238). Therefore the cleaning water from radioactivity waste occurs to be quite a complicated radiochemical task. (authors)

Stepanov, Alexey; Simirsky, Yury; Semin, Ilya; Volkovich, Anatoly; Ivanov, Oleg [National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)] [National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Evolutionary Computing for Detection of Retentive Structures in Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,robillia,poty,fonlupt}@lil.univ-littoral.fr, Abstract-- The demography of anchovy fishes in the Gulf of Biscay seems to be related to the presence of so- called "retentive" hydrodynamical structures, that keep fish eggs and larvae in a favorable environment be used to decide fishing quotas or bans for the sake of preserving the natural resource. We propose two

Fernandez, Thomas

17

Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California, March 1985 to March 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. The water samples increased in specific conductance and concentrations of total arsenic, total recoverable boron and total recoverable molybdenum going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. 6 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Fujii, R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion investigations1 of water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in mortars2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion investigations1 of water retention mechanism by cellulose : 10.1016/j.cemconres.2012.06.002 #12;2 ABSTRACT22 23 We show how nuclear magnetic spin-lattice relaxation dispersion of protons-water24 (NMRD) can be used to elucidate the effect of cellulose ethers

Boyer, Edmond

19

Multiresponse multilayer vadose zone model calibration using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation and field water retention data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and field water retention data Thomas Wöhling1,2 and Jasper A. Vrugt3,4,5 Received 4 March 2010; revised 14

Vrugt, Jasper A.

20

216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Full Range of Saturation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to capillary forces only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified with six datasets from the literature. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but under-estimate the conductivity while the extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

Zhang, Z. F.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

SOLAR SEA-WATER DESALINATION AND THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMICAL FEASIBILITY OF SOLAR POND POWERED DISTILLATION PLANTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Desalination is an important and interesting application for the use of solar radiation as a source of undepletable energy. After almost a decade of research and development including the installation and testing of various smaller pilot systems, our solar desalination technology - among others - is now becoming available on a commercial level. The paper discusses the evolution of the technology both of the desalination-and the collector-subsystems as a result of the technical and economical constraints associated with the utilization of solar energy, a highly fluctuating energy source of low surface density. Performance data is presented in particular for the coupling of a selfregulating MSF unit with a solar pond energy collection and storage system, both inhouse developments. The performance and layout data was obtained from computer simulation and experimental results with a small sized solar pond and desalination subsystem in Switzerland. The economy assessment, which is presented for Middle East climate conditions, clearly demonstrates that solar desalination already becomes competitive for medium sized installations at remote locations. Potential further cost reductions particularly through upscaling may well lead to the use of desalinated water for agricultural applications one day.

M. Posnansky

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Investigation of the use of nanofluids to enhance the In-Vessel Retention capabilities of Advanced Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofluids at very low concentrations experimentally exhibit a substantial increase in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) compared to water. The use of a nanofluid in the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) severe accident management strategy, ...

Hannink, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The culture of some marine fishes in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sampled to determine survival, growth, condition, and for saltmarsh species reproduction: bay anchovy, Anchoa 'tch'lll (Valenc' nnes); h epshead m'n ow, ~Cr' r t Led:*oc'tfth, Gb ff'1(a'Md Gt d); a'lf' molly, P '1'a~tt' 'n (L ); lfd wats 'Iv 'd, M 'd...' beryl)'n (C p ); Pl 'da p p, P ht t 1 (Lf );Atl t' k, ~Mt d lt (L' 1; bl kd om, P~ac 's (Id eos); reddr, ~dc' n* o ll t (L' ): t 'p d list, ~Mtt ~ht 11 LITERATURE REVIEW Pond culture of fish has been going on for centuries virtually throughout...

Luebke, Richard William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Pond Scum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DeWitt, assistant professor of ecological genetics with the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, and his colleagues recently discovered these ponds and set out to make educational and experimental use of them through the creation... of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences to evaluate and measure natural selection factors, predator behavior and morphology, experimental foodweb manipula- tions, habitat structure and use, ecology, and several additional proposed research studies...

Crawford, Amanda

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Culture of penaeid shrimp in brackfish water ponds receiving thermal effluents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waters can be used to extend the growing seasons and stimulate increased growth rates so as to reduce the time needed to reach marketable size (Hihursky 1967; de Sylva 1969; Strawn 1969; Yee 1971; Tennessee Valley Authority 1974) . However, extremely... waters can be used to extend the growing seasons and stimulate increased growth rates so as to reduce the time needed to reach marketable size (Hihursky 1967; de Sylva 1969; Strawn 1969; Yee 1971; Tennessee Valley Authority 1974) . However, extremely...

Fredieu, Barbara Jane

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

No Name

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Pond pH Control  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pond pH Control Pond pH Control Name: CLIFTON Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have just put in a pond in eastern Ky it is about 400 ft by 150ft the water level is about 6 ft on the low end and about 20ft on the dam end our problem is slate and shale rock the ph is around .That was the soil test before we started digging. What I would like to know is is there anyway to lower the ph and how? Also all the run off to the pond on two sides runs over slate and shale. We were told that if the water was a bright green there was to much acid,and there are a lot of crawdads in this bottom area. Replies: Dear Clifton, re. pH control of ponds, see: http://www.grassrootsnursery.com/answers/h20qual/queswq12.htm There are various pond care companies. Here's one: http://www.pondauthority.com/pondcare.htm

29

The Integration Of Shallow Solar-Pond and Swimming Pool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A way of integration of shallow solar-pond into swimming pool is proposed for collecting, storage and utilizing ... solar-pond part can heat the water of swimming pool, share the heat loads of ventilation and...

Haijun Qiao; Diankui Gao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Solar pond technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar pond technology has made substantial progress in the last ... . This paper reviews the basic principles of solar ponds and the problems encountered in their ... which influence the technical and economic vi...

J Srinivasan

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The culture of marine fish and their use as biological monitors of water quality in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Map showing location of power plant snd research facilities. 12 Diagram showing research facilities. Ponds numbered 1 through 25 from west to east. Daily hydrological data for the intake canal (Janu- ary 23, 1973 ? March 5, 1974... pond was approximately 0. 1 ha in surface area, 82. 3 m long, TS 00 SS 20 COOI INC IAXE 29 ~ 5 INTAKE AREA RESEARCH I CILITIES DISCHAROE CANAL POWER PLANT CEOAR RATOU TRINITY SAY ~ 0 0% M 0 0 OO . ~, OO 0 0 +I 0 Oll CLI 0 HLI 08 ~ '0...

Linder, Donald Ray

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

[Task 1.] Biodenitrification of low nitrate solar pond waters using sequencing batch reactors. [Task 2.] Solidification/stabilization of high strength and biodenitrified heavy metal sludges with a Portland cement/flyash system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process wastewater and sludges were accumulated on site in solar evaporation ponds during operations at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant (DOE/RF). Because of the extensive use of nitric acid in the processing of actinide metals, the process wastewater has high concentrations of nitrate. Solar pond waters at DOE/RF contain 300-60,000 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L. Additionally, the pond waters contain varying concentrations of many other aqueous constituents, including heavy metals, alkali salts, carbonates, and low level radioactivity. Solids, both from chemical precipitation and soil material deposition, are also present. Options for ultimate disposal of the pond waters are currently being evaluated and include stabilization and solidification (S/S) by cementation. Removal of nitrates can enhance a wastes amenability to S/S, or can be a unit operation in another treatment scheme. Nitrate removal is also a concern for other sources of pollution at DOE/RF, including contaminated groundwater collected by interceptor trench systems. Finally, nitrate pollution is a problem at many other DOE facilities where actinide metals were processed. The primary objective of this investigation was to optimize biological denitrification of solar pond waters with nitrate concentrations of 300--2,100 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L to below the drinking water standard of 45 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L (10 mg N/L). The effect of pH upon process stability and denitrification rate was determined. In addition, the effect Cr(VI) on denitrification and fate of Cr(VI) in the presence of denitrifying bacteria was evaluated.

Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Mosher, J.; Terry, S.; Canonico, S.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

Report on the effectiveness of flocculation for removal of {sup 239}Pu at concentrations of 1 pCi/L and 0.1 pCi/L. RFP Pond Water Characterization and Treatment (LATO-EG&G-91-022): Task C deliverables: 5.1.2 and 5.2.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to assess the effectiveness of flocculation for the removal of Pu from Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) pond waters spiked with {sup 239}Pu at the 1.0 and 0.1 pCi/L level. The flocculation treatment procedure is described in detail. Results are presented for treatment studies for the removal of Pu from C-2 pond water spiked with {sup 239}Pu and from distilled water spiked with {sup 239}Pu.

Triay, I.R.; Bayhurst, G.K.; Mitchell, A.J.; Cisneros, M.R.; Efurd, D.W.; Roensch, F.R.; Rokop, D.J.; Aguilar, R.D.; Attrep, M.; Nuttall, H.E. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Classification and waterfowl use of ponds in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE REVIEW STUDY AREA 10 pond Formation 12 METHODS RESULTS 13 26 Pond Suruey Pond Classification Water Quality Vegetation Classification System Estuarine/intertidal/unconsolidated shore Lacustrine/limnetic/aquatic bed Lacustrine/litton'al/unconsolidated... bottom Lacustrine/littoral/aquatic bed Lacustrine/littoral/unconsolidated shore Lacustrine/limnetic s littoral/ aquatic bed Lacustrine/limnetic a littoral/ unconsolidated shore a uncon- solidated bottom 26 33 33 38 41 46 46 49 49 50 51...

McAdams, Matthew Stephen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

An Internet survey of private pond owners and managers in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amphibians, frogs and salamanders, and reptiles, turtles, lizards, and snakes valuable habitat. Many types of mammals visit ponds for water, including deer, rabbits, and raccoons. Some, including beavers and muskrats, make ponds their homes. All provide... amphibians, frogs and salamanders, and reptiles, turtles, lizards, and snakes valuable habitat. Many types of mammals visit ponds for water, including deer, rabbits, and raccoons. Some, including beavers and muskrats, make ponds their homes. All provide...

Schonrock, April Elizabeth

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Heat extraction from a large solar pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The largest operational, salt-gradient solar pond in the United States, occupying 2000 m/sup 2/, was constructed during 1978 in Miamisburg, Ohio. The heat from this solar pond, nearly 1055 GJ/y (1000 million Btu/y) is used to heat an outdoor swimming pool in the summer and an adjacent recreation building during part of the winter. A new heat exchanger system has been installed externally to the pond and operated successfully to deliver 391 GJ (371 million Btu) of heat during May-June. Hot brine water is drawn through a diffuser by a self-priming pump fabricated from fiberglass reinforced plastic. The brine water passes through copper-10% nickel tubes of a tube-and-shell heat exchanger and is then returned to the bottom of the pond. Cooling water from the swimming pool circulates through the shell side of the heat exchanger. Several designs and flow velocities of the brine inlet and outlet diffusers into the pond have been tested in order to minimize the effect of turbulence upon the salt gradient zone.

Wittenberg, L.J.; Etter, D.E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Sustainable Water Practices at Pomona's Parks: Improving Irrigation Use and Stormwater Runoff Retention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, however, it falls short of the abundant use of other renewable resources such as wind and solar energy use at parks. This would prevent the problems created by traditional runoff and landscape design, it is a necessary step towards a more sustainable future. #12;2 Water Problems and Urban Parks The human body

Young, Terence

38

Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Physicochemical Properties Related to Long-Term Phosphorus Retention by Drinking-Water Treatment Residuals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is necessary to determine the true long-term P sorption capacities of WTRs, if used to reduce soluble P in systems very high in P, such as in animal waste lagoons. ... Second-order rate coefficients for Fe-based WTRs were generally smaller than those of Al-based WTRs, consistent with there being less P sorption for the second biphasic (longer term) sorption stage. ... Typical air-dried Fe- and Al-based WTR show minimal bacterial activity (long-term storage, and chlorine addition during the drinking-water purification process (5). ...

Konstantinos C. Makris; Willie G. Harris; George A. O'Connor; Thomas A. Obreza; Herschel A. Elliott

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

40

Evaluation of solar pond performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Miamisburg, Ohio, constructed during 1978 a large, salt-gradient solar pond as part of its community park development project. The thermal energy stored in the pond is being used to heat an outdoor swimming pool in the summer and an adjacent recreational building during part of the winter. This solar pond, which occupies an area of 2020 m/sup 2/ (22,000 sq. ft.), was designed from experience obtained at smaller research ponds located at Ohio State University, the University of New Mexico and similar ponds operated in Israel. During the summer of 1979, the initial heat (40,000 kWh, 136 million Btu) was withdrawn from the solar pond to heat the outdoor swimming pool. All of the data collection systems were installed and functioned as designed so that operational data were obtained. The observed performance of the pond was compared with several of the predicted models for this type of pond. (MHR)

Wittenberg, L.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Investigation of downward facing critical heat flux with water-based nanofluids for In-Vessel Retention applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-Vessel Retention ("IVR") is a severe accident management strategy that is power limiting to the Westinghouse AP1000 due to critical heat flux ("CHF") at the outer surface of the reactor vessel. Increasing the CHF level ...

DeWitt, Gregory L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fuel Pond Sludge - Lessons Learned from Initial De-sludging of Sellafield's Pile Fuel Storage Pond - 12066  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) at Sellafield was built and commissioned between the late 1940's and early 1950's as a storage and cooling facility for irradiated fuel and isotopes from the two Windscale Pile reactors. The pond was linked via submerged water ducts to each reactor, where fuel and isotopes were discharged into skips for transfer along the duct to the pond. In the pond the fuel was cooled then de-canned underwater prior to export for reprocessing. The plant operated successfully until it was taken out of operation in 1962 when the First Magnox Fuel Storage Pond took over fuel storage and de-canning operations on the site. The pond was then used for storage of miscellaneous Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) and fuel from the UK's Nuclear Programme for which no defined disposal route was available. By the mid 1970's the import of waste ceased and the plant, with its inventory, was placed into a passive care and maintenance regime. By the mid 1990s, driven by the age of the facility and concern over the potential challenge to dispose of the various wastes and fuels being stored, the plant operator initiated a programme of work to remediate the facility. This programme is split into a number of key phases targeted at sustained reduction in the hazard associated with the pond, these include: - Pond Preparation: Before any remediation work could start the condition of the pond had to be transformed from a passive store to a plant capable of complex retrieval operations. This work included plant and equipment upgrades, removal of redundant structures and the provision of a effluent treatment plant for removing particulate and dissolved activity from the pond water. - Canned Fuel Retrieval: Removal of canned fuel, including oxide and carbide fuels, is the highest priority within the programme. Handling and export equipment required to remove the canned fuel from the pond has been provided and treatment routes developed utilising existing site facilities to allow the fuel to be reprocessed or conditioned for long term storage. - Sludge Retrieval: In excess of 300 m{sup 3} of sludge has accumulated in the pond over many years and is made up of debris arising from fuel and metallic corrosion, wind blown debris and bio-organic materials. The Sludge Retrieval Project has provided the equipment necessary to retrieve the sludge, including skip washer and tipper machines for clearing sludge from the pond skips, equipment for clearing sludge from the pond floor and bays, along with an 'in pond' corral for interim storage of retrieved sludge. Two further projects are providing new plant processing routes, which will initially store and eventually passivate the sludge. - Metal Fuel Retrieval: Metal Fuel from early Windscale Pile operations and various other sources is stored within the pond; the fuel varies considerably in both form and condition. A retrieval project is planned which will provide fuel handling, conditioning, sentencing and export equipment required to remove the metal fuel from the pond for export to on site facilities for interim storage and disposal. - Solid Waste Retrieval: A final retrieval project will provide methods for handling, retrieval, packaging and export of the remaining solid Intermediate Level Waste within the pond. This includes residual metal fuel pieces, fuel cladding (Magnox, aluminium and zircaloy), isotope cartridges, reactor furniture, and miscellaneous activated and contaminated items. Each of the waste streams requires conditioning to allow it to be and disposed of via one of the site treatment plants. - Pond Dewatering and Dismantling: Delivery of the above projects will allow operations to progressively remove the radiological inventory, thereby reducing the hazard/risk posed by the plant. This will then allow subsequent dewatering of the pond and dismantling of the structure. (authors)

Carlisle, Derek; Adamson, Kate [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Solar Ponds - What Are They?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Shallow Solar Ponds,"Jan. 8, 1978, 65p. Lawrence Livermore Lab. UCRL-52385 (2) Casamajor, A.B. "Application of Shallow Solar Ponds to Industrial Process Heat: Case Histories," October 16, 1978. 18 p. Lawrence Livermore Lab, UCRL 81764. (3... for Shallow Solar Ponds,"Jan. 8, 1978, 65p. Lawrence Livermore Lab. UCRL-52385 (2) Casamajor, A.B. "Application of Shallow Solar Ponds to Industrial Process Heat: Case Histories," October 16, 1978. 18 p. Lawrence Livermore Lab, UCRL 81764. (3...

Anderson, A. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate.

Alexander, D.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (S-3 Ponds, Boneyard/Burnyard, Oil Landfarm, Sanitary Landfill 1, and the Burial Grounds, including Oil Retention Ponds 1 and 2) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent and scope of the work plan are to assemble all data necessary to facilitate selection of remediation alternatives for the sites in Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (BCV OU 1) such that the risk to human health and the environment is reduced to acceptable levels based on agreements with regulators. The ultimate goal is to develop a final Record Of Decision (ROD) for all of the OUs in BCV, including the integrator OU. However, the initial aim of the source OUs is to develop a ROD for interim measures. For source OUs such as BCV OU 1, data acquisition will not be carried out in a single event, but will be carried out in three stages that accommodate the schedule for developing a ROD for interim measures and the final site-wide ROD. The three stages are as follows: Stage 1, Assemble sufficient data to support decisions such as the need for removal actions, whether to continue with the remedial investigation (RI) process, or whether no further action is required. If the decision is made to continue the RI/FS process, then: Stage 2, Assemble sufficient data to allow for a ROD for interim measures that reduce risks to the human health and the environment. Stage 3, Provide input from the source OU that allows a final ROD to be issued for all OUs in the BCV hydrologic regime. One goal of the RI work plan will be to ensure that sampling operations required for the initial stage are not repeated at later stages. The overall goals of this RI are to define the nature and extent of contamination so that the impact of leachate, surface water runoff, and sediment from the OU I sites on the integrator OU can be evaluated, the risk to human health and the environment can be defined, and the general physical characteristics of the subsurface can be determined such that remedial alternatives can be screened.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

2101-M pond closure plan. Volume 1, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ORNL Pond; Past, Present, and Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORNL'S Pond: ORNL'S Pond: Past, Present, and Future Mike Ryon Summer 2008 All pictures: ORNL staff photos ORNL'S Pond: Past, Present, and Future * Pond was created in 1961. * Swans were added in 1964, as a result of campaign by physicist Frances Pleasonton. * First swans named Y and Not, lived more than 10 years, and sired more than 50 offspring. * Swans were viewed as "symbolic of Oak Ridge's tranquility and the natural beauty that surrounds the Laboratory." Transition of the Pond * Although a fixture on campus, ORNL Swan Pond was not integrated into the landscape. * As it was managed, pond invited use by large numbers of Canada geese. * Fish fauna of pond was dominated by non-native species. August 1965 Initially it looked like a farm pond. Transition of the Pond

48

Toxicity of stormwater treatment pond sediments to Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stormwater runoff from highways and commercial, industrial, and residential areas contains a wide spectrum of pollutants including heavy metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, sediment, and nutrients. Recent efforts to reduce the impacts of urbanization on natural wetlands and other receiving waters have included the construction of stormwater treatment ponds and wetlands. These systems provide flood control and improve water quality through settling, adsorption, and precipitation of pollutants removing up to 95% of metals, nutrients and sediment before discharged from the site. The design of stormwater ponds to provide habitat for aquatic wildlife has prompted concern over the potential exposure of aquatic organisms to these contaminants. Aquatic sediments concentrate a wide array of organic and inorganic pollutants. Although water quality criteria may not be exceeded, organisms living in or near the sediments may be adversely affected. The availability of chemicals in sediments depends strongly on the prevailing chemistry. Physical conditions of the sediment and water quality characteristics including pH, redox potential and hardness, also influence contaminant availability. Studies have shown that heavy metals and nutrients carried by runoff concentrate in the sediment of stormwater ponds. Although several investigations have assessed the toxicity of sediments in streams receiving urban runoff, there have been few studies of the toxicity of stormwater treatment pond sediments to aquatic organisms. This study was part of a large-scale assessment of the contaminant hazards of stormwater treatment ponds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of sediments and water from stormwater ponds over a 10-d period to juvenile Hyalella azteca. Bioassay results were related to concentrations of acid volatile sulfides and metals of the tested sediments. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

Karouna-Renier, N.K. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)] [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States); [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sparling, D.W. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)] [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modeling of shallow stabilization ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model is used to simulate shallow stabilization ponds. The model computes the flow field and the concentration distribution of a conservative tracer in the entire area of a pond. The location and the size of the dead zones, the bypassing, and the recirculating areas are also determined by the model. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained in the laboratory.

Babarutsi, S.; Marchand, P.; Safieddine, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Report on Produced Water  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the pond, as well as the quality of the produced water. In semiarid regions, hot, dry air moving from a land surface will result in high evaporation rates for smaller ponds. As...

51

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 More Documents & Publications Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 9 Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7...

52

Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CIR802 Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document is CIR802, one-out and impounded waters, limerock pits, and sand or gravel pits, commonly called borrow pits. Fishing pressure in fishing as a source of recreation and food. Competition for public fishery resources, coupled

Watson, Craig A.

53

Brine clarity maintenance in salinity-gradient solar ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brine transparency is an important part of the maintenance of a salinity-gradient solar pond as it affects the amount of solar radiation reaching the storage zone and hence has an influence on the thermal performance. There is a wide range of factors that can hinder the transmission of light in a solar pond. Algal and microbial growths are the most common problems encountered in working solar ponds and control of their densities is essential to maintain transparency. Two different chemical treatment methods for algae growth prevention are described in this paper: chlorine and a novel chemical product copper ethylamine complex. The latter method has never been implemented previously in a working pond. This paper discusses the theory of the algae control methods used and presents the experimental results of the chemical treatments. The results showed that Cupricide is more effective than chlorine and is therefore the recommended chemical for algae control in solar ponds; it improves the water transparency especially in the upper convective zone and lower convective zone with all measurement values less than 1 NTU. Chlorine was found to be more corrosive than Cupricide due to the acidic effect it has on the pH. The preliminary cost analysis showed that granular chlorine is the cheapest chemical. A more detailed financial analysis is nevertheless required to refine these costs.

Neus Gasulla; Yusli Yaakob; Jimmy Leblanc; Aliakbar Akbarzadeh; Jose Luis Cortina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

NSA-Beaver Pond Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) The storage tent and gas collectors NSA-BP site looking to the east. Visible is the investigator hut on drier land to the west and the boardwalk leading out to the tower site in the right portion of the image with the mounded beaver lodge visible in the middle of the image. The bridge and the 3 meter flux tower The beaver lodge The bridge from the flux tower This is the floating bridge leading from the flux tower back to the shore. The large tent for holding equipment is clearly visible on the shore. The TGB gas collectors on the beaver pond Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos

55

Across the Pond Newsletters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Across the Pond Newsletters Across the Pond Newsletters Across the Pond Newsletters April 10, 2013 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 8 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 8: Winter 2013. April 15, 2012 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 7: Spring 2012. April 1, 2011 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 6 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 6: Spring 2011. December 1, 2010 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 5 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 5: Winter 2010. July 1, 2010 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 4 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 4: Summer 2010. April 15, 2010

56

An innovative approach to heat extraction from a salinity gradient solar pond to enhance overall efficiency.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A solar pond is a simple and low-cost solar collector with long-term thermal storage. It utilizes a large body of salinity gradient water to absorb (more)

Yaakob, Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties -- Alternative wastewater treatment: Advanced Integrated Pond systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a discussion of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the Advanced Integrated Pond System as an alternative for other more costly municipal waste water treatment plants.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Impact of population and latrines on fecal contamination of ponds in rural Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Due to poor sanitation, ponds receive fecal contaminatio-based methods and E. coli, Bacteroidales and adenovirus using quantitative PCR. Population and sanitation focused on safe drinking water, as well as improved sanitation and hygiene (Esrey, 1996; Pruss et al

van Geen, Alexander

59

Western Pond Turtle Recovery Columbia Gorge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Pond Turtle Recovery in the Columbia Gorge Project ID 200102700 Submitted by: 4 March 2009 species of concern Western Pond Turtle Washington Status #12;Columbia Mainstem Goals · Maintain;Western Pond Turtle Recovery Current Efforts · Head Start · Population Reintroduction · Predator Control

60

Investigation of Phase and Emulsion Behavior, Surfactant Retention and Condensate Recovery for Condensate/Water/Ethanol Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-02NT15447 during the period October 01, 2003 to March 31, 2004 which covers the third six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system. Ethylbenzene that has the equivalent carbon number is used as the model condensate. During this reporting period, temperature scans were performed mixing equal volumes of ethylbenzene and 10mM NaCl water with various concentrations of ethanol ranging from 2 to 70 vol%. For the range of temperatures tested (2 to 70 C), results indicate that temperature is invariant and produced a single phase for ethanol concentrations greater than 60 vol%. For ethanol concentrations less than 60 vol%, only two phases were obtained with aqueous rich bottom phase more in volume than that of the ethylbenzene rich top phase. Linear coreflooding experiments were completed by our industrial partner in this project, Surtek, CO, to measure the condensate recovery in flooding processes. It was found about 30% ethylbenzene recovery was obtained by the waterflooding, however, 2wt% ethanol flooding did not produce incremental recovery of the ethylbenzene. Radial coreflooding with ethanol injection prior to water injection is in progress to assess the effectiveness of the surfactant flooding in the recovery of condensate.

Ramanathan Sampath

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Aerial radiological surveys of Steed Pond, Savannah River Site: Dates of surveys, 1984--1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From June 1984 to August 1985, three aerial radiological surveys were conducted over Steed Pond at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In addition, Steed Pond was included in larger-area surveys of the Savannah River Site in subsequent years. The surveys were conducted by the Remote Sensing Laboratory of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, Nevada, for the US Department of Energy. Airborne measurements were obtained for both natural and man-made gamma radiation over Steed Pond and surrounding areas. The first survey was conducted when the pond was filled to normal capacity for the time of the year. On September 1, 1984, the Steed Pond dam spillway failed causing the pond to drain. The four subsequent surveys were conducted with the pond drained. The second survey and the third were conducted to study silt deposits exposed by the drop in water level after the spillway`s opening. Steed Pond data from the February 1987 and April 1989 Savannah River Site surveys have been included to bring this study up to date.

Fritzsche, A.E.; Jobst, J.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Influence of pH, Oxygen, and Humic Substances on Ability of Sunlight To Damage Fecal Coliforms in Waste Stabilization Pond Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Duration, 255 min; radiant energy received = 4.52 MJ m2 shown...light Probability of no Radiant energy Dissolved oxygenForm of oxygen...spectra for oxygen dependant and independant inactivation of Eschenchia...transformations involving electronic energy transfer in natural waters...

Thomas P. Curtis; D. Duncan Mara; Salomao A. Silva

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

INVESTIGATION OF PHASE AND EMULSION BEHAVIOR, SURFACTANT RETENTION, AND CONDENSATE RECOVERY FOR CONDENSATE/WATER/ETHANOL MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final technical report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-02NT15447 during the period October 01, 2002 to September 30, 2005, which covers the total performance period of the project. During this period, work was conducted to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system. Ethylbenzene that has the equivalent carbon number was used as the model condensate. Salinity scans were performed for 0, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mM salt concentrations at room temperature to identify the optimal salinity and salinity intervals in which all phases coexisted. It was found that only two phases formed, and salinity has no significant effect in the volumes of the phases formed. Experiments were repeated at 30 C and observed salinity has no effect at higher temperatures as well. Following the salinity experiments, measurements were made with 10mM NaCl water for surfactant concentrations from 2 to 70 volume percent at room temperature. It was found that only two phases were formed upto 60 vol% concentration of the surfactant. Above 60 vol% surfactant, the mixture produced only a single phase. Experiments were repeated from 2 to 70 C and observed that temperature has no significant effect on the number of phases formed. At the temperatures and surfactant concentration tested, volume fraction of the aqueous bottom phase was found to be larger than that of the top phase. Electrical conductivity measurements were then conducted for bottom/top, and top/bottom conjugate pair phases of the ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system formed by mixing ethanol at various volume percentages including 2,10,33,and 56% while keeping the volumes of ethylbenzene and water the same in the mixture. Electrical conductivity of the bottom phase decreased as ethanol volume fraction in the mixture increased. Conductivity of the top phase was found small and remained almost the same for variations in ethanol volume fraction in the mixture. Also inversion phenomena was observed. Prediction of the conductivity data obtained was then conducted employing a theoretical model developed in this project based on Maxwell relations. Results of the comparisons for 2, 10, 33, and 56% ethanol volume in the mixture are presented here. A good agreement was obtained between the predicted emulsion conductivities and the measured values. Work was also conducted at Surtek, Golden, CO, our industrial partner in this project, to measure the effectiveness for condensate recovery employing coreflooding techniques. In Run 1 of the radial coreflooding experiments conducted, 10 mM NaCl without ethanol injection recovered 31.5% of the initial ethyl benzene saturation. Injection of ethanol following 10 mM NaCl produced a tertiary ethyl benzene bank with maximum ethyl benzene cuts of 32%. In Run 2, 50 vol% of pure (100%) ethanol was injected and flowed through the Berea sandstone after Ethyl Benzene Saturation. 69% of the initial ethyl benzene was recovered. While 50 vol% of ethanol injection does not make economic sense when injecting a large fraction of a pore volume, injection of sufficient volume to remove water and condensate from around the near well bore area of a gas well could be economic.

Ramanathan Sampath

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Long-term changes in nitrogen loads of a stream in the vicinity of an earthen waste storage pond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is not sufficiently known for how long earthen waste storage ponds that are no more in use continue to affect surface water quality. In 2006, we carried out an investigation on the water quality and hydrolo...

T. Kato; H. Kuroda; H. Nakasone

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Life History of a Pond  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of a Pond History of a Pond Nature Bulletin No. 617 November 12, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE LIFE HISTORY OF A POND In the Palos division of the Forest Preserve District there is an extraordinary number of ponds and sloughs Many were created by damming the outlets from wet places; some were originally farm ponds that we have restored. The largest and probably oldest pond is located in Swallow Cliff Woods, west of the picnic area in a grove of white pines planted about 40 years ago. The pond is dying. Like most others, if undisturbed, after fifty years or so it will be forgotten because in its place there will be trees willows, cottonwoods, soft maples, and probably swamp white and bur oaks. Indeed, at one time it had already filled up until, after being drained by tile, corn was grown there.

66

Detention basins, also known as dry ponds, or dry detention basins, are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

permanent standing pools of water. The pur- pose is to provide basic flood protec- tion and potentially Rutgers websites: water conservation, turf, Environ- mental Stewards, water chestnut 5 Rain barrels measures that detain water for a period of time but unlike wet ponds are not de- signed to have large

Goodman, Robert M.

67

BASIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH FOR D&D OF R REACTOR STORAGE POND SLUDGE: ELECTROKINETICS, CARBON DIOXIDE EXTRACTION, AND SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D&D operations at DOE sites across the country. Currently, the volume of these wastes is approximately 23,500 m3, and the majority of these wastes (i.e., almost 19,000 m3) consist of PCBs and PCB-contaminated materials. Further, additional PCB-contaminated waste will be generated during D&D operations in the future. The standard process for destruction of this waste is incineration, which generates secondary waste that must be disposed, and the TSCA incinerator at Oak Ridge has an uncertain future. Beyond incineration, no proposed process for the recovery and/or destruction of these persistent pollutants has emerged as the preferred choice for DOE cleanup. The main objective of the project was to investigate and develop a deeper understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic reactions involved in the extraction and destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from low-level mixed waste solid matrices in order to provide data that would permit the design of a combined-cycle extraction/destruction process. The specific research objectives were to investigate benign dense-fluid extraction with either carbon dioxide (USC) or hot water (CU), followed by destruction of the extracted PCBs via either electrochemical (USC) or hydrothermal (CU) oxidation. Two key advantages of the process are that it isolates and concentrates the PCBs from the solid matrices (thereby reducing waste volume greatly and removing the remaining low-level mixed waste from TSCA control), and little, if any, secondary solvent or solid wastes are generated. This project was a collaborative effort involving the University of South Carolina (USC), Clemson University (CU), and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) (including the Savannah River Technology Center, Facilities Decommissioning Division and Regulatory Compliance). T he project was directed and coordinated by the South Carolina Universities Research and Education Foundation (SCUREF), a consortium of the four public research universities in South Carolina. The original plan was to investigate two PCB extraction processes (supercritical carbon dioxide and hot, pressurized water) and two PCB destruction processes (electrochemical oxidation and hydrothermal oxidation). However, at approximately the mid-point of the three year project, it was decided to focus on the more promising extraction process (supercritical carbon dioxide) and the more promising destruction process (supercritical water oxidation). This decision was taken because the investigation of two processes simultaneously by each university was stretching resources too thin, and because the electrochemical oxidation process needed more concentrated research before it would be ready for application to PCB destruction. The solid matrix chosen for experimental work was Toxi-dry, a commonly used adsorbent made from plant material that is used in cleanup of spills and/or liquid solvents. The Toxi-dry was supplied by the research team member from the Facilities Decommissioning Division, WSRC. This adsorbent is a major component of job control waste.

Matthews, Michael A.; Bruce,David; Davis,Thomas; Thies, Mark; Weidner, John; White, Ralph

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Basic Engineering Research for D&D of R. Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collaborating researchers at the University of South Carolina (USC), Clemson University (CU), and the Savannah River Site (SRS) are investigating the fundamentals of a combined extraction and destruction process for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of PCB-contaminated materials as found at DOE sites. Currently, the volume of PCBs and PCB contaminated wastes at DOE sites nationwide is approximately 19,000 m3. While there are a number of existing and proposed processes for the recovery and/or destruction of these persistent 4 pollutants, none has emerged as the preferred choice. Therefore, this research focuses on combining novel processes to solve the problem. The research objectives are to investigate benign dense-fluid extraction with either carbon dioxide (USC) or hot water (CU), followed by destruction of the extracted PCBs via either electrochemical (USC) or hydrothermal (CU) oxidation. Based on the results of these investigations, a combined extraction and destruction process that incorporates the most successful elements of the various processes will be recommended for application to contaminated DOE sites.

Hamilton, Edward A.; Bruce, David A.; Oji, Lawrence; White, Ralph E.; Matthews, Michael A.; Thies, Mark C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Transient hydrodynamic, heat and mass transfer in a salinity gradient solar pond: A numerical study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The impoverishment of our planet in non-renewable energies has incited researchers to design salinity gradient solar ponds to collect and store solar energy at a lower cost. It is in this context that the present research work lies to focus on the numerical study of the transient hydrodynamic, heat and mass transfer in a salinity gradient solar pond. The problem is tackled using the dimensionless governing equations of NavierStokes, thermal energy and mass transfer, which are solved numerically by finite-volume method to provide the temperature, concentration and velocity fields in transient regime. The pond is filled with salty water of various salinities to form three zones of salty water: Upper Convective Zone (UCZ), Non-Convective Zone (NCZ) and Lower Convective Zone (LCZ). To prevent convective movements induced by the internal heating of salty water due to solar radiation absorption, a salinity gradient is used in the solar pond. Representative results illustrating the influence of internal Rayleigh number on the thermal performance of the pond and the effect of the aspect ratio on the distribution of temperature and velocity fields in the salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP) are discussed. In addition, results for the transient average temperature of UCZ and LCZ are presented and discussed for various parametric conditions.

Ridha Boudhiaf; Mounir Baccar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 216-B-3 Pond system was a series of ponds used for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation from 1945 to 1997, the B Pond System has been a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility since 1986, with RCRA interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994 the expansion ponds of the facility were clean closed, leaving only the main pond and a portion of the 216-B-3-3 ditch as the currently regulated facility. In 2001, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued a letter providing guidance for a two-year, trial evaluation of an alternate, intrawell statistical approach to contaminant detection monitoring at the B Pond system. This temporary variance was allowed because the standard indicator-parameters evaluation (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and accompanying interim status statistical approach is ineffective for detecting potential B-Pond-derived contaminants in groundwater, primarily because this method fails to account for variability in the background data and because B Pond leachate is not expected to affect the indicator parameters. In July 2003, the final samples were collected for the two-year variance period. An evaluation of the results of the alternate statistical approach is currently in progress. While Ecology evaluates the efficacy of the alternate approach (and/or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit), the B Pond system will return to contamination-indicator detection monitoring. Total organic carbon and total organic halides were added to the constituent list beginning with the January 2004 samples. Under this plan, the following wells will be monitored for B Pond: 699-42-42B, 699-43-44, 699-43-45, and 699-44-39B. The wells will be sampled semi-annually for the contamination indicator parameters (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and annually for water quality parameters (chloride, iron, manganese, phenols, sodium, and sulfate). This plan will remain in effect until superseded by another plan or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit.

Barnett, D BRENT.; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.; McDonald, John P.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Environmental Checklist Form 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan (Revision 1) consists of a Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. The 216-B-3 Pond System consists of a series of four earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. These four ponds, collectively. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the 216-B-3-3 Ditch. Water discharged to the 216-8-3-3 Ditch flows directly into the 216-B-3 Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to B Pond and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the nonradioactive dangerous portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA. Mixed waste also may be considered a hazardous substance under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) when considering remediation of waste sites.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Solar energy storage by salinity gradient solar pond: Pilot plant construction and gradient control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental solar pond pilot plant was constructed in Solvay-Martorell, facilities, Catalonia (NE part of the Iberian Peninsula) to capture and store solar energy. The body of the pond is a cylindrical reinforced concrete tank, 3m height, 8m diameter and total area of 50m2. Salinity and thermal gradient were properly established by using the salinity distribution methodology. The gradient in the pond was maintained by feeding salt (NaCl) through a cylindrical salt charger to the bottom at a height of 80cm from the pond floor. Continuous surface washing using tap water supply maintained the salinity of the top convective layer at a low level and compensate loses by evaporation. An acidification method by addition of \\{HCl\\} at different heights was used to control the clarity of the pond. The salinity gradient was fully established on 30 September 2009 and has been maintained until the date. After winter time (February 2010), the pond warms up and the temperature increased continuously until it reached its maximum (55C) in August 2010. The salinity gradient observed great stability after one year of continuous control and maintenance and under different weather conditions.

Csar Valderrama; Oriol Gibert; Jordina Arcal; Pau Solano; Aliakbar Akbarzadeh; Enric Larrotcha; Jos Luis Cortina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch characterization studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site has generated large volumes of radioactive liquid effluents. The majority of these effluents have been used strictly for cooling or other supportive functions and have been discharged to ditches and ponds. The 216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch are two such disposal facilities. These facilities are components of an integrated system of ditches, ponds, and overflow facilities collectively referred to as the U-Pond disposal system. The U-Pond system has been used since 1943 and has received a large variety of radioisotopes from several sources. This study covered tho major aspects of the environment, including wind resuspension, biological uptake and transport, geologic distribution in surface and subsurface sediments, and ground-water impacts. The long-term use of U-Pond and the Z-19 Ditch has resulted in the localized accumulation of transuranic and fission product inventories as a result of sorption and filtration of particulates onto the uppermost sediments.

Last, G.V.; Duncan, D.W.; Graham, M.J.; Hall, M.D.; Hall, V.W.; Landeen, D.S.; Leitz, J.G.; Mitchell, R.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Easton Pond Business Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Easton Pond Business Center Easton Pond Business Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Easton Pond Business Center Facility Easton Pond Business Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Location Middletown RI Coordinates 41.50220171984°, -71.28672659° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.50220171984,"lon":-71.28672659,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

ELECTROKINETIC DENSIFICATION OF COAL FINES IN WASTE PONDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. The specific objectives were: Design and develop a scaleable electrophoresis apparatus to clarify suspensions of colloidal coal and clay particles; Demonstrate the separation process using polluted waste water from the coal-washing facilities at the coal-fired power plants in Centralia, WA; Develop a mathematical model of the process to predict the rate of clarification and the suspension electrical properties needed for scale up.

E. James Davis

1999-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

Coatings for performance retention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance and performance retention are becoming increasingly important in todays gas turbine engines. The military aircraft engine operator wants the flexibility and flight envelope that increased performance will give and the commercial useraircraft utility generation or pumperdemands the long term fuel economy that improved performance retention will provide. Materials advances have provided the intrinsic strength and temperature increases to push the capability of todays engines and coatings have been an integral part of that advancement. Specifically in the performance retention area coatings and seal systems have become increasingly important in both compressor and turbine components. It is the intent of this overview paper to present a brief review of the coating systems presently in use and in development and to consider areas in which the technology might be heading.

R. V. Hillery

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appeared to be structured by the responses of individual species to the estuarine salinity gradient shown that nekton abundance can be affected by salinity gradients in estuaries (Baltz et al. 1993, 1998Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity

78

Numerical-Model Investigation of the Hydrothermal Regime of a Straight-Through Shallow Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematic model based on solution of hydrodynamics and heat-transfer equations by the finite-element method is constructed to predict the hydrothermal regime of a straight-through shallow cooling pond, which provides cooling circulating water to a repository of spent nuclear fuel. Numerical experiments made it possible to evaluate the influence exerted by wind conditions and flow rate of water in the river on the temperature of the circulating water.

Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter.

Hranac, K.C. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Chromec, F.W.; Fiehweg, R. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Hopkins, J. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Retrieval of Melt Pond Coverage from MODIS using Optimal Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results showed an error in melt pond coverage estimation of 1.1%. The technique was then applied to Svalbard sea ice over the 2003 melt season to produce an estimate of melt pond coverage evolution. This melt pond evolution showed a similar general trend...

Dodd, Emma

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Post-Emergence Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Post-Emergence Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles www.oregonwildlife.org #12;2 Post-Emergence Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles Final Report August 2010 Daniel K. Rosenberg Oregon Wildlife: Rosenberg, D. K. and R. Swift. 2010. Post-emergence behavior of hatchling western pond turtles. Oregon

Rosenberg, Daniel K.

82

Workforce Retention | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Outreach & Collaboration » Focus Groups » Workforce Services » Outreach & Collaboration » Focus Groups » Workforce Retention Workforce Retention The HSS Workforce Retention Work Group was established to collaboratively address the needs of the Department to maintain a skilled work force in the face of anticipated retirements and to address the specific health and safety concerns of that work force that could impede retention. Objectives: Better understand relationship between skilled workforce retention; health, safety and productivity; and especially preventive health care. Inform and support improvement and/or development of wellness, fitness, and prevention programs through data collections and analyses. Promote the implementation of preventive health services designed to assure retention of the contractor work force.

83

The microbial flora of pond-reared shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris, P. setiferus, P. vannamei, and Macrobrachium rosenbergii)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in the pond waters. Samples of P. setiferus and Macr btachdcm ~reenb 11 mere obtained f o pr feet lo- cations on the Pecos and. Rio Grande Rivers. Aerobic plate counts of fresh shrimp ranged from 1. 5 X 10 ? 2. 9 X 10 per gram. Coryneform bacteria... stored on ice for 1V eight days ranged from 5. 1-9. 4 X 10 . The microbial flora 2 of stored shrimp was dominated by coryneform bacteria, Pseudomonas, and Nicrococcus species. The aerobic plate counts of pond waters ranged from 6. 1 X 10 ? 2. 2 X 10...

Christopher, Frank Mitchell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

86

Protections: Sediment Control = Contaminant Retention  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sediment Control Protections: Sediment Control Contaminant Retention LANL maintains hundreds of wells, stream sampling stations and stormwater control structures to protect...

87

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatic Biology Fish Ponds, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-021  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatice Biology Fish Ponds waste site was an area with six small rectangular ponds and one large circular pond used to conduct tests on fish using various mixtures of river and reactor effluent water. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification and applicable confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

publication 426-042 Urban Water-Quality Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

publication 426-042 Urban Water-Quality Management Winterizing the Water Garden Lynnette Swanson. Prepare the pond for the winter months by managing the plants, cleaning the pond, and monitoring the water Traci Gilland, Extension Agent, Portsmouth Water gardens require maintenance throughout the year

Liskiewicz, Maciej

89

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Across The Pond Across The Pond 1 DOE-NDA discuss Spent Fuel Shipments Meeting with Dounreay Site Restoration Ltd. on Gap (non-US origin) Material Shipment: Environmental Management (EM) supported a National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) led team on a visit to the Dounreay Site, near Thurso, Scotland on July 14-15, 2010. The purpose of the visit was to meet with DSRL representatives on a potential Gap spent fuel (non U.S.- origin) shipment to the US at the Savannah River Site. The EM-HQ representatives included Yvette Collazo, Director for Technology Innovation and Development and Gary DeLeon, Director for Nuclear Materials Disposition. Gary said "This visit gave me the opportunity to see first hand the complexities involved with planning and logistics for shipping spent fuel back to

90

Nutrient Limitation across a salinity gradient of Martha's Vineyard Coastal Ponds Emily S Rogers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Limitation across a salinity gradient of Martha's Vineyard Coastal Ponds Emily S Rogers and their respective salinities were Long Cove Pond, 1ppt, Little Jobs Pond, 4ppt, Jobs Neck Pond, 9ppt, Chilmark Pond. There was a strong correlation between ammonium limitation and salinity. There was very little response

Vallino, Joseph J.

91

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 2: December 2009. In this issue: DOE - NDA relationship recognized at International Environmental Cleanup Conference NDA - DOE Standing Committee Meeting commends progress Topic Area Update: Significant Progress Being Made Information Exchange is one of "DOE's best business practices" Glass Chemistry - A Flagship of Progress Under the Statement of Intent US Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board visit UK Visit from Senior Sellafield Ltd staff to Hanford considered a 'Great Success' Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 2 More Documents & Publications Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 3 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 6

92

Relative Retention Data for an Ethofat Column  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Retention Data for an Ethofat Column David P. Mowry Marathon Oil Company, Littleton, Colorado 80121 ture. RECIPROCAL...Retention Data for an Ethofat Column by David P. Mowry, Marathon 011 Company, Littleton, Colorado 80121 Relative retention......

David P. Mowry

1966-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake for RSL formation, CaCl2 brines and chloride deposits in basins may provide clues to the origin of ancient,2,10­14 , the composition of the brine is unlike any other body of water in the world, as ,90% of the salt is CaCl2 1

Marchant, David R.

94

Solar pond technology for large-scale heat processing in a Chilean mine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coppermining is the largest industrial activity in Northern Chile a region that relies mostly on imported energy resources thus making the mining sector vulnerable to the rising cost of fuel oil and electricity. The extraction of copper is mostly accomplished by hydrometallurgy a three-step low energy process consisting of heap leaching concentration by solvent extraction and metal recovery by electro-winning. Since the content of copper in its ore tends to degrade as the mining operation proceeds higher leaching temperatures would be needed along with increasing energy requirements. In order to address this demand and considering that the region has one of the highest levels of solar radiation and clear skies the authors assessed the solar pond technology for rising the temperature of the leaching stream. The working principle of such technology is presented as well as its mathematical formulation restrictions and assumptions aiming to simulate the performance of a solar pond and to size a suitable setup. The results indicate that this technology can provide sufficient heat to raise the temperature to a range of 50 to 70?C throughout the year with an annual gross thermal supply of 626?GWh. In order to minimize the loss of water and salt from the pond a closed salt cycle is suggested. Savings of up to 59 000 tons of diesel oil per year and the avoidance of 164 000 tons of CO2 per year could be achieved with a solar pond effective area of 1.43 km2 reaching an average efficiency of 19.4%. Thus solar pond technology is suitable for attaining the goal of increasing the leaching temperature while diminishing fuel costs and greenhouse emissions.

F. Garrido; R. Soto; J. Vergara; M. Walczak; P. Kanehl; R. Nel; J. Garca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Environmental Response Team Standard Operating Procedures for Contaminated Water Diving Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dilution of Contaminants ·· Small Closed Body of WaterSmall Closed Body of Water ·· Pond or Flooded QuarryPond or FloodedEnvironmental Response Team Standard Operating Procedures for Contaminated Water Diving Operations for Contaminated Water Diving OperationsProcedures for Contaminated Water Diving Operations AAUS March 2010 Meeting

Sura, Philip

97

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Data evaluation technical memorandum on the K-1407C Retention Basin at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K-1407-C Retention Basin was a surface impoundment at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The basin was used primarily for storing potassium hydroxide scrubber sludge generated at the K-25 Site. In addition, from 1960 to 1973, metal hydroxide sludges that were removed from the K-1407-B Holding Pond were discharged to the K-1407-C Retention Basin. The sludge in the K-1407-B Pond contained discharge from the K-1420 Decontamination and Uranium Recovery, the K-1501 Steam Plant, the K-1413 Laboratory, and the K-1401 Maintenance Building. Radioactive material is also present in the K-1407-C Retention Basin, probably the result of cleaning and decontamination activities at some of the aforementioned facilities. The discharge of waste materials to K-1407-C was discontinued before November of 1988, and all sludge was removed from the retention basin. Some of the sludge was stored, and the remainder was fixed in concrete. This report is specific to the K-1407-C Retention Basin and includes information pertinent to the evaluation of soil contamination. The focus of this evaluation is the effectiveness of the Phase 1 investigation of the K-1407-C Retention Basin to define site conditions adequately to support decisions regarding appropriate closure alternatives. This includes the physical characterization of the site area and the characterization of the nature and extent of contamination at the site in relation to risk characterization and statistical evaluation.

Beal, D.; Bock, J.; Hatmaker, T.; Zolyniak, J.; Goddard, P. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Kucsmas, D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Data evaluation technical memorandum on the K-1407C Retention Basin at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K-1407-C Retention Basin was a surface impoundment at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The basin was used primarily for storing potassium hydroxide scrubber sludge generated at the K-25 Site. In addition, from 1960 to 1973, metal hydroxide sludges that were removed from the K-1407-B Holding Pond were discharged to the K-1407-C Retention Basin. The sludge in the K-1407-B Pond contained discharge from the K-1420 Decontamination and Uranium Recovery, the K-1501 Steam Plant, the K-1413 Laboratory, and the K-1401 Maintenance Building. Radioactive material is also present in the K-1407-C Retention Basin, probably the result of cleaning and decontamination activities at some of the aforementioned facilities. The discharge of waste materials to K-1407-C was discontinued before November of 1988, and all sludge was removed from the retention basin. Some of the sludge was stored, and the remainder was fixed in concrete. This report is specific to the K-1407-C Retention Basin and includes information pertinent to the evaluation of soil contamination. The focus of this evaluation is the effectiveness of the Phase 1 investigation of the K-1407-C Retention Basin to define site conditions adequately to support decisions regarding appropriate closure alternatives. This includes the physical characterization of the site area and the characterization of the nature and extent of contamination at the site in relation to risk characterization and statistical evaluation.

Beal, D.; Bock, J.; Hatmaker, T.; Zolyniak, J.; Goddard, P. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Kucsmas, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technetium Retention During Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC November 18, 2010 Overview * Tc in borosilcate glass structure * Re as a surrogate for Tc * Summary of previous data on Tc incorporation into LAW glass * Summary of results from ongoing test program * Single-pass retention vs. retention with recycle * Tc volatilization during container filling Tc in LAW Glass Structure * Tc is present as Tc 7+ and Tc 4+ * Tc 7+ is dominant in more oxidized glasses and Tc 4+ is dominant in reduced glasses * Strongly reducing conditions produce Tc 0 * The structure and local environment of Tc in WTP LAW glasses has been investigated by: * Synchrotron X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy * Lukens, McKeown, Buechele, Muller, Shuh, and Pegg, Chem. Mater., 19, 559 (2007)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout Kentucky's 39,486 square miles. Surface water occurs as rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands. Ground- water occurs underlain by soluble carbonate rocks (for example, limestone). Water Supply � Approximately 49 inches

MacAdam, Keith

103

Measurement of sound transmission through mud at Dodge Pond, Connecticut.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Questions important to the sonic detection of buried ordinance are whether the sound dispersion and attenuation of muddy bottoms can be predicted and verified. Wood and Weston [Acustica (1964)] measured compressional speeds in harbor mud 3% less than that of water with attenuation considerably less than those of sandy/silty sediments. A recent theoretical treatment [Pierce and Carey POMA 7001 (2009)] making use of the MallockWood equation and of a card?house theory of the structure of mud estimates the slow sound speed to depend on porosity as 1?(0.35)(1??). Present measurements at frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz with a buried array in the depositional mud at the bottom of Dodge Pond which contains considerable gas microbubbles yield speeds of the order of 60% of the sound speed in water. The initial measurements on the disturbed sediment were found to be strongly influenced by scattering from larger bubbles whereas the results after a period of 10 months showed the effect of a smaller size distribution of bubbles. Estimates based on the Dodge Pondmeasurements and on the card?house theory of the propagation characteristics and of the effect of micro?bubbles are discussed. [Sponsored by SERDP?NSWC?PCD.

William M. Carey; Allan D. Pierce

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OF OF ENERGY ACROSS THE POND Issue 1: Summer 2009 The US Department of Energy (DOE) / UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Bilateral Agreement The US DOE (Department of Energy) and the UK NDA (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority) signed an agreement in March 2007 in which both parties agreed that there was mutual benefit in working together and sharing information in the development and application of technologies and approaches to pressing needs in a number of areas including environmental remediation, radioactive waste management and decommissioning & deactivation (D&D). Since then there have been a number of `Information Exchange' activities between the parties discussing a wide range of topics which have assisted both parties in their approach to

105

Optimal Efficiency of a Solar Pond and a Rankine Cycle System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optimal efficiency of a solar pond Rankine cycle system is found analytically. The optimum for...

M. H. Cobble; A. R. Shouman

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Measurement of sound transmission through mud at Dodge Pond, Connecticut  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depositional muddy sediments are slow bottoms and pose a problem for the sonic detection of buried ordnance. This paper addresses the question: can the frequency dependent dispersion be predicted and verified by measurements in areas where buried object detection is required? Wood and Weston (Acustica V14 1964) have indicated that muddy sediments in the kHz range have a compressional speed 3% less than water with a frequency dependent attenuation (less than that of sand). A theoretical treatment of "muddy sediments" the Card House Theory (Pierce and Carey POMA (5) 7001 2009) estimates the slow sound speed and frequency dispersion proportional to mud porosity. Preliminary Dodge Pond results obtained with a buried array (1 to 10 kHz) are presented and illustrate the importance of micro-bubbles on the dispersion characteristic. The initial measurements on the disturbed sediment were found strongly influenced by scattering from larger bubbles whereas the results after a period of 10 months showed the effect of a smaller size distribution of bubbles. Estimates of the dispersion characteristic of mud and the effect of micro-bubbles are discussed. Finally the application of an impedance tube to the characterization of mud is discussed.

William M. Carey; Allan D. Pierce

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 1: Summer 2009. In this issue: The US Department of Energy (DOE) / UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Bilateral Agreement Initial Topic Areas for Discussion US DOE Represented at NDA-Sponsored Pu Workshop DOE - NDA Implementation Plan (4th Standing Committee Meeting held in Phoenix ) SRNL and NNL Collaborate on RadBall Trials NDA Provides Support to EM in Prioritization of D&D Technology Needs DOE and NRC Criticality Team visit Sellafield NDA Nucleargraduates Program Participant Seconded to DOE Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 More Documents & Publications RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization

109

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in Research and Development Collaboration in Plutonium Management Moves to the Next Level Organizational Changes in NDA and DOE-EM Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 7 More Documents...

110

Water Boatman  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Boatman Water Boatman Name: Joshua Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a research on water boatman. I go through your web, I only find little information about it. Can you give me its habitat, its appearance, life cycles and communication between themselves and they defenses themselves? Replies: Find a good book in the library on insects, also on pond biology/ecology, as boatmen live in ponds and marshes. It should be easy to find. J.Elliott Try this web site: http://www.dnr.state.il.us/ctap.ctaphome.htm or http://www.dnr.state.il.us/nredu/nredpage.htm this is the state of Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources homepage and somewhere on there is a page called "bugpage". They have pictures and characteristics of aquatic insects there. good luck

111

An environmental simulation of a shrimp mariculture pond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Zooplankton 30 33 EVALUATION OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES . . 46 Evaluation of Stocking Densities and Feeding Rates 46 SUMMARY . REFERENCES 59 60 VITA 67 vss LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Pond Model Biomass Flows 2 Dissolved Oxygen and Population... Submodels 3 Pond Model Biomass Curves Under Baseline Conditions, 80, 000 Animals per Hectare, Commercial Feed Rate 19 4 Reported Chlorophyll Levels from Rubright et al. , 1981 . 5 Detail of Figure 3 Showing Days 0 Through 35. . . . . . . . 20 21 6...

Whitson, John Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Low-temperature spray ponds: performance evaluation and prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOW-TEMPERATURE SPRAY PONDS: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND PREDICTION A Thesis by PHILIP DWAN KERIG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1980 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering LOW-TEMPERATURE SPRAY PONDS: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND PREDICTION A Thesis by PHILIP DWAN KERIG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Hea...

Kerig, Philip Dwan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Microsoft Word - DUR 2007 CR-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

increased uranium concentration reported downgradient needs to be evaluated. In 2007, a solar-powered water management system was installed to distribute retention pond water to...

114

OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air Shower Detector Sensitivity (5m 2 ), water Cherenkov detectors (tanks) will be deployed around the pond to effectively extend its from the Milagro pond. 2 Water Tank Detector & Array The criteria for selecting a detector design

California at Santa Cruz, University of

115

Water conservation and reuse has become a major issue in aquacul-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water conservation and reuse has become a major issue in aquacul- ture in recent years. Concern enhancing water circula- tion in ponds and developing intensive, recirculating tank sys- tems of water and lower invest- ment and production costs have contributed to the present expanse of pond

Watson, Craig A.

116

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Performance testing of the Sandy Pond HVDC converter terminal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of several performance tests for the 1,800 MW Sandy Pond HVDC converter terminal are presented and discussed. The work progressed during 1990 and 1991 and included tests for power line carrier interference, audible sound, ac and dc line faults and dc harmonic performance. The testing was conducted as part of the commissioning program for the first stage of the Quebec-New England Phase 2 multi-terminal system. In this stage, the Radisson (Quebec) and Sandy Pond (New England) terminals are operational.

Donahue, J.A.; Fisher, D.A.; Railing, B.D.; Tatro, P.J. (New England Power Service Co., Westborough, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Account Sponsorship & Retention Policy | Argonne Leadership Computing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Allocations MiraCetusVesta Tukey Policies Accounts Policy Account Sponsorship & Retention Policy ALCC Quarterly Report Policy ALCF Acknowledgment Policy Data Policy INCITE...

120

Workforce Retention Work Group | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

skilled workforce retention; health, safety and productivity; and especially preventive health care. Inform and support improvement andor development of wellness, fitness, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

122

Water Bugs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

123

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

Johnson, Pieter

124

Sediment management in sustainable urban drainage system ponds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment management in sustainable urban drainage system ponds K.V. Heal*, D.A. Hepburn** and R.lunn@strath.ac.uk) Abstract Since removal and disposal of sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) sediment can incur high maintenance costs, assessments of sediment volumes, quality and frequency of removal are required. Sediment

Heal, Kate

125

BIRD COMMUNITIES AT \\VASTEWATER PONDS IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Third Annual Conference on Ecosystems Restoration and Creation. Hillsborough Community College, Tampa ground gleaners on plant food, aquatic ground gleaners, and divers. The most species-rich and diverse, Florida. #12;Dabblers and surface dippers were positively associated with pond surface area. Aquatic

126

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Technical and economical aspects of solar desalination with particular emphasis on solar pond powered distillation plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Desalination remains an important and interesting application for the use of solar radiation as a source of undepletable energy. After almost a decade of research and development including the installation and testing of various smaller pilot systems, our solar desalination technology - among others - is now becoming available on a commercial level. The paper discusses the evolution of the technology both of the desalination and the collector-subsystems as a result of the technical and economical constraints associated with the utilization of solar energy, a highly fluctuating energy source of low surface density. Performance data is presented in particular for the coupling of a selfregulating MSF unit with a solar pond energy collection and storage system, both inhouse developments. The performance and layout data was obtained both from computer simulation and experimental results with a small sized solar pond and desalination subsystem in Switzerland. The economy assessment, which is presented for Middle East climate conditions, clearly demonstrates that solar desalination already becomes competitive for medium sized installation at remote locations. Potential further cost reductions also through upscaling may lead to the use of desalinated water for agricultural applications one day.

M. Posnansky

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Microsoft Word - Poorman Ponds_CX Memo_20120607.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Poorman Ponds Property Funding Poorman Ponds Property Funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-003-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition, or acquisition of interests in land and associated buildings for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, or fish and wildlife management provided that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that could pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Twisp, Okanogan County, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation (MSRF) to acquire approximately 22.1 acres of land and 1,455 feet of the Twisp

129

Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 5 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 5 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 5: Winter 2010. In this issue: Introduction 7th Standing Committee Meeting between USDOE - UKNDA held in Sellafield. Topic Area Update Group From Sellafield Visits Idaho To Exchange Information On Hot Isostatic Pressing Glass Chemistry Collaboration Update International Partnership Workshop on DOE Used Nuclear Fuel & High Level Waste NWTRB Discusses Technical Lessons Gained From NDA HighLevel Nuclear Waste Disposal Efforts To Date Richard Abitz From SRNL Delivers Key Address At 2010 UK Decommissioning And Waste Management Conference In Penrith, Cumbria Upcoming Events: Waste Management Conference in Phoenix Across the Pond Newsletter - Issue 5 More Documents & Publications

130

Salinity gradient solar pond technology applied to potash solution mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solution mining facility at the Eddy Potash Mine, Eddy County, New Mexico has been proposed that will utilize salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP) technology to supply industrial process thermal energy. The process will include underground dissolution of potassium chloride (KCl) from pillars and other reserves remaining after completion of primary room and pillar mining using recirculating solutions heated in the SGSP. Production of KCl will involve cold crystallization followed by a cooling pond stage, with the spent brine being recirculated in a closed loop back to the SGSP for reheating. This research uses SGSP as a renewable, clean energy source to optimize the entire mining process, minimize environmental wastes, provide a safe, more economical extraction process and reduce the need for conventional processing by crushing, grinding and flotation. The applications of SGSP technology will not only save energy in the extraction and beneficiation processes, but also will produce excess energy available for power generation, desalination, and auxiliary structure heating.

Martell, J.A.; Aimone-Martin, C.T.

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

MHK Projects/Twin Pond | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twin Pond Twin Pond < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.7971,"lon":-89.1361,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study Study ID Nos. 546B, 563 Prepared RECYCLING PROGRAMS Study ID Nos. 546B and 563 Prepared for Southern California Edison Rosemead, California

133

Phosphorus release and retention by soils of natural isolated wetlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrological restoration of historically isolated wetlands may mitigate phosphorus (P) loss. The objectives of this study were to quantify P in soil, and to determine the effect of (1) soil characteristics on P release, and (2) antecedent soil hydrological conditions on P dynamics. Humic/fulvic acid bound P and residual P accounted for majority of P (>78%) in surface soils. Soils with highest nutrient status and labile P fractions released most P during initial flooding. Phosphorus dynamics during additional flooding were dependent on soil characteristics, antecedent soil hydrological conditions, and P levels in the water. Phosphorus retention varied between 0.3 and 8 mg m-2 d-1.

E.J. Dunne; K.R. Reddy; M.W. Clark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Western Pond Turtle; Habitat and History, 1993-1994 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The western pond turtle is known from many areas of Oregon. The majority of sightings and other records occur in the major drainages of the Klamath, Rogue, Umpqua, Willamette and Columbia River systems. A brief overview is presented of the evolution of the Willamette-Puget Sound hydrographic basin. A synopsis is also presented of the natural history of the western pond turtle, as well as, the status of this turtle in the Willamette drainage basin. The reproductive ecology and molecular genetics of the western pond turtle are discussed. Aquatic movements and overwintering of the western pond turtle are evaluated. The effect of introduced turtle species on the status of the western pond turtle was investigated in a central California Pond. Experiments were performed to determine if this turtle could be translocated as a mitigation strategy.

Holland, Dan C. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Diversity Program, Portland, OR)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian yellow pond Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chapter 19, verse 10), and ornamental fish... ponds appear in paintings from ancient Egypt. European aqua- culture began sometime in the Middle Ages... and transformed the "art"...

136

Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science Candidate,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science........................................................................................ 3 Arsenic in Soil & Sediments......................................................................................... 12 Sediment Digestion and Analysis

Short, Daniel

137

Enhancing harvestable algal biomass production in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds by recycling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs) are an efficient and cost-effective system for wastewater treatment and produce algal biomass which could be converted to biofuels. However, (more)

Park, Byung Kwan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - area process ponds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology 7 Tracing anthropogenic nutrient inputs into coastal plain ponds on an urban-rural gradient: a study using stable Summary: Tracing anthropogenic nutrient inputs into...

139

QSPR models of boiling point, octanolwater partition coefficient and retention time index of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QSPR models of boiling point, octanol­water partition coefficient and retention time index of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Fabiana Alves de Lima Ribeiro, Ma´rcia Miguel Castro Ferreira* Laborato Structure­Property Relationship (QSPR) analysis and study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

140

Temporary Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temporary waters are lakes, ponds, streams, seeps, microhabitats, and other areas that hold water periodically and then dry. They occur across the globe, at all latitudes, and in all biomes, wherever water can collect long enough for aquatic life to develop. These waters are numerous, mostly small, and easily studied. Their biological communities are diverse, have much among-site variation, often include endemic species, and differ from those in permanent waters, contributing to regional biodiversity. Organisms survive through species-specific behavioral, physiological, and life-history adaptations. Community composition and structure change in response to environmental variations. Temporary waters are highly productive and their food webs are relatively simple. For all of these reasons, temporary waters lend themselves to surveys and experimental manipulations designed to test hypotheses about biological adaptation, population regulation, evolutionary processes, community composition and structure, and ecosystem functioning. In many parts of the world, most temporary waters have been lost. The conservation and restoration of vulnerable temporary waters is a major thrust of applied ecology. Also important are applications of ecological understanding to the control of disease vectors, especially pathogen-transmitting mosquitoes, from temporary water habitats. This article describes temporary waters, examines their biota and adaptations, and summarizes key questions about their ecology.

E.A. Colburn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

120-D-1 (100-D) ponds training plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Environmental Restoration Contractor Team training plan for the 100-D Ponds treatment, storage, and disposal unit. This plan is intended to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303-330 and the Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit. The WAC 173-303-330(1)(d)(ii, v, vi) requires that personnel be familiar, where applicable, with waste feed cut-off systems, proper responses to groundwater contamination incidents, shutdown of operations, response to fire or explosion, and other process operation activities.

G. B. Mitchem

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hydrogeophysical investigations of the former S-3 ponds contaminant plumes, Oak Ridge Integrated Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogeophysical investigations of the former S-3 ponds contaminant plumes, Oak Ridge Integrated. Hubbard4 , T. L. Mehlhorn5 , and D. B. Watson5 ABSTRACT At the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contaminants from the former S-3 ponds have infiltrated

Hubbard, Susan

143

Algae/Bacteria Ratio in High-Rate Ponds Used for Waste Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ALGAE/BACTERIAL RATIO IN HIGH-RATE PONDS 573 1140 1120...ALGAE/BACTERIAL RATIO IN HIGH-RATE PONDS 575 and N is the...favorable operating conditions with high algal productivity, the algae...utilization in converted oil- fired boiler. Resource Recov. Conserv...

Gideon Oron; Gedaliah Shelef; Anna Levi; Arie Meydan; Yossef Azov

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

PROC. S.D. ACAD. SCI., VOL. 69 (1990) 109 EVALUATION OF AN EVAPORATION POND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in concert with production of electricity. However, we had no data on the extent of winterkill that would Dakota 57007 ABSTRACT The evaporation pond (85 hectares) at the Big Stone Power Plant, Milbank, SD at the Big Stone Power Plant, Milbank, South Dakota (reviewed by Berry 1988). The evaporation pond (85

145

Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment processes well adapted to small rural communities mainly because they are easy to operate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

147

Survival of the western pond turtle (Emys marmorata) in an urban California environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survival of the western pond turtle (Emys marmorata) in an urban California environment Phillip Q, 2320 Storer Hall, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA b Turtle Bay Museum and Arboretum; accepted 9 November 2002 Abstract The western pond turtle Emys (formerly Clemmys) marmorata is declining

Grether, Gregory

148

DOE Handbook on Recruitment and Retention Incentives | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Handbook on Recruitment and Retention Incentives Handbook on Recruitment and Retention Incentives DOE Handbook on Recruitment and Retention Incentives This desk reference contains sample recruitment, relocation, retention, and student loan incentive plans and service agreements for eligible employees; sample worksheets to assist in documenting the justification and approvals for all types of recruitment and retention incentives; information on superior qualification determinations; guidance and sample documents regarding crediting directly-related service for annual leave for new appointments; frequently asked questions regarding relocation expenses; and other relevant documents. This desk reference is intended to supplement information currently available in the following references. DOE Handbook on Recruitment and Retention Incentives

149

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of special compliance conditions Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

NAME: Molokai Fish Pond & Fringing Reef Restoration LOCATION: Kaunakakai, Island of Molokai (Maui County), Hawai'i  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: Molokai Fish Pond & Fringing Reef Restoration LOCATION: Kaunakakai, Island of Molokai (Maui fish ponds on the fringing reef of the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Mangroves were planted in 1902 conditions and threaten to take over the reef flats and fish ponds. EXPECTED BENEFITS: Fine sediment flushed

US Army Corps of Engineers

151

Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management and salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management: impoundments, marsh sediments, ponds, salinity Abstract Physical characteristics of sediments in coastal marsh compositions of waterbird communities. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain potentially

Afton, Alan D.

152

Design, construction, and initial operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory salt-gradient solar pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 232 m/sup 2/ solar pond was constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of studying pond hydrodynamics on a large scale and to complement the flow visualization and one-dimensional pond simulator experiments that are ongoing at the Laboratory. Design methods and construction techniques, some of which are unique to this pond, are described in detail. The pond was excavated from a soft volcanic rock known as tuff; such rock forms a large fraction of the Los Alamos area surface geology. Because tuff has a small thermal conductivity, little insulation was required to reduce perimeter energy losses. In addition, the strength of tuff permitted the pond to be built with vertical side walls; this design eliminated local side wall convection in the gradient zone that is possible with sloping side walls. Instrumentation in the pond consists of traversing and fixed rakes of thermometers and salinity probes, an underwater pyranometer, and a weather station. The traversing rake is a wheeled trolley driven vertically on a rectangular rail. Installed on the trolley are coplanar platinum RTDs, a point conductivity probe, and an induction salinometer. The stationary rake supports 28 thermocouples and 28 sample-fluid withdrawal taps located every 10 cm. About 127 T of sodium chloride has been introduced and is nearly dissolved. A 120-cm-thick salinity gradient was established and the pond is heating. Preliminary results indicate a lower-convective-zone heating rate of 1.2/sup 0/C/day during the pond's first month of operation. Recommendations on pond design, construction, and instrumentation are presented.

Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Dreicer, J.S.; Grimmer, D.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Reactive barriers for {sup 137}Cs retention  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sup 137}Cs was dispersed globally by cold war activities and, more recently, by the Chernobyl accident. Engineered extraction of {sup 137}Cs from soils and groundwaters is exceedingly difficult. Because the half life of {sup 137}Cs is only 30.2 years, remediation might be more effective (and less costly) if {sup 137}Cs bioavailability could be demonstrably limited for even a few decades by use of a reactive barrier. Essentially permanent isolation must be demonstrated in those few settings where high nuclear level wastes contaminated the environment with {sup 135}Cs (half life 2.3x10{sup 6} years) in addition to {sup 137}Cs. Clays are potentially a low-cost barrier to Cs movement, though their long-term effectiveness remains untested. To identify optimal clays for Cs retention Cs resorption was measured for five common clays: Wyoming Montmorillonite (SWy-1), Georgia Kaolinites (KGa-1 and KGa-2), Fithian Illite (F-Ill), and K-Metabentonite (K-Mbt). Exchange sites were pre-saturated with 0.16 M CsCl for 14 days and readily exchangeable Cs was removed by a series of LiNO{sub 3} and LiCl washes. Washed clay were then placed into dialysis bags and the Cs release to the deionized water outside the bags measured. Release rates from 75 to 139 days for SWy-1, K-Mbt and F- 111 were similar; 0.017 to 0.021% sorbed Cs released per day. Both kaolinites released Cs more rapidly (0.12 to 0.05% of the sorbed Cs per day). In a second set of experiments, clays were doped for 110 days and subjected to an extreme and prolonged rinsing process. All the clays exhibited some capacity for irreversible Cs uptake so most soils have some limited ability to act as a natural barrier to Cs migration. However, the residual loading was greatest on K-Mbt ({approximately} 0.33 wt% Cs). Thus, this clay would be the optimal material for constructing artificial reactive barriers.

KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; BRADY,PATRICK V.; ANDERSON,HOWARD L.

2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

154

Work Force Retention Work Group Charter  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Work force Retention Work Group is established to support the Departments critical focus on maintaining a high-performing work force at a time when a significant number of the workers needed to support DOEs national security mission are reaching retirement age.

155

Auditing a database under retention policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Auditing the changes to a database is critical for identifying malicious behavior, maintaining data quality, and improving system performance. But an accurate audit log is an historical record of the past that can also pose a serious threat to privacy. ... Keywords: Auditing, Privacy, Retention policy

Wentian Lu; Gerome Miklau; Neil Immerman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Task Force on Undergraduate Retention and Graduation: Meeting Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Task Force on Undergraduate Retention and Graduation: Meeting Documentation April 28, 2011 Part 1 such as tenacity impacting retention and graduation are more difficult to measure and have not been tracked

Bieber, Michael

157

Recruiting, Retention & Advancement Recruiting: Searching for Excellence and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Recruiting, Retention & Advancement Recruiting: Searching for Excellence and Diversity: A Workshop for Faculty Search Committee Chairs Retention: Enhancing Department Climate: A Chair's Role Advancement: Senior women meetings #12;Recruiting 3-part workshops for chairs of hiring committees Based

Sheridan, Jennifer

158

Evaluation of models for predicting evaporative water loss in cooling impoundments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling impoundments can offer a number of advantages over cooling towers for condenser water cooling at steam electric power plants. However, a major disadvantage of cooling ponds is a lack of confidence in the ability ...

Helfrich, Karl Richard

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS R. K. Hadlock 0 . B. Abbey Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories Prepared for U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission b + NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, nor assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, pro- duct or process disclosed, nor represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. F Available from National Technical Information Service

160

ELECTROKINETIC DENSIFICATION OF COAL FINES IN WASTE PONDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. In this experimental and analytical study the authors elucidate the transport processes that control the rate of concentrated colloidal particle removal, demonstrate the process on a laboratory scale, and develop the scale-up laws needed to design commercial-scale processes. The authors are also addressing the fundamental problems associated with particle-particle interactions (electrical and hydrodynamic), the effects of particle concentration on the applied electric field, the electrochemical reactions that occur at the electrodes, and the prediction of power requirements.

E. James Davis

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Gerber, M.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Energy-Water Nexus for Mass Cultivation of Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy-Water Nexus for Mass Cultivation of Algae ... This work addresses the energy needed to manage the water used in the mass cultivation of saline, eukaryotic algae grown in open pond systems. ... Estimates of both direct and upstream energy requirements for obtaining, containing, and circulating water within algae cultivation systems are developed. ...

Cynthia Folsom Murphy; David T. Allen

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility.

L. V. Street

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

300 Area Building Retention Evaluation Mitigation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluate the long-term retention of several facilities associated with the PNNL Capability Replacement Laboratory and other Hanfor mission needs. WCH prepared a mitigation plan for three scenarios with different release dates for specific buildings. The evaluations present a proposed plan for providing utility services to retained facilities in support of a long-term (+20 year) lifespan in addition to temporary services to buildings with specified delayed release dates.

D. J. McBride

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

Deuterium Retention in NSTX with Lithium Conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High (approximate to 90%) deuterium retention was observed in NSTX gas balance measurements both with- and without lithiumization of the carbon plasma-facing components. The gas retained in ohmic discharges was measured by comparing the vessel pressure rise after a discharge to that of a gas-only pulse with the pumping valves closed. For neutral beam heated discharges the gas input and gas pumped by the NB cryopanels were tracked. The discharges were followed by outgassing of deuterium that reduced the retention. The relationship between retention and surface chemistry was explored with a new plasma-material interface probe connected to an in vacuo surface science station that exposed four material samples to the plasma. XPS and TDS analysis demonstrated that binding of D atoms in graphite is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular atoms are weakly bonded in regions near lithium atoms bound to either oxygen or the carbon matrix. This is in contrast to the strong ionic bonding that occurs between D and pure Li. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Allain, J. P. [Purdue University; Blanchard, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kugel, H. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Roquemore, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Soukhanovskii, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Taylor, C. N. [Purdue University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Diversity and conservation status of large branchiopods (Crustacea) in ponds of western Poland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A survey on temporary ponds has been conducted in search for large branchiopod crustaceans (Anostraca, Notostraca, Spinicaudata and Laevicaudata) in Wielkopolska province (western Poland). 728 pools have been studied and large branchiopods have been found in 221 of them. Seven species have been recorded, including three anostracans: Branchipus schaefferi, Chirocephalus shadini and Eubranchipus grubii; two notostracans: Lepidurus apus and Triops cancriformis; one spinicaudatan, Cyzicus tetracerus and one laevicaudatan, Lynceus brachyurus. According to the analysis of co-occurrence, the species form three groups, differing in habitat preferences and conservation status. The number of species shows that the diversity of globally threatened large branchiopods is still relatively high in the region. On the other hand, their conservation status is highly diverse and in most species unfavourable. Distribution of all species is highly clustered: large branchiopods have been generally found in 33 UTM squares (10נ10km) of 96 squares studied. However, only two species, i.e. E. grubii and L. apus occurred in more than five such squares and could be assessed as moderately widespread. Most water bodies inhabited by large branchiopods occur in groups forming patches of suitable habitats which are dispersed among prevailing seemingly unsuitable areas. Sustaining the existence of large metapopulations seems, therefore, to be essential for conservation of branchiopod species diversity. Field observations also bring some examples of human activities unintentionally supporting the branchiopod conservation.

Bart?omiej Go?dyn; Rafa? Bernard; Micha? Jan Czy?; Anna Jankowiak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Texas AgriLife Research with General Atomics Pilots Microalgae Ponds in Pecos BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas AgriLife Research with General Atomics Pilots Microalgae Ponds in Pecos BIOENERGY PROGRAM on the tank bottom will be opened. The Continued on back #12;http://AgBioenergy.tamu.edu concentrated algae

169

Is degradation of the herbicide atrazine enhanced in turfgrass pond sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To further understand the fate of atrazine, a herbicide of public concern in the environment, this study was undertaken to determine if atrazine degradation potential is increased in turfgrass ponds having a history of repeated exposure...

Shourds, Shalyn Wayne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Salt Gradient Solar Pond for Solar Heat Collection and Lang Term Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Work is described concerning the instrumentation, thermal modelling and laboratory tests on a salt gradient solar pond to be used for heat collection and storage. A densitameter capable of measuring the salinity....

V. Phillips; P. J. Unsworth; N. A. Al-Saleh

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The effect of heterocope predation on zooplankton communities in arctic ponds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of Heterocope septentrionalis, a predacious calanoid copepod, on five species of artic pond zooplankton is investigated. Prey species coexisting with Heterocope are relatively invulnerable to predation, but ...

O'Brien, W. John; Luecke, C.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Reclamation of Abandoned Shrimp Pond Soils in Southern Thailand for Cultivation of Mauritius Grass (Brachiaria mutica)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study on soil reclamation for cultivation of Mauritius grass was conducted on soils obtained from abandoned shrimp ponds at Ranote District, Songkhla Province, southern Thailand. A glass house experiment on ...

P. Towatana; C. Voradej; N. Leeraphante

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Comparative growth of six strains of largemouth bass in Texas ponds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARATIVE GROWTH OF SIX STRAINS OF LARGEMOUTH BASS IN TEXAS PONDS A Thesis by ALAN EUGENE RUDD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1985 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences COMPARATIVE GROWTH OF SIX STRAINS OF LARGEMOUTH BASS IN TEXAS PONDS A Thesis by ALAN EUGENE RUDD Approved as to style and content by: Richard L. Noble (Chairman) William H. Neill (Member) J...

Rudd, Alan Eugene

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Chironomids associated with common microhabitats in three ponds in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species of Chironomidae per ha- bitat, per season in TAMU Golf Course Pond, TAMU Research Park Pond and Bryan Municipal Lake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 INTRODUCTION The family Chironomidae is an ecologically important group... of aquatic insects often occurring in high densities and diversities. The relatively short life cycles and the large total biomass of the numerous larvae confer ecological energetic significance on this taxon (as consumers and prey) and the partitioning...

Hernandez Oviedo, Alba Isbela

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

SHORT COMMUNICATION Nitrogen recovery from shrimp pond efuent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the water as ammonia (total ammonia nitrogen, TAN), through either direct excretion by animals or ammoni

Lorenzen, Kai

176

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Metropolitan area: an additional ecosystem service?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Special thanks to all of our field and lab help: Rebecca Hale, Stevan Earl, Bony Ahmed, Lin Ye, Jolene. Samples were then taken throughout the day to assess water concentrations and gas losses (see photos

Hall, Sharon J.

177

Cooking utensil with improved heat retention  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber therebetween. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food.

Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burch, Steven D. (Golden, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

University of Arizona Water Sustainability Program Conservation Easement Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ranches as the single greatest threat to wildlife habitat, water supply and the long-term viability regulation of hydrological flows, storage and retention of water, and waste treatment and detoxification

Fay, Noah

180

Potential Role of Biochar in Water Management in Rainfed Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

employed to help manage agricultural water sustainably. Previous studies indicate that incorporation of biochar into sandy soil improves its water retention capacity. This study demonstrates how addition of biochar produced from different feedstock biomass...

Flavia, Namagembe

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Solar-thermal-energy collection/storage-pond system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar thermal energy collection and storage system is disclosed. Water is contained, and the water surface is exposed directly to the sun. The central part of an impermeable membrane is positioned below the water's surface and above its bottom with a first side of the membrane pointing generally upward in its central portion. The perimeter part of the membrane is placed to create a watertight boundary separating the water into a first volume which is directly exposable to the sun and which touches the membranes first side, and a second volumn which touches the membranes second side. A salt is dissolved in the first water volume.

Blahnik, D.E.

1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

06-0500 06-0500 14.4 06-0501 14.53 15-M03S 14.97 18-0500 14.34 18-0502 14.23 18-0521 14.18 18-0525 14.31 18-0526 13.79 20-M025 14.26 20-M035 14.4 21-0502 12.66 21-0503 12.34 21-0504 13.12 21-0505 13.23 18-0524 14.24 12-0539 12.86 18-RW02 14.09 18-RW03 14.16 12-0523 14.43 12-0525 13.7 12-S29C 14.25 12-S32B 14.4 12-S35B 14.18 12-S37B 14.59 15-0530 14.13 15-M14S 14.68 12-0509 14.52 12-0513 13.64 12-0517 14.08 12-0521 14.35 12-0526 12.88 12-RW01 14.55 12-S31B 14.25 12-S36B 13.99 12-TE03 13.95 15-0507 13.45 15-0510 14.1 15-0515 14.24 15-0516 13.95 15-0520 13.52 15-M27S 13.84 15-M32S 14.61 18-0504 14.4 20-M003 14.54 20-M012 14.96 20-M024 14.55 20-M40S 14.45 12-S67C 13.92 12-S67B 13.85 12-S68B 13.62 12-S68C 13.47 12-S69B 12.96 12-S69C 12.95 12-S70B 13.37 12-S70C 13.4 12-S71C 13.39 12-S72B 13.11 12-S72C 12.99 12-S73B 12.95 12-S73C 12.87 15-0568 14.05 15-0571 14.4 18-RW0501 14.2 20-RW01

183

East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

12-S30B 713.6 12-S30B 713.6 12-S33C 1863 12-S35B 38320 15-0534 ND 20-M003 ND 20-M005 ND 20-M054 3.9 12-S68D 164.7 12-S69C ND 12-S70B 30 12-S70C 70 12-S71C 77 12-S72C 3.8 12-S73B ND 12-S73C 11.9 12-S67B 349.9 12-S67C 197.2 12-S67D 56.7 15-0566 101 12-0527 ND 12-S69D ND 12-S70D 43.2 12-S71D 28.2 12-S72D ND 12-S71B ND 12-S69B ND 20-M028 ND 20-M011 ND 20-M019 ND 20-0503 4.1 20-M024 ND 20-M025 ND 20-M035 2.9 20-M036 ND 20-M38D ND 20-M40S ND 20-M023 ND 20-M41D ND 15-0569 5.6 20-MWL3 996.1 20-M049 5.6 20-M22D 4.2 15-0559 ND 15-M32S ND 15-M32D ND 06-0500 ND 12-0526 8.5 12-0509 ND 12-0514 46.2 12-0524 1214 12-0513 ND 12-0525 1.4 12-0515 ND 12-0516 ND 12-0517 ND 12-0550-3 ND 21-0502 2.1 21-0503 ND 21-0504 ND 21-0505 ND 15-0535 17.6 15-0537 750 15-M16D ND 15-M16S ND 12-0518 1.5 12-S68C 35 12-S73D ND 20-M012 ND 20-0502 32 20-M40D ND 15-M27D ND

184

Responses of phtyoplankton photosynthesis and phosphorus kinetics to resuspended sediments in copper sulfate-treated ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six farm ponds (dugouts) and one lake that differ in the history of copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) treatment were selected for studies of effects of sediments resuspension on phytoplankton. All sites are located within 50 km of Peace River, Alberta, and are shallow, hardwater, and eutrophic. Effects of sediment resuspension on phytoplankton photosynthesis were assessed by changes in the photosynthesis-irradiance P-D curve parameters, Pmax and {alpha}, after addition of sediment at 2% v/v to lakewater samples; the effects on phytoplankton P-state were assessed by changes in {sup 32}PO{sub 4} turnover time. Copper concentrations in sediments of Gour No. 4, the dugout that had received the largest dosage of CuSO{sub 4}, were 60-times greater than untreated sites but were only 1.5 to 3-times greater at the other treated sites. Changes of Pmax and {alpha} were not correlated with Cu concentrations in the sediments. Instead, the prevailing P-state in lakewater could better explain the observed trends in Pmax after sediment addition. Pmax values decreased at sites where phytoplankton were P-limited ({sup 32} P-PO{sub 4} turnover time <63 min) and increased at more P-sufficient sites ({sup 32}P-PO{sub 4} turnover time >63 min). Stimulation of Pmax and increase in {sup 32}P-PO{sub 4} turnover time were positively correlated. With the exception of Gour No. 4, values of a increased in all treatments. Similar changes in Pmax and a in response to sediment addition occurred in laboratory experiments with P-sufficient cultures of Anabaena flos-aquae. We suggest that, with the exception of grossly Cu-polluted sediments, resuspension of sediments in waters previously treated with CuSO{sub 4} will enhance phytoplankton photosynthesis by increasing P availability, and possibly by supplying Cu at trace metal levels. 25 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Nalewajko, C. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Prepas, E.E. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Vitrification demonstration with surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation K-25 B and C pond sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) K-25 B&C Pond sludge was vitrified in a pilot-scale EnVit Co melter operated by Clemson University at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research Center. This demonstration was performed for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in support of a Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Technology Development (OTD) Technical Task Plan. The intent of the demonstration was to determine the feasibility of vitrifying actual K-25 B&C Pond sludge in an EnVitCo type melter. B&C Pond sludge is a mixed waste consisting primarily of various amounts of Ca, Fe, and Si, with Ni and U as the principal hazardous and radioactive components. The demonstration was successfully completed and homogeneous, durable glass was produced. Characterization of the glass product, as well as details of the demonstration, will be discussed.

Cicero, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Overcamp, T.J.; Erich, D.L. [Clemson Univ., Anderson, SC (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Utilization of SRS pond ash in controlled low strength material. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design mixes for Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) were developed which incorporate pond ashes (fly ashes) from the A-Area Ash Pile, the old F-Area Ash Basin and the D-Area Ash Basin. CLSM is a pumpable, flowable, excavatable backfill used in a variety of construction applications at SRS. Results indicate that CLSM which meets all of the SRS design specifications for backfill, can be made with the A-, D-, and F-Area pond ashes. Formulations for the design mixes are provided in this report. Use of the pond ashes may result in a cost savings for CLSM used at SRS and will utilize a by-product waste material, thereby decreasing the amount of material requiring disposal.

Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The role of zooplankton in the ecological succession of plankton and benthic algae across a salinity gradient in the Shark Bay solar salt ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relatively low biodiversity and simple hydrodynamics make solar salt ponds ideal sites for ecological studies. We have studied the ecological gradient of the primary ponds at the Shark ... representative of t...

Louise C. Bruce; Jrg Imberger

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Warming shifts top-down and bottom-up control of pond food web structure and function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...top-down and bottom-up control of pond food web structure and function Jonathan B. Shurin...structuring experimental freshwater pond food webs in western Canada over 16 months. Experimental...temperatures produced top-heavy food webs with lower biomass of benthic and pelagic...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Novel Americium Treatment Process for Surface Water and Dust Suppression Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), a former nuclear weapons production plant, has been remediated under CERCLA and decommissioned to become a National Wildlife Refuge. The site conducted this cleanup effort under the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) that established limits for the discharge of surface and process waters from the site. At the end of 2004, while a number of process buildings were undergoing decommissioning, routine monitoring of a discharge pond (Pond A-4) containing approximately 28 million gallons of water was discovered to have been contaminated with a trace amount of Americium-241 (Am-241). While the amount of Am-241 in the pond waters was very low (0.5 - 0.7 pCi/l), it was above the established Colorado stream standard of 0.15 pCi/l for release to off site drainage waters. The rapid successful treatment of these waters to the regulatory limit was important to the site for two reasons. The first was that the pond was approaching its hold-up limit. Without rapid treatment and release of the Pond A-4 water, typical spring run-off would require water management actions to other drainages onsite or a mass shuttling of water for disposal. The second reason was that this type of contaminated water had not been treated to the stringent stream standard at Rocky Flats before. Technical challenges in treatment could translate to impacts on water and secondary waste management, and ultimately, cost impacts. All of the technical challenges and specific site criteria led to the conclusion that a different approach to the treatment of this problem was necessary and a crash treatability program to identify applicable treatment techniques was undertaken. The goal of this program was to develop treatment options that could be implemented very quickly and would result in the generation of no high volume secondary waste that would be costly to dispose. A novel chemical treatment system was developed and implemented at the RFETS to treat Am-241 contaminated pond water, surface run-off and D and D dust suppression water during the later stages of the D and D effort at Rocky Flats. This novel chemical treatment system allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment of all contaminated waste waters to the very low stream standard of 0.15 pCi/1 with strict compliance to the RFCA discharge criteria for release to off-site surface waters. The rapid development and implementation of the treatment system avoided water management issues that would have had to be addressed if contaminated water had remained in Pond A-4 into the Spring of 2005. Implementation of this treatment system for the Pond A-4 waters and the D and D waters from Buildings 776 and 371 enabled the site to achieve cost-effective treatment that minimized secondary waste generation, avoiding the need for expensive off-site water disposal. Water treatment was conducted for a cost of less than $0.20/gal which included all development costs, capital costs and operational costs. This innovative and rapid response effort saved the RFETS cleanup program well in excess of $30 million for the potential cost of off-site transportation and treatment of radioactive liquid waste. (authors)

Tiepel, E.W.; Pigeon, P. [Golder Associates (United States); Nesta, S. [Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (United States); Anderson, J. [Rocky Flats Closure Site Services - RFCSS (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[2]. The distance which the wind has to act on the surface of a pond is commonly called fetch, or fetch length. The purpose of the nets or other devices used in wind suppression is to reduce the fetch and transmit some of the energy in the waves... to the sides of the pond. Wind mixing of the upper convective zone can be thought of as converting some of the kinetic energy in the wind to potential energy in the fluid by a process called entrainment. Entrainment is defined in detail in Chapter V...

McMinn, Steven Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December I97S Hajor Subject: Wildlife and. Fisheries Sciences THE EFFECTS OF CATTLE ON SHORELINE VEGETATION OF PONDS AND TANKS IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis by RICHARD JOHN WHITE Approved as to content and style by: Chairmen of Committee Head... of Department M ber ber December 1978 ABSTRACT Ti e Effe ts of Cattle on Shoreline Vegetation of Ponds a", !d Tanks in "outh Texas. (December i978) Richard John Nhytc, B, Nat ~ Res. , University of New England Chairman of Mvisory Committee: Dr. N ~ J...

Whyte, Richard John

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Estimated Costs and Returns for Catfish Farms with Recirculating Ponds Along the Upper Texas Coast.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_TDOC ' Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1704 - . , ., TEXAS A&M UNIVERSHY LIBRARY for Catfish Farms ' with Recirculating Ponds Along ? . . the Upper Texas Coast ~7'!K~fi~~~ation ? J. Charles Lee: Interim Director? The Texas A&M University System ? C...~J1ege Station, Texas :,. .,: (Blank Page in OrigiBal BuBetiol ' 1iJ. ~ ; :; . : . . / I Estimated Costs and Returns for Catfish Farms with Recirculating Ponds Along the Upper Texas Coast J.A.D. Lambregts, Marketing Manager for Niaid...

Lambregts, J.A.D.; Griffin, W.L.; Lacewell R.D.; Davis, J.T.; Clary, G.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

Hull, J.R.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis retention behaviour Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

retention, which... the criterion for retention analysis) into account (Table 1). Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA revealed a significant effect... Part One SCN AND MEMORY PROCESSES...

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects mibg retention Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

constipation, functional fecal retention, and non-retentive fecal soiling. A... time. Boys and girls are equally affected. 12;Infant Dyschezia Dyschezia ... Source: Louisiana...

197

Formation and retention of methane in coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Southwest region solar pond study for three sites: Tularosa Basin, Malaga Bend, and Canadian River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the study, the Bureau of Reclamation investigated the technical and economic feasibility of using solar salt-gradient ponds to generate power and to produce freshwater in Bureau projects at three sites--the Canadian River at Logan, New Mexico; Malaga Bend on the Pecos River near Carlsbad, New Mexico; and the Tularosa Basin in the vicinity of Alamogordo, New Mexico. The ponds would be used to generate electric power that could be integrated with the Bureau's power grid or used in combination with thermal energy from the ponds to power commercially available desalination systems to produce freshwater. Results of the economic analysis, which concentrated primarily on the Tularosa Basin site, showed that solar-pond-generated intermediate load power would cost between 62 and 90 mills/kWh and between 52 and 83 mills/kWh for baseload power. This results in benefit-cost ratios of approximately 2.0 and 1.3 for intermediate and baseload, respectively, when compared to similar facilities powered by fossil fuels. The cost savings are even more pronounced when comparing the two (solar versus fossil fuel) as a source of power for conventional distillation and membrane-type desalination systems.

Boegli, W.J.; Dahl, M.M.; Remmers, H.E.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the atmosphere and ocean. In particular, sea ice affects the polar climate by insulating the ocean fromA continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 the Northern Hemisphere summer, absorbed solar radiation melts snow and the upper surface of Arctic sea ice

Feltham, Daniel

200

2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses Main Canal B Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 16  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-325 2008 Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses Main Canal B Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 16 Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering... MAIN CANAL B HIDALGO COUNTY IRRIGATION DISTRICT NO. 16 Report Prepared by: Eric Leigh and Guy Fipps,1 P.E. February 17, 2004 IRRIGATION TECHNOLOGY CENTER Texas Cooperative Extension - Texas Agricultural...

Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

202

Pond thermal stratification and turnover -A 1 Year Experiment Last updated on 9 Dec 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We recorded the temperatures once every 50 sec continuously. The voltage output of a solar cell is also recorded. The solar cell shows sunrise and sunset and the passing of clouds. The pond is located fruitful discussions and the loan of equipment. James D. Brownridge (9 Dec 08) jdbjdb@binghamton.edu. #12;

Suzuki, Masatsugu

203

Tracing anthropogenic nutrient inputs to coastal plain ponds using stable Wayne Daniel1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to determine if invasive species Phragmites australis is dependent on sewage derived nitrogen using stable tissues in Duck Pond expressed elevated del 15 N values. Del 15 N of and Phragmites australis suggested colonization. Phragmites australis is know in North America as the common reed, but has a genetic lineage

Vallino, Joseph J.

204

September 2012, Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview 2 Subgroups: Pro-Force and Non-Pro-Force Pro-Force Subgroup: Accomplishments: 1. Completion of 10 CFR 1046 [Protective Force Personnel Medical, Physical Readiness, Training, and Access Authorization Standards] as a final rule that includes modification efforts to address barriers to workforce retention. 2. Pro-Force (PF) union representative, Randy Lawson, identified this accomplishment as the single most significant step toward PF workforce retention in over 20 years. 3. Draft re-charter of PF Career Options Committee (PFCOC) to establish a PF Working Group approved by GC-63 and GC NNSA. Near Term Goals and Activities: 1. Publish 1046 as a final rule - publication anticipated this month.

205

July 2012, Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview Accomplishments: 1. Progress on the completion of the 10 CFR 1046 modifications to address barriers to workforce retention. Written response to public comment is being drafted by HS-51. 2. Pro-Force (PF) union representative, Randy Lawson, identified this accomplishment as the single most significant step toward PF workforce retention in over 20 years. 3. Draft re-charter of PF Career Options Committee (PFCOC) to establish a PF Working Group approved by GC-63 and GC NNSA. Near Term Goals and Activities: 1. Publish 1046 as a final rule - anticipated completion no later than September, assuming timely OMB review and approval. 2. Draft PF Working Group charter final review by senior management to be

206

Task Force on Undergraduate Retention and Graduation: Meeting Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Task Force on Undergraduate Retention and Graduation: Meeting Documentation March 17, 2011 Part 1 Altenkirch Charge to the Committee, February 3, 2011 Meeting Date: March 17, 2011; minutes revised on April

Bieber, Michael

207

Retention of neptunium in uranyl alteration phases formed during spent fuel corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranyl oxide hydrate phases are known to form during contact of oxide spent nuclear fuel with water under oxidizing conditions; however, less is known about the fate of fission and neutron capture products during this alteration. We describe, the first time, evidence that neptunium can become incorporated into the uranyl secondary phase, dehydrated schoepite (UO{sub 3}{lg_bullet}0.8H{sub 2}O). Based on the long-term durability of natural schoepite, the retention of neptunium in this alteration phase may be significant during spent fuel corrosion in an unsaturated geologic repository.

Buck, E.C.; Finch, R.J.; Finn, P.A.; Bates, J.K.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Chemical analysis of groundwater from Mokapu was severely restricted by the absence of drilled wells; the only groundwater sources present were five shallow, brackish ponds, Chemical data indicated that all of the ponds consisted of seawater diluted by varying amounts of fresh surface water; no thermal alteration was revealed by the water chemistry (Table 2). Available temperature and water chemistry data on the Koolau caldera area were also assessed as part of the Mokapu study. The results of this analysis (Table

209

Bubble retention in synthetic sludge: Testing of alternative gas retention apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several of the underground storage tanks currently used to store waste at Hanford have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. The objective of this experimental study is to develop a method to measure gas bubble retention in simulated tank waste and in diluted simulant. The method and apparatus should (1) allow for reasonably rapid experiments, (2) minimize sample disturbance, and (3) provide realistic bubble nucleation and growth. The scope of this experimental study is to build an apparatus for measuring gas retention in simulated waste and to design the apparatus to be compatible with future testing on actual waste. The approach employed for creating bubbles in sludge involves dissolving a soluble gas into the supernatant liquid at an elevated pressure, recirculating the liquid containing the dissolved gas through the sludge, then reducing the pressure to allow bubbles to nucleate and grow. Results have been obtained for ammonia as the soluble gas and SY1-SIM-91A, a chemically representative simulated tank waste. In addition, proof-of-principle experiments were conducted with both ammonia and CO{sub 2} as soluble gases and sludge composed of 90-micron glass beads. Results are described.

Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mercury in the Atmosphere, Snow and Melt Water Ponds in the North  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Institute for Coastal Research/Physical and Chemical Analysis, G.K.S.S. Research Centre Geesthacht, D-21502 Geesthacht, Germany, and Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Ge´ophysique de l'Environnement du C.N.R.S., 54 rue

Jacob, Daniel J.

211

Identification and quantification of the source terms for uranium in surface waters collected at the Rocky Flats facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intent of this study was to determine the fraction of soluble uranium attributable to the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) operations which is recoverable from waters and suspended sediments drawn from ponds on site at RFP. Samples were collected from late 1992 through 1993. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) measurement techniques indicate that the water samples contain both naturally occurring uranium and depleted uranium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.5% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public.

D.W. Efurd; D.J. Rokop; R.D. Aguilar; F.R. Roensch; J.C. Banar; R.E. Perrin

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Thirtieth anniversary of the retention index according to Kovts in gas-liquid chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GC retention data measured in various laboratories are given in many different forms and therefore their usefulness is limited. The retention index system according to Kovts solves the problem of the uniform expression of retention data. In this review, the main theoretical and practical results relating to retention index systems published in the past 5 years are summarized.

G. Tarjn; Sz. Nyiredy; M. Gyr; E.R. Lombosi; T.S. Lombosi; M.V. Budahegyi; S.Y. Mszros; J.M. Takcs

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 57 (2012) Long-Term Weather Patterns,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program have been forced to stop sampling their lakes because there is not enough water to get a boat out true for much of central Florida: · Low water in area lakes Shrinking lakes, ponds, creeks and rivers

Watson, Craig A.

214

Experimental and numerical investigations of mixing in raceway ponds for algae cultivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The current high interest in the algae sector is leading to the development of several demo/commercial scale projects, either for the food market or bioenergy production. Raceway Ponds (RWPs) are a widely used technology for algae mass cultivation. \\{RWPs\\} were developed long time ago, and thus capital and operating costs are well assessed. Nevertheless, room still exists to further reduce operational costs. A possible route towards energy optimization and therefore operational cost reduction can be identified through a better understanding of the mixing phenomena. The focus of the present work is that vertical mixing, defined as the cyclical movement of the algal cells between surface and bottom layers of the culture, cannot be completely determined by considering only turbulence, and therefore it is not represented by the Re number. A 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of a conventional RWP was carried out based on a multi-phase Volume of Fluid model, in order to investigate the flow field of the culture in the pond. The CFD results were compared with experimental measures on a 20m2 pilot RWP. Once agreement among CFD and experimental results was shown, a statistical evaluation of the trajectories calculated for algae particles in the flow was carried out. The aim of this statistical evaluation was to define the level of vertical mixing in different sections of the pond. The model proposed was then used to scale-up the results to a demo/pre-commercial size RWP (500m2). The standard deviation of the actual trajectory was calculated with respect to the undisturbed trajectory for each section modeled. The results of the simulation showed that a limited mixing is to be expected in RWPs. In the long straight parts of the pond vertical mixing is poor and algae tend to settle to the bottom. Only in the bends the vortexes produced by flow separation move part of the culture from the bottom to the top and vice-versa. This result does not fit with the practice, typically observed in large scale ponds, of reducing vortexes around the bends by placing baffles. The method described can be applied to different pond designs operated at different culture velocities.

Matteo Prussi; Marco Buffi; David Casini; David Chiaramonti; Francesco Martelli; Mauro Carnevale; Mario R. Tredici; Liliana Rodolfi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 179 individual painted turtles captured in 2006 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Trophic structure and avian communities across a salinity gradient in evaporation ponds of the San Francisco Bay estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial salt evaporation ponds comprise a large proportion of baylands adjacent to the San Francisco Bay, a highly urbanized estuary. In the past two centuries, more than 79% of the historic tidal wetlands ...

J. Y. Takekawa; A. K. Miles; D. H. Schoellhamer; N. D. Athearn

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Trophic structure and avian communities across a salinity gradient in evaporation ponds of the San Francisco Bay estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial salt evaporation ponds comprise a large proportion of baylands adjacent to the San Francisco Bay, a highly urbanized estuary. In the past two centuries, more than 79% of the historic tidal wetlands ...

J. Y. Takekawa; A. K. Miles; D. H. Schoellhamer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Environmental assessment of coal ash ponds of thermal power plants in the south of the Russian Far East  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of environmental assessment of ash ponds of thermal power plants in Vladivostok and Khabarovsk are given. High radioactivity of coal in the Russian Far East is responsible ... accumulation of radionuc...

V. P. Zvereva; L. T. Krupskaya

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

Tsilingiris, P.T. (Commercial Bank of Greece, Athens (Greece))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The redox and iron-sulfide geochemistry of Salt Pond and the thermodynamic constraints on native magnetotactic bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salt pond is a meromictic system with an outlet to the sea allowing denser seawater to occupy the monimolimnion while the mixolimnion has relatively low salinity and is the site of greater mixing and microbial activity. ...

Canovas, Peter A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Grass Upland Water Quality Wednesday November 21st 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grass Upland Water Quality Workshop Wednesday November 21st 2007 Water Quality in the Uplands financial support to farming could protect rural economies while reducing this damage to water. Help farmers · Unnatural spates ­ potential downstream flooding little water retention on land uneven flows lack

Quinton, John

223

Portable conduit retention apparatus for releasably retaining a conduit therein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Portable conduit retention apparatus for releasably retaining a conduit therein. The apparatus releasably retains the conduit out of the way of nearby personnel and equipment. The apparatus includes a portable support frame defining a slot therein having an open mouth portion in communication with the slot for receiving the conduit through the open mouth portion and into the slot. A retention bar is pivotally connected to the support frame adjacent the mouth portion for releasably retaining the conduit in the slot. The retention bar freely pivots to a first position, so that the mouth portion is unblocked in order that the conduit is received through the mouth portion and into the slot. In addition, the retention bar freely pivots to a second position, so that the mouth portion is blocked in order that the conduit is retained in the slot. The conduit is released from the slot by pivoting the retention bar to the first position to unblock the mouth portion and thereafter manipulating the conduit from the slot and through the mouth portion. The apparatus may further include a mounting member attached to the support frame for mounting the apparatus on a vertical support surface. Another embodiment of the apparatus includes a shoe assembly of predetermined weight removably connected to the support frame for resting the apparatus on a floor in such a manner that the apparatus is substantially stationary on the floor.

Metzger, Richard H. (West Seneca, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Microsoft Word - DUR-2012_Final.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

from the cell in the retention pond is being pumped out and dispersed through drip lines onto the pond side slopes to enhance evaporation. Decommissioning of the retention...

225

DOE/EA-1075 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED CASEY'S POND IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

75 75 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED CASEY'S POND IMPROVEMENT PROJECT MAY 1995 DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT I S UNLMlTED DOE /EA4075 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED CASEY'S POND IMPROVEMENT PROJECT DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied. or assumes any legal liability or respnsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

226

Miamisburg salt-gradient solar pond: mid-1980 status report. [For swimming pool heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The largest salt-gradient solar pond in the US was constructed by the City of Miamisburg, Ohio to provide heat for an outdoor swimming pool in the summer and an adjacent recreational building from October to December. The pond which occupies an area of 2020 m/sup 2/ was installed for $35/m/sup 2/ and is conservatively estimated to provide 1012 GJ/year (960 million Btu) at a cost of $6.80/GJ ($7.20/MBtu). During July to September 1979, 143.5 GJ (136 million Btu) of heat was utilized. Several unpredicted operational concerns have been noted related to corrosion of the metallic heat exchanger and the failure of selected seams in the plastic liner. Based upon two years of experience, suggestions are made to prevent or minimize these difficulties.

Wittenberg, L.J.; Harris, M.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, Third quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During third quarter 1992, the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were sampled for analyses required each quarter or annually by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for base-neutral/acid semivolatile constituents. None of the analytical results exceeded standards.

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 renews the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate defense nuclear facilities. Retaining highly qualified employees in critical technical skills areas is vital to the maintenance of these technical capabilities. The Department has therefore committed in the revised R? to the development of a model that offices can use to proactively manage and preserve critical technical capabilities. During the

229

Does UV disinfection compromise sutures? An evaluation of tissue response and suture retention in salmon surgically implanted with transmitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can be used as a tool to disinfect surgery tools used for implanting transmitters into fish. However, the use of UVR could possibly degrade monofilament suture material used to close surgical incisions. This research examined the effect of UVR on monofilament sutures to determine if they were compromised and negatively influenced tag and suture retention, incision openness, or tissue reaction. Eighty juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were surgically implanted with an acoustic transmitter and a passive integrated transponder. The incision was closed with a single stitch of either a suture exposed to 20 doses of UV radiation (5 minute duration per dose) or a new, sterile suture. Fish were then held for 28 d and examined under a microscope at day 7, 14, 21 and 28 for incision openness, ulceration, redness, and the presence of water mold. There was no significant difference between treatments for incision openness, redness, ulceration or the presence of water mold on any examination day. On day 28 post-surgery, there were no lost sutures; however, 2 fish lost their transmitters (one from each treatment). The results of this study do not show any differences in negative influences such as tissue response, suture retention or tag retention between a new sterile suture and a suture disinfected with UVR.

Walker, Ricardo W.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.; Eppard, M. B.; Cooke, Steven J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources October 8, 2013 - 9:50am Addthis Many Federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from alternate water sources. Potentially available alternative water sources for Federal sources include municipal-supplied reclaimed water, treated gray water from on-site sanitary sources, and storm water. Overview On-site alternative water sources are most economic if included in the original design. Common uses for these sources include landscape irrigation, ornamental pond and fountain filling, cooling tower make-up, and toilet and urinal flushing. Municipal-Supplied Reclaimed Water Municipal supplied reclaimed water has been treated and recycled for

232

Arsenate and Chromate Retention Mechanisms on Goethite. 2.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenate and Chromate Retention Mechanisms on Goethite. 2. Kinetic Evaluation Using a Pressure on goethite (R-FeOOH) were investigated using apressure-jump(p-jump)relaxationtechnique. Information provided. The adsorption/desorption of these oxyanions on goethite involved a double relaxation event. The proposed

Sparks, Donald L.

233

Evaluation of a Rapid, Quantitative Real-Time PCR Method for Enumeration of Pathogenic Candida Cells in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and with no additional purification. In contrast, extracts of the pond and river water samples required additional dilution or purification (CFEQ method) of the...step of a Qiagen kit purification. g Presumptive indigenous...target organisms in the water sample. TABLE 5. Cellular...

Nichole E. Brinkman; Richard A. Haugland; Larry J. Wymer; Muruleedhara Byappanahalli; Richard L. Whitman; Stephen J. Vesper

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Novel Adsorbent-Reactants for Treatment of Ash and Scrubber Pond Effluents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project was to evaluate the ability of novel adsorbent/reactants to remove specific toxic target chemicals from ash and scrubber pond effluents while producing stable residuals for ultimate disposal. The target chemicals studied were arsenic (As(III) and As(V)), mercury (Hg(II)) and selenium (Se(IV) and Se(VI)). The adsorbent/reactants that were evaluated are iron sulfide (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Procedures for measuring concentrations of target compounds and characterizing the surfaces of adsorbent-reactants were developed. Effects of contact time, pH (7, 8, 9, 10) and sulfate concentration (0, 1, 10 mM) on removal of all target compounds on both adsorbent-reactants were determined. Stability tests were conducted to evaluate the extent to which target compounds were released from the adsorbent-reactants when pH changed. Surface characterization was conducted with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify reactions occurring on the surface between the target compounds and surface iron and sulfur. Results indicated that target compounds could be removed by FeS{sub 2} and FeS and that removal was affected by time, pH and surface reactions. Stability of residuals was generally good and appeared to be affected by the extent of surface reactions. Synthesized pyrite and mackinawite appear to have the required characteristics for removing the target compounds from wastewaters from ash ponds and scrubber ponds and producing stable residuals.

Bill Batchelor; Dong Suk Han; Eun Jung Kim

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sunlight-Mediated Inactivation Mechanisms of Enteroccocus faecalis and Escherichia coli in Waste Stabilization Ponds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Soscol Water Recycling Facility, a wastewater treatmentWater Recycling Facility (SWRF), a municipal wastewater

Kadir, Khalid

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Harvesting Ornamental Fish From Ponds1 Tina C. Crosby, Jeffrey E. Hill, Carlos V. Martinez, Craig A. Watson, Deborah B. Pouder, and Roy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FA-117 Harvesting Ornamental Fish From Ponds1 Tina C. Crosby, Jeffrey E. Hill, Carlos V. Martinez, ornamental fish are predominantly farmed in earthen ponds. Once fish reach marketable size and are ready and physical damage during harvesting (see UF IFAS Circular 919 Stress-Its Role in Fish Disease). Overall, col

Watson, Craig A.

238

Large Pond stocked with Bass Fenced in Swimming Pool and Hot Tub University of Tennessee Alumni RECONNECT Fun Day at New Caney, Texas May 4, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large Pond stocked with Bass Fenced in Swimming Pool and Hot Tub University of Tennessee Alumni RECONNECT Family Fun Day!! AT THE ALLISONKREWE RANCH DISC GOLF, VOLLEYBALL, BASKETBALL SWIMMING POOL, FISHING POND HORSESHOES, POOL TABLE, AIR HOCKEY LADDER BALL, BAG TOSS, YARD DARTS MODEL ROCKETRY, OR JUST

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

239

Selective control of SNARE recycling by Golgi retention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Two distinct sets of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) catalyze membrane fusion in the cis-Golgi and trans-Golgi. The mechanism that controls Golgi localization of \\{SNAREs\\} remains largely unknown. Here we tested three potential mechanisms, including vesicle recycling between the Golgi and the endoplasmic reticulum, partitioning in Golgi lipid microdomains, and selective intra-Golgi retention. Recycling rates showed a linear relationship with intra-Golgi mobility of SNAREs. The cis-Golgi \\{SNAREs\\} had higher mobility than intra-Golgi SNAREs, whereas vesicle \\{SNAREs\\} had higher mobility than target membrane SNAREs. The differences in SNARE mobility were not due to preferential partitioning into detergent-resistant membrane microdomains. We propose that intra-Golgi retention precludes entropy-driven redistribution of \\{SNAREs\\} to the endoplasmic reticulum and endocytic compartments.

Masayoshi Fukasawa; Anda Cornea; Oleg Varlamov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Acquisition and retention performance of a rapid force production task  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was designed to investigate (a) concurrent feedback and (b) terminal feedback under acquisition and retention conditions. It was the purpose of Experiment 2 to investigate the influences of (a) blocked presentation of practice trials and (b) random practice... performed five blocks. Subjects from both contexts were divided into concurrent, terminal, or no augmented feedback contexts. In Exper1ment 2, the subjects (N = 64) and the procedures were the same, except subjects were to learn 5 cr1terion forces (75...

Indermill, Catherine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Segmented vs conventional numerals: legibility and long term retention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the environmental chamber. Sub jects The subjects were thirty male students between the ages of 1g and 27 from the Industrial Engineering department at Texas A&M University. Subjects were divided into three groups of 10. Procedure Exposure time and number... December 1971 Ma]or Subject: Industrial Engineering SEGMENTED VS CONVENTIONAL NUMERALS: LEGIBILITY AND LONG TERM RETENTION A Thesis STEVE EDGAR HILL Approved as to style and content by: Elias Chairman of Committee) r. A. W. ortham (Head...

Hill, Steve Edgar

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Yellow perch embryo-larval survival and growth in surface waters associated with oil-sands mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of their land reclamation strategy, Syncrude Canada Ltd. is currently developing environmentally acceptable tailings disposal methods. Fine tailings, a suspension of clay and residual bitumen, is the waste product from oil sands extraction. Fine-tailings contain naphthenic acids, a group of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic carboxylic acids, which occur naturally in petroleum and are partly responsible for the toxicity of process water. The wet landscape method involves covering fine tails with a layer of water such that a self-sustaining ecosystem can be established. A 5 ha demonstration pond with a bottom of fine-tailings was constructed and stocked with yellow perch for experimental purposes. Two other reclaimed ponds formed with oil-sands overburden material were also stocked with perch. Adult perch sampled in the fall of 1995 from the experimental and reclaimed ponds exhibited a 2-fold induction of MFO activity compared to the source lake; indicating organic compound exposure. Perch from one of the reclaimed ponds showed significantly reduced circulating reproductive hormone levels, gonad size and smaller ovarian follicles. Reproductive parameters were not different between the source lake and the remaining ponds. Paired lab and field experiments were conducted to determine if contaminants present would be detrimental to egg viability and development of larvae either through direct exposure of spawned eggs or indirectly by effecting oogenesis. An early life stage toxicity test was also performed using commercially available naphthenic acid standard. Endpoints measured were percent fertilization, percent hatch, mortality, deformities, timing of developmental periods and larval growth.

Peters, L.E.; Heuvel, M.R. van den; Dixon, D.G. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Power, M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Boerger, H.; MacKinnon, M.D.; Meer, T. Van [Syncrude Canada, Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

2009 Site environmental report5-Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emergency Holding Ponds (lined) Pump Station Sludge Drying Apparatus Sludge Pumps Modular Aeration System

245

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule requires an eight month advance notice period whenever a consumer-owned water utility intends to transfer water resource land, defined as any land or real property owned by a water utility for the purposes of providing a source of supply, storing water or protecting sources of supply or water storage, including reservoirs, lakes, ponds, rivers or streams, wetlands and watershed areas. The rule also provides an assignable right of first refusal to the municipality or municipalities

246

Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

Inventory of Ponds in the Brazos and Colorado River (Texas) Drainages, from NASA Color Infrared Photography.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we decided to carry out the stepwise regression on the densi ty of each of the different size 7 '0 c o :; u cu -LL 1.5 A. All Ponds 1.2 6. 0.9 ? ? 6. ?????? 6. ??? ? ?? ? eI ?? .. , .. ., ..... O... FRMX FRMX POPD POPD FRMX FRMX R2 0.125 0.206 0.262 0.296 0.313 0.321 0.324 0.352 0.372 PROB) F 0.0026 0.0004 0.0002 0.0001 0.0002 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 * Underlined variables were significant at ex = 20.05. Doubly underlined variables...

Clark, William J.; Springer, Timothy A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

01-1 · Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

249

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

250

Shor Lab "Soil Water" Project Undergraduate Research Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Their approach is to emulate the physical structure of the soil using a combination of microfluidic flow cells microfluidic devices to systematically emulate different soil physical structures. Manipulate water content biofilm EPS level, drying condition and water retention. 5. Use microfluidic devices to systematically

Shor, Leslie McCabe

251

Water Analytical Data Tables for 1CQ11.xls  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Results for Water Samples-First Quarter CY 2011 Analytical Results for Water Samples-First Quarter CY 2011 This page intentionally left blank Appendix C1 Analytical Results for Water Samples - First Quarter CY 2011 LOCATION_CODE LOCATION_TYPE DATE SAMPLED LAB REQUISITION NUMBER CAS ANALYTE SAMPLE ID RESULT UNITS LAB QUALIFIERS SAMPLE TYPE DETECTION LIMIT UNCER- TAINTY DATA VALIDATION QUALIFIERS A4 POND SL 1/12/2011 11013559 NO3+NO2 AS N Nitrate + Nitrite as Nitrogen N001 0.043 mg/L J F 0.019 valid A4 POND SL 1/12/2011 11013559 7440-61-1 Uranium N001 9 ug/L F 0.02 valid B5 POND SL 1/12/2011 11013559 7440-61-1 Uranium N001 7.2 ug/L F 0.02 valid GS13 SL 1/12/2011 11013559 NO3+NO2 AS N Nitrate + Nitrite as Nitrogen N001 33 mg/L F 0.19 valid PLFSEEPINF TS 1/19/2011

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - age-dependent skeletal retention Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Riparian Forest Soil Jodi B. Lyons... of nutrients movingfrom the upland areas to aquatic eco- systems (Lowrance, 1991). Nutrient retention varies... is considered to be generally...

253

Superior Long-Term Energy Retention and Volumetric Energy Density for Li-Rich Cathode Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Superior Long-Term Energy Retention and Volumetric Energy Density for Li-Rich Cathode Materials ... Department of Energy Engineering, School of

Pilgun Oh; Seungjun Myeong; Woongrae Cho; Min-Joon Lee; Minseong Ko; Hu Young Jeong; Jaephil Cho

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - alliance rubiaceae retention Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alliance rubiaceae retention Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Razafimandimbison & al. A basal grade...

255

UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface remedial action has been completed at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Durango, Colorado. Contaminated soil and debris have been removed from the former processing site and placed in the Bodo Canyon disposal cell. Ground water at the former uranium mill/tailings site and raffinate pond area has been contaminated by the former milling operations. The ground water at the disposal site was not impacted by the former milling operations at the time of the cell`s construction. Activities for fiscal 1994 involve ground water sampling and site characterization of the disposal site.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

TECHNICAL NOTES Long-Term Behavior of Water Content and Density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Champaign, Ill. in 1987. A pond of water 0.31 m deep was maintained on top of the 7.3 m X 14.6 m X 0.9 mTECHNICAL NOTES Long-Term Behavior of Water Content and Density in an Earthen Liner Timothy E thick liner for 14 years. One of the goals of the project was to evaluate the long-term performance

257

The hydrogeochemistry of pond and rice field recharge : implications for the arsenic contaminated aquifers in Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shallow aquifers in Bangladesh, which provide drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, are severely contaminated with geogenic arsenic. Water mass balance calculations show that ...

Neumann, Rebecca B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerated treatment pond Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 publication 426-045 Urban Water-Quality Management Summary: publication 426-045 Urban Water-Quality Management...

259

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2002-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of June 2002-September 2003. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2002 and 2003 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. In 2002, 27 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored until they nested. Four more females carrying old transmitters were also monitored; only one of these transmitters lasted through the nesting season. In 2003, 30 females were monitored. Twenty-three of the females monitored in 2002 nested and produced 84 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in fall 2002 and reared in captivity at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in the head-start program. Twenty-seven of the turtles monitored in 2003 nested. Six of the turtles nested twice, producing a total of 33 nests. The nests will be checked in September and October 2003 for hatchlings. Of 121 head-started juvenile western pond turtles collected in the Columbia Gorge during the 2001 nesting season, 119 were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2002, and 2 held over for additional growth. Of 86 turtles reared in the head-start program at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos fall 2002 through summer 2003, 67 were released at sites in the Columbia Gorge in summer of 2003, and 15 held over for more growth. Fifty-nine juveniles were released at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge in July 2002, and 51 released there in July 2003. Sixteen of those released in 2002 and 16 released in 2003 were instrumented with radio transmitters and monitored for varying amounts of time for survival and habitat use between the time of release and August 2003, together with juveniles from the 2001 release which were monitored from June 2001 through August 2003, and juveniles from the 2000 release which were monitored from August 2000 through August 2003. The number of functioning transmitters varied due to transmitter failures and detachments, and availability of replacement transmitters, as well as opportunities to recapture turtles. By August 15, 2003, a total of 39 turtles were being monitored: 6 from the 2000 release, 8 from the 2001 release, 10 from the 2002 release, and 15 from the 2003 release. During the 2002 field season trapping effort, 280 turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 236 previously head-started turtles. During the 2003 trapping season, 349 turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge; 304 of these had been head-started. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual re-sightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 160 individual painted turtles captured in 2002 and 189 painted turtles captured in 2003 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Eight female painted turtles were monitored by telemetry during the 2002 nesting season; 4 nests were recorded for these animals, plus 35 nests located incidentally. Preferred habitat for nesting was identified based on the telemetry results, to be considered in anticipating future turtle habitat needs and in management planning at Pierce NWR. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding supported activities in the Columbia River Gorge from June 2002 through September 2003.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Examining potential benefits of combining a chimney with a salinity gradient solar pond for production of power in salt affected areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of combining a salinity gradient solar pond with a chimney to produce power in salt affected areas is examined. Firstly the causes of salinity in salt affected areas of northern Victoria, Australia are discussed. Existing salinity mitigation schemes are introduced and the integration of solar ponds with those schemes is discussed. Later it is shown how a solar pond can be combined with a chimney incorporating an air turbine for the production of power. Following the introduction of this concept the preliminary design is presented for a demonstration power plant incorporating a solar pond of area 6hectares and depth 3m with a 200m tall chimney of 10m diameter. The performance, including output power and efficiency of the proposed plant operating in northern Victoria is analysed and the results are discussed. The paper also discusses the overall advantages of using a solar pond with a chimney for production of power including the use of the large thermal mass of a solar pond as a practical and efficient method of storing collected solar energy.

Aliakbar Akbarzadeh; Peter Johnson; Randeep Singh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Use of rare earth elements as external markers for mean retention time measurements in ruminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Use of rare earth elements as external markers for mean retention time measurements -- The present review deals with the utilisation of rare earth (RE) elements as particulate markers for ruminant earth / retention time / feedstuff / methodology / ruminant Résumé -- Utilisation des terres rares comme

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

262

A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

217 A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE LAPLATTE RIVER BASIN approach to examine phosphorus retention in wetlands of the LaPlatte River basin (13,723 ha), Vermont information system. Most wetland variables had significant (p

Wang, Deane

263

RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

Fox, K.

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

264

Water, water everywhere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... available water resources, either locally or globally, are by no means exhausted. At present desalination -- the removal of salt from sea water or brackish water -- is very ... or brackish water -- is very expensive, mainly because it consumes so much energy. Desalination provides less than 0.2 per cent of all the water used in the world ...

Philip Ball

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

265

Processing of Oak Ridge B&C pond sludge surrogate in the transportable vitrification system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) developed at the Savannah River Site is designed to process low-level and mixed radioactive wastes into a stable glass product. The TVS consists of a feed preparation and delivery system, a joule-heated melter, and an offgas treatment system. Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) B&C pond sludge was treated in a demonstration of the TVS system at Clemson University and at ORR. After initial tests with soda-lime-silica (SLS) feed, three melter volumes of glass were produced from the surrogate feed. A forthcoming report will describe glass characterization; and melter feeding, operation, and glass pouring. Melter operations described will include slurry characterization and feeding, factors affecting feed melt rates, glass pouring and pour rate constraints, and melter operating temperatures. Residence time modeling of the melter will also be discussed. Characterization of glass; including composition, predicted liquidity and viscosity, Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and devitrification will be covered. Devitrification was a concern in glass container tests and was found to be mostly dependent on the cooling rate. Crucible tests indicated that melter shutdown with glass containing Fe and Li was also a devitrification concern, so the melter was flushed with SLS glass before cooldown.

Zamecnik, J.R.; Young, S.R.; Peeler, D.K.; Smith, M.E.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

A methodology to assess open pond, phototrophic, algae production potential: A Hawaii case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Geographic information system (GIS) analysis was used to identify lands suitable for open pond production of phototrophic microalgae in the state of Hawaii where rainfall is less than 1.0my?1, solar insolation is at least 4.65kWhm?2d?1, slope is?5%, zoning is non-residential, and contiguous area is at least 0.2km2 (Base Case). Eight sensitivity analyses were performed that varied these criteria and considered an added criterion stipulating a maximum distance from power plants that could serve as CO2 sources. Results were overlaid with GIS layers for agricultural lands of importance to the State of Hawaii and land serviced by freshwater irrigation infrastructure. Base Case conditions were identified on 476km2, 2.9% of State land area. 60% of Base Case lands are important agricultural lands and of these, half are serviced by irrigation infrastructure. Assumed algae oil productivity of 1.87dm3m?2y?1 would yield 0.9hm3y?1, equivalent to 30% of the combined total consumption of distillate and jet fuel in the State in 2011.

Mele C. Bennett; Scott Q. Turn; Wai Ying Chan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Sunlight Inactivation of Fecal Indicator Bacteria and Bacteriophages from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluent in Fresh and Saline Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Calkins (ed.), The role of solar ultraviolet radiation in marine...Escherichia coli in a South Africa river using membrane diffusion...Switzerland. 19 Jagger, J. 1985. Solar-UV actions on living cells...McMeekin. 1981. Effect of solar radiation and predacious micro-organisms...

Lester W. Sinton; Carollyn H. Hall; Philippa A. Lynch; Robert J. Davies-Colley

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

269

The moisture retention characteristic of four soils from Niger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of air at the surface is relatively facile. Hydraulic Conductivity Redistribution of soil water affects plant growth, and the rate and duration of internal moisture flow determines 19 effective soil water storage. This is important to remember when... in sorption (wetting). This characteristic of wetting versus drying for a soil is known as the hysteresis effect (Lal 1979a). Hillel (1980) notes that hysteresis is important for coarse-textured soils in the process of redistribution of soil water...

Landeck, Jonathon Keith

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Innovative Treatment Technologies for Natural Waters and Wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this report focused on the development of novel membrane contactor processes (in particular, forward osmosis (FO), pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), and membrane distillation (MD)) in low energy desalination and wastewater treatment applications and in renewable energy generation. FO and MD are recently gaining national and international attention as viable, economic alternatives for removal of both established and emerging contaminants from natural and process waters; PRO is gaining worldwide attention as a viable source of renewable energy. The interrelationship of energy and water are at the core of this study. Energy and water are inextricably bound; energy usage and production must be considered when evaluating any water treatment process for practical application. Both FO and MD offer the potential for substantial energy and resource savings over conventional treatment processes and PRO offers the potential for renewable energy or energy offsets in desalination. Combination of these novel technologies with each other, with existing technologies (e.g., reverse osmosis (RO)), and with existing renewable energy sources (e.g., salinity gradient solar ponds) may enable much less expensive water production and also potable water production in remote or distributed locations. Two inter-related projects were carried out in this investigation. One focused on membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment and PRO for renewable energy generation; the other focused on MD driven by a salinity gradient solar pond.

Childress, Amy E.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Scaling Soil Water Retention Curves using a Correlation Coefficient Maximization Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Luxmoore, 1979; Hopmans and Stricker, 1989; ?nlu et.al. ,functions (Hopmans and Stricker, 1989). Several similar-

Lakshman Nandagiri; Jan de Leeuw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

PREVENTING LOSS AND RESTORING WATER RETENTION VALUES TO PULP BY FIBER LOADING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or service. 2000 TAPPI Recycling Symposium / 663 #12;Equipment A Hobart (Troy, OH) mixer was used to mix

Abubakr, Said

273

NREL: Learning - Student Resources on Solar Hot Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Hot Water Solar Hot Water Photo of a school building next to a pond. Roy Lee Walker Elementary School in Texas incorporates many renewable energy design features, including solar hot water heating. The following resources will help you learn more about solar water heating systems. If you are unfamiliar with this technology, see the introduction to solar hot water. Grades 7-12 NREL Educational Resources Educational resources available to students from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. High School and College Level U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Savers: Solar Water Heaters Features comprehensive basic information and resources. U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Savers: Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Features comprehensive basic information and resources. U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon

274

Increased intrapulmonary retention of radiolabeled neutrophils in early oxygen toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequential lung injuries, such as oxygen toxicity followed by septicemia, are common during the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). As these forms of vascular injury may be mediated in part by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), aberrant interactions between PMN and previously injured pulmonary endothelium are of both theoretical interest and clinical importance. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that early oxygen toxicity at a dose that injuries pulmonary endothelium relatively selectively alters intrapulmonary neutrophil kinetics. Unanesthetized rats breathing 1.0 atmospheres oxygen for 36 h showed ultrastructural endothelial damage but no edema, injury, or neutrophilic inflammation by histologic criteria. However, in these oxygen-toxic animals, whereas initial accumulation of radiolabeled PMN in lungs was normal, washout of PMN was abnormal at 120 min after infusion, at which point the pulmonary retention of radiolabeled PMN in the lungs of oxygen-treated animals was significantly higher than in control animals (139% of control, p less than 0.0096). Features of our methodology, including avoidance of osmotic stress and use of paired control animals, appear to have greatly enhanced the sensitivity of radiolabeled neutrophils for detecting a subtle abnormality of neutrophil-endothelial interactions. Our studies in the oxygen toxicity model provide the first demonstration in vivo of abnormal intrapulmonary neutrophil kinetics in early oxygen toxicity prior to the onset of histologic evidence of lung injury or inflammation.

Rinaldo, J.E.; English, D.; Levine, J.; Stiller, R.; Henson, J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Biogeochemical cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine basin. 7. Sulfur mass balance, oxygen uptake and sulfide retention  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur and oxygen fluxes were quantified in the seasonally varying anoxic marine sedimentary system of Cape Lookout Bight, N.C., U.S.A. Over the three year study period, 1981-1983, the mean annual sulfate reduction rate was determined to be 18.2 +/- 1.6 moles x m/sup -2/ x y/sup -1/. This value, added to the estimate of the detrital sulfur input of 1.2 +/- 4.4 gave a total sulfur input of 19.4 +/- 4.7 moles x m/sup -1/ x y/sup 2/)/sup 1/. The sulfide flux to the sediment-water interface, measured in anaerobic benthic chambers was 4.6 +/- 0.5 moles x m/sup -2/ x y/sup -1/, and represented 37% of the annual oxygen uptake rate of 25.2 +/- 2.8 moles x m/sup -2/ x y/sup -1/. The sulfide burial rate, determined to be 15.5 +/- 3.1 moles x m/sup -2/ x y/sup -1/, was within 5% of the value predicted by summing the fluxes at the sediment-water interface. The C/S weight ratio of sediment below the depth of diagenetic reaction was determined to be 2.75. The sulfide retention rate in these rapidly accumulating sediments (10 cm/yr) was 77 +/- 19%. Comparison of this result with previous studies shows that rapid sediment accumulation and the lack of bioturbation control this unusually high degree of sulfide retention.

Chanton, J.P.; Martens, C.S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Economic comparison of open pond raceways to photo bio-reactors for profitable production of algae for transportation fuels in the Southwest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As energy prices climb there is an increasing interest in alternative, renewable energy sources. One possible source of renewable bio-fuel is algae. This research uses a multi-year, Monte Carlo financial feasibility model to estimate the costs of production and chance of economic success for commercial size algal biofuel facilities in the Southwest. Capital and operating costs and productivity information from Davis et al. were used to develop parameters to define and simulate two types of algae production systems; open pond and photo-bioreactor (PBR). The financial feasibility of \\{PBRs\\} is substantially lower than for open ponds. In the base case, average total costs of production for lipids, including financial costs, were $12.73/gal and $31.61/gal for open ponds and PBRs, respectively. The chance of economic success for the base situation was zero for both open ponds and PBRs. The financial feasibility analysis showed that the only way to achieve a 95% probability of economic success in the PBR system was to reduce CAPEX by 80% or more and OPEX by 90% or more. For the open pond system there were several options that could return a 95% or greater chance of economic success, for example, reducing CAPEX by 60% and OPEX by 90%.

James W. Richardson; Myriah D. Johnson; Joe L. Outlaw

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Water Quality 5 2005 Site environmental report5-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emergency Holding Ponds (lined) Pump Station Sludge Drying Apparatus Sludge Pumps Modular Aeration System

279

2011 Site environmental report5-1 Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abandoned Sand Filter Beds Emergency Holding Ponds (lined) Pump Station Sludge Drying Apparatus Sludge Pumps

280

Water Quality 5 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT5-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ponds (lined) Pump Station Sludge Drying Apparatus Sludge Pumps Modular Aeration System Peconic River

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

2010 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT5-1 Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emergency Holding Ponds (lined) Pump Station Sludge Drying Apparatus Sludge Pumps Modular Aeration System

282

Water Quality 5 2008 Site environmental report5-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filter Beds Emergency Holding Ponds (lined) Pump Station Sludge Drying Apparatus Sludge Pumps Modular

283

Water Fleas and their Kin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fleas and their Kin Fleas and their Kin Nature Bulletin No. 369-A February 14, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER FLEAS AND THEIR KIN Disgruntled fishermen who wonder why an artificial body of water, like an old quarry, does not produce more fish and bigger fish, might well investigate its population of "microcrustacea" -- a fancy name for Water Fleas and their kin -- and the possibility of increasing their numbers. They are the principal food of nearly all little fish as well as many big ones. They are widely grown to feed tropical fish in aquaria. Almost every natural body of water, fresh or salt, contains some crustaceans. Most of us are familiar with the larger ones found in the oceans -- lobsters, crayfish, crabs and shrimps -- and the freshwater crayfish, or "crawdads", and shrimp so common in our ponds and streams, but there is a host of very small species classed under that one name: "microcrustacea".

284

Employee Retention and Integrated Disability Management Practices as Demand Side Factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduction Demand-side employment research on company policies and practices related to retention and absence and disability management (ADM) can contribute to our understanding...Aim To examin...

Rochelle Habeck; Allan Hunt; Colleen Head Rachel

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Shale-Gas Permeability and Diffusivity Inferred by Improved Formulation of Relevant Retention and Transport Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretically improved model incorporating the relevant mechanisms of gas retention and transport in gas-bearing shale formations is presented for determination of intrinsic gas permeability and diffusivity. Th...

Faruk Civan; Chandra S. Rai; Carl H. Sondergeld

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Absorption and retention of different chemical forms of trace minerals by mature horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study was undertaken to compare the absorption and retention of copper, manganese and zinc when supplemented to the diet in the form of oxide, sulfate or organic-chelate mineral supplements. Six mature Miniature Horses were used in a...

Wagner, Elizabeth Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Characterization of LaVerkin Springs water and methods for its reuse in energy development. [Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical water data obtained from a 9-month test program at the LVS (LaVerkin Springs) site, which is located in Washington County, Southwestern Utah, were evaluated. Fresh water and the water after processing through various pretreatment steps and after ED (electrodialysis) desalting were characterized. Upgrading water quality by various physical and chemical treatment methods and by desalting processes was demonstrated by the LVS site test program. The relative merit of different methods of treatment, disposal, and reuse of LVS water were studied. The objectives of the study were to evaluate methods for preventing high salinity LVS water from entering the Virginia River and for utilizing the processed water in energy development. The disposal of water by (1) deep well injection, (2) use as a secondary coolant in a binary cooling tower, (3) use in solar salt-gradient ponds, and (4) use as a transport media for coal slurry pipelines were found to be technically feasible. Use of LVS water to transport coal to a consuming powerplant and subsequent reuse in a binary cooling tower and/or solar salt-gradient ponds would achieve both objectives of salt reduction and energy conservation. Because LVS water has a salt content of 9500 mg/L and a boron content of 5 mg/L, it cannot be directly used for irrigation.

Eisenhauer, R.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A rational approach for evaluation and screening of treatment and disposal options for the solar pond sludges at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document consists of information about the treatment options for the sludge that is located in the evaporation ponds at the Rocky Flats Plant. The sludges are mixed low-level radioactive wastes whose composition and character were variable. Sludges similar to these are typically treated prior to ultimate disposal. Disposal of treated sludges includes both on-site and off-site options. The rational approach described in this paper is useful for technology evaluation and screening because it provides a format for developing objectives, listing alternatives, and weighing the alternatives against the objectives and against each other.

Dickerson, K.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Habitat-related activities and body mass of wintering redhead ducks on coastal ponds in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and content by: Milton W. Wailer (Co-Chair of Committee) William H. Riel, Jr. (Co-Chair of Committee) Nova J. Silvy (Member) James W. Webb, Jr. (Member) D id J. Schmid y (Head of Depart nt) August 1991 ABSTRACT Habitat-Related Activities and Body Mass... of Wintering Redhead Ducks on Coastal Ponds in South Texas. (August 1991) Joseph Lane Moore, B. S. F. R. , University of Georgia, Athens Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Milton W. Weller William H. Riel, Jr. Time-activity budgets of individually...

Moore, Joseph Lane

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Pond B Dam Repair Project at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1285) for the proposed repair of the Pond B dam at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

N /A

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

Nanoscale retention-loss dynamics of polycrystalline PbTiO{sub 3} nanotubes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed the nanoscale retention dynamics of polycrystalline PbTiO{sub 3} nanotubes using piezoresponse force microscopy. We found that the retention loss of the nanodot domains on the nanotubes showed the stretched exponential relaxation behaviors with stretched exponential factor n being less than 1 (0.523 and 0.692), which are similar to the thin films. In addition, the nanodot domains showed a diverse relaxation time constant {tau} due to different remnant polarization of each dot domains.

Choi, H.; Kim, Y.; Hong, S.; Sung, T.-H.; Shin, H.; No, K. (Materials Science Division); (Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology); (Hanyang Univ.); (Kookmin Univ.)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Estimation of heterosis and heterosis retention in the development of a synthetic breed of goat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATION OF HETEROSIS AND HETEROSIS RETENTION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SYNTHETIC BREED OF GOAT A Thesis by MATTHEW BLAIN JONES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1994 Major Subject Animal Breeding ESTIMATION OF HETEROSIS AND HETEROSIS RETENTION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SYNTHETIC BREED OF GOAT A Thesis by MATTHEW BLAIN JONES Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial...

Jones, Matthew Blain

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Inhibitory Effect of Green Tea in the Drinking Water on Tumorigenesis by Ultraviolet Light and 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in the Skin of SKH-1 Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mm I.D.). The green tea water extracts...phase contained three solvents (Solvent A, acetonitrile...Solvent B, 5% Solvent C); and 24 to 30 min (100% Solvent A). The retention...min, respectively. Green tea extracts were...

Zhi-Yuan Wang; Mou-Tuan Huang; Thomas Ferraro; Ching-Quo Wong; You-Rong Lou; Kenneth Reuhl; Michael Iatropoulos; Chung S. Yang; and Allan H. Conney

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Acetate retention and metabolism in the hyporheic zone of a ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

nally over much larger (meter to kilometer) scales, and discrete zones .... metering pump (Fluid Metering). The water ..... indicating no net acetate sorption by the sediments. ..... oxidation in continental margin sediments off central Chile. Limnol.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

295

Behavior of deuterium retention and surface morphology for VPSW/F82H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deuterium (D) retention for Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS)tungsten (W)/F82H was studied using two different implantation methods, namely D plasma exposure and View the MathML source implantation. The D retention for polished VPSW/F82H after plasma exposure was found to be reduced compared to that for polycrystalline tungsten. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations indicated that porous structures around grain boundaries and the interface between VPSW layers would be potential D diffusion paths, leading to low D retention. In the case of View the MathML source implantation, the shape of D2 TDS spectrum was almost the same as that for D plasma-exposed VPSW/F82H; however, the D retention was quite high for unpolished VPSW/F82H, indicating that most of D was trapped by the oxide layer, which was produced by the VPS process. The reduction of surface area due to the polishing process also reduces D retention for VPSW/F82H. These results indicate that controlling the surface chemical states is important for the reduction of tritium retention for future fusion reactors.

Yasuhisa Oya; Masashi Shimada; Tomonori Tokunaga; Hideo Watanabe; Naoaki Yoshida; Yuji Hatano; Ryuta Kasada; Takuya Nagasaka; Akihiko Kimura; Kenji Okuno

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic pond ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

297

Water Efficiency  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wheeler - Water Savers, LLC * fwheeler@watersaversllc.com Topics * Performance contracting analysis * Water industry terms * Federal reduction goals * Water balance * Water...

298

Effect of graded hypoxia on retention of technetium-99m-nitroheterocycle in perfused rat heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of graded hypoxia on the retention of a {sup 99m}Tc-labeled nitroimidazole. Rat hearts were perfused retrogradely with Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 37{degrees}C and paced at 5 Hz. After a 20-min stabilization period, coronary flow was maintained at 8 ml/min/g wet wt and the hearts were perfused with media equilibrated with gas mixtures containing 5% CO{sub 2} and various levels of O{sub 2}, from 544 to 29 Torr. Technetium-99m-O(PnAO-1-(2-nitroimidazole)), BMS-181321, was infused for 20 min into a side port of the aortic cannula. Perfusion continued for an additional 40 min to allow for compound clearance. Each decrease of perfusate PO{sub 2} brought about an increase in the retention of BMS-181321, resulting in a good correlation between its retention and perfusate PO{sub 2} (r=0.97). Myocardial oxygen consumption was independent of oxygen delivery when the perfusate oxygen pressure was greater than 350 Torr. Below this value, oxygen consumption declined markedly as influent PO{sub 2}. A good correlation was obtained between retention of the nitroheterocycle and the cytosolic lactate/pyruvate ratio (r=0.98). When glucose was omitted from the perfusate (PO{sub 2}=27 Torr), retention of the nitroheterocycle was increased by about 25% as compared to hearts perfused in the presence of this substrate. These results indicate that myocardial retention of BMS-181321 is coupled to the level of tissue oxygenation and that hypoxic retention may be affected by substrate input. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Rumsey, W.L.; Patel, B.; Linder, K.E. [Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Inst., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fission product retention in newly discovered organic-rich natural fission reactors at Oklo and Bangombe, Gabon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of naturally occurring fission reactors in the rock strata of the Paleoproterozoic Francevillian Basin in the Republic of Gabon in equatorial West Africa led to several programs to define migration and/or retention of uranium and fissiogenic isotopes from/in the natural reactor zones. Although much understanding has been gained, new insight is needed regarding the chemical and physical parameters that control movement and retention of fission products over almost two billion years from/in the natural reactors. Seventeen known natural fission reactors sustained criticality for 0.1 to 1 million years in hydrothermally altered sedimentary rocks 1968 +/- 50 million years ago. These natural nuclear reactors attained criticality because of high concentrations of uranium in small pockets in uranium ores, the lack of neutron poisons, and because at the time they reached criticality, the abundance of [sup 235]U was five times greater than it is today. Water acted as a moderator, and temperature in the natural reactors was between 160 and 360[degrees]C. Both the uranium-rich pockets and the uranium ore bodies in which these pockets are located were formed when aqueous solutions moving through highly fractured zones in the Francevillian sedimentary rocks met organic-rich sediments. This resulted in the reduction of U(VI) in the dissolved uranyl ions to U(IV), causing the precipitation of pitchblende and uraninite. It has been proposed that between 2.2 and 1.9 billion years ago, the earth's atmosphere experienced a remarkable temporary rise in O[sub 2] content; this event may account for the uranium-bearing, oxidizing aqueous solutions in the Francevillian rocks.

Nagy, B.; Rigali, M.J. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Intraosseous Venography with Carbon Dioxide in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Carbon Dioxide Retention in Renal Veins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of gas retention in the renal vein following carbon dioxide intraosseous venography in the prone position and, while citing references, to examine its onset mechanisms. All percutaneous vertebroplasties performed at our hospital from January to December 2005 were registered and retrospectively analyzed. Of 43 registered procedures treating 79 vertebrae, 28 procedures treating 54 vertebrae were analyzed. Vertebral intraosseous venography was performed using carbon dioxide as a contrast agent in all percutaneous vertebroplasty procedures. In preoperative and postoperative vertebral CT, gas retention in the renal vein and other areas was assessed. Preoperative CT did not show gas retention (0/28 procedures; 0%). Postoperative CT confirmed gas retention in the renal vein in 10 of the 28 procedures (35.7%). Gas retention was seen in the right renal vein in 8 procedures (28.6%), in the left renal vein in 5 procedures (17.9%), in the left and right renal veins in 3 procedures (10.7%), in vertebrae in 22 procedures (78.6%), in the soft tissue around vertebrae in 14 procedures (50.0%), in the spinal canal in 12 procedures (42.9%), and in the subcutaneous tissue in 5 procedures (17.9%). In conclusion, in our study, carbon dioxide gas injected into the vertebra frequently reached and remained in the renal vein.

Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: kome64@yo.rim.or.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Shomura, Yuzo; Tokuda, Takanori; Nomura, Motoo; Terada, Jiro; Kamata, Minoru; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Cold tolerance of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and thermal-refuge technology to protect this species from cold-kill in aquaculture ponds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.004 to 0.006 min-' for the 1992-93 version (r > 0.99). A second phase of the research focused on cold tolerance of red drum in ponds at Palacios, from 6 February to 2 April 1993. Values of the 24-h lower lethal temperature of fish sampled from refuge...

Dorsett, Paul Wesley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Survey of Radionuclide Distributions Resulting from the Church Rock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Pond Dam Failure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intensive site survey and on-site analysis program were conducted to evaluate the distribution of four radionucliGes in the general vicinity of Gallup, New Mexico, subsequent to the accidental breach of a uranium mill tailings pond dam and the release of a large quantity of tailings pond materials. The objective of this work was to determine the distribution and concentration levels of {sup 210}Pb, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 238}U in the arroyo that is immediately adjacent to the uranium tailings pond (pipeline arroyo) and in the Rio Puerco arroyo into which the pipeline arroyo drains. An intensive survey between the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Church Rock Mill site and the New Mexico-Arizona state border was performed. Sampling locations were established at approximately 500-ft intervals along the arroyo. During the weeks of September 24 through October 5, 1979, a series of samples was collected from alternate sampling locations along the arroyo. The purpose of this collection of samples and their subsequent analysis was to provide an immediate evaluation of the extent and the levels of radioactive contamination. The data obtained from this extensive survey were then compared to action levels which had been proposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and were adapted by the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Division (NMEID) for {sup 230}Th and {sup 226}Ra concentrations that would require site cleanup. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory/Nuclear Regulatory Commission mobile laboratory van was on-site at the UNC Church Rock Mill from September 22, 1979, through December 13, 1979, and was manned by one or more PNL personnel for all but four weeks of this time period. Approximately 1200 samples associated with the Rio Puerco survey were analyzed 1n the laboratory. An additional 1200 samples related to the Rio Puerco cleanup operations which the United Nuclear Corporation was conducting were analyzed on-site in the mobile laboratory. The purpose of these analyses was to determine the effectiveness of the cleanup operations that were ongoing and to evaluate what additional cleanup would be required. This on-site analysis of radioactive contamination constituted the principal task of this project, with the identification of those portions of the arroyo exceeding the NMEID proposed cleanup criteria being the major output. Additiond1 tasks included an evaluation of the initial soil sampling scheme (letter from T. Wolff [NMEID] to J. Abiss [UNC]. oated September 25, 1979) and the proposed NMEID verification sampling scheme (letter from T. Buhl [NMEID] to H. Miller [NRC]. dated April 23, 1980).

Weimer, W. C.; Kinnison, R. R.; Reeves, J. H.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 7, 2004 April 7, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWL-4 TO: Proposed Action: Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the coho acclimation research task would be modified to include a new site located in the upper Yakima south of Cle Elum, WA. Project No.: F3204 Location: Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (YFP EIS)

305

Flue gas desulfurization sludge: establishment of vegetation on ponded and soil-applied waste. Final report January 1977-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of research to identify and evaluate forms of vegetation and methods of their establishment for reclaiming retired flue gas desulfurization sludge ponds. Also studied were the soil liming value of limestone scrubber sludge (LSS) and plant uptake and percolation losses of some chemical nutrients in the sludge. Several vegetation schemes were evaluated between 1977 and 1982 for covering and stabilizing LSS at Colbert Steam Plant, Cherokee, AL, and Shawnee Steam Plant, Paducah, KY. Eleven tree and 10 grass or legume species were tested for adaptability and survival when planted directly in LSS or in LSS amended with soil, municipal sewage sludge, or standard potting mix. Other studies indicated that LSS apparently has sufficient unreacted limestone to be a satisfactory soil liming agent.

Giordano, P.M.; Mays, D.A.; Soileau, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3nH2O) to goethite (?-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathways contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ~7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 ?M, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM) coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14 to 89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ? 50 ?M when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64 to 89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within iron oxides as a retention process of U across a wide range of biogeochemical environments and the sensitivity of uranium retention processes to operative (bio)geochemical conditions.

Massey, Michael S.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, Jose M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental Ponds1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENY-670 Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental fish, and supplying water for wildlife, the potential for new mosquito breeding sites is increasing. Small insectivorous fish are a valuable tool in controlling mosquitoes and midges ("blind mosquitoes

Watson, Craig A.

308

Gas-Phase Identity SN2 Reactions of Halide Anions and Methyl Halides with Retention of Configuration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas-Phase Identity SN2 Reactions of Halide Anions and Methyl Halides with Retention back-side and front-side SN2 reactions are found to involve the same ion-molecule complex (X-,,,H3CX of a front-side SN2 reaction with retention of configuration at saturated carbon. Analysis of our

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

309

Body retention and tissue distribution of59Fe and 54Mn in newborn rats fed iron-supplemented cow's milk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Body retention and tissue distribution of59Fe and 54Mn in newborn rats fed iron-supplemented cow distribution has been studied in newborn rats. Six-day old rats, divided into three groups were artificially retention in newborn rats, whereas it enhanced 59Fe deposition in the liver and the intestinal wall and

Boyer, Edmond

310

Interventions to improve recruitment and retention in clinical trials: a survey and workshop to assess current practice and future priorities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recruitment and retention in clinical trials is still a major challenge and are of high priority for many Clinical Trials Units. Using survey and workshop data, methods used to encourage recruitment and retention were categorised and the authors highlighted areas for prioritising further methodological research.

Peter Bower; Valerie Brueton; Carrol Gamble; Shaun Treweek; Catrin Smith; Bridget Young; Paula Williamson

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

Larval retention and recruitment in an island population of a coral-reef fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... windward shore (Jack's Bay) and two down-current sites on the leeward shore (Northstar and Butler Bay) during the summer and autumn of 1992. For this analysis, ... of local retention of larvae to recruitment. At both leeward reefs (Butler Bay and Northstar, Fig. 2a, b), recruitment levels were positively correlated with CF1, indicating that ...

Stephen E. Swearer; Jennifer E. Caselle; David W. Lea; Robert R. Warner

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

Uptake and retention kinetics of para-fluorine-18-fluorobenzylguanidine in isolated rat heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Para-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzylguanidine ([{sup 18}F]PFBG) is a newly developed tracer for imaging myocardial sympathetic neuronal innervation. This study investigated the uptake and retention mechanisms of [{sup 18}F]PFBG in perfused, isolated rat heart. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Berry, C.R.; Garg, P.K.; Zalutsky, M.R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)]|[Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

On the long-term retention of geometry-centric digital engineering artifacts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the challenges of long-term preservation of digital geometric models and the engineering processes associated with them. For engineering, design, manufacturing, and physics-based simulation data this requires formats that are accessible ... Keywords: Digital preservation, Knowledge capture, Long-term knowledge retention, Representation, Standards

William C. Regli; Joseph B. Kopena; Michael Grauer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ca RETENTION IN YOUNG PULLETS AND LAYING HENS FED A Ca47 LABELLED DIET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ca RETENTION IN YOUNG PULLETS AND LAYING HENS FED A Ca47 LABELLED DIET OF DIFFERENT Ca LEVELS K levels of dietary calcium. A basal diet poor in calcium but otherwise optimal was supplemented with CaC03 and Na2HP04 as seen below : #12;CaCO, supplement of the diet was replaced by Ca&dquo; labelled Calcium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Retention of Radioactive Substances in the Body of Rats and the Lethal Dose  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... proved to be dangerous1. For this reason only two elements have been studied, namely, radon and polonium, with regard to their retention in the organism and quick elimination by ... 66 gm. to 290 gm. The present communication deals with the results obtained with radon only. A physiological solution, namely, a 10 per cent solution of glucose or ...

F. BHOUNEK; F. V. NOVK

1937-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

316

Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen Department of Biology, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA Introduction Orb webs depend upon threads, the sticky spirals of orb webs perform two important functions during prey cap- ture. First

Blackledge, Todd

317

Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres settling in sharply stratified fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be important for accurate modeling of the vertical carbon flux in the ocean. A first step in this direction with a first-principle model based on diffusive processes. The model correctly predicts accelerations. With this parametrization, which exhibits a power law dependence on Reynolds numbers, retention times are accurately

McLaughlin, Richard M.

318

Energy requirements for a swimming pool through a water-atmosphere energy balance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology displayed here is to calculate the energy requirements for heating a swimming pool to a desired temperature. This methodology consists of an energy balance between water-atmosphere as is used in the temperature evaluation of cooling ponds in power plants. Different mathematical expressions are given to calculate such a balance. It is necessary to know the month of the year, the ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind velocity, and solar radiation. With these parameters it is possible to know the natural temperature of the water, natural evaporation, energy needed to reach a determined swimming pool temperature and the evaporation of the heated pool.

Almanza, F.; Lara, J. (Ciudad Universitaria (Mexico))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, a part of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and landfill. Without the headsup, not only PVT but Oahu's entire construction industry would have been hurt, with losses in the millions of dollars. As the only construction landfill on the island, more constructed storm water retention pond at the PVT landfill in Nanakuli, Oahu, Hawai'i Road to landfill

320

Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23/05/2012 1 Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce Brian D'Arcy and Kate Heal Types drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment of GHG emissions (N2O and CH4) Types of constructed wetland · Stormwater wetlands · Retention ponds

Heal, Kate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costly remediation alternatives is capping of surface impoundments such as lagoons, ponds or old quarries

Aydilek, Ahmet

322

Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, water electrolysis technology and its applications for nuclear hydrogen ... of the chapter, a general classification of water electrolysis systems is given, the fundamentals of water electrolysis

Greg F. Naterer; Ibrahim Dincer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to percolati on in single-shell tank (SST) waste forms. The much higher void being currently observed in SY-101 represents essentially a new crust configuration, and the mechanisms for sudden gas release need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the situation of gas bubbles in crust based on the previous work on gas bubble retention, migration, and release in simulants and actual waste. We have also conducted some visual observations of bubble migration through simulated crusts to help understand the interaction of the various mechanisms.

SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

Improved leaching practices save water, reduce drainage problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the more-common ponded or flood applications. Early researchthe sea in the Netherlands flood disaster of 1953 was more

Coats, W J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

November 13 - 15, 2012 HSS Work Group Leadership Meeting Summary - Work Force Retention  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Work Force Retention Work Group Work Force Retention Work Group Co-Lead Telecom November 16, 2012 DRAFT Discussion Overview Purpose: This HSS Focus Group Work Group telecom was held with the Work Group Co-Leads to discuss change elements and strategic direction to support accelerated efforts to advancing progress, productivity and performance within each of the Work Groups. Although current roles within all of the Work Groups and Focus Group efforts remain the same, the addition of centralized leadership and oversight by representatives (2) of the Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board are established. 1. Leadership Transition * Co-Leads will continue to provide technical functions * Functions of the Focus Group Program will remain the same. [Lily/Stephanie]

327

RESRAD soil concentration guidelines for the Old F-Area Retention Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentration guidelines for residual radionuclides in soil at the site of the Old F-Area Retention Basin have been calculated using a dose-based approach. Estimation of these soil guidelines was completed using RESRAD 5.0 in accordance with the DOE RESRAD methodology specified in DOE/CH/8901. Guidelines are provided for the two predominant nuclides, Sr-90 and Cs-137, known to be present in the soil beneath the old basin. A guideline is also given for Pu-238 since it is known to exist at the H-Area Retention Basin. Site-specific soil characteristics are defined for the areas above, within, and beneath the contaminated zone.

Hamby, D.M.

1994-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

Arsenate and Arsenite Retention and Release in Oxide and Sulfide Dominated Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenate and Arsenite Retention and Release in Oxide and Sulfide Dominated Systems Principal Investigator: Richard H. Loeppert Co-Investigators: Amita Jain Klaus Raven Jianlin Wang Soil & Crop Sciences Dept. Texas A&M University College Station, TX... Resources Institute. Non-Federal matching funds were provided by the Soil & Crop Sciences Dept., Texas A&M University, College Station, TX. A portion of this report was adapted from a part of a dissertation by Jianlin Wang which will be submitted...

Loeppert, Richard H.; Jain, Amita; Raven, Klaus; Wang, Jianlin

329

Determination of the retention function of [superscript 67]Ga in canine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

()))()] Fecal excretion was the primary route of elimination of gallium, accounting for 63K of the gallium excreted, during the 12 days of observation, Due to the wide variation in gallium retention exhibited by the individual dogs, it is recommended... ABSTRACT . . . ~ ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES INTRODUCTION LITERATURE REVIEW vi vii viii 3 History Gallium Kinetics Physical Properties of 67Ga METHODS AND MATERIAL 3 4 18 21 Research Subjects...

Schoenbucher, Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

330

Heterosis and Heterosis Retention for Reproductive and Maternal Traits in Nellore-Angus Crossbred Cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HETEROSIS AND HETEROSIS RETENTION FOR REPRODUCTIVE AND MATERNAL TRAITS IN NELLORE-ANGUS CROSSBRED COWS A Dissertation by MOHAMMAD DIYA TALAL HAMED OBEIDAT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements hqt the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Chair of Committee, David G. Riley Committee Members, James O. Sanders Andy D. Herring Jason E. Sawyer Head of Department, H. Russell Cross August 2013 Major...

Obeidat, Mohammad Diya Talal Hamed

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Study of Prevention and Retention Strategies for Successful Urban Secondary High School Hispanic Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF PREVENTION AND RETENTION STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFUL URBAN SECONDARY HIGH SCHOOL HISPANIC STUDENTS A Dissertation by ROBERTO IBARRA LOPEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF EDUCATION Approved by: Chair of Committee, Mario S. Torres Committee Members, Virginia Collier Larry Dooley Ben Welch Head of Department, Fredrick M. Nafukho May 2013...

Lopez, Roberto I

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Professional School Psychology Programs' Recruitment and Retention of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graduate students of color. American Psychologist, 61, 143-156. Sanders, J. B., Wilson, M., & Jones, J. (2010). Generating Markets: Recruitment for programs and program faculty, encouraging diversity. Trainers Forum, 29 (2),32-35. Solomon, David J... PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS? RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENTS Major: Mathematics April 2011 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University...

Smith, Leann

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

Theoretical Analysis of Antibody Targeting of Tumor Spheroids: Importance of Dosage for Penetration, and Affinity for Retention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...processes determine tumor penetration rate and subsequent retention...incrementally affect the rate of tumor penetration. The moving reaction front...different parameters affect the rate of tumor penetration. R, Ag t , and describe...

Christilyn P. Graff and K. Dane Wittrup

2003-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner David Morin  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

David Morin, PE U.S. Air Force Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas As energy manager of Laughlin Air Force Base, David Morin led the base's energy program to achieve FY 2012 energy and water intensity reductions of 29 and 24 percent over the prior year and save $1.8 million in utility costs. Mr. Morin focused on three key areas: projects, maintenance, and individual conservation. In FY 2012 he implemented $1.3 million in projects, including a photovoltaic re-roofing project; lighting and plumbing fixture upgrades; base-wide leak detection and repair; and conversion of a domestic water fed pond into a bio-swale. Using new advanced metering, Mr. Morin worked with facility managers to identify and address anomaly power use and reduce base power outages by 29 percent. Mr. Morin also initiated

335

Marketing water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management, water conservation programs Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 17 public information programs and materials that increase awareness about regional water issues. The company recently opened the TecH2O, a water resource learning center...tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The effect of stone retention walls on soil productivity and crop performance on selected hillside farms in southern Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF STONE RETENTION WALLS ON SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND CROP PERFORMANCE ON SELECTED HILLSIDE FARMS IN SOUTHERN HONDURAS A Thesis by MARC ELLERY THOMPSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject Soil Science THE EFFECT OF STONE RETENTION WALLS ON SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND CROP PERFORMANCE ON SELECTED HILLSIDE FARMS IN SOUTHERN HONDURAS A Thesis by MARC...

Thompson, Marc Ellery

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Baseline risk assessment of the perched water system at the INEL test reactor area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A baseline health risk assessment (HRA) was prepared to evaluate potential risks to human health and the environment posed by the Perched Water System (PWS) at the Test Reactor Area (TRA). The PWS has been designated Operable Unit 2-12, one of the 13 operable units identified at TRA. During the period from 1962 to 1990, a total of 6770 million gal of water were discharged from the TRA to unlined surface ponds. Wastewater discharged to the surface ponds at TRA percolates downward through the surficial alluvium and the underlying basalt bedrock. A resulting shallow perched water zone has formed at the interface between the surficial sediments and the underlying basalt. Further downward movement of groundwater is again impeded by a low-permeability layer of silt, clay, and sand encountered at a depth of [approximately]150 ft. The deep perched water zone occurs on top of this low-permeability interbed. An evaluation was made as to whether potential risks for the PWS could justify implementing a remedial action. The risk evaluation consisted of two parts, the human health evaluation and the ecological evaluation.

Gordon, J.W.; Sinton, P.O. (Dames Moore, Denver, CO (United States)); Jensen, N. (DOE, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); McCormick, S. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

John R. Gallagher

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evaluation of electrodialysis for scaling prevention of nanofiltration membranes at high water recoveries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The water recovery of nanofiltration in drinking water production is limited to 8085%. When the water recovery is increased, there is a risk of scaling of sparingly soluble salts, such as CaSO4 or CaCO3, onto the membrane surface. There is a need for robust technologies that handle the problem of mineral scaling in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis, allowing operation at higher recoveries, i.e., with a higher production of potable water. In this study, the retentate stream of a nanofiltration unit was therefore desalinated by electrodialysis. Two different ion exchange membrane pairs, namely AMX-CMX (Neosepta, Japan) and FTAM-FTCM (Fumasep, Germany) were used for this purpose. The membrane pairs were compared on the basis of their removal efficiency of the main ions present in natural waters, with special attention to calcium and sulphate ions. The economic feasibility of retentate treatment by electrodialysis is discussed as well. The FTAM anion exchange membranes of Fumasep were able to remove sulphate ions faster, relative to chloride or nitrate ions. This is unexpected, because sulphate ions have a high hydrated ionic radius and steric hindrance typically obstructs their transport through anion exchange membranes, as is the case with the AMX membranes. This feature makes the FTAM membranes appropriate for the desalination of retentate streams of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes, in water recycling applications. The other membranes can be regarded as non-selective.

Steven Van Geluwe; Leen Braeken; Thomas Robberecht; Maarten Jans; Claude Creemers; Bart Van der Bruggen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Suitability of salt-gradient solar ponds for electrical power generation in the US Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Guam, and American Samoa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The procedures and findings of a study to assess the suitability of salt-gradient solar ponds for base-load (firm) electricity generation in the US Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (TTPI), Guam and American Samoa are described. The general conclusion is that solar pond power plants (SPPPs) are viable both technically and economically for some applications, possibly including atolls. The most practical immediate application would be to small and intermediate power users such as villages and airports. It is recommended that (1) at least one small SPPP be built immediately on a dry land site such as for the main village on Peleliu, Palau, (considered in this report) or at other identified feasible sites, and (2) that a design study be conducted to adapt the technology to atoll sites. This study was carried out by first reviewing all available literature on solar ponds and the regions concerned. All the regions in question were visited. Several sites were selected for specific study and SPPP conceptual designs were developed for these sites. These sites are (1) North Peleliu, Palau, with (2) Peleliu airport as an auxiliary site, (3) Aimeliik, Palau, and (4) atoll environments. Cultural, political, environmental and legal considerations were given equal weight with technical and economic factors, and locally resident persons were used as interpreters and liaisons. There exists strong support in the government and the community to develop these proposed site-specific SPPPs and land is available. Power needs were defined, construction and operation costs were calculated and performance was predicted for the site-specific designs. The results of the Palau site-specific studies were generalized to other areas and environments in the TTPI, Guam and American Samoa. An economic analysis of the SPPP conceptual design developed for Palau was made using the discounted cash flow method.

McCord, T.B.; Bathen, K.H.; Boesgaard, H.; Fanale, F.P.; McCord, C.S.; Scudder, R.J.; Weeks, D.D.; Yuen, J.W.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude necessary to have a dramatic impact on blending, washing, or waste loading strategies for DWPF) for the glasses studied here. In general, the concentrations of those species that significantly improve sulfate solubility in a borosilicate glass must be added in relatively large concentrations (e.g., 13 to 38 wt % or more of the frit) in order to have a substantial impact. For DWPF, these concentrations would constitute too large of a portion of the frit to be practical. Therefore, it is unlikely that specific additives may be introduced into the DWPF glass via the frit to significantly improve sulfate solubility. The results presented here continue to show that sulfate solubility or retention is a function of individual glass compositions, rather than a property of a broad glass composition region. It would therefore be inappropriate to set a single sulfate concentration limit for a range of DWPF glass compositions. Sulfate concentration limits should continue to be identified and implemented for each sludge batch. The current PCCS limit is 0.4 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass, although frit development efforts have led to an increased limit of 0.6 wt % for recent sludge batches. Slightly higher limits (perhaps 0.7-0.8 wt %) may be possible for future sludge batches. An opportunity for allowing a higher sulfate concentration limit at DWPF may lay lie in improving the laboratory experiments used to set this limit. That is, there are several differences between the crucible-scale testing currently used to define a limit for DWPF operation and the actual conditions within the DWPF melter. In particular, no allowance is currently made for sulfur partitioning (volatility versus retention) during melter processing as the sulfate limit is set for a specific sludge batch. A better understanding of the partitioning of sulfur in a bubbled melter operating with a cold cap as well as the impacts of sulfur on the off-gas system may allow a higher sulfate concentration limit to be established for the melter feed. This approach would have to be taken carefully to ensure that a

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

342

Workforce Retention Accomplishments Presentation - Sustainability Assessment of Workforce Well-Being and Mission Readiness  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sustainability Assessment of Workforce Sustainability Assessment of Workforce Well-Being and Mission Readiness Jodi M. Jacobson, Ph.D., University of Maryland 2 Illness and Injury Lost Work Time Generational Divide Recruitment & Retention Competition Retirement & Aging Workforce Health & Well-Being Stress Depression & Anxiety Budget Cuts Technology Talent Management Work/Life Balance Safety Accountability Security Leadership Development Workforce Sustainability Chronic Health Conditions Globalization Critical Skills Shortage Job Skill Re-Alignment Job Transitioning Healthcare Costs YOU ARE NOT ALONE! 3 Indirect Costs  "You can"t manage what you can"t measure" (Dr. Ron Goetzel, Director, Institute for Health & Productivity Studies, Cornell University)

343

Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. 38 39 Information provided in this Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 40 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility permit application documentation is 41 current as of June 1, 1997.

Coenenberg, J.G.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Axial thermal medium delivery tubes and retention plates for a gas turbine rotor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a multi-stage turbine rotor, tubes are disposed in openings adjacent the rotor rim for flowing a thermal medium to rotor buckets and returning spent thermal medium. The tubes have axially spaced lands of predetermined wall thickness with thin-walled tube sections between the lands and of increasing thickness from the forward to the aft ends of the tubes. A pair of retention plates are carried on the aft end face of the aft wheel and straddle the tube and engage against a shoulder on the tube to preclude displacement of the tube in an aft direction.

Mashey, Thomas Charles (Coxsackie, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The effect of solids retention time on tertiary ozonation and carbon adsorption of petrochemical wastewaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and biochemical oxygen demands were measured before and after ozaontion as well as the amount of ozone consumed. Non-adsorbable COD was measured and a comparison of ozonized and unozonized wastewater made. BOD concentration rose after ozonation, but decreased... of solids retention time on nonadsorbable COD, with and without ozonation. 39 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Biochemical and chemical oxygen demand data. COD removal and ozone consumption data 21 26 iVon-adsorbable COD data for bio-oxidized effluent. . 3O...

Buys, Ronald Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

346

Shrew response to variable woody debris retention: Implications for sustainable forest bioenergy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shrews are integral components of forest food webs and may rely on downed woody debris to provide microhabitats that satisfy high moisture and metabolic requirements. However, woody biomass harvests glean downed woody debris to use as a bioenergy feedstock. Biomass Harvesting Guidelines (BHGs) provide guidance on the amount and distribution of downed woody debris retained after harvest to ensure ecological sustainability of woody biomass harvesting and limit detrimental effects on wildlife. However, the success of Biomass Harvesting Guidelines at reaching sustainability goals, including conservation of wildlife habitat, has not been tested in an operational setting. Thus, we compared shrew captures among six woody biomass harvesting treatments in pine plantations in North Carolina, USA from April to August 20112014 (n=4) and Georgia, USA from April to August 20112013 (n=4). Treatments included: (1) woody biomass harvest with no BHGs; (2) 15% retention with woody biomass dispersed; (3) 15% retention with woody biomass clustered; (4) 30% retention with woody biomass dispersed; (5) 30% retention with woody biomass clustered; and (6) no woody biomass harvested. We sampled shrews with drift fence arrays and compared relative abundance of shrews among treatments using analysis of variance. Additionally, we used general linear regression models to evaluate the influence of downed woody debris volume and vegetation structure on shrew capture success at each drift fence for species with >100 captures/state/year. In 53,690 trap nights, we had 1,712 shrew captures representing three species, Cryptotis parva, Blarina carolinensis, and Sorex longirostris. We did not detect consistent differences in shrew relative abundance among woody biomass harvest treatments, but relative abundance of all species increased over time as vegetation became established. In North Carolina, total shrew capture success was negatively related to volume of downed woody debris within 50m of the drift fence array (P=0.05) in 2013 and positively related to bare groundcover in 2013 (P=0.02) and 2014 (P<0.01). In Georgia, total shrew capture success was negatively related to herbaceous groundcover (P<0.01) and leaf litter groundcover (P=0.02) and positively related to woody vegetation groundcover (P<0.01) and vertical vegetation structure (P=0.03) in 2013. Our results suggest that shrews in our study area were associated more with vegetation characteristics than downed woody debris and that woody biomass harvests may have little influence on shrew abundances in the southeastern United States Coastal Plain.

S.R. Fritts; C.E. Moorman; S.M. Grodsky; D.W. Hazel; J.A. Homyack; C.B. Farrell; S.B. Castleberry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSIDE UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT PROTECTING NEBRASKAíS WATER RESOURCES THROUGH RESEARCH with a vision, thereís an untapped market using resources right under our feet,î the University of Nebraska outdoors in India, Bangladesh, China and Viet- nam. Thousands of them have been grown to harvest

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

348

water pipeline gallery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

water pipeline gallery, water pipeline drift; water pipeline tunnel (US) ? Wasserleitungsrohrstollen m

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Basic Engineering Research for D and D of R Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D and D operations at DOE sites across the country. The standard process for destruction of MLLW is incineration, which has an uncertain future. The extraction and destruction of PCBs from MLLW was the subject of this research Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with carbon dioxide with 5% ethanol as cosolvent and Supercritical Waster Oxidation (SCWO) were the processes studied in depth. The solid matrix for experimental extraction studies was Toxi-dry, a commonly used absorbent made from plant material. PCB surrogates were 1.2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) and 2-chlorobiphenyl (2CBP). Extraction pressures of 2,000 and 4,000 psi and temperatures of 40 and 80 C were studied. Higher extraction efficiencies were observed with cosolvent and at high temperature, but pressure little effect. SCWO treatment of the treatment of the PCB surrogates resulted in their destruction below detection limits.

Michael A. Matthews; David A. Bruce,; Thomas A. Davis; Mark C. Thies; John W. Weidner; Ralph E. White

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

Chen, Tsuhan

351

Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

Reusing Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reusing Water Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. April 12, 2012 Water from cooling the supercomputer is release to maintain a healthy wetland. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We reuse the same water up to six times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. How many times does LANL reuse water? Wastewater is generated from some of the facilities responsible for the Lab's biggest missions, such as the cooling towers of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, one of the Lab's premier science research

354

Inhibition of splicing and nuclear retention of pre-mRNA by spliceostatin A in fission yeast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear retention of pre-mRNAs is tightly regulated by several security mechanisms that prevent pre-mRNA export into the cytoplasm. Recently, spliceostatin A, a methylated derivative of a potent antitumor microbial metabolite FR901464, was found to cause pre-mRNA accumulation and translation in mammalian cells. Here we report that spliceostatin A also inhibits splicing and nuclear retention of pre-mRNA in a fission yeast strain that lacks the multidrug resistance protein Pmd1. As observed in mammalian cells, spliceostatin A is bound to components of the SF3b complex in the spliceosome. Furthermore, overexpression of nup211, a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MLP1, suppresses translation of pre-mRNAs accumulated by spliceostatin A. These results suggest that the SF3b complex has a conserved role in pre-mRNA retention, which is independent of the Mlp1 function.

Lo, Chor-Wai [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biotechnology, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kaida, Daisuke; Nishimura, Shinichi; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Yashiroda, Yoko; Taoka, Hiroshi [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishigami, Ken; Watanabe, Hidenori [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Nakajima, Hidenori [Drug Discovery Research, Fermentation Research Laboratories, Astellas Pharma Inc., 5-2-3 Tokodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Tani, Tokio [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Horinouchi, Sueharu [Department of Biotechnology, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), CREST Research Project, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)], E-mail: yoshidam@riken.jp

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

The Effect of Blocked Versus Random Task Practice Schedules on the Acquisition and Retention of Surgical Skills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background When learning multiple tasks, blocked or random training schedules may be used. We assessed the effects of blocked and random schedules on the acquisition and retention of laparoscopic skills. Methods 36 laparoscopy novices were randomized to practice laparoscopic tasks using blocked, random, or no additional training. Participants performed immediate post-tests, followed by retention tests six weeks later. Outcomes included previously validated Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) and hand-motion efficiency (HME) scores. Results Both blocked and random groups had significantly higher FLS and HME scores over baseline on post-tests for each task (p<0.05) and higher overall FLS scores than controls on retention tests (p<0.01). No difference was seen between the blocked and random groups in the amount of skill acquired or skill retained. Conclusion Both blocked and random training schedules can be considered as valid training options to allow programs and learners to tailor training to their individual needs.

Justin D. Rivard; Ashley S. Vergis; Bertram J. Unger; Lawrence M. Gillman; Krista M. Hardy; Jason Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Management This department applies multi-disciplinary science and technology-based modeling to assess complex environmental systems. It integrates ecology, anthropology, and...

357

Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and fresh water aquatic weeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvahiae has been in culture continuously for over two years. Yield for the past year has averaged 12 g ash-free dry wt/m/sup 2/ .day (17.5 t/a.y) in suspended 2600-1 aluminum tank cultures with four exchanges of enriched seawater per day and continuous aeration. Yields from nonintensive pond-bottom culture, similar to commercial Gracilaria culture methods in Taiwan, averaged 3 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day in preliminary experiments. Rope and spray cultures were not successful. Yields of water hyacinths from March 1978 to March 1979 averaged 25 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day (37 t/a.y). Season, nutrient availability (form and quantity) and stand density were found to affect the relative proportions of structural and nonstructural tissue in water hyacinths and thereby significantly affect digestibility of and methane production by the plants. Pennywort (Hydrocotyle) grew poorly in winter and its annual yield averaged only one-third that of water hyacinth. Water lettuce (Pistia) appears more comparable to hyacinths in preliminary studies and its yields will be monitored throughout a complete year. Stable, continuous anaerobic digestion of both water hyacinths and Gracilaria has been maintained with an average gas production from both species of 0.4 1/g volatile solids at 60% methane.

Ryther, J.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Chapter 2 Lake and reservoir water uses and abuses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Reservoirs are beneficial for human water needs, sometimes for one particular purpose, but frequently for multiple simultaneous purposes (multipurpose use). In contrast, lakes are natural waterbodies, often without designated human water uses. However, the use of their water is recently becoming more intensive and multipurpose, particularly for lakes in heavily-populated countries and intensively-utilized regions. This multipurpose and extensive use can often lead to abuse and conflicts, to a reduced ability to supply water of good quality, aesthetic and safe for human consumption. This chapter distinguishes twelve types of lake and reservoir functions. These include drinking water, irrigation, flood control, fish production and production of other useful organisms, mining, fire- and ice-ponds, and urban reservoirs. The deterioration of lakes and reservoirs is difficult to classify and two major groups are distinguished. One is based on their improper usageabuses of the waterbodies, classified according to sources or reasons of the deterioration. The other is based on the agents and compounds causing the deteriorationpollution.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

May 21, 2012, Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Work Force Retention Work Group Charter  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Work Force Retention Work Group Charter Work Force Retention Work Group Charter In an ongoing effort to further the improvement of health, safety, environmental, and security performance within the Department, DOE is engaged in the establishment of work groups to pursue health and safety improvements across the DOE Complex. These efforts support DOE's responsibility as owner/manager to protect its greatest asset: the worker. The work groups support DOE's integrated safety management system and further DOE's best interests by fostering worker involvement and partnerships to maximize continuity of operations and the success of the Department's national security mission.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Power Law Size-Distributed Heterogeneity Explains Colloid Retention on Soda Lime Glass in the Presence of Energy Barriers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power Law Size-Distributed Heterogeneity Explains Colloid Retention on Soda Lime Glass in the Presence of Energy Barriers ... This is shown in Figure 1 under the condition of 80 nm heterodomains and 6 mM IS, where the ZOIs and the corresponding colloidcollector interaction force profiles as a function of minimum separation distance (H) are shown for the three colloid sizes examined in this study (blue = 0.25 ?m, green = 1.1 ?m, red = 1.95 ?m). ... Such work will determine whether representing retention via discrete heterogeneity yields a distinct but logical set of heterodomain representations among mineral surfaces predominant in groundwater aquifers. ...

Eddy Pazmino; Jacob Trauscht; Brittany Dame; William P. Johnson

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Separation of oil and water produced by micellar-solution/ polymer flooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase behavior of produced fluids from a micellar/polymer project is dominated by producedsulfonate equivalent-weight distribution, total sulfonate production, and aqueous-phase salt concentration and type. Produced fluids at Marathon Oil Co.'s 219-R Project showed evidence of having passed through a salinity gradient created by reservoir brine at the leading edge of the displacement and fresh polymer water behind the micellar solution. During early production, when aqueousphase salt concentration was relatively high, highequivalent-weight sulfonates were permanently entrained in produced oil. Significant amounts of water also remained. As the salt content of produced water declined, high-equivalent-weight sulfonates moved to middle and aqueous phases. The middle and aqueous phases carried significant quantities of oil during these periods. All three problems-water in oil, oil in the middle phase, and oil in water-were corrected by treatment with demulsifying chemicals that rendered all sulfonates highly watersoluble. Water-soluble amines and alcohols were effective. Because of large quantities of sulfonate production and resulting low oil/water tensions, extended retention times were needed in separation vessels. In the absence of adequate retention (highest sulfonate production), a freshwater wash of the oil with an appropriate demulsifying chemical after initial oil/water separation removed the remaining sulfonate (and water) from the oil. All production from the 219-R Project was successfully treated and sold with strict quality control. Data from laboratory corefloods pertinent to the characterization of produced-fluid phase behavior are presented.

Dreher, K.D.; Shoppman, T.D.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Plant and microbial controls on nitrogen retention and loss in a Humid Tropical Forest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humid tropical forests are generally characterized by the lack of nitrogen (N) limitation to net primary productivity, yet paradoxically have high potential for N loss. We conducted an intensive field experiment with {sup 15}NH{sub 4} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3} additions to highly weathered tropical forest soils to determine the relative importance of N retention and loss mechanisms. Over half of all the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced from gross mineralization was rapidly converted to NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the process of gross nitrification. During the first 24 h plant roots took up 28 % of the N mineralized, dominantly as NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and were a greater sink for N than soil microbial biomass. Soil microbes were not a significant sink for added {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} or {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the first 24 hr, and only for {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} after 7 d. Patterns of microbial community composition, as determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis, were weakly, but significantly correlated with nitrification and denitrification to N{sub 2}O. Rates of dissimilatory NO{sub 3}{sup -} reduction to NH{sub 4}{sup +} (DNRA) were high in this forest, accounting for up to 25 % of gross mineralization and 35 % of gross nitrification. DNRA was a major sink for NO{sub 3}{sup -} which may have contributed to the lower rates of N{sub 2}O and leaching losses. Despite considerable N conservation via DNRA and plant NH{sub 4}{sup +} uptake, the fate of approximately 45% of the NO{sub 3}{sup -} produced and 22% of the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced were not measured in our fluxes, suggesting that other important pathways for N retention and loss (e.g., denitrification to N{sub 2}) are important in this system. The high proportion of mineralized N that was rapidly nitrified and the fates of that NO{sub 3}{sup -} highlight the key role of gross nitrification as a proximate control on N retention and loss in humid tropical forest soils. Furthermore, our results demonstrate the importance of the coupling between DNRA and plant uptake of NH{sub 4}{sup +} as a potential N conserving mechanism within tropical forests.

Templer, P.; Silver, W.; Pett-Ridge, J.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Firestone, M.K.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Biological treatment options for consolidated tailings release waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suncor Inc., Oil Sands Group, operates a large oil sands mining and extraction operation in northeastern Alberta. The extraction plant produces large volumes of a tailings slurry which resists dewatering and treatment, and is toxic to aquatic organisms. Consolidated tailings (CT) technology is used to treat tailings by either acid/lime or gypsum and enhances the possibility of treating residual fine tails in a ``dry`` land reclamation scenario and treating the release water in a wastewater treatment reclamation scenario. The objective was to assess the treatability of CT release water (i.e., the reduction of acute and chronic toxicities to trout, Ceriodaphnia, and bacteria) in bench-scale biological treatment systems. Microtox{reg_sign} IC20 test showed complete detoxification for the gypsum CT release water within 3 to 5 weeks compared with little reduction in toxicity for dyke drainage. Acute toxicity (fish) and chronic toxicity (Ceriodaphnia, bacterial) was removed from both CT release waters. Phosphate and aeration enhanced detoxification rates. Concentrations of naphthenic acids (an organic toxicant) were not reduced, but levels of dissolved organic compounds decreased faster than was the case for dyke drainage water, indicating that some of the organic compounds in both acid/lime and gypsum CT waters were more biodegradable. There was a pattern of increasing toxicity for dyke drainage water which confirmed observations during field-scale testing in the constructed wetlands and which was not observed for CT release waters. Acid/lime and gypsum CT water can be treated biologically in either an aeration pond, constructed wetlands, or a combination of both thereby avoiding the expense of long-term storage and/or conventional waste treatment systems.

Gunter, C.P.; Nix, P.G.; Sander, B. [EVS Environment Consultants, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Knezevic, Z.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2011-October 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Guidelines for acceptable soil concentrations in the old F- and H-Area Retention Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentration guidelines for residual radionuclides in soil at the sites of the Old F- and H-Area Retention Basins (281-3F, 281-3H) have been calculated using a dose-based approach. The guidelines also are being applied to areas around the F-Basin`s Process Line. Estimation of these soil guidelines was completed using RESRAD 5.0 in accordance with the DOE RESRAD methodology specified in DOE/CH/8901 (Gi89). Guidelines are provided for the nuclides known to be present in the soils at each basin (Sc87). Soil and hydrologic characteristics specific to each basin are defined for the areas above, within, and beneath the contaminated zones.

Hamby, D.M.

1994-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

Preliminary geohydrologic site characterization and proposed water quality well locations for WAG 4, WAG 5, WAG 3, and SWSA 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to assess general site conditions and to recommend water quality well locations at Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) 4, 5 and 3 and Solid Waste Storage Area 1 (SWSA 1) within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) complex. The subject sites are identified on the general site location map. For reference, the relationship of the subject sites to other WAGs are shown. WAGs are regions prescribed by Martin Marietta throughout the ORNL complex that require environmental assessment which will include design and installation of ground water monitoring systems. WAGs contain solid waste management units such as SWSAs, as well as pipelines, spill sites, buildings, ponds and experimental test sites. These solid waste management units are considered to be potential sources of contamination requiring further evaluation. This report recommends locations for water quality wells which will be installed at WAG boundaries in order to gather water quality data.

Baughn, D.C. (MCI/Consulting Engineers, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Liposomal Vincristine Which Exhibits Increased Drug Retention and Increased Circulation Longevity Cures Mice Bearing P388 Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...tumor models (9). Four mice were used per time point. The mice were anesthetized...the circulation half-lift of vincristine from approximately...retention. At every time point, .@. 0 0 a a. :3...the mean using at least four mice. higher drug...

Nancy L. Boman; Dana Masin; Lawrence D. Mayer; Pieter R. Cullis; and Marcel B. Bally

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 289 (2006) 254255 Erratum to "Retention of mineral colloids in unsaturated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 289 (2006) 254­255 Erratum Erratum to "Retention. Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 256 (2005) 207­216) Gang Chen, Markus Flury Department of Crop and Soil Sciences.colsurfa.2006.06.029 #12;G. Chen, M. Flury / Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 289 (2006) 254

Flury, Markus

371

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 256 (2005) 207216 Retention of mineral colloids in unsaturated porous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 256 (2005) 207­216 Retention of mineral colloids theory, where removal of col- loidal particles from the fluid phase is governed by physico- chemical transport is also subject to physical constraint, i.e., colloid physical entrap- ment in pore throats

Flury, Markus

372

The perceptions of novice and veteran teachers on the role of the principal in the retention of urban novice teachers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the perceptions of novice and veteran teachers on the role of the principal in teacher retention. Participants for the study were selected from 15 elementary schools in an urban school district in the Southwestern part of the United States. The study included 270...

Sarpy-Simpson, Claudine L.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

373

O2, CH4 and CO2 gas retentions by acid smectites before and after thermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acid smectites in natural condition and after thermal treatment up to 900 C were studied for their O2, CH4 and CO2 gas retentions at 25 C and 1 kg/cm2. Two smectites, one dioctahedral and one trioctahedral, wer...

C. Volzone; J. Ortiga

374

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................... 193 Lesson 11 Water and Pollution........................................................................................................................ 195 Activity 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere...! ............................................................................. 205 Record Sheet 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere! ..................................................................... 207 Activity 11.2, Pollution at Its Source...

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

375

Water Privatisation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

Zlls, Elisa

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

376

Computerized Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with WRAP. TWRI Technical Report 283, April 2005. This report serves as an introductory tutorial to help new users apply the model quickly for basic water availability modeling applications. ? Comparative Evaluation of Generalized Reservoir...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer via synthetic ammonia was a national project in Japan just after World War II, and water electrolysis as the source of hydrogen was active....3 of hydrogen and 700 Nm3 of...

Fumio Hine

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Water Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal bed methane (CBM) gas recovery techniques are unique compared to other production methods. Formation water must be removed, or dewatered as it holds the methane gas in the coal seam by hydrostatic pressure...

Alireza Bahadori; Malcolm Clark; Bill Boyd

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Photocatalytic nanomats clean up produced water from fracking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper refers to the transfer of the results of federally funded research towards commercialization in a very short time in order to meet the needs of an emerging and fast growing industry, involving the remediation of produced water from fracking operations on site and at low cost. The focus is on photocatalytic nanogrids: ceramic mats that may be used as covers for produced water stored in ponds and pits. The electrospun mats of the self-supported ceramic photocatalysts are responding to the whole solar spectrum and oxidize benzene and other liquid hydrocarbons in water, turning them into innocuous compounds. There is no hydrocarbon pollution left in the water after catalytic reactions and the nanogrids are reusable. The scalable processing of this technology, as well as the scaled-up proof of concept, is detailed in this work. The pathway from a research funding award in response to the Gulf oil spill remediation, through the inaugural class of the National Science Foundation Innovation Corps (I-Corps) cohorts towards a small business development is also outlined. The impact of the visionary and effective I-Corps program on the fast translation of lab-based technology from proof of concept to prototyping for industry validation is also described.

P I Gouma; J Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Rainfall leaching is critical for long-term use of recycled water in the Salinas Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the more-common ponded or flood applications. Early researchthe sea in the Netherlands flood disaster of 1953 was more

Platts, Belinda E; Grismer, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Crop Water Requirement and Water Use Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water use efficiency is defined as ratio of yield to irrigation water requirement (De Pascale and Maggio 2005) WUE=yield/irrigation water requirement (kg crop/m3 irrigation water) ...

Christian von Zabeltitz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs) · Audience: homeowners Outcome 4: Increase water reuse and recycling programs · Example program: Water harvesting ­ rain barrels and cisterns · Audience: home owners #12;: Water conservation. Conserve Florida's finite water resources by teaching rural, suburban and urban

Kane, Andrew S.

383

Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

384

Anion retention in soil: Possible application to reduce migration of buried technetium and iodine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a literature review of our present knowledge of the anion exchange properties of a number of soils and minerals, which may potentially be used as anion exchangers to retard migration of such anions as iodide (I{sup {minus}}), iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) and pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) away from disposal site. The amorphous clays allophane and imogolite, are found to be among the most important soil components capable of developing appreciable amounts of positive charge for anion exchange even at about neutral pH. Decreases in the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio and soil pH result in an increase in soil AEC. Allophane and imogolite rich soils have an AEC ranging from 1 to 18 meq/100g at pH about 6. Highly weathered soils dominated by Fe and Al oxides and kaolinite may develop a significant amount of AEC as soil pH falls. The retention of iodine (I) and technetium ({Tc}), by soils is associated with both soil organic matter, and Fe and Al oxides, whereas sorption on layer silicate minerals in negligible. Fe and Al oxides become more important in the retention of anionic I{sup {minus}}, IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} as pH falls, since more positive charge is developed on the oxide surfaces. Although few studies, if any, have been conducted on I and {Tc} sorption by soil allophane and imogolite, it is estimated that a surface plough soil (2 million pounds soil per acre) with 5 meq/100g AEC, as is commonly found in andisols, shall retain approximately 5900 kg I and 4500 kg {Tc}. It is conceivable that an anion exchanger such as an andisol could be used to modify the near field environment of a radioactive waste disposal facility. This whole disposal system would then offer similar migration resistance to anions as is normally afforded to cations by usual and normal soils. 93 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Gu, B.; Schulz, R.K. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Soil Science)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE AND RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. They are deposited on the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, slag must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Analysis indicated that slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to perform a series of tests to determine the factors that control the retention of the sulfur in the slag. 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed prior to the end of this reporting period, 12/31/98. This compares with 16 tests required in the original project plan. Combustor tests in early 1997 with high (37%) ash, Indian coal confirmed that high slag mass flow rates of about 500 lb/hr resulted in retention in the slag of up to 20% of the injected sulfur content mineral matter. To further increase the slag flow rate, rice husks, which contain 20% ash, and rice husk char, which contain 70% ash, were co-fired with coal in the combustor. A series of 13 combustor tests were performed in fourth quarter of 1997 and a further 6 tests were performed in January 1998 and in the summer of 1998. The test objective was to achieve slag flow rates between 500 and 1,000 lb/hr. Due to the very low bulk density of rice husk, compared to pulverized coal, almost the entire test effort focused on developing methods for feeding the rice husks into combustor. In the last test of December 1997, a peak mineral matter, injection rate of 592 lb/hr was briefly achieved by injection of coal, rice husk char, gypsum, and limestone into the combustor. However, no significant sulfur concentration was measured in the slag removed from the combustor. The peak injection rate reached with biomass in the 1997 tests was 310 lb/hr with rice husk, and 584 lb/hr with rice husk char.

Dr. Bert Zauderer

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Water Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...explains the su-percooling behavior. The important issue...Hydrophobic Interactions The behavior of water toward non-polar...structures ofthe clath-rate hydrates for many ofthese nonpolar...underlying the anomalous behavior of supercooled wa-ter...Schuster, G. Zundel, C. Sand-SCIENCE, VOL. 209...

Frank H. Stillinger

1980-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

387

Whither water?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... proposal for the future seems to have been ruled out for some time to come. Desalination has been widely mooted as a practical system of obtaining pure water in Britain, ... addition, the environment lobby, which by and large seems to favour the idea of desalination, has not, perhaps, taken full account of the impact on the coastal environment ...

John Gribbin

1974-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

388

Anaerobic digestion of wool scouring wastewater in a digester operated semi-continuously for biomass retention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An anaerobic digester, operated semi-continuously in order to retain high concentrations of biomass in the digester, was used to treat wool scouring wastewater. At a space load of 99 kg COD m?3 day ?1 (hydraulic retention time, 28 days) >56% of the COD and >47% of the grease were removed. At these efficiencies, this rate was estimated to be at least 253 times greater than that which would be achieved in a continuously stirred digester. Preliminary studies of enzymatic pretreatment of the scouring effluent showed that significantly improved treatment rates and/or efficiencies could be achievedi.e. >70% removal of both the COD and grease at a space load of 12 kg COD m?3 day?1. It is unlikely that any substancial levels of flocculation would develop in this system and it is expected that the moderate use of polyelectrolytes would be required to help maintain the VSS concentration in the reactor.

R.G. Cail; J.P. Barford; R. Lichacz

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evaluation of in-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling for integral reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) for a small integral reactor has been evaluated to determine the thermal margin for the prevention of a reactor vessel failure. A thermal load analysis from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel wall in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel has been performed to determine the heat flux distribution. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the outer reactor vessel wall has been determined to fix the maximum heat removal rate through the external coolant between the outer reactor vessel and the insulation of the reactor vessel. Finally, the thermal margin has been evaluated by comparison of the thermal load with the maximum heat removal rate of the CHF on the outer reactor vessel wall. The maximum heat flux from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel is estimated at approximately 0.25 MW/m{sup 2} in the metallic layer because of the focusing effect. The CHF of the outer reactor vessel is approximately 1.1 MW/m{sup 2} because of a two phase natural circulation mass flow. Since the thermal margin for the IVR-ERVC is sufficient, the reactor vessel integrity is maintained during a severe accident of a small integral reactor. (authors)

Park, R. J.; Lee, J. R.; Kim, S. B.; Jin, Y.; Kim, H. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Preliminary Study of Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energys River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize initial progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The work is ongoing; this report provides a summary of the initial findings. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments will begin with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hydrogeology and hydrodynamics of coral reef pore waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of forces can produce head gradients that drive the flow and advective mixing of internal coral reef pore waters. Oscillatory gradients that produce mixing result from wave and tide action. Sustained gradients result from wave and tide-induced setup and ponding, from currents impinging on the reef structure, from groundwater heads, and from density differenced (temperature or salinity gradients). These gradients and the permeabilities and porosities of reef sediments are such that most macropore environments are dominated by advection rather than diffusion. The various driving forces must be analyzed to determine the individual and combined magnitudes of their effects on a specific reef pore-water system. Pore-water movement controls sediment diagenesis, the exchange of nutrients between sediments and benthos, and coastal/island groundwater resources. Because of the complexity of forcing functions, their interactions with specific local reef environments, experimental studies require careful incorporation of these considerations into their design and interpretation. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Buddemeier, R.W.; Oberdorfer, J.A.

1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of heterosis and heterosis retention in Bos taurus-Bos indicus crossbred cattle for productivity traits in cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appreciation and gratitude to my committee chair, Dr. Sanders, and my committee members, Dr. Herring and Dr. Speed, who gave me support, guidance, and answers to my many questions from the moment I came to Texas A&M University. I would also like to thank my... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2005 Major Subject: Animal Breeding EVALUATION OF HETEROSIS AND HETEROSIS RETENTION IN BOS TAURUS -BOS INDICUS...

Meuchel, Meredith Christine

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Aerosol retention during SGTR meltdown sequences: Experimental insights of the effect of size and shape of the breach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the major insights gained from aerosol retention capability of a tube bundle that simulates the break stage of the secondary side of a failed steam generator under dry SGTR conditions. This scenario is highly relevant in nuclear safety since it affects the potential retention of radioactive particles in case of meltdown sequences with a SGTR. An 8-test experimental campaign has been carried out, extending the current database on the decontamination capability of the steam generator. The effects of the breach features (shape and size) and the particle nature (SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}) on the collection efficiency have been explored. The results confirmed the strong effect of the physical nature even when tube breaks in a fish-mouth mode. Loose aggregates (i.e. TiO{sub 2}) would be trapped to a limited extent (less than 25%); while single- or few-aggregates (i.e. SiO{sub 2}) would undergo a quite effective removal (i.e. over 75%). For fish-mouth breaches and SiO{sub 2} particles, the breach size has been found to moderately affect retention efficiency. Furthermore, the breach shape does not seem to have any effect on the net collection efficiency within the break stage, no matter the particle type. However, individual tube measurements indicate notably different deposition patterns, although an effect of the facility geometry cannot be disregarded as a key player in this observation. (authors)

Herranz, L. E.; Tardaguila, R. D.; Lopez, C. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, Avd. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Enterococci in the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...combined treatment: a pilot plant study. Water Res. 37...Optical characteristics of waste stabilization ponds: recommendations...2003. Disinfection in a pilot-scale pond system (APS...indicator microorganisms in waste stabilisation ponds. Water...

Muruleedhara N. Byappanahalli; Meredith B. Nevers; Asja Korajkic; Zachery R. Staley; Valerie J. Harwood

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Remedial investigation report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report comprises appendices A--J which support the Y-12 Plant`s remedial action report involving Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch). The appendices cover the following: Sampling fish from McCoy Branch; well and piezometer logs; ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch 1989-1990; heavy metal bioaccumulation data; microbes in polluted sediments; and baseline human health risk assessment data.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Water|Energy Energy|Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water|Energy Energy|Water ... This issue of Environmental Science & Technology features articles addressing the concept of the waterenergy nexus. ... Perrone et al. invoke the concept in their title, in creating a tool to account for the energy [used] for water and water [used] for energy (Environ. ...

Darcy J. Gentleman

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health). Water Safety Plans A Water Safety Plan (WSP) is a preventive management approach used to manage threats to a drinking water system--from catchment to consumer. It helps in the · Management of activities

400

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy are inextricably bound. Energy is consumed and sometimes produced by every form of water resourcesWATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, water resources professionals squarely faced the fact that water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

Saldin, Dilano

402

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water Supply and Demand Jim Schneider, Ph · How Nebraska manages water · Dealing with uncertain water supplies: adaptive management #12;Regional-wide, systematic approach · Flexible--Adaptive Management Adaptive Manageme nt #12;Integrated Water Management

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

403

Capture and Retention of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...R. Sterling. 1987. Isolation of Cryptosporidium parvum...in biofilms formed in a pilot-scale water distribution...Cryptosporidium parvum isolation & purification pathogenicity...physiology Humans Oocysts isolation & purification pathogenicity...

Kristin E. Searcy; Aaron I. Packman; Edward R. Atwill; Thomas Harter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hydrogen Ingress in Steels During High-Temperature Oxidation in Water Vapor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well established that hydrogen derived from water vapour can penetrate oxidizing alloys with detrimental effect. However, the complexities of tracking hydrogen in these materials have prevented the direct profiling of hydrogen ingress needed to understand these phenomena. Here we report hydrogen profiles in industrially-relevant alumina- and chromia- forming steels correlated with the local oxide-metal nano/microstructure by use of SIMS D2O tracer studies and experimental protocols to optimize D retention. The D profiles unexpectedly varied markedly among the alloys examined, which indicates mechanistic complexity but also the potential to mitigate detrimental water vapour effects by manipulation of alloy chemistry.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Quality assurance project plan for the Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization Project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization (CRFAPS) Project will stabilize a 19-m-high (62-ft-high) earthen embankment across Upper McCoy Branch situated along the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge. This task will be accomplished by raising the crest of the embankment, reinforcing the face of the embankment, removing trees from the face and top of the embankment, and repairing the emergency spillway. The primary responsibilities of the team members are: Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) will be responsible for project integration, technical support, Title 3 field support, environmental oversight, and quality assurance (QA) oversight of the project; Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWENC) will be responsible for design and home office Title 3 support; MK-Ferguson of Oak Ridge Company (MK-F) will be responsible for health and safety, construction, and procurement of construction materials. Each of the team members has a QA program approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations. This project-specific QA project plan (QAPP), which is applicable to all project activities, identifies and integrates the specific QA requirements from the participant`s QA programs that are necessary for this project.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

407

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

408

F I N A L R E P O R T STEWARDSHIP ECOSYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................................... 16 Water Purification: Nutrient Retention......................................................................................................................... 23 Water Purification: Nutrient Retention............................................................................................................................. 16 Economic Value of Water Resource Protection and Forest Conservation

Watson, Craig A.

409

Photosynthetic water oxidation versus photovoltaic water electrolysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Media about Center Center Video Library Bisfuel Picture Gallery Photosynthetic water oxidation versus photovoltaic water electrolysis 13 May 2011 Professor Tom Moore, a...

410

Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? ?r)/(?s ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

ELSEVIER Analytica Chimica Acta 315 (1995) 123-135 Determination of phosphorus in turbid waters using alkaline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Japan No. 3 Chlorella and No. 2 Pond Sediment. Suspensions were prepared by adding these materials/l Chlorella suspensions were obtained using both autoclave and microwave heating. For the Pond Sediment peroxodisulphate digestion; Autoclave heating; Microwave heating; NIES Chlorella; NIES Pond Sediment; Phosphonates

Canberra, University of

412

Global Water Sustainability:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ground Water and Drinking Water EPA 816-R-04-003...oil and gas produced water treatment. Journal of Hazardous...92-99 Jurenka B (2007) Electrodialysis (ED) and Electrodialysis...usbr.gov/pmts/water/publications/reportpdfs...

Kelvin B. Gregory; Radisav D. Vidic; David A. Dzombak

413

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Water Beetles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beetles Beetles Nature Bulletin No. 639-A April 29, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis Supt. of Conservation WATER BEETLES The world is full of beetles. They live everywhere except in the oceans and in the polar regions. There are more of them than any other kind of insect. A quarter of a million species are known and new ones are being discovered every year. Whether it is a microscopic mushroom beetle a hundredth of an inch long, or a giant six-inch Hercules beetle from South America, it can be recognized by its wings. The upper pair forms a hard shell curving like a shield over the thin folded lower wings and the abdomen. In flight, the upper pair is extended like the wings of an airplane and the lower two become buzzing propellers.

415

Water watch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Water Power Program: Publications  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE Water Power Program Information Resources Publications...

417

Water Sustainability Program Challenges to Sustainable Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Drought, Climate Change · Growth and the need for additional supplies · Water and Energy · Water the Southwest, nation, semi-arid and arid regions, and the world. · Today's program provides just a glimpse to and utilization of renewable supplies · Transboundary water issues · The surface water/groundwater interface

Cushing, Jim. M.

418

Water Resources Policy & Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

Buehrer, R. Michael

419

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Saver Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water heating costs....

420

Water Footprint | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Footprint Blue water represents water withdrawn from surface water and groundwater for feedstock irrigation and refinery processing. Blue water represents water withdrawn from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Diamonds in the rough: identification of individual napthenic acids in oil sands process water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Expansion of the oil sands industry of Canada has seen a concomitant increase in the amount of process water produced and stored in large lagoons known as tailings ponds. Concerns have been raised, particularly about the toxic complex mixtures of water-soluble naphthenic acids (NA) in the process water. To date, no individual NA have been identified, despite numerous attempts, and while the toxicity of broad classes of acids is of interest, toxicity is often structure-specific, so identification of individual acids may also be very important. The chromatographic resolution and mass spectral identification of some individual NA from oil sands process water is described. The authors concluded that the presence of tricyclic diamondoid acids, never before even considered as NA, suggests an unprecedented degree of biodegradation of some of the oil in the oil sands. The identifications reported should now be followed by quantitative studies, and these used to direct toxicity assays of relevant NA and the method used to identify further NA to establish which, or whether all NA, are toxic. The two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method described may also be important for helping to better focus reclamation/remediation strategies for NA as well as in facilitating the identification of the sources of NA in contaminated surface waters (auth)

Rowland, Steven J.; Scarlett, Alan G.; Jones, David; West, Charles E. (Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, Biogeochemistry Research Centre, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)); Frank, Richard A. (Aquatic Ecosystems Protection Research Division-Water Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Partnering to Save Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partnering Partnering to Save Water Phill Consiglio Southern California Edison What We Are Going to Discuss * A Little Bit About Water * The Energy Cost of Water * Water Technologies * What We Have Done * Where We Are Going A Little Bit About Water *The Earth Has A Finite Supply Of Fresh Water. - Water Is Stored In Aquifers, Surface Waters And The Atmosphere - Sometimes Oceans Are Mistaken For Available Water, But The Amount Of Energy Needed To Convert Saline Water To Potable Water Is Prohibitive Today *This Has Created A Water Crisis Due To: - Inadequate Access To Safe Drinking Water For About 884 Million People - Inadequate Access To Water For Sanitation And Waste Disposal For 2.5 Billion People - Groundwater Overdrafting (Excessive Use) Leading To Diminished Agricultural Yields

423

RAPID/Roadmap/14-UT-e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

feed operations; includes a heap leach facility for extracting minerals includes a wastewater pit, pond or lagoon; or includes a process water pond or impound. Contact...

424

Characterization of organic-rich colloids from surface and ground waters at the actinide-contaminated Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Colorado, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colloids, i.e. nanoparticles and macromolecules, play an important role in the environmental dispersion of actinides. Thus, colloids (3kDa0.5?m) were collected and purified from three different environments, i.e. surface water, pond water and near-surface ground water at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado, where elevated actinide concentrations had previously been documented. Their chemical composition was determined in order to better understand their role in actinide migration. All three types of colloid samples were found to be similar in chemical composition, with a higher percentage of organic carbon, OC (518%), than any other measured component, and only small amounts of Si, Mn, Al, and Fe (1.5% or below). Analytically determined components account for 4056% of the colloidal matter, with water likely making up the difference. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of colloidal material from all three sample types indicate the presence of cellulose or chitin, likely from plant (terrestrial and/or aquatic) material. Other major components include humic acid type particles, with only small amounts (<5%) of mineral particles. Our findings of colloids high in organic and low in inorganic matter content agree with previously reported results on Pu(IV) associated with an acidic natural macromolecular organic compound that also contains small amounts of Fe. Pu/OC and Fe/OC ratios both showed a steady decrease from surface water to pond water to groundwater, with a more marked decrease in the Fe/OC ratio, but no significant change in overall colloidal organic carbon (COC) concentrations.

Kimberly A. Roberts; Peter H. Santschi; Gary G. Leppard; M.Marcia West

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Long-Term Dynamics of Phosphorus Forms and Retention in Manure-Amended Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All air-dried samples were stored in a dry and cool storage facility for no longer than a few weeks before processing. ... While these losses are insignificant in agronomic terms, peak concns. of P (?30,000 ?g/L TP) in surface water during a runoff event, could be of considerable concern in sensitive catchments. ... the immediate and long-term effects of animal waste application to soil in lab. ...

Johannes Lehmann; Zhongdong Lan; Charles Hyland; Shinjiro Sato; Dawit Solomon; Quirine M. Ketterings

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that these are highly preliminary, incomplete, and optimistic estimates. Biophotolysis processes, indirect or direct, clearly require considerable basic and applied R and D before a more detailed evaluation of their potential and plausible economics can be carried out. For example, it is not yet clear which type of algae, green algae, or cyanobacteria, would be preferred in biophotolysis. If lower-cost photobioreactors can be developed, then small-scale (<1 ha) single-stage biophotolysis processes may become economically feasible. A major basic and applied R and D effort will be required to develop such biophotolysis processes.

Benemann, J.R.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

428

Grains, Water Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grains, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near the Shore Surf Induced Sand Dynamics Discussion Dry Granular Flows, Water Waves & Surf, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

429

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Energy Efficiency Standards .. 4 Multi-Family Water Heating.. 4 Pipe HeatBuilding Energy Efficiency Standards The scope of this task included the following subtasks; Multi-Family Water Heating, Pipe Heat

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns.

Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Measurements of water vapor adsorption on the Geysers rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers was measured at 150 C and at 200 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 ? p/p0 ? 0.98, where p0 is the saturated water vapor pressure. The rocks were crushed and sieved into three fractions of different grain sizes (with different specific surface areas). Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, BET surface area analyses were performed by Porous Materials Inc. on the same rock samples using nitrogen or krypton adsorption measurements at 77 K. Specific surface areas and pore volumes were determined. These parameters are important in estimating water retention capability of a porous material. The same laboratory also determined the densities of the samples by helium pycnometry. Their results were then compared with our own density values obtained by measuring the effect of buoyancy in compressed argon. One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously (Shang et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995) between 90 and 130C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang et al. (1994a, 1994b, 1995), some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms (with closing points at p/p0 ? 0.6) were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated processes were not present, and no increase in water adsorption with temperature was observed

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Horita, Juske; Simonson, John M.; Mesmer, Robert E.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

432

Feature - WATER Tool Released  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Argonne National Laboratory recently released an open access online tool called WATER (Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources), which quantifies water footprint of fuel production stages from feedstock production to conversion process for biofuel with county, state, and regional level spatial resolution. WATER provides analysis on water consumption and its impact on water quality. It contains biofuel pathways for corn grain ethanol, soybean biodiesel, and cellulosic ethanol produced from corn stover and wheat straw. Perennial grass (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) and forest wood residue-based biofuel pathways are currently under development. The WATER tool enables users to conduct pathway comparison, scenario development, and regional specific feedstock analysis in supporting of biofuel industry development and planning. It is available at http://water.es.anl.gov/.

433

Demineralization of Saline Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...application to saline-water conversion of the electrodialysis process than...Webster well water would danmage the electrodialysis memiibrane...stack. In the electrodialysis process, power...thus potable water, meeting health...

W. S. Gillam; J. W. McCutchan

1961-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

434

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews...

Adler, J.

435

Microbial water stress.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sufficient to bring cellular water potential to about the same...considerable reduction in internal water potential caused by the additive...minor event sufficient to make up any discrepancy between internal and external water potentials (with allowance...

A D Brown

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction in Your Building Portfolio Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction in Your Building Portfolio...

437

Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types of water management organizations, environmental NGOs,environmental policy and integrated water management hasenvironmental and water infrastructure stakeholders involved in Bay Area water management.

Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental policy and integrated water management hastypes of water management organizations, environmental NGOs,environmental and water infrastructure stakeholders involved in Bay Area water management.

Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Sandia National Laboratories: Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basins, surface andor groundwater may be available through permitting with the state water-management agency, alternatively water might be purchased and transferred out of its...

440

Performance Assessment of Suture Type, Water Temperature, and Surgeon Skill in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assessed performance of seven suture types in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha implanted with acoustic microtransmitters. Nonabsorbable (Ethilon) and absorbable (Monocryl) monofilament and nonabsorbable (Nurolon, silk) and absorbable (Vicryl, Vicryl Plus, Vicryl Rapide) braided sutures were used to close incisions in Chinook salmon. Monocryl exhibited greater suture retention than all other suture types 7 d after surgery. Both monofilament suture types were retained better than all braided suture types at 14 d. Incision openness and tag retention did not differ among suture types. Wound inflammation was similar for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon at 7 d. Wound ulceration was lower for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon than for all other suture types at 14 d post-surgery. Fish held in 12C water had more desirable post-surgery healing characteristics (i.e., higher suture and tag retention and lower incision openness, wound inflammation, and ulceration) at 7 and 14 d after surgery than those held in 17C water. The effect of surgeon was a significant predictor for all response variables at 7 d. This result emphasizes the importance of including surgeon as a variable in telemetry study analyses when multiple surgeons are used. Monocryl performed better with regard to post-surgery healing characteristics in the study fish. The overall results support the conclusion that Monocryl is the best suture material to close incisions created during surgical implantation of acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon.

Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A. [University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Botany

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Guidelines for acceptable soil concentrations in the Old F- and H-Area Retention Basins. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentration guidelines for residual radionuclides in soil at the sites of the Old F- and a Retention Basins (281-3F, 281-3H) have been calculated using a dose-based approach. The guidelines also are being applied to areas around the F-Basin`s Process Line. Estimation of these soil guidelines was completed using RESRAD 5.0 in accordance with the DOE RESRAD methodology specified in DOE/CH/8901 (Gi89). Guidelines are provided for the nuclides known to be present in the soils at each basin (Sc87). Soil and hydrologic characteristics specific to each basin are defined for the areas above, within, and beneath the contaminated zones.

Hamby, D.M.

1994-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nitrogen Fixation (Acetylene Reduction) Associated with Decaying Leaves of Pond Cypress (Taxodium distichum var. nutans) in a Natural and a Sewage-Enriched Cypress Dome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carbide and water, and samples...0.5 ml of gas into a Varian...ionization detector. Nitrogen was the carrier...0.5 ml of gas phase was withdrawn...ethylene content by gas chromatog...for ethylene solubility in equili...with overlying water) were sealed...MICROBIOL. NITROGEN FIXATION AND...

Forrest E. Dierberg; Patrick L. Brezonik

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

2010 Water & Aqueous Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water covers more than two thirds of the surface of the Earth and about the same fraction of water forms the total mass of a human body. Since the early days of our civilization water has also been in the focus of technological developments, starting from converting it to wine to more modern achievements. The meeting will focus on recent advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding of the behavior of the most important and fascinating liquid in a variety of situations and applications. The emphasis will be less on water properties per se than on water as a medium in which fundamental dynamic and reactive processes take place. In the following sessions, speakers will discuss the latest breakthroughs in unraveling these processes at the molecular level: Water in Solutions; Water in Motion I and II; Water in Biology I and II; Water in the Environment I and II; Water in Confined Geometries and Water in Discussion (keynote lecture and poster winners presentations).

Dor Ben-Amotz

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this 24 month project is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor with sulfur capture by calcium oxide sorbent injection into the combustor. This sulfur capture process consists of two steps: Capture of sulfur with calcined calcium oxide followed by impact of the reacted sulfur-calcium particles on the liquid slag lining the combustor. The sulfur bearing slag must be removed within several minutes from the combustor to prevent re-evolution of the sulfur from the slag. To accomplish this requires slag mass flow rates in the range of several 100 lb/hr. To study this two step process in the combustor, two groups of tests are being implemented. In the first group, calcium sulfate in the form of gypsum, or plaster of Paris, was injected in the combustor to determine sulfur evolution from slag. In the second group, the entire process is tested with limestone and/or calcium hydrate injected into the combustor. This entire effort consists of a series of up to 16 parametric tests in a 20 MMtu/hr slagging, air cooled, cyclone combustor. During the present quarterly reporting period ending September 30,1996, three tests in this project were implemented, bringing the total tests to 5. In addition, a total of 10 test days were completed during this quarter on the parallel project that utilizes the same 20 MMtu/hr combustor. The results of that project, especially those related to improved slagging performance, have a direct bearing on this project in assuring proper operation at the high slag flow rates that may be necessary to achieve high sulfur retention in slag.

Zauderer, B.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Rainwater Harvesting & Other LEEDing Strategies at BRIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Our Mission R & D Education Botanical Research Institute of Texas Botanical & horticultural resource including children?s books and rare books. Library Herbarium Botanical Research Institute of Texas IRRIGATION A retention pond.... Our Mission R & D Education Botanical Research Institute of Texas Botanical & horticultural resource including children?s books and rare books. Library Herbarium Botanical Research Institute of Texas IRRIGATION A retention pond...

Gunn, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 482: Area 15 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document /Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 482 U15a/e Muckpiles and Ponds. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 482 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and one adjacent area: CAS 15-06-01, U15e Muckpile; CAS 15-06-02, U15a Muckpile; CAS 15-38-01, Area 15 U15a/e Ponds; and Drainage below the U15a Muckpile. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions on the three CASs and the adjacent area of CAU 482. To support this recommendation, a corrective action investigation (CAI) was performed in September 2002. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to determine appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 482 dataset from the CAI was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Tier 2 FALS were determined for the hazardous constituents of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-diesel-range organics (DRO) and the radionuclides americium (Am)-241, cesium (Cs)-137, plutonium (Pu)-238, and Pu-239. The Tier 2 FALs were calculated for the radionuclides using site-specific information. The hazardous constituents of TPH-DRO were compared to the PALs defined in the CAIP, and because none of the preliminary action levels (PALs) were exceeded, the PALs became the FALs. The radionuclide FALs were calculated using the Residual Radioactive (RESRAD) code (version 6.21). The RESRAD calculation determined the activities of all radionuclides that together would sum to an exposure dose of 25 millirem per year to a site receptor (based on their relative abundances at each CAS). Based on the field investigation, the following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) CAS 15-06-01 - None. (2) CAS 15-06-02 - Cs-137 and Pu-239. (3) CAS 15-38-01 - Am-241, Cs-137, Pu-238, and Pu-239. (4) Drainage below CAS 15-06-02 - Cs-137 and Pu-239. Based on the data and risk evaluations, the DQO data needs presented in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan were met, and the data accurately represent the radiological and chemical risk present at CAU 482. Based on the results of the CAI data evaluation, it was determined that closure in place with use restrictions is the appropriate corrective action for CAU 482 and that use restrictions will effectively control exposure to future land users. This is based on the fact that even though the FALs were exceeded in a few samples, this remote, controlled access site poses only limited risk overall to public health and the environment. Given the relatively low levels of contamination present, it would create a greater hazard to worker safety, public health, and the environment to remove the contamination, transport it, and bury it at another location. Therefore, DTRA provides the following recommendations: (1) Close COCs in place at CAS 15-06-02, CAS 15-38-01, and the drainage below CAS 15-06-02 with use restrictions. (2) No further action for CAU 482. (3) A Notice of Completion be issued to DTRA by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 482. (4) Move CAU 482 from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Evaluating the Impact of Embodied Conversational Agents (ECAs) Attentional Behaviors on User Retention of Cultural Content in a Simulated Mobile Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents an evaluation study of the impact of an ECA's attentional behaviors using a custom research method that combines facial expression analysis, eye-tracking and a retention test. The method provides additional channels to EEG-based methods ... Keywords: embodied conversational agents (ecas), eye tracking

Ioannis Doumanis, Serengul Smith

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

An investigation of the effects of wettability on oil recovery after water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Theeie Lpyr as te stg1o ask eoateat hgs 7, L1BRARY A A B COLLEGE OF TEXAS AB IB|tESTIGATION OF TBE EFFECTS QF WETTABILITY OK OIL RECO|tERT AFTER WATER FMOIDIBG Robert, S, BojFldn Suhaittsl to the GracTnate School cd. ' the Agrioultaral a...CRncwlelgaenteo b'av eee ~ a ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ aee ~ ee ~ e ~ e ReferenCeet ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ a ~ 0 ~ ~ eao ~ ~ tee ~ ~ e44 ~ 4 ~ 4 ~ ~ 0 ~ 04 ~ 1. Schsaatio Diagram of Theoretical Oil Retention?~ ?, . ??4, 2. Schematic Diagram of Theoretical Oil...

Boykin, Robert Stith

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Agricultural, Industrial and Domestic 4 Annexure III: Water recycling technologies Wastewater and Industrial

Sohoni, Milind

451

Irrigation Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irrigation water quality is determined by the total amounts of salts and the types of salts the water contains. In this publication you'll learn why well water can be salty, what problems salty water can cause, what tests should be done...

McFarland, Mark L.; Lemon, Robert G.; Stichler, Charles

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

452

Drinking Water Problems: Benzene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their water. Activated charcoal or granular activated carbon Cellulose fibers Unfiltered water inlet Filtered water outlet Carbon granules Cellulose fibers Cellulose fibers Figure 2: Granular activated carbon (GAC) filter (adapted from Parrott et al...). filters used to improve the taste or remove odor of the water also can remove some contaminants in water supplies. These filters are effective in removing vola- tile organic compounds which easily vaporize into the atmosphere under normal conditions...

Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

453

Ground water and energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environment Impacts of Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clemson University with Chevron as an industry partner developed and applied treatment technology using constructed wetland systems to decrease targeted constituents in simulated and actual produced waters to achieve reuse criteria and discharge limits. Pilot-scale and demonstration constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) experiments led to design strategies for treating a variety of constituents of concern (COCs) in produced waters including divalent metals, metalloids, oil and grease, and ammonia. Targeted biogeochemical pathways for treatment of COCs in pilot-scale CWTS experiments included divalent metal sulfide precipitation through dissimilatory sulfate reduction, metal precipitation through oxidation, reduction of selenite to insoluble elemental selenium, aerobic biodegradation of oil, nitrification of ammonia to nitrate, denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, separation of oil using an oilwater separator, and sorption of ammonia to zeolite. Treatment performance results indicated that CWTSs can be designed and built to promote specific environmental and geochemical conditions in order for targeted biogeochemical pathways to operate. The demonstration system successfully achieved consistent removal extents even while inflow concentrations of COCs in the produced water differed by orders of magnitude. Design strategies used in the pilot-scale and demonstration CWTSs to promote specific conditions that can be applied to designing full-scale CWTSs include plant and soil selection, water-depth selection, addition of amendments, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). These strategies allow conditions within a CWTS to be modified to achieve ranges necessary for the preferred biogeochemical treatment pathways. In the case of renovating a produced water containing COCs that require different biogeochemical pathways for treatment, a CWTS can be designed with sequential cells that promote different conditions. For example, the pilot-scale CWTS for post-reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or ?footprint? of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environmental Impacts of Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clemson University with Chevron as an industry partner developed and applied treatment technology using constructed wetland systems to decrease targeted constituents in simulated and actual produced waters to achieve reuse criteria and discharge limits. Pilot-scale and demonstration constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) experiments led to design strategies for treating a variety of constituents of concern (COCs) in produced waters including divalent metals, metalloids, oil and grease, and ammonia. Targeted biogeochemical pathways for treatment of COCs in pilot-scale CWTS experiments included divalent metal sulfide precipitation through dissimilatory sulfate reduction, metal precipitation through oxidation, reduction of selenite to insoluble elemental selenium, aerobic biodegradation of oil, nitrification of ammonia to nitrate, denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, separation of oil using an oilwater separator, and sorption of ammonia to zeolite. Treatment performance results indicated that CWTSs can be designed and built to promote specific environmental and geochemical conditions in order for targeted biogeochemical pathways to operate. The demonstration system successfully achieved consistent removal extents even while inflow concentrations of COCs in the produced water differed by orders of magnitude. Design strategies used in the pilot-scale and demonstration CWTSs to promote specific conditions that can be applied to designing full-scale CWTSs include plant and soil selection, water-depth selection, addition of amendments, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). These strategies allow conditions within a CWTS to be modified to achieve ranges necessary for the preferred biogeochemical treatment pathways. In the case of renovating a produced water containing COCs that require different biogeochemical pathways for treatment, a CWTS can be designed with sequential cells that promote different conditions. For example, the pilot-scale CWTS for post-reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or ?footprint? of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Beebe, Alex; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

459

Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy-Water Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Emerging Issues and Challenges Emerging Issues and Challenges DOE/EIA 2010 Energy Conference Mike Hightower Sandia National Laboratories mmhight@sandia.gov, 505-844-5499 Energy and Water are ... Interdependent Water for Energy and Energy for Water Energy and power production require water: * Thermoelectric cooling * Hydropower * Energy minerals extraction/mining * Fuel Production (fossil fuels, H 2 , biofuels) * Emission control Water production, processing, distribution, and end-use require energy: * Pumping * Conveyance and Transport * Treatment * Use conditioning * Surface and Ground water Water Consumption by Sector U.S. Freshwater Consumption, 100 Bgal/day Livestock 3.3% Thermoelectric 3.3% Commercial 1.2% Domestic 7.1% Industrial 3.3% Mining 1.2% Irrigation 80.6% Energy uses 27 percent of all non-agricultural fresh water

462

Water Management Planning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water efficiency water efficiency at Federal sites Background The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during fiscal year 2010. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment was to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y-12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements. The water-assessment team learned key lessons from the Y-12 assessment. Therefore, the aim of this document is to share these key lessons to help other large process-driven sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) and beyond develop a comprehensive

463

Water Management Planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

water efficiency water efficiency at Federal sites Background The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during fiscal year 2010. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment was to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y-12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements. The water-assessment team learned key lessons from the Y-12 assessment. Therefore, the aim of this document is to share these key lessons to help other large process-driven sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) and beyond develop a comprehensive

464

Water | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Water Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 77.7 KiB)

465

Water Rate Escalations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies need accurate water cost escalation rates to perform life cycle cost analyses for water efficiency projects to meet Executive Order 13514 and Energy Independence and Security Act...

466

Water Pollution Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Water Pollution Control Board are tasked with the prevention of pollution in the waters of the state. The Board may adopt rules and...

467

Water, Sun, Energy | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water, Sun, Energy Water, Sun, Energy Novel method yields highly reactive, highly hydroxylated TiO2 surface The team's new method is a two-step photochemical process. STM images...

468

Global Water Sustainability:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fracturing, or fracking, involves the...environmental impacts associated with...water into the environment (Kargbo et al...water into the environment can have a range of impacts. While many...Evaluate the Impacts to USDWs by Hydraulic...

Kelvin B. Gregory; Radisav D. Vidic; David A. Dzombak

469

Electrolysis of Sea Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In implementation of the hydrogen economy, the electrolysis of sea water as the source of hydrogen has been ... . Two options exist for performance of this electrolysis. The first option is to subject the water t...

L. O. Williams

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Water Quality (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Quality Act establishes cumulative remedies to prevent, abate and control the pollution of the waters of the state.The act establishes responsibilities of the Oklahoma Department of...

471

California's Water Energy Relationship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................................................................................7 THE ENERGY INTENSITY OF THE WATER USE CYCLE.........................................................................................9 ENERGY INTENSITY IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support

472

ARM Water Vapor IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM Water Vapor IOP The SGP CART site will host the third ARM water vapor IOP on September 18-October 8, 2000. The CART site is home to a powerful array of instruments capable of...

473

Water Cycle Pilot Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Water Cycle Pilot Study To learn more about Earth's water cycle, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established a multi-laboratory science team representing five DOE...

474

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2014 Groundwater, Surface Water, Produced Water, and Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site October 2014 LMSGSBS00614 Available for sale to the public from: U.S....

475

The Water Problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New editions of Wasser Kalender 1979 [1) and the Manual on Water [2) have been published. A bibliography on water resources in arid and semiarid regions contains 140 abstracts, 31 of which are new entries. The...

Prof. Dr. Anthony Delyannis; Dr. Euridike-Emmy Delyannis

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Zombie Water Projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...it makes no difference to the corn and the alfalfa whether it gets Colorado River water or Mississippi water or Missouri ... which have been severely impaired this year by flood conditions, and at the same tim...

Peter H. Gleick; Matthew Heberger; Kristina Donnelly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

birds, the overall water requirements are minimal and exist only for washing the blades of wind turbines

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Facing Israel's water problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Sea of Galilee), rivers and wadies; it calls for the implementation of sea water desalination by nuclear energy.

Kapai Pines

1975-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

479

Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Heaters Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales...

480

Factors affecting water coning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these variables and plotted as reservoir WOR versus cumulative production of recoverable oil; the water and oil production characteristi cs of a field situation can be predicted by finding the equivalent system among these computer runs. The surface water... of these variables and plotted as reservoir WOR versus cumulative production of recoverable oil; the water and oil production characteristi cs of a field situation can be predicted by finding the equivalent system among these computer runs. The surface water...

Parker, Randy Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water retention pond" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.