National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for water retention pond

  1. Pond age and riparian zone proximity influence anuran occupancy of urban retention ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    Pond age and riparian zone proximity influence anuran occupancy of urban retention ponds Devynn A and negatively affects many wildlife populations. However, certain urban features, such as retention ponds, may proximity and pond age on retention pond occupancy by anurans. We identified and estimated the age of 25

  2. June, 2003 Journal of Vector Ecology 31 Nuisance chironomids in waste water stabilization ponds: monitoring and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inbar, Moshe

    June, 2003 Journal of Vector Ecology 31 Nuisance chironomids in waste water stabilization ponds from waste water stabilization ponds in central Israel created severe nuisance to nearby residents

  3. Solar-induced thermal activity and stratification in pond water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownridge, James D

    2015-01-01

    Ponds are universally used to store water for a large number of uses. With the increasing demand for more fresh water, ponds, lakes and reservoirs are likely to be constructed on a larger scale. We must understand the effects of environmental changes on fresh water if we are to most efficiently utilize this resource. This study undertakes to increase our understanding of the rate of thermal response of ponds and other bodies of water to every-day environmental changes. The central research agenda is to investigate how the temperature of pond water from top to bottom responds to the day/night cycle, changes in air temperature just above the surface, cloud conditions, and other sudden environmental changes. Data collection for this study spanned October 2007 to June 2011 and had a continuous time resolution of 50 seconds.

  4. Water Management: Clearing Cloudy and Muddy Water in Ponds and Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Water Management: Clearing Cloudy and Muddy Water in Ponds and Lakes T.L. Provin and J.L Pitt Professor and Soil Chemist, Program Specialist Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Cloudy or muddy water and ponds can

  5. 22 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. LIST O F WATER PLANTS POR CARP PONDS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .-Narrow-leaved Oat-tail. Very common. Less common,but found in this District and notably in a pond near the foot22 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. LIST O F WATER PLANTS POR CARP PONDS. B y LESTER. Rudolph Hessel, Superintendent of the Carp Ponds. The names given in that list where obsolete are placed

  6. Optical diversity of thaw ponds in discontinuous permafrost: A model system for water color analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    Optical diversity of thaw ponds in discontinuous permafrost: A model system for water color 2011. [1] Permafrost thaw ponds result from the irregular melting and erosion of frozen soils. In the discontinuous permafrost region of Nunavik, Canada, thaw ponds show pronounced differences in color even among

  7. Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FA17 Fertilization of Fresh Water Fish Ponds 1 Craig Watson and Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document to increase productivity of a field. One can also increase the productiv- ity of a pond by adding fertilizer, then pond fertilization can increase the production of these fish. Fertilizers provide nutrients

  8. A polluted pond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A polluted pond. Consider a pond that has an initial volume of 10,000 cubic meters. Suppose that at time t = 0, the water in the pond is clean and that the pond ...

  9. Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds Michael A. Mallin the natureand outflowing water nutrient concentrations. There were substantial suburban runoff inputs entering-circuited pollutant removal contact time. The golf course pond geometry of the system. showed significant increases

  10. A Particle-Water Based Model for Water Retention Hysteresis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yixiang Gan; Federico Maggi; Giuseppe Buscarnera; Itai Einav

    2013-12-04

    A particle-water discrete element based approach to describe water movement in partially saturated granular media is presented and tested. Water potential is governed by both capillary bridges, dominant at low saturations, and the pressure of entrapped air, dominant at high saturations. The approach captures the hysteresis of water retention during wetting and drainage by introducing the local evolution of liquid-solid contact angles at the level of pores and grains. Extensive comparisons against experimental data are presented. While these are made without the involvement of any fitting parameters, the method demonstrates relative high success by achieving a correlation coefficient of at least 82%, and mostly above 90%. For the tested materials with relatively mono-disperse grain size, the hysteresis of water retention during cycles of wetting and drainage has been shown to arise from the dynamics of solid-liquid contact angles as a function of local liquid volume changes.

  11. Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic; Davy, C.A.; Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean

    2012-07-15

    This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

  12. NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2012 19(1):111122 Pond pH, Acid Tolerance, and Water Preference in Newts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Elizabeth

    NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2012 19(1):111­122 Pond pH, Acid Tolerance, and Water Preference in Newts-spotted Newt) collected from 3 low-pH ponds (ca. 4.8) and 3 high-pH ponds (ca. 8.1) in Vermont varied in pH tolerance and water preference. While newts from all ponds survived in pH values as low as 4.4, the mean 10

  13. Culture of penaeid shrimp in brackfish water ponds receiving thermal effluents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fredieu, Barbara Jane

    1978-01-01

    CULTURE OF PENAEID SHRIMP IN BRACKISH WATER PONDS RECEIVING THERMAL EFFLUENTS A Thesis by BARBARA JANE FREDIEU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences CULTURE OF PENAEID SHRIMP IN BRACKISH WATER PONDS RECEIVING THERMAL EFFLUENTS A Thesis by BARBARA JANE FREDIEU Approved as to style and content by: (&WP-'~n. C airman o Commrttee...

  14. Fish Pond - 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    Catfish ponds can provide enjoyable outdoor recreation as well as excellent food fish. This publication explains pond preparation, stocking, feeding, water quality, off-flavor, harvesting, fish diseases, and controlling pond pests....

  15. 40 CFR 265 interim-status ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Dudziak, S.

    1989-03-01

    This report outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond, located in the southwestern part of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials may have been discharged to the pond. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to determine if hazardous chemicals are moving out of the pond. This plan describes the location of new wells for the monitoring system, how the wells are to be completed, the data to be collected, and how those data can be used to determine the source and extent of any ground-water contamination from the 2101-M pond. Four new wells are planned, one upgradient and three downgradient. 35 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Using mathematical modelling to inform on the ability of stormwater ponds to improve the water quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using mathematical modelling to inform on the ability of stormwater ponds to improve the water the mathematical modelling of flow and solute transport through stormwater ponds. The model is based on appropriate decreased. Keywords Dilution; flow attenuation; mathematical modelling; solute transport; stormwater ponds

  17. Mysterious POND Mysterious POND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Yoshifumi

    Mysterious POND *1 *2 *2 Mysterious POND Satoshi Sakurai*1 , Kazuhiro Asai*2 and Yoshifumi Kitamura*2 Abstract -- We present a media art work"Mysterious POND", which gives a mysterious illusion of Mysterious POND, followed by some sceneries of the demonstrations. Finally, the future extensions of the work

  18. The culture of some marine fishes in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luebke, Richard William

    1973-01-01

    / l 0 O I- ILI CIS CII CIS O Ill IL CL O C I- III O O Ict C3 U. IL O 1 its origin. A 75 hp pump (Worthington Corporation) supplied the pond water. This water entered the intake end of each pond through a inventories and final... Cd (~dd) N39AXO 03A10SSIO ( Ol & I&/ccl(cldI AIIAILDOONOO (Od 38lllIIN3dN3d. 27 ONI AlINI1VS JJI O ICI oJ IIJ ID IU CJ UI o I?: OI 9 OI ) CI IK IJJ III 0 I CJ 0 CL VJ IIJ O. III CJJ I 0 't5 ~ td 0 0 g 0 ld W e 40 oo 0 0 E...

  19. The culture of Penaeid shrimp in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a steam electric generating station, and their use as indicators of water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsema, Lawrence Alan

    1975-01-01

    University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Sub9ect: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE CULTURE OF PENAEID SHRIMP IN PONDS RECEIVING HEATED DISCHARGE WATER FROM A STEAM ELECTRIC... 70. 0 to 89. 9 mm in length. Shrimp were tagged, tagged and dyed, or left unmarked. Brown shrimp survival was lower. in these ponds than in ponds stocked with postlarvae at the same stocking rate in the brown shrimp experrment. The growth...

  20. Catfish Ponds for Recreation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masser, Michael P.; Steinbach, Don W.; Higginbotham, Billy

    1999-08-02

    through the natural food chain. The natural food chain starts with pond plants, particularly microscopic algae or phytoplankton. Phytoplankton are the start of the pond?s food chain, much as grasses are the start of many food chains on land. These algae... and their detritus (dead bodies) are eaten by microscopic animals (zooplank- ton) and by aquatic insects and worms, which are in turn eaten by fish such as catfish. Microscopic algae color the pond?s water some shade of green. This green water is often referred...

  1. Background: Subsurface Water Retention Technology (SWRT) Durable and easy to install: Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Background: Subsurface Water Retention Technology (SWRT) Benefits Durable and easy to install: Water retaining membranes can last at least 40 years and can be installed quickly and costeffectively permeable marginal soils converting them to much higher production levels of food crops. Better water

  2. Sediment Retention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediment Retention Sediment Retention Tour LANL maintains hundreds of wells, stream sampling stations and stormwater control structures to protect waters. Open full screen to view...

  3. Sunlight-Mediated Inactivation Mechanisms of Enteroccocus faecalis and Escherichia coli in Waste Stabilization Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadir, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    this apparatus to filter pond water resulted in much highersunlight with various cutoff filters in pond water and DIvarious cutoff filters in pond water (green squares) and DI

  4. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance Lucheng Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance ......................................................................................................................... 2 2. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof .............................................................................. 13 4. Methods of Storm Analysis and Green Roof Performance Analysis

  5. Evolutionary Computing for Detection of Retentive Structures in Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    and the demography of these fishes. Retentive structures are meso-scale vortices, whose size ranges from 10 km to 200 task At this stage of the study, there is no formal model for these meso-scales retentive structures

  6. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Suo, Zhigang E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  7. Use of in situ volumetric water content at field capacity to improve prediction of soil water retention properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Use of in situ volumetric water content at field capacity to improve prediction of soil water water content at field capacity to improve prediction of soil water retention properties. Most database. Results showed that use of in situ volumetric water content at field capacity as a predictor led

  8. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt 2014; published online 14 October 2014) Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced

  9. Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California, March 1985 to March 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, R.

    1988-01-01

    Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. The water samples increased in specific conductance and concentrations of total arsenic, total recoverable boron and total recoverable molybdenum going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. 6 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Pond Scum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    stream_source_info Pond Scum.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2559 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Pond Scum.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2O | pg. 7 Eight years ago..., 10 ponds were built on theTexas A&M University Riverside Campus. But the agricultural program for which these ponds were intended moved away from that campus and the ponds were neither used nor maintained. Thomas DeWitt, assistant professor...

  11. Evolutionary Computing for Detection of Retentive Structures in Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    ,robillia,poty,fonlupt}@lil.univ-littoral.fr, Abstract-- The demography of anchovy fishes in the Gulf of Biscay seems to be related to the presence of so- called "retentive" hydrodynamical structures, that keep fish eggs and larvae in a favorable environment be used to decide fishing quotas or bans for the sake of preserving the natural resource. We propose two

  12. The culture of selected marine fish in ponds receiving thermal effluent from a power station and their use as biological monitors of water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pane, Joseph John

    1976-01-01

    THE CULTURE OF SELECTED MARINE FISH IN PONDS RECEIVING THERMAL EFFLUENT FROM A POWER STATION AND THEIR USE AS BIOLOGICAL MONITORS OF WATER QUALITY A Thesis by JOSEPH JOHN PANE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE CULTURE OF SELECTED MARINE FISH IN PONDS RECEIVING THERMAL EFFLUENT FROM A POWER STATION AND THEIR USE...

  13. Maintaining artificial recharge ponds under uncertainty: a probabilistic approach for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Maintaining artificial recharge ponds under uncertainty: a probabilistic approach for engineering surface ponds (SP) Clogging What is clogging? Mathematical models for clogging Risk formulation Carlo analysis Conclusions #12;Surface ponds (SP) collect selected external water (e.g. regenerated

  14. HOLDING PONDS FOR ADULT SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    357; HOLDING PONDS FOR ADULT SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory LIBKABY 50 WOODS HOLE, MASS, Daniel H. Janzen, Director HOLDING PONDS FOR ADULT SALMON By Roger E. Burrows Fishery Research Biologist Retention of adult salmon 2 Holding pond design 2 Prevention of self-inflicted injury 2 Factors influencing

  15. 216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

  16. Aspect influences on soil water retention and storage I. J. Geroy,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Hans-Peter

    D. G. Chandler,4 S. G. Benner3 and J. P. McNamara3 * 1 United States Forest Service, Durango, CO differentiated by slope aspect. In this study, we compare quantitative measures of soil water retention capacity hydraulic conductivity and moisture cont

  17. Growth, survival, distribution, and population estimates of penaeid shrimp in fertilized and unfertilized brackish water ponds receiving thermal effluents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furness, Gary Neal

    1978-01-01

    ; UF designates ponds receiving no fertilizer. Ponds 2 and 3 were stocked with 7, 500 shrimp; ponds 4-6 were stocked with 5, 000 shrimp Heavy metal concentrations of tail meat of samples from fertilized (F) ponds 2, 4, and 6, and unfertilized (UF... the brown shrimp experiment. ' Ponds are in order of decreasing bottom softness, from left to right, in the qualitative test. Quantitative results are in depth of penetration (cm) 121 134 137 Table 19 Summary of the tail meat heavy metal analyses...

  18. Prediction of soil water retention properties after stratification by combining texture, bulk density and the type of horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of water content at particular water potentials (Rawls et al., 1982 & 2004) or the estimation). Most class-PTFs provide class average water contents at particular water potentials or one average1 Prediction of soil water retention properties after stratification by combining texture, bulk

  19. Investigation of the use of nanofluids to enhance the In-Vessel Retention capabilities of Advanced Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannink, Ryan Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids at very low concentrations experimentally exhibit a substantial increase in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) compared to water. The use of a nanofluid in the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) severe accident management strategy, ...

  20. BIRD COMMUNITIES AT \\VASTEWATER PONDS IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ponds. In the semiarid desert ofthe upper Snake River Plain, where the INEL lies, many water sources

  1. BULLETIN OF THE u w r m STATES FISU: COMMISSION. 435 140.-NOTEB WROJYI THE CARP PONDS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BULLETIN OF THE u w r m STATES FISU: COMMISSION. 435 140.-NOTEB WROJYI THE CARP PONDS. B y R U D O L P W IIESSEE. In the ponds t h e fish are looking well, the ponds themselves have good mater in the smaller ponds, and to supply the larger ponds (the west, ngrth, and south ponds) with fresh water

  2. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No Name

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

  3. Enhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    al. [10], assuming the overall efficiency of the fuel cell system is 20%, the specific energyEnhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells 31 July 2010 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) Neat-methanol operation Water

  4. SUDS Ponds in Scotland Performance Outcomes to Date Institute of Ecology & Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SUDS Ponds in Scotland ­ Performance Outcomes to Date KATE HEAL Institute of Ecology & Resource quality. This paper presents results for various aspects of the performance of SUDS ponds which have been Programme, a collaborative research effort. A SUDS pond is also defined as a retention basin with permanent

  5. Geologic and geophysical investigation of a small water retention structure, Salado, Tx 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, James Lewis

    2002-01-01

    erosion. Although such problems do not pose a significant risk to life or property, they do pose a financial liability to the landowner. For those whose ponds are undergoing such problems, a basic geological and geophysical investigation can help...

  6. Stocking and Management Recommendations for Texas Farm Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1983-01-01

    , ponds less than one acre receive different recommendations than larger ponds. The extent of water surface fluctuations, degree of expected fishing pressure and the muddiness of the water are a few of the traits which the pondowner needs to know... fluctuate considerably in surface area should be stocked on the basis of average annual low water surface area. Muddy Water Many Texas ponds have a tendency to stay muddy. This condition is caused by suspended soil particles in the water and should...

  7. The growth and survival of brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) and blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) in ponds receiving heated bay water from an electric power plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Robert Andrew

    1973-01-01

    ) J IU CA IS UI SI CA CS I S ! 0 l2 IS 18 20 SURFACE BOTTOM P. M. R 2 4 0 I R 8 ~ 22 JULY A U G. SEI'T. TIME (NEEEG) FIGURE 5. ? Hydrological data for pond 8. Ao ED I 2 So Uf 2' SURFACE SDEEDII 20 PUIAP OFF Z J 10 UI 10... HEATED BAY WATER PROM AN ELECTRIC POWER PLAI JT A Thesis by ROBERT ANDREW GOULD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Deoartment) (Member) (Member) IMay 19 73 436659 ABSTRACT Yh G* th dS ' l fB Sh' P(P t* ) d...

  8. Abbey Pond ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;Abbey Pond #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like t'o express my sincerest gratitude for their cooperation throughout the study. TWG #12;FOOD HABITS OF FISH IN A MULTISPECIES FARM POND ABSTRACT Thomas W in Abbey Pond, South Dakota. Aquatic in- sects, zooplankton, mollusks, and fish were the most frequently

  9. Forest Resources: Pond Construction and Management http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources: Pond Construction and Management http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1 A properly located, well-constructed pond is a beautiful addition to a landscape. Ponds provide owners with excel sources for live- stock watering, irrigation and firefighting. Building and maintaining quality ponds

  10. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRITICAL HEAT FLUX WITH ALUMINA-WATER NANOFLUIDS IN DOWNWARD-FACING CHANNELS FOR IN-VESSEL RETENTION APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, R.J.

    The Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of water with dispersed alumina nanoparticles was measured for the geometry and flow conditions relevant to the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) situation which can occur during core melting sequences ...

  12. [Task 1.] Biodenitrification of low nitrate solar pond waters using sequencing batch reactors. [Task 2.] Solidification/stabilization of high strength and biodenitrified heavy metal sludges with a Portland cement/flyash system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Mosher, J.; Terry, S.; Canonico, S.

    1995-09-22

    Process wastewater and sludges were accumulated on site in solar evaporation ponds during operations at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant (DOE/RF). Because of the extensive use of nitric acid in the processing of actinide metals, the process wastewater has high concentrations of nitrate. Solar pond waters at DOE/RF contain 300-60,000 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L. Additionally, the pond waters contain varying concentrations of many other aqueous constituents, including heavy metals, alkali salts, carbonates, and low level radioactivity. Solids, both from chemical precipitation and soil material deposition, are also present. Options for ultimate disposal of the pond waters are currently being evaluated and include stabilization and solidification (S/S) by cementation. Removal of nitrates can enhance a wastes amenability to S/S, or can be a unit operation in another treatment scheme. Nitrate removal is also a concern for other sources of pollution at DOE/RF, including contaminated groundwater collected by interceptor trench systems. Finally, nitrate pollution is a problem at many other DOE facilities where actinide metals were processed. The primary objective of this investigation was to optimize biological denitrification of solar pond waters with nitrate concentrations of 300--2,100 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L to below the drinking water standard of 45 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L (10 mg N/L). The effect of pH upon process stability and denitrification rate was determined. In addition, the effect Cr(VI) on denitrification and fate of Cr(VI) in the presence of denitrifying bacteria was evaluated.

  13. Brackish water pond culture of fishes and their use as biological monitors of the water quality of thermal effluent from a power station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaehler, Todd

    1975-01-01

    Atlantic Croaker Atlantic Spadefish Striped Mullet Hydrological Methods 14 14 14 15 16 17 18 18 19 19 20 21 22 22 23 24 RESULTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ ~ . . ~ Unfiltered Ponds Channel Catfish. Florida Pompano. Spotted Seatrout... Seatrout Spot Atlantic Croaker Atlantic Spadefish Striped Nullet Selected metals and Pesticides Hydrological Data. 95 96 98 99 99 101 102 104 106 CONCLUSIONS. LITERATURE CITED 109 APPENDICES Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D...

  14. Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbst, David B

    2006-01-01

    arti?cial salt evaporation ponds of the San Fran- cisco Bayindustrial evaporation ponds. Water Environment Research 71:Hydrobiology of the Alviso salt ponds. Ecol- ogy 38:382–385.

  15. Stormwater Detention and Discharge from Aquaculture Ponds in Florida1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    BUL334 Stormwater Detention and Discharge from Aquaculture Ponds in Florida1 J. E. Hill and C. L-flow control device for management of stormwater discharge and water conservation. It also provides information water will be detained in the production pond and only slowly discharged. #12;2Stormwater Detention

  16. Fate of Nitrogenand Phosphorus in a Waste-water RetentionReservoir Containing Aquatic Macrophytes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    such as water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes [Mart] Solms), duckweed (Lemna minor), and cattails (Typha sp

  17. Sustainable Water Practices at Pomona's Parks: Improving Irrigation Use and Stormwater Runoff Retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Terence

    Sustainable Water Practices at Pomona's Parks: Improving Irrigation Use and Stormwater Runoff;1 Abstract The need for water sustainability has emerged as a response to urbanization and the depletion of water sources. Urban green spaces, such as the city parks of Pomona, are at the forefront for the need

  18. Assessing Functional Equivalency of Nekton Habitat in Enhanced Habitats: Comparison of Terraced and Unterraced Marsh Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, John

    and Unterraced Marsh Ponds MEGAN K. LA PEYRE1, *, BRYAN GOSSMAN2 , and JOHN A. NYMAN2 1 U.S. Geological Survey and quality. Using shallow water ponds rehabilitated with a technique called marsh terracing, we examined quality. We examined three paired terraced and unterraced marsh ponds in southwest Louisiana. Nekton

  19. BULLETIN OF TIIE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 159 76.-PLANTS FOR O A R P PONDS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BULLETIN OF TIIE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 159 76.-PLANTS FOR O A R P PONDS. B y JOHN H pond. Uf tphis the carp tear np vast quantities,,which float about in large masses, throm- ing out of the com- mon water-lily (Nyniphocu odorafa),aud the more conimoii yellow pond- lily ( N t q k warloenrr

  20. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

    2014-01-01

    The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

  1. Engineered design of SSC cooling ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bear, J.B.

    1993-05-01

    The cooling requirements of the SSC are significant and adequate cooling water systems to meet these requirements are critical to the project`s successful operation. The use of adequately designed cooling ponds will provide reliable cooling for operation while also meeting environmental goals of the project to maintain streamflow and flood peaks to preconstruction levels as well as other streamflow and water quality requirements of the Texas Water Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.

  2. Spatial Analysis of Kansas Farm Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callihan, Ryan Andrew

    2011-11-16

    RYAN CALLIHAN, GEOGRAPHY A Spatial Analysis of Kansas Farm Ponds Regression Modeling and Outlier Detection Small Reservoirs (ponds...

  3. Fish Pond - 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Crombie

    2006-01-01

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences PACTORS IMPLUEMCIMQ NIMTERIMQ DIVIMS DUCK USE OP COASTAL PONDS IM SCUTE TEXAS A Thesis by STEPHEN EMMETT ADAIR Approved as to style and content by: Milton W. Weller (Co...-Chair of Committee) William H. Riel, Jr. (Co-Chair of Committee) )a Jack M. Pay (Member) James W. Webb (Member) Devi J. Schmidly (Head f Department) August 1990 ABSTRACT Factors Influencing Wintering Diving Duck Use of Coastal Ponds in South Texas...

  4. POND CULTURE fishery leaflet 311

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEXTBOOK OF POND CULTURE fishery leaflet 311 Ifish and wildlife service UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR #12;#12;TEXTBOOK OF POND CULTURE REARING AND KEEPING OF CARP , TROUT AND ALLIED FISHES by Vr'- at the Elsersvfalde Forestry Acadeny and in the Department for Fish Diseases and Pond Management of the Prussian State

  5. The culture of marine fish and their use as biological monitors of water quality in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Donald Ray

    1974-01-01

    For Individual Fish Tables 1 through 12. Length-Weight and Standard Length-Total Length Relationships for Each Sample Of Fish Tables 1 through 9 173 174 247 332 345 xx LIST OF TABLES Table Page Distribution of experimental fish populations... were periodically sampled to determine growth, survival, snd condi- tion. LITERATURE REVIEW Effects of Power Station Effluents Power stations normaljy discharge water which is 6 to 9 C above ambient water temperature (Davidson and Bradshaw 1967; de...

  6. Fuel Pond Sludge - Lessons Learned from Initial De-sludging of Sellafield's Pile Fuel Storage Pond - 12066

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Derek; Adamson, Kate [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) at Sellafield was built and commissioned between the late 1940's and early 1950's as a storage and cooling facility for irradiated fuel and isotopes from the two Windscale Pile reactors. The pond was linked via submerged water ducts to each reactor, where fuel and isotopes were discharged into skips for transfer along the duct to the pond. In the pond the fuel was cooled then de-canned underwater prior to export for reprocessing. The plant operated successfully until it was taken out of operation in 1962 when the First Magnox Fuel Storage Pond took over fuel storage and de-canning operations on the site. The pond was then used for storage of miscellaneous Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) and fuel from the UK's Nuclear Programme for which no defined disposal route was available. By the mid 1970's the import of waste ceased and the plant, with its inventory, was placed into a passive care and maintenance regime. By the mid 1990s, driven by the age of the facility and concern over the potential challenge to dispose of the various wastes and fuels being stored, the plant operator initiated a programme of work to remediate the facility. This programme is split into a number of key phases targeted at sustained reduction in the hazard associated with the pond, these include: - Pond Preparation: Before any remediation work could start the condition of the pond had to be transformed from a passive store to a plant capable of complex retrieval operations. This work included plant and equipment upgrades, removal of redundant structures and the provision of a effluent treatment plant for removing particulate and dissolved activity from the pond water. - Canned Fuel Retrieval: Removal of canned fuel, including oxide and carbide fuels, is the highest priority within the programme. Handling and export equipment required to remove the canned fuel from the pond has been provided and treatment routes developed utilising existing site facilities to allow the fuel to be reprocessed or conditioned for long term storage. - Sludge Retrieval: In excess of 300 m{sup 3} of sludge has accumulated in the pond over many years and is made up of debris arising from fuel and metallic corrosion, wind blown debris and bio-organic materials. The Sludge Retrieval Project has provided the equipment necessary to retrieve the sludge, including skip washer and tipper machines for clearing sludge from the pond skips, equipment for clearing sludge from the pond floor and bays, along with an 'in pond' corral for interim storage of retrieved sludge. Two further projects are providing new plant processing routes, which will initially store and eventually passivate the sludge. - Metal Fuel Retrieval: Metal Fuel from early Windscale Pile operations and various other sources is stored within the pond; the fuel varies considerably in both form and condition. A retrieval project is planned which will provide fuel handling, conditioning, sentencing and export equipment required to remove the metal fuel from the pond for export to on site facilities for interim storage and disposal. - Solid Waste Retrieval: A final retrieval project will provide methods for handling, retrieval, packaging and export of the remaining solid Intermediate Level Waste within the pond. This includes residual metal fuel pieces, fuel cladding (Magnox, aluminium and zircaloy), isotope cartridges, reactor furniture, and miscellaneous activated and contaminated items. Each of the waste streams requires conditioning to allow it to be and disposed of via one of the site treatment plants. - Pond Dewatering and Dismantling: Delivery of the above projects will allow operations to progressively remove the radiological inventory, thereby reducing the hazard/risk posed by the plant. This will then allow subsequent dewatering of the pond and dismantling of the structure. (authors)

  7. Modeling water retention of sludge simulants and actual saltcake tank wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, C.S.

    1996-07-01

    The Ferrocyanide Tanks Safety Program managed by Westinghouse hanford Company has been concerned with the potential combustion hazard of dry tank wastes containing ferrocyanide chemical in combination with nitrate salts. Pervious studies have shown that tank waste containing greater than 20 percent of weight as water could not be accidentally ignited. Moreover, a sustained combustion could not be propagated in such a wet waste even if it contained enough ferrocyanide to burn. Because moisture content is a key critical factor determining the safety of ferrocyanide-containing tank wastes, physical modeling was performed by Pacific Northwest National laboratory to evaluate the moisture-retaining behavior of typical tank wastes. The physical modeling reported here has quantified the mechanisms by which two main types of tank waste, sludge and saltcake, retain moisture in a tank profile under static conditions. Static conditions usually prevail after a tank profile has been stabilized by pumping out any excess interstitial liquid, which is not naturally retained by the waste as a result of physical forces such as capillarity.

  8. Investigation of downward facing critical heat flux with water-based nanofluids for In-Vessel Retention applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Gregory L

    2011-01-01

    In-Vessel Retention ("IVR") is a severe accident management strategy that is power limiting to the Westinghouse AP1000 due to critical heat flux ("CHF") at the outer surface of the reactor vessel. Increasing the CHF level ...

  9. Selecting a Method for Sealing Ponds in Florida1 Dorota Z. Haman, Fedro S. Zazueta, and Gary A. Clark2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    for irrigation, livestock production, fish production, fir protection or other purposes can be stored in the pond. Ponds can also be used to capture and store runoff from irrigation or rainfall events. The use of this surface resource can then lead to reduced pumping from deep aquifer water supplies. Ponds are excavated

  10. PAR Pond N Roads

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPowered oscillator usingLow Risk¯ RPADDPAR Pond

  11. Vietnam -- Bomb Crater Fish Ponds [Roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campanella, Thomas J

    1995-01-01

    E T N A M Bomb Crater Fish Ponds Thomas J. Campanella One ofthe bomb craters into ponds for growing fish, a staple of

  12. Solar Ponds - What Are They? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    Solar ponds can provide low cost solar energy collection as well as low temperature heat storage. Currently there are two types of solar ponds in an advanced state of development in the U.S. Each system uses a different collection and energy storage...

  13. 2101-M pond closure plan. Volume 1, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izatt, R. D.; Lerch, R. E.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment.

  14. ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION OF LAKES AND PONDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION OF LAKES AND PONDS A Review of the Literature SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT., John L. Farley, Director ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION OF LAKES AND PONDS A Review of the Literature By John Interpretation of results .................. l5 Fertilization and pond culture .................. l6 The pond

  15. Swan Lake Dusaf Pond Main Ring Lake Casey's Pond

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CC-BY-SA A B C D E 5 4 3 2 1 0 0.5 1 0.25 Miles Published: 552015 Public Access Areas Buildings Parking Lots Ponds Bicycle Path Trails Streams Public Access Roads...

  16. Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity pond sizes (diameter 750 m=large), and two habitat types (pond, adjacent marsh) in the Barataria Bay Estuary, Louisiana. Nekton assemblages of ponds and the adjacent marsh

  17. arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1 of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice

  18. 254 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. from the river to fish-poolsor ponds which are about 20 feet squareand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    254 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. from the river to fish-poolsor ponds which of tree branches is put over the pond, about 4feet above the water, to screen the pohd from excessive they are sold to stock fish-ponds in various localities where fishermen are raising fish for markets. Now cqmes

  19. OPERATING PLAN TAILINGS CELLS AND EVAPORATION PONDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPERATING PLAN TAILINGS CELLS AND EVAPORATION PONDS PIÑON RIDGE MILL Energy Fuels Resources Appendix A Tailings and Evaporation Pond Delivery and Return Piping Conceptual Plan AC..........................................................................................................1 2.0 TAILINGS CELL DESIGN

  20. In re Kent Pond, No MLP-03-10, Findings of Fact, Conclusions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In re Kent Pond, No MLP-03-10, Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, and Order at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  1. EA-1444: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Construction of a New Office Building, Childcare Facility, Parking Garage, and Storm water Retention Pond

  2. EA-1444: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Construction of New Office Building, Child-Care Facility, Parking Garage, And Storm Water Retention Pond

  3. Remote community drinking water supply : mechanisms of uranium retention and adsorption by ultrafiltration, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte-Herbruggen, Helfrid Maria Albertina

    2012-11-29

    Worldwide, around 884 million people lack access to safe drinking water. To address this, groundwater sources such as boreholes and wells are often installed in remote locations especially in developing countries. However, ...

  4. THE USE OF PONDS TO REDUCE POLLUTION FROM POTENTIALLY CONTAMINATED STEADING RUNOFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and SEPA's Diffuse Pollution and Habitat Enhancement Initiatives. INTRODUCTION The EC Water Framework ecological status in surface waters. The control of diffuse, land-based sources of pollution to these waters in water treatment in farm ponds vary between pollutants. P removal occurs mainly by sedimentation

  5. Nature of Flow and Gas Dynamics Below Spreading Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Jordan F; Avisar, Dror; Hudson, G. Bryant

    2005-01-01

    breakthrough curve at El Rio #8. Pond 2 El Rio #5 El Rio #6Ne and Xe concentrations in Pond 2 and groundwater samples.vadose zone beneath a spreading pond in more detail than was

  6. SURVEY OF FISHING IN 1000 PONDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURVEY OF FISHING IN 1000 PONDS in 1959 HUG ^^^ri^L UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Circular 86 #12;Cover. --Fishing in a pond, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Arnle J. Suomela, Coimnissioner BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE

  7. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure.

  8. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    1 Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds Stormwater management practices must be kept maintenance guidelines for stormwater wetlands and wet ponds, two stormwater prac- tices that are being constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system

  9. Effects of coal fly-ash disposal on water quality in and around the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana. Water-resources investigations (final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, M.A.

    1981-04-01

    Dissolved constituents in seepage from fly-ash settling ponds bordering part of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (the Lakeshore) have increased trace elements, and gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity in ground water and surface water downgradient from the settling ponds. Data suggest that concentrations of some dissolved trace elements may be greater beneath interdunal pond 2 than in the pond. The soil system downgradient from the settling ponds seems to have affected the concentrations of dissolved ions in the settling-pond seepage. Calcium concentrations were greater in ground water downgradient from the settling ponds than in the ponds. Where organic material was present downgradient from the settling ponds, concentrations of arsenic, fluoride, molybdenum, potassium, sulfate, and strontium were greater in the ground water than in the ponds. In contrast, the concentrations of cadmium, copper, nickel, aluminum, cobalt, lead, and zinc were less.

  10. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.; McDonald, John P.

    2005-11-01

    The 216-B-3 Pond system was a series of ponds used for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation from 1945 to 1997, the B Pond System has been a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility since 1986, with RCRA interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994 the expansion ponds of the facility were clean closed, leaving only the main pond and a portion of the 216-B-3-3 ditch as the currently regulated facility. In 2001, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued a letter providing guidance for a two-year, trial evaluation of an alternate, intrawell statistical approach to contaminant detection monitoring at the B Pond system. This temporary variance was allowed because the standard indicator-parameters evaluation (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and accompanying interim status statistical approach is ineffective for detecting potential B-Pond-derived contaminants in groundwater, primarily because this method fails to account for variability in the background data and because B Pond leachate is not expected to affect the indicator parameters. In July 2003, the final samples were collected for the two-year variance period. An evaluation of the results of the alternate statistical approach is currently in progress. While Ecology evaluates the efficacy of the alternate approach (and/or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit), the B Pond system will return to contamination-indicator detection monitoring. Total organic carbon and total organic halides were added to the constituent list beginning with the January 2004 samples. Under this plan, the following wells will be monitored for B Pond: 699-42-42B, 699-43-44, 699-43-45, and 699-44-39B. The wells will be sampled semi-annually for the contamination indicator parameters (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and annually for water quality parameters (chloride, iron, manganese, phenols, sodium, and sulfate). This plan will remain in effect until superseded by another plan or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit.

  11. 216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch characterization studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Duncan, D.W.; Graham, M.J.; Hall, M.D.; Hall, V.W.; Landeen, D.S.; Leitz, J.G.; Mitchell, R.M.

    1994-02-01

    The chemical, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site has generated large volumes of radioactive liquid effluents. The majority of these effluents have been used strictly for cooling or other supportive functions and have been discharged to ditches and ponds. The 216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch are two such disposal facilities. These facilities are components of an integrated system of ditches, ponds, and overflow facilities collectively referred to as the U-Pond disposal system. The U-Pond system has been used since 1943 and has received a large variety of radioisotopes from several sources. This study covered tho major aspects of the environment, including wind resuspension, biological uptake and transport, geologic distribution in surface and subsurface sediments, and ground-water impacts. The long-term use of U-Pond and the Z-19 Ditch has resulted in the localized accumulation of transuranic and fission product inventories as a result of sorption and filtration of particulates onto the uppermost sediments.

  12. Turbidity study of solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Nan; Sun, Wence; Shi, Yufeng [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Yin, Fang [YLab, 358 South 700 East, Suit B-139, Salt Lake City, UT 84102 (United States); Zhang, Caihong [Dalian Thermoelectric Group Co. Ltd., Dalian 116001 (China)

    2010-02-15

    A series of experiments were conducted to study the turbidity reduction in solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source. The experiment on the turbidity reduction efficiency with chemicals indicates that alum (KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O) has a better turbidity control property because of its strongly flocculating and also well depressing the growing of algae and bacteria in the seawater. In comparison with bittern and seawater, our experiment shows that the residual brine after desalination can keep limpidity for a long time even without any chemical in it. Experiments were also conducted on the diffusion of turbidity and salinity, which show that the turbidity did not diffuse upwards in the solution. In the experiment on subsidence of soil in the bittern and saline with the same salinity, it was found that soil subsided quite quickly in the pure saline water, but very slowly in the bittern. In this paper we also proposed an economical method to protect the solar pond from the damage of rain. Finally, thermal performance of a solar pond was simulated in the conditions of different turbidities using a thermal diffusion model. (author)

  13. A Comparison of Nannochloropsis salina Growth Performance in Two Outdoor Pond Designs: Conventional Raceways versus the ARID Pond with Superior Temperature Management

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crowe, Braden; Attalah, Said; Agrawal, Shweta; Waller, Peter; Ryan, Randy; Van Wagenen, Jon; Chavis, Aaron; Kyndt, John; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kim L.; et al

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L algae raceway integrated design (ARID) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8-20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superiormore »temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9°C, the water temperature was 18°C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 to 25% and from 5 to15%, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acids comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 versus 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.47 versus 3.34 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.« less

  14. Factors influencing algal biomass in hydrologically dynamic salt ponds in a subtropical salt marsh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Carrie J.

    2009-05-15

    )????????????????.. 4 2 Aerial photographs of Boat Ramp (BR), Pump Canal (PC) and Sundown Bay (SB) sites at site-appropriate scales???......... 5 3 Left-hand column indicates correlation between pond water level and tidal creek water level...????????????????. 13 4 Hydrologic timeline (bay water level and local precipitation) for Guadalupe estuary, February 2005 through May 2006?????.. 17 5 Tidal creek salinity (A) and average salinity by site (B)...????. 18 6 Water column algal...

  15. 250 BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. ponds. Here they are fed on gruel and the refuse obtained after eItr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are transferred to tanks attached to fish- boats, and thence to larger receptacles, usually large water kongs obtained after eItr tracting the oil from rape-seed. As soon aa.the spawn are large enough to determine their species they are separated and the different varieties' placed in ponds by themselves. From these ponds

  16. 36 selected citations from Petroleum: An Annotated Bibliography on Petroleum Pollution Chabreck, R. H. 1973. Bird usage of marsh ponds subjected to oil spills. Proceedings of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . H. 1973. Bird usage of marsh ponds subjected to oil spills. Proceedings of the Louisiana Academy of Sciences 26:101-110. Effects of a crude oil spill in three freshwater ponds in Louisiana over a 2-year period. Data on bird usage, plants, invertebrates, fish, and oil in sediments and water. The petroleum

  17. Description of work for 100-N Hanford Generating Plant settling pond drilling and sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbraith, R.P.

    1993-09-01

    This description of work details the field activities associated with borehole drilling and sampling of the 100-N Hanford Generating Plant (HGP) Settling Pond and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. It should be used in conjunction with the Environmental Investigations and Site Characterization Manual (WHC 1988a) for specific procedures. The borehole location is shown in Figure 1. The settling pond, the dimensions of which are 40 m by 16 m (131.3 ft by 52.5 ft), is located at the HGP adjacent to the 100-N Area. The pond received process water from the plant. The water contained trace oxygen scavenging conditioners such as morpholine, hydrazine, and ammonia. Surface radioactivity readings are 150 to 500 cpm. Trace levels of surface contamination are present. Drilling and sampling will be in accordance with procedures in the EII manual (WHC 1988a).

  18. Hydrological Regimes, Pond Morphology, and Habitat Use: Predicting the Impact of an Emerging Aquatic Pathogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrological Regimes, Pond Morphology, and Habitat Use:with infection, are the pond morphology and the topographyis that differences in the pond morphology and topography of

  19. Threats in the Frog Pond: A Multilevel Analysis of College Enrollment and Completion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whang Sayson, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Mere categorization and the frog-pond effect. Psychologicaland Chung, C.Y. (2005). The frog pond revisited: High schoolexperiences: The frog pond revisited (again). Journal of

  20. Plant communities as a tool in temporary ponds conservation in SW Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinto-Cruz, C.; Molina, J. A.; Barbour, M.; Silva, V.; Espírito-Santo, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    in Mediterranean Dune Ponds in relation to rainfallof Mediterranean temporary ponds under agricultural intensi?L. Brendonck, 2005. Ponds and pools as model system in

  1. ELECTROKINETIC DENSIFICATION OF COAL FINES IN WASTE PONDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. James Davis

    1999-12-18

    The objective of this research was to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. The specific objectives were: Design and develop a scaleable electrophoresis apparatus to clarify suspensions of colloidal coal and clay particles; Demonstrate the separation process using polluted waste water from the coal-washing facilities at the coal-fired power plants in Centralia, WA; Develop a mathematical model of the process to predict the rate of clarification and the suspension electrical properties needed for scale up.

  2. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  3. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  4. The growth of Tilapia aurea in ponds receiving laying hen wastes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Robert Paul

    1978-01-01

    of laying hen wastes. Water quality was regularly monitored during the course of the study. Dissolved oxygen levels ranged from 4. 3 to over 15 mg/l. Until the second week of October, water temperatures remained within the range conducive to rapid... than fifty years in Munich, Germany, sewage effluents have been mechanically purified, diluted with water, and sprayed into carp ponds; producing 600 Kg/ha in seven months (Hickling, 1973) . 10 Since the early 1960's, the Fish Research Station...

  5. Numerical-Model Investigation of the Hydrothermal Regime of a Straight-Through Shallow Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    A mathematic model based on solution of hydrodynamics and heat-transfer equations by the finite-element method is constructed to predict the hydrothermal regime of a straight-through shallow cooling pond, which provides cooling circulating water to a repository of spent nuclear fuel. Numerical experiments made it possible to evaluate the influence exerted by wind conditions and flow rate of water in the river on the temperature of the circulating water.

  6. Texas AgriLife Research with General Atomics Pilots Microalgae Ponds in Pecos BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    production goal would be 5,000 gallons per acre, and researchers are evaluating hybrid systems that could tied to coal-fired power plants, which could use carbon dioxide emissions and waste heat for algae the raceways, and pumps move the water from one pond to another. A laboratory supports the production facility

  7. DVM Admissions Office (0442) 245 Duck Pond Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DVM Admissions Office (0442) 245 Duck Pond Drive Blacksburg, VA 24061 Phone: 540-231-4699 Fax: 540 June 30, 2016 #12;DVM Admissions Office (0442) 245 Duck Pond Drive Blacksburg, VA 24061 Phone: 540

  8. THE TOWER, REFLECTED IN THE TOWER GARDEN PONDS THE GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE TOWER, REFLECTED IN THE TOWER GARDEN PONDS THE GENERAL UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS INFORMATION O Box 7216, Austin TX 78713- 7216. Cover: The Tower, reflected in one of the Tower Garden ponds

  9. Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hranac, K.C.; Chromec, F.W.; Fiehweg, R.; Hopkins, J.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter.

  10. Walleye fingerling culture in lined and earthen substrate ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walleye fingerling culture in lined and earthen substrate ponds Matthew J. Ward #12;Objectives 1://www.lakevermilionrealestate #12;Study Site, Design, and Statistics · Experimental unit was a 0.8-ha pond ­ Two treatments: Lined-test ­ Significance set at 0.05 * Blue Dog Lake State Fish Hatchery #12;Liner Material · Firestone Product ­ Pond

  11. THE POTAMOGETONS IN RELATION TO POND CULTURE By Emmeline Moore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE POTAMOGETONS IN RELATION TO POND CULTURE By Emmeline Moore Contribution from the Department IN RELATION TO POND CULTURE. .I- By EMMELINE MOORE, Contribution from the Department of Limnology, Cornell University. .I- INTRODUCTION. The cultivation of lakes, ponds, and streams follows as a natural consequence

  12. WATERFOWL USE OF WASTEWATER PONDS ON THE IDAHO NATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATERFOWL USE OF WASTEWATER PONDS ON THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY Lester D. Flake, SD 57007~1696 ABSTRACT Wastewater ponds attract a variety of waterfowl to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho. We censused waterfowl on INEL ponds monthly from August

  13. Pond Management 1 Gilchrist 4-H Partners with Local 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Pond Management 1 Gilchrist 4-H Partners with Local 1 SWAT Clubs Optimizing Peanut Harvest 2 On My Faculty 7 Resignation 7 OCTOBER 2010 Table of Contents Pond Management 1 Gilchrist 4-H Partners with Local and Waterways Management Reeling Em' In!! 7 New Faculty 7 Resignation 7 Pond Management In Northeast Florida

  14. Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Network Modeling of Arctic Melt Ponds Meenakshi Barjatiaa , Tolga Tasdizena,b, , Boya Songc. In late spring and summer, the albedo of the ice pack is determined primarily by melt ponds that form on the sea ice surface. The transition of pond configurations from isolated structures to interconnected

  15. Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    CIR802 Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document is CIR802, one. Millie Ferrer-Chancy, Interim Dean Florida has thousands of natural and man-made ponds which range in surface area from less than 1/10 acre to greater than ten acres. Man-made ponds include dug

  16. Post-Emergence Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Daniel K.

    Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles Final Report August 2010 Daniel K. Rosenberg Oregon Wildlife............................................................................................................ 29 APPENDIX I. LIFE-CYCLE SUMMARY FOR WESTERN POND TURTLE HATCHLINGS ............ 33 #12;Post-EmergencePost-Emergence Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles www.oregonwildlife.org #12;2 Post-Emergence

  17. Texas Catfish Production in Ponds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masser, Michael P.; Woods, Peter; Clary, Gregory M.

    2005-03-31

    waste decomposition. ? Excessive bacterial decomposition from algae bloom die-offs and over-feeding. ? Reduced oxygen production from photosyn- thesis because of cloud cover or fog. ? Lack of water agitation from wind. ? Rapid reduction in algae...

  18. Institute of Water Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on research, and extended education programs on watershed management and surface and ground water protection, microcomputer, nitrogen, nonpoint source pollution, pesticides, pollutants, pollution control, ponds, research transfer, urban water systems, water quality, water quality management, watershed management, wetlands

  19. Tritium retention in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dylla, H.F.; Wilson, K.L. (eds.)

    1988-04-01

    This report discusses the materials physics related to D-T operation in TFTR. Research activities are described pertaining to basic studies of hydrogenic retention in graphite, hydrogen recycling phenomena, first-wall and limiter conditioning, surface analysis of TFTR first-wall components, and estimates of the tritium inventory.

  20. A Comparison of Nannochloropsis salina Growth Performance in Two Outdoor Pond Designs: Conventional Raceways versus the ARID Pond with Superior Temperature Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, Braden [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Attalah, Said [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering; Agrawal, Shweta [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering; Waller, Peter [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering; Ryan, Randy [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) College of Agriculture; Van Wagenen, Jon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chavis, Aaron [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kyndt, John [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Chemitstry and Biochemistry; Kacira, Murat [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering; Ogden, Kim L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering; Huesemann, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L algae raceway integrated design (ARID) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8-20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superior temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9°C, the water temperature was 18°C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 to 25% and from 5 to15%, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acids comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 versus 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.47 versus 3.34 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.

  1. Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lynn Sager

    2013-01-01

    the rocky tailings, water levels in swale ponds and canalstailings, and the red azola, green duckweed-covered swale pondsas swale ponds and at locations between the tailing rows.

  2. A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crowe, Braden [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Attalah, Said [University of Arizona; Agrawal, Shweta [University of Arizona; Waller, Peter [University of Arizona; Ryan, Randy [University of Arizona.edu; Van Wagenen, Jon [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Chavis, Aaron [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Kyndt, John [University of Arizona; Kacira, Murat [University of Arizona; Ogden, Kim L. [University of Arizona; Huesemann, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

  3. TRIBUTE TO STANLEY DODSON Does the morphology of beaver ponds alter downstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Angus

    ratio of beaver dam height (which determines hydraulic head) to pond surface area and related to pond depended on pond morphology, increasing downstream of small ponds with high dams, but only during the low-limiting nutrients downstream. Both periphyton biomass and BOM decreased down- stream of small ponds with high dams

  4. Exponential growth of ponds in invasion percolation on regular trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    In invasion percolation, the edges of successively maximal weight (the outlets) divide the invasion cluster into a chain of ponds separated by outlets. On the regular tree, the ponds are shown to grow exponentially, with law of large numbers, central limit theorem and large deviation results. The tail asymptotics for a fixed pond are also studied and are shown to be related to the asymptotics of a critical percolation cluster, with a logarithmic correction.

  5. Sandia Energy - Sandian Todd Lane's "Pond Crash Forensics" Project...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Todd Lane's "Pond Crash Forensics" Project Receives Secretarial Notice Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels JBEI News News & Events Biomass Sandian Todd...

  6. Small Thaw Ponds: An Unaccounted Source of Methane in the Canadian High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    from permafrost thaw ponds. Limnol Oceanogr 55: 115–133.J, Langer M, Boike J (2012) Small ponds with major impact:The relevance of ponds and lakes in permafrost landscapes to

  7. Experimental warming increases CO2 saturation in a shallow prairie pond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, Kyla M.; McCauley, Edward

    2010-01-01

    in a shallow prairie pond Kyla M. Flanagan • Edward McCauleydynamics of lakes and ponds in order to assess contributionsin a shallow prairie pond. We outline and test three

  8. Accumulation of Toxic Trace Elements in Evaporites in Agricultural Evaporation Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanji, Kenneth K; Dahlgren, Randy A; Ong, Colin; Herbel, Mitchell; Quek, Ann; Gao, Suduan

    1994-01-01

    1988. Investigation of Evaporation Ponds for the Disposal ofAgricultural Evaporation Ponds. P h . D . diss. U n i v e rfor Agricultural Evaporation Ponds and Other Hyper saline

  9. A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING AND COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavana, Medhi

    2011-01-01

    on Heating Performance of Roof Pond XSL803-6664 Fig. 4.on Heating Performance of Roof Pond Phoenix, Arizona Auguston Cooling Performance of Roof Pond HOur of the doy (solar

  10. Easton Pond Business Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDoubleEERESoda Lake GeothermalEaston Pond

  11. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  12. Counterexample-Guided Abstraction Refinement for POND Planning Jonas Thiem and Robert Mattmuller and Manuela Ortlieb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Counterexample-Guided Abstraction Refinement for POND Planning Jonas Thiem and Robert Mattm to define abstractions (guar- anteeing over-approximations). A straightforward way for POND planning

  13. Farm Pond Safety Dennis J. Murphy, Professor, Agricultural Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    across the width of pond's surface. Life ring or buoy tied to nylon rope for tossing to potential to reach across the pond. Attach one end of the rope to a buoy and the other end to a wood block. Then hang

  14. Retrieval of Melt Pond Coverage from MODIS using Optimal Estimation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodd, Emma

    2011-11-24

    Melt pond coverage on sea ice is an important influence on sea ice albedo reduction during the summer and can also affect the monitoring of sea ice extent, sea ice models and sea ice forecasting. Techniques to estimate melt pond coverage from global...

  15. Shallow ground-water flow, water levels, and quality of water, 1980-84, Cowles Unit, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, D.A.; Shedlock, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Cowles Unit of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in Porter County, northwest Indiana, contains a broad dune-beach complex along the southern shoreline of Lake Michigan and a large wetland, called the Great Marsh, that occupies the lowland between the shoreline dunes and an older dune-beach complex farther inland. Water levels and water quality in the surficial aquifer were monitored from 1977 to 1984 near settling ponds on adjacent industrial property at the western end of the Cowles Unit. Since 1980, when the settling pond bottoms were sealed, these intradunal lowlands contained standing water only during periods of high snowmelt or rainfall. Water level declines following the cessation of seepage ranged from 6 feet at the eastern-most settling pond to nearly 14 feet at the western-most pond. No general pattern of water table decline was observed in the Great Marsh or in the shoreline dune complex at distances > 3,000 ft east or north of the settling ponds. Since the settling ponds were sealed, the concentration of boron has decreased while concentrations of cadmium, arsenic, zinc, and molybdenum in shallow ground-water downgradient of the ponds show no definite trends in time. Arsenic, boron and molybdenum have remained at concentrations above those of shallow groundwater in areas unaffected by settling pond seepage. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    as well as the water content and water retention propertiesvariations in soil-water content, Water Resources Research,eld soil. Subsequent to water content water measurement, the

  17. Algal bioflocculation and energy conservation in microalgal sewage ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, D.M.; Koopman, B.; Benemann, J.R.; Oswald, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Controlled bioflocculation for harvesting of microalgae produced during municipal wastewater treatment in high-rate ponds was investigated. Nonflocculant algal cultures were produced in high-rate ponds operated at very high dilution rates or with poor mixing. Bioflocculation of such cultures was achieved by isolating them in secondary ponds, but isolation periods of up to 29 days were required. In-pond sedimentation of flocculant algal cultures produced by the isolation technique resulted in algal removals consistently exceeding 80%. When high-rate ponds were operated with improved mixing and at moderate-to-high dilution rates, flocculant algal cultures were developed. The settleability of flocculant algal cultures produced in this manner averaged 76 to 80% when measured in 24-h-detention Imhoff cones and 71% when measured in 48-h-detention settling ponds. It is estimated that, under suitable climate conditions, a high-rate pond system employing bioflocculation-sedimentation for algal removal would require less than one-half the direct energy input of an equivalently sized activated sludge or trickling filter plant. This requirement could be provided entirely through complete utilization of biogas produced from anaerobic digestion of primary (sewage) sludge.

  18. Solar pond research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Grimmer, D.P.

    1984-01-01

    A description of solar pond research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. The main issues in the theory of solar ponds are discussed. Among these are the interfacial-boundary-layer model, models for interface motion and pond performance, heat extraction, and ground heat loss. The core of the research effort at Los Alamos was the development of a one-dimensional computer program to accurately predict dynamic performance of a solar pond. The computer model and the experiments that were designed and performed to validate it are described. The experiments include two laboratory tanks wherein temperature, salinity, and flow visualization data were obtained and a 232 m/sup 2/ outdoor solar pond. Results from preliminary validation show good agreement between the pond's predicted dynamic behavior and that which actually occurred in the experiments. More validation using data from full-sized solar ponds is needed. A new correlation for the ratio of interfacial salt-flux to heat-flux is proposed which agrees well with our data. Recommendations for future research are given.

  19. Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout Kentucky's 39,486 square miles. Surface water occurs as rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands. Ground- water occurs underlain by soluble carbonate rocks (for example, limestone). Water Supply · Approximately 49 inches

  20. A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 to generate meltwater that accumulates in ponds. The melt ponds reduce the albedo of the sea ice cover during), which simulates the formation and evolution of the melt pond cover. In order to be compatible

  1. Emigration Orientation of Juvenile Pond-Breeding Amphibians in Western Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarigal, Kevin

    Emigration Orientation of Juvenile Pond-Breeding Amphibians in Western Massachusetts BRAD C. TIMM of four species of pond- breeding amphibians at 14 seasonal ponds over four consecutive years in western Massachusetts. Emigration orientation of each species was non-uniform for the majority of pond-years examined

  2. Short pond hydroperiod decreases fitness of nonnative hybrid salamanders in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jarrett

    Short pond hydroperiod decreases fitness of nonnative hybrid salamanders in California J. R, with modified permanent ponds harboring salamanders with a greater proportion of nonnative genes. Our study, nonnative and hybrid. Using experimental pond mesocosms, we implemented three pond drying regimes

  3. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudakov, Ivan; Golden, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo $-$ a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a simple sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point $-$ an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a nonlinear phase transition model for melt ponds, and bifurcation analysis of a simple climate model with ice - albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to a potential bifurcation point.

  4. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water stress and irrigation needs to be ensured to obtain acceptable yields. Existing ponds and dams in the USVI are insufficient to store water for agricultural purposes and the low quality of underground water

  5. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AT RD 838 OF I. G. N. P. STAGE -II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    1 SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AT RD 838 OF I. G. N. P. STAGE - II C. P. Kumar* Sanjay knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h) and unsaturated presents the soil moisture retention characteristics at RD 838 of Indira Gandhi Nahar Priyojana, Stage - II

  6. An environmental simulation of a shrimp mariculture pond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitson, John Lee

    1989-01-01

    . Zooplankton 30 33 EVALUATION OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES . . 46 Evaluation of Stocking Densities and Feeding Rates 46 SUMMARY . REFERENCES 59 60 VITA 67 vss LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Pond Model Biomass Flows 2 Dissolved Oxygen and Population... Submodels 3 Pond Model Biomass Curves Under Baseline Conditions, 80, 000 Animals per Hectare, Commercial Feed Rate 19 4 Reported Chlorophyll Levels from Rubright et al. , 1981 . 5 Detail of Figure 3 Showing Days 0 Through 35. . . . . . . . 20 21 6...

  7. Comparative physical limnology of farm ponds in Southcentral Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Dewey Gregory

    1973-01-01

    COMPARATIVE PHYSICAL LIMNOLOGY OF FARM PONDS IN SOUTHCENTRAL TEXAS A Thesis by DEWEY GREGORY MEYERS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1973 Ma)or Subject: Biology COMPARATIVE PHYSICAL LIMNOLOGY OF FARM PONDS IN SOUTHCENTRAL TEXAS A Thesis by DEWEY GREGORY MEYERS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairma of Committee) / i/y'/ /', . nf (Head 'of Depart'ment) (Member...

  8. Classification and waterfowl use of ponds in south Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAdams, Matthew Stephen

    1987-01-01

    CLASSIFICATION AND WATERFOWL USE OF PONDS IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis . by MATTHEW STEPHEN McADAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the recpxirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1987 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences CLASSIFICATION AND WATERFOWL USE OF PONDS IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis by MATTHEW STEPHEN M ADAMS Approved as to style and content by: William H. Kiel, Jr. (Chair of Committee) Robert D. Baker...

  9. Level 1 remedial investigation work plan, 300 Area Process Ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the objectives of the site characterization for the 300 Area Process Ponds which are to identify and quantify contamination at the ponds and to estimate their potential impact on human health and the environment. The results of the site characterization will be used to identify any future actions related to contamination at the site and to identify any additional data requirements needed to support selection of a remedial action. 9 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Modeling a ponded infiltration experiment at Yucca Mountain, NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, D.B.; Guertal, W.R. [Foothill Engineering, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States); Flint, A.L. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository for high level radioactive waste. As part of the site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, a field-scale ponded infiltration experiment was done to help characterize the hydraulic and infiltration properties of a layered dessert alluvium deposit. Calcium carbonate accumulation and cementation, heterogeneous layered profiles, high evapotranspiration, low precipitation, and rocky soil make the surface difficult to characterize.The effects of the strong morphological horizonation on the infiltration processes, the suitability of measured hydraulic properties, and the usefulness of ponded infiltration experiments in site characterization work were of interest. One-dimensional and two-dimensional radial flow numerical models were used to help interpret the results of the ponding experiment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of a ponded infiltration experiment done around borehole UE25 UZN {number_sign}85 (N85) at Yucca Mountain, NV. The effects of morphological horizons on the infiltration processes, lateral flow, and measured soil hydaulic properties were studied. The evaluation was done by numerically modeling the results of a field ponded infiltration experiment. A comparison the experimental results and the modeled results was used to qualitatively indicate the degree to which infiltration processes and the hydaulic properties are understood. Results of the field characterization, soil characterization, borehole geophysics, and the ponding experiment are presented in a companion paper.

  11. Quality control summary report for the RFI/RI assessment of the submerged sediment core samples taken at Par Pond, Pond C, and L-Lake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J. II

    1996-12-01

    This report presents a summary of the sediment characterization performed under the direction of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company`s (WSRC) Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) in support of Par Pond, Pond C, and L- Lake. This characterization will be a screening study and will enable the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) to develop a defensible contaminants of concern list for more extensive characterization of the Par Pond, Pond C, and L-Lake.

  12. Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model and evolution of melt ponds. Melt ponds accumulate on the surface of sea ice from snow and sea ice melt, melt ponds cover up to 50% of the sea ice surface. We have developed a melt pond evolution theory. Here

  13. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA IN SELECTED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA systems require knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K). This study involved field and laboratory determination of soil

  14. Water conservation and reuse has become a major issue in aquacul-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Water conservation and reuse has become a major issue in aquacul- ture in recent years. Concern enhancing water circula- tion in ponds and developing intensive, recirculating tank sys- tems of water and lower invest- ment and production costs have contributed to the present expanse of pond

  15. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tutu, Narinder K. (Manorville, NY); Ginsberg, Theodore (East Setauket, NY); Klages, John R. (Mattituck, NY)

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  16. Post-project evaluation of Tule Ponds in Fremont, California : Integration of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunde, Kevin B; Weinstein, Adam H

    2006-01-01

    Pollutant Removal by Two Wet Ponds in Bellevue, Washington.Lake extended detention pond. http://www.rougeriver.com/Williams, D.D. 1997. Temporary ponds and their invertebrate

  17. ELSEVIER Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 150 (1999) 223246 Marine saline ponds as sedimentary archives of late Holocene climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    ELSEVIER Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 150 (1999) 223­246 Marine saline ponds sedimentation is preserved in shallow ponds on Lee Stocking Island, Exuma Cays, Bahamas. Details throughout the remaining history of saline pond development. Foraminiferal isotope stratigraphy is compatible

  18. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF THECAMOEBIANS (TESTATE AMOEBAE) IN SMALL LAKES AND PONDS, BARBADOS, WEST INDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    DISTRIBUTION OF THECAMOEBIANS (TESTATE AMOEBAE) IN SMALL LAKES AND PONDS, BARBADOS, WEST INDIES and ephemeral lakes and ponds on Barbados, West Indies, are characterized by low numbers of individuals and low

  20. The size of a pond in 2D invasion percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Jacob van den; Vágvölgyi, Bálint

    2007-01-01

    We consider invasion percolation on the square lattice. It has been proved by van den Berg, Peres, Sidoravicius and Vares, that the probability that the radius of a so-called pond is larger than n, differs at most a factor of order log n from the probability that in critical Bernoulli percolation the radius of an open cluster is larger than n. We show that these two probabilities are, in fact, of the same order. Moreover, we prove an analogous result for the volume of a pond.

  1. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  2. Small Thaw Ponds: An Unaccounted Source of Methane in the Canadian High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    methane production between runnel and polygonal ponds using stable isotope ratios, 14 C signatures, and investigated potential

  3. Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lynn Sager

    2013-01-01

    of small ponds on stream water chemistry. Lake and ReservoirSpeciation of iron in river water using a specific catalyticin surface-subsurface water exchange and lateral hyporheic

  4. Transactions of the ASABE Vol. 54(5): 1685-1691 2011 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers ISSN 2151-0032 1685

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    practices (BMPs) such as detention basins, wet ponds, sedimentation filtration ponds, and retention BMPs such as detention basins, wet ponds, sedimentation filtration ponds, and retention irrigation

  5. Foreign Fishery Developments may have also affected 1984 pond pro-Ecuadorean Shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments may have also affected 1984 pond pro- duction. Ecuadorean Shrimp post- larvae to stock their ponds since March 1985. More recent reports from Ecuador indicate's estimated 60,000 hectares of ponds were dry because of this shortage. About 80 percent of Ecuador's shrimp

  6. Sunlight-Mediated Inactivation Mechanisms of Enteroccocus faecalis and Escherichia coli in Waste Stabilization Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadir, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    p=1.7e-7 N 2 Air DbO N 2 DI Air Pond DbO N 2 Air DI NoUVBEscherichia coli DbO N 2 Air Pond Full Spectrum DbOdisinfection in a high rate pond." Ecological Engineering

  7. Forest Resources: Beaver Pond Management for Waterfowl http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources: Beaver Pond Management for Waterfowl http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1 Foraging--in and around beaver ponds provide excellent fall and winter forage for ducks, especially mallards, wood ducks and black ducks. Beaver ponds with living mast trees can be managed as a green tree reservoir by installing

  8. Drainage of Ponded Surface by an Array of Ditches Bhagu R. Chahar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    Drainage of Ponded Surface by an Array of Ditches Bhagu R. Chahar1 and Ghanshyam P. Vadodaria2 penetrating ditches from a ponded surface has been obtained using hodograph and Schwarz boundary conditions using different methods. Drainage of ponded area underlain by an im- pervious layer

  9. 1 INTRODUCTION In 1971, twenty circular aquaculture ponds were constructed for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTRODUCTION In 1971, twenty circular aquaculture ponds were constructed for the W.K. Kellog a grant from the National Science Foundation. Eighteen of the ponds were for experimental purposes and two were for storage purposes. The ponds were allowed to colonize naturally with flo- ra and fauna from

  10. POND CONSERVATION Inter-and intra-annual variations of macroinvertebrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murcia, Universidad de

    POND CONSERVATION Inter- and intra-annual variations of macroinvertebrate assemblages are related to the hydroperiod in Mediterranean temporary ponds Margarita Florencio Æ Laura Serrano Æ Carola Go´mez-Rodri´guez Æ+Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract Macroinvertebrate assemblages of 22 tem- porary ponds with different

  11. POND-Hindsight: Applying Hindsight Optimization to POMDPs Alan Olsen and Daniel Bryce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanner, Scott

    POND-Hindsight: Applying Hindsight Optimization to POMDPs Alan Olsen and Daniel Bryce alan@olsen.org, daniel.bryce@usu.edu Utah State University Logan, UT Abstract We present the POND-Hindsight entry planning graph heuristic. POND-Hindsight is an action selection mechanism that eval- uates each possible

  12. QUAD RESIDENCE POND ROAD/SENTINEL ROAD LOT CONSTRUCTION August 21, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUAD RESIDENCE POND ROAD/SENTINEL ROAD LOT CONSTRUCTION August 21, 2014 Further to the notice issued on July 25 in regards to changes to the Sentinel and Pond Road parking lots flowing from the Quad and the Pond Road parking lots. Effective September 1, 2014 the remaining southern portion of the Sentinel

  13. Copepods come in first: rapid colonization of new temporary ponds Dagmar Frisch1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Andy J.

    1 Copepods come in first: rapid colonization of new temporary ponds Dagmar Frisch1,2 Andy J. Green1 of new temporary ponds Abstract The sequence in which new colonists reach an empty habitat can be crucial on colonization of newly constructed temporary ponds in Doñana, Southwest Spain, created by removing 30 or 60 cm

  14. Hydrogeophysical investigations of the former S-3 ponds contaminant plumes, Oak Ridge Integrated Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Hydrogeophysical investigations of the former S-3 ponds contaminant plumes, Oak Ridge Integrated Challenge site, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contaminants from the former S-3 ponds have infiltrated Ridge Reservation of the DOE. The 5-m-deep S-3 settling basins consisted of four ponds built in 1951

  15. Nutrient Removal in a Cold-Region Wastewater Stabilization Pond: Importance of Ammonia Volatilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    Nutrient Removal in a Cold-Region Wastewater Stabilization Pond: Importance of Ammonia through a three pond wastewater stabilization system WWSP was measured over the course of a year in a cold%, with most of the removal occurring in the primary pond. Algal carbon requirements were met by a combination

  16. A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface covered in melt ponds is essential for a realistic estimate of the albedo for global climate models. We

  17. First-Year Growth and Survival of Largemouth Bass Fingerlings Stocked into Western South Dakota Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponds Nicholas R. Peterson, Justin A. VanDeHey, and David W. Willis Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Micropterus salmoides are commonly introduced into Midwestern ponds at stocking densities of 125 1981; Willis et al. 1990). Over the past decade, private pond managers in the southern U.S. began

  18. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake on Earth. We report on new studies of Don Juan Pond (DJP), which exists at the upper limit of ephemeral on Juan Pond (DJP), found at the lowest point in the South Fork of Upper Wright Valley, Antarctica (Figure

  19. Emigration Timing of Juvenile Pond-Breeding Amphibians in Western Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarigal, Kevin

    Emigration Timing of Juvenile Pond-Breeding Amphibians in Western Massachusetts BRAD C. TIMM,1 of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, USA ABSTRACT.--Understanding the timing of movement events of pond-breeding amphibians to and from breeding and natal ponds, respectively, is essential to implementing effective

  20. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project SYNTHESES OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project SYNTHESES OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE for Maintaining and Improving Functioning of the South Bay Ecosystem and Restoring Tidal Salt Marsh and Associated Habitats over) Maintaining and Improving Functioning of the South Bay Ecosystem and (2) Restoring tidal salt marsh

  1. Sediment management in sustainable urban drainage system ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment management in sustainable urban drainage system ponds K.V. Heal*, D.A. Hepburn** and R.lunn@strath.ac.uk) Abstract Since removal and disposal of sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) sediment can incur high maintenance costs, assessments of sediment volumes, quality and frequency of removal are required. Sediment

  2. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

  3. Design Storm for Total Retention.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    endorse the viewpoint of a publication or guarantee its technical correctness. Title: Design Storm for "Total Retention" under Individual Permit, Poster, Individual Permit for...

  4. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  5. Policy on Retention and Disposition of University Records Policy on Retention and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Retention and Disposition of University Records 06/01/2012 Policy on Retention and Disposition of University Records I. Purpose and Scope This policy and its implementing procedures will assist, as well as to optimize the use of storage space and minimize the cost of record retention. This policy

  6. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  7. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Halbig, James K. (Los Alamos, NM); Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Klosterbuer, Shirley F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  8. The Karjat Drinking Water Project GISE (CSE)-CTARA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    . in the north Karjat area. South Karjat served by the tail-water of Bhivpuri Hydel station through Pej river wells, handpumps and energized borewells. Ponds and tanks: storage and seasonal levels. Location

  9. Sunlight-Mediated Inactivation Mechanisms of Enteroccocus faecalis and Escherichia coli in Waste Stabilization Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadir, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    with a primary focus on wastewater treatment pond systems.of primary treatment, through the settling of wastewateris the primary beneficiary of wastewater treatment? There is

  10. Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science Candidate,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science........................................................................................ 3 Arsenic in Soil & Sediments......................................................................................... 12 Sediment Digestion and Analysis

  11. http://w w w .campustimes.org/2011/10/20/across-the-pond-from-england-to-rochester/ October 20, 2011 Across the Pond: From England to Rochester | Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    http://w w w .campustimes.org/2011/10/20/across-the-pond-from-england-to-rochester/ October 20, 2011 Across the Pond: From England to Rochester | Campus Times Photo by Ella Bond College can

  12. Technical and economic feasibility of salt-gradient solar ponds at the Truscott Brine Lake of the Red River Chloride Control Project. A report to the House-Senate Committee on Appropriations of the Ninety-Seventh Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The Truscott Brine Lake is being constructed to impound highly brackish water from a number of sources which would normally flow into the Wichita River, a tributary of the Red River in Knox County, Texas. A 35.4-km (22-mile) pipeline is being constructed to carry the brines from their primary source to the Truscott Brine Lake site. The reservoir is designed to contain 100 years of brine emissions from three chloride emission areas in the Wichita River Basin. The solar ponds and power generating facilities would be located in the Bluff Creek Arm of Truscott Brine Lake. The Truscott Brine Lake study includes: survey of suitability of Truscott Lake site, review of solar pond technology, preconceptual design of solar salt pond power plant, and economic evaluation.

  13. Design and analysis of microalgal open pond systems for the purpose of producing fuels: A subcontract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, J.C.; Goebel, R.P.

    1987-04-01

    The designs and systems developed include many innovative concepts and experiments, including the design and operation of a low-cost system. Cost-effectiveness is realized by minimizing capital costs of the system and achieving efficient use of inputs. Extensive engineering analysis of carbonation, mixing, and harvesting subsystems has elucidated both the lowest cost, most efficient options and the essential parameters needed to construct, test, and evaluate these subsystems. The use of growth ponds sealed with clay and lined with crushed rock results in construction cost savings of 50% over ponds lined with synthetic membranes. In addition a low-cost but efficient design allows improvements in technology to have maximum impact on final product cost reductions. In addition to the innovations in low-cost construction, the operational efficiency of the design is both higher and more feasible than that attained by any previous system concept of comparable scale. The water analysis has led to operational specifications that minimize water use and virtually eliminate losses of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. The carbon dioxide injection system is designed for 95% efficiency, but is still low in cost. The construction of a large-scale, covered anaerobic lagoon to recycle carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus has not been attempted at the scale analyzed here. Yet efficient recycling is essential for achieving economic affordability. 23 refs., 21 figs., 53 tabs.

  14. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  15. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  16. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  17. NAME: Molokai Fish Pond & Fringing Reef Restoration LOCATION: Kaunakakai, Island of Molokai (Maui County), Hawai'i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: Molokai Fish Pond & Fringing Reef Restoration LOCATION: Kaunakakai, Island of Molokai (Maui fish ponds on the fringing reef of the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Mangroves were planted in 1902 conditions and threaten to take over the reef flats and fish ponds. EXPECTED BENEFITS: Fine sediment flushed

  18. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system I. Sudakova,, S. A. Vakulenkob,c, K. M. Goldena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system I. Sudakova,, S. A. Vakulenkob,c, K. M Abstract Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a bifurcation analysis

  19. The Use of Lime in Fish Ponds1 Andy M. Lazur, Charles E. Cichra and Craig Watson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FA38 The Use of Lime in Fish Ponds1 Andy M. Lazur, Charles E. Cichra and Craig Watson2 1. There are three main purposes for liming ponds: 1) to increase the availability of nutrients, 2) to increase pH and to buffer against daily pH fluctuations and 3) to steril- ize ponds prior to stocking. While these practices

  20. Pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) invasion of Cape Cod pond shores alters abiotic environment and inhibits indigenous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    Pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) invasion of Cape Cod pond shores alters abiotic environment 25 April 2003 Abstract Invasion by pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) on coastal plain pond shores may that had been invaded by P. rigida and those that had not on two Cape Cod ponds. Soil under living pines

  1. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management and salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management: impoundments, marsh sediments, ponds, salinity Abstract Physical characteristics of sediments in coastal marsh compositions of waterbird communities. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain potentially

  2. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Erosion and surface runoff are the main concerns in the Piedmont, while leaching of contaminants extensively through Pennsylvania and Maryland. Water quality of the White Clay and Red Clay Creeks of lakes/reservoirs/ponds, 841 square miles of estuarine waters, and 25 miles of ocean coastline

  3. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Erosion and surface runoff are the main concerns in the Piedmont, while leaching of contaminants extensively through Pennsylvania and Maryland. Water quality of the White Clay and Red Clay Creeks acres of lakes/reservoirs/ponds, 841 square miles of estuarine waters, and 25 miles of ocean coastline

  4. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware. Erosion and surface runoff are the main concerns in the Piedmont, while leaching of contaminants extensively through Pennsylvania and Maryland. Water quality of the White Clay and Red Clay Creeks acres of lakes/reservoirs/ponds, 841 square miles of estuarine waters, and 25 miles of ocean coastline

  5. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in southeastern Delaware. Erosion and surface runoff are the main concerns in the Piedmont, while leaching extensively through Pennsylvania and Maryland. Water quality of the White Clay and Red Clay Creeks and rivers, 2954 acres of lakes/reservoirs/ponds, 841 square miles of estuarine waters, and 25 miles of ocean

  6. Monitoring Stormwater: Do's, Don'ts, Why's and How's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Conventional Devices Retention Pond Rip Rap Swale Retention Pond---2004 to 2006 Detention Pond---2006 · Discrete Samples Metals Petroleum Hydrocarbons Sediment Anions and Cations Nutrients Microorganisms #12

  7. The clean water act -- (Federal Water Pollution Control Act), what it means to utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talt, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    Departing from previous policy, in August 1993 the USEPA`s Water Office recommended that the agency regulate a proposed electric power plant`s cooling pond as a water of the US. At issue was a proposal by Florida Power corp. to build a new electric power plant in Polk County, Florida. A 2,600 acre cooling pond to collect heated and discharged water was included in the proposal. Region 4 USEPA staff asked USEPA Headquarters in Washington, DC to decide whether the pond was exempt from the CWA or a water of the US. The pond could be a habitat for migratory birds according to a memo prepared by Region 4 staff. The USEPA Water Office used the presence of migratory birds to claim a nexus to interstate commerce and therefore concluded that the pond should be regulated under the CWA. Electric power industry proponents have argued that an overly expansive definition of waters of the US may result in any new power plant being required to construct cooling towers. Cooling towers are said to be a more expensive and wasteful method to cool heated water. Region 4 ultimately recanted its earlier position after considerable discussions with various other Environmental Protection Agency offices and, no doubt industry pressure. Florida Power Corp. was not required to obtain an NPDES permit for the cooling pond. The lesson of Florida Power Corp. is that the regulatory environment for utilities can be uncertain under the Clean Water Act even in the face of a relatively straightforward exemption from regulation.

  8. RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  9. Evaluation of models for predicting evaporative water loss in cooling impoundments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helfrich, Karl Richard

    1982-01-01

    Cooling impoundments can offer a number of advantages over cooling towers for condenser water cooling at steam electric power plants. However, a major disadvantage of cooling ponds is a lack of confidence in the ability ...

  10. New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention BDMS Security Access - Instructions 1@nmsu.edu if you have any questions. #12;Reset New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention BDMS

  11. Undergraduate Retention Initiatives College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Undergraduate Retention Initiatives College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources Office and Natural Resources. Current Structure/Approach The college generally provides retention services. Practically speaking, the evidence of effective programs is clear, namely that the route to successful

  12. The effect of heterocope predation on zooplankton communities in arctic ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, W. John; Luecke, C.

    1983-03-01

    The influence of Heterocope septentrionalis, a predacious calanoid copepod, on five species of artic pond zooplankton is investigated. Prey species coexisting with Heterocope are relatively invulnerable to predation, but prey species found...

  13. The influence of organic carbon on oxygen dynamics and bacterial sulfate reduction in inland shrimp ponds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suplee, Michael Wayne

    1995-01-01

    Experiments conducted in saline aquaculture ponds demonstrated that organic matter was the primary factor influencing sediment sulfate reduction rates. Changes in sediment oxygen demand (SOD), sulfate reduction rates, and ...

  14. The relationship between engineering design and construction costs of aquaculture ponds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Michael Edward

    1988-01-01

    THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ENGINEERING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION COSTS OF AQUACULTURE PONDS A Thesis by MICHAEL EDWARD YATES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ENGINEERING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION COSTS OF AQUACULTURE PONDS A Thesis by MICHAEL EDWARD YATES Approved as to style and content by: Wade L. Grif (Chair...

  15. Information Sheet for Retention Review During Fourth Probationary Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Sheet for Retention Review During Fourth Probationary Year Faculty Name materials must be included for those faculty undergoing their Fourth Year Retention Review in the order shown below: (1) Information Sheet for Retention Review During Fourth Probationary Year (2) Academic

  16. Information Sheet for Retention Review During Third Probationary Year -Comprehensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Sheet for Retention Review During Third Probationary Year - Comprehensive Faculty Name The following materials must be included for those faculty undergoing a comprehensive Third Year Retention Review in the order shown below: 1) Information Sheet for Retention Review During Third Probationary Year

  17. 300 Area Building Retention Evaluation Mitigation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. McBride

    2007-07-03

    Evaluate the long-term retention of several facilities associated with the PNNL Capability Replacement Laboratory and other Hanfor mission needs. WCH prepared a mitigation plan for three scenarios with different release dates for specific buildings. The evaluations present a proposed plan for providing utility services to retained facilities in support of a long-term (+20 year) lifespan in addition to temporary services to buildings with specified delayed release dates.

  18. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Milking Center Wastewater Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29

    Storing wastewater from the milking center and applying it to crops is the best method of preventing ground water contamination. This publication discusses proper methods of storing and applying such waste, with illustrations of a detention pond...

  19. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Erosion and surface runoff are the main concerns in the Piedmont, while leaching of contaminants and Maryland. Water quality of the White Clay and Red Clay Creeks and Brandywine River are strongly affected has 2509 miles of streams and rivers, 2954 acres of lakes/reservoirs/ponds, 841 square miles

  20. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in southeastern Delaware. Erosion and surface runoff are the main concerns in the Piedmont, while leaching that first flow extensively through Pennsylvania and Maryland. Water quality of the White Clay and Red Clay has 2509 miles of streams and rivers, 2954 acres of lakes/reservoirs/ponds, 841 square miles

  1. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of sediment thermal stratification. The more significant the early success of ponds as a sink for externally-mobilization of P by anaerobic respiration enabled by micro-stratification, can produce very high fluxes of P to the water column (internal loading of P). These high fluxes can occur as event-like processes due to thermal

  2. Solar-thermal-energy collection/storage-pond system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blahnik, D.E.

    1982-03-25

    A solar thermal energy collection and storage system is disclosed. Water is contained, and the water surface is exposed directly to the sun. The central part of an impermeable membrane is positioned below the water's surface and above its bottom with a first side of the membrane pointing generally upward in its central portion. The perimeter part of the membrane is placed to create a watertight boundary separating the water into a first volume which is directly exposable to the sun and which touches the membranes first side, and a second volumn which touches the membranes second side. A salt is dissolved in the first water volume.

  3. East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev.Metals&-?a/71 2.z='

  4. East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev.Metals&-?a/71 2.z='West

  5. East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev.Metals&-?a/71

  6. Responses of phtyoplankton photosynthesis and phosphorus kinetics to resuspended sediments in copper sulfate-treated ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalewajko, C. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Prepas, E.E. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1996-01-01

    Six farm ponds (dugouts) and one lake that differ in the history of copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) treatment were selected for studies of effects of sediments resuspension on phytoplankton. All sites are located within 50 km of Peace River, Alberta, and are shallow, hardwater, and eutrophic. Effects of sediment resuspension on phytoplankton photosynthesis were assessed by changes in the photosynthesis-irradiance P-D curve parameters, Pmax and {alpha}, after addition of sediment at 2% v/v to lakewater samples; the effects on phytoplankton P-state were assessed by changes in {sup 32}PO{sub 4} turnover time. Copper concentrations in sediments of Gour No. 4, the dugout that had received the largest dosage of CuSO{sub 4}, were 60-times greater than untreated sites but were only 1.5 to 3-times greater at the other treated sites. Changes of Pmax and {alpha} were not correlated with Cu concentrations in the sediments. Instead, the prevailing P-state in lakewater could better explain the observed trends in Pmax after sediment addition. Pmax values decreased at sites where phytoplankton were P-limited ({sup 32} P-PO{sub 4} turnover time <63 min) and increased at more P-sufficient sites ({sup 32}P-PO{sub 4} turnover time >63 min). Stimulation of Pmax and increase in {sup 32}P-PO{sub 4} turnover time were positively correlated. With the exception of Gour No. 4, values of a increased in all treatments. Similar changes in Pmax and a in response to sediment addition occurred in laboratory experiments with P-sufficient cultures of Anabaena flos-aquae. We suggest that, with the exception of grossly Cu-polluted sediments, resuspension of sediments in waters previously treated with CuSO{sub 4} will enhance phytoplankton photosynthesis by increasing P availability, and possibly by supplying Cu at trace metal levels. 25 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Workforce Retention Work Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department of EnergyDataWind TheEnergy WorkersRetention Work

  8. Potential Role of Biochar in Water Management in Rainfed Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flavia, Namagembe

    2012-08-16

    employed to help manage agricultural water sustainably. Previous studies indicate that incorporation of biochar into sandy soil improves its water retention capacity. This study demonstrates how addition of biochar produced from different feedstock biomass...

  9. EISPC White Paper on "State Approaches to Retention of Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (EISPC) has released a white paper on "State Approaches to Retention of Nuclear Power Plants" that examines operational, economic, and policy pressure points affecting...

  10. Fottea 8(2): 133146, 2008 133 Epipelic cyanobacteria and algae: a case study from Czech ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fottea 8(2): 133­146, 2008 133 Epipelic cyanobacteria and algae: a case study from Czech ponds Petr and algae (particularly desmids). Altogether 45 sediment samples were taken at ponds covering a p and various protozoa, feeding on epipelic algae (Amoeba, Urceolus cyclostomus). Key words: epipelon

  11. DOE responses to Ecology review comments for ``Sampling and analysis plans for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds at the Hanford Reservation. This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to Ecology review for ``Sampling and Analysis Plan for the 100-D Ponds Voluntary Remediation Project.``

  12. An Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Hurricane Creek Detention Pond Number 4 in Central Angelina County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-12

    HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION POND NUMBER 4 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS Texas Antiquities Permit Number 2335 By William E. Moore Brazos Valley Research Associates Contract Report Number 73... 2000 AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE PROPOSED HURRICANE CREEK DETENTION POND NUMBER 4 IN CENTRAL ANGELINA COUNTY, TEXAS BVRA Project Number 99-18 Principal Investigator William E. Moore Prepared...

  13. Waterfowl use of sediment ponds on an east Texas coal mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Larry A

    1989-01-01

    WATERFOWL USE OF SEDIMENT PONDS ON AN EAST TEXAS COAL MINE A Thesis by LARRY ANTHONY REYNOLDS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1989 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences WATERFOWL USE OF SEDIMENT PONDS ON AN EAST TEXAS COAL M1NE A Thesis LARRY ANTHONY REYNOLDS Approved as to style and content by: Milton W. Weller (Chair of Committee) Nova J. Silvy (Member...

  14. Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1982-09-29

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  15. Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Steven Lee

    1990-01-01

    EFFECT OF WIND SPEED ON THE GROWTH OF THE UPPER CONVECTIVE ZONE IN A SOLAR POND A Thesis by STEVEN LEE MCMINN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering EFFECT OF WIND SPEED ON THE GROWTH OF THE UPPER CONVECTIVE ZONE IN A SOLAR POND A Thesis by STEVEN LEE MCMINN Approved as to style and content by: W. R. Laster (Chair...

  16. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  17. Cooking utensil with improved heat retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burch, Steven D. (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01

    A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber therebetween. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food.

  18. Cooking utensil with improved heat retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potter, T.F.; Benson, D.K.; Burch, S.D.

    1997-07-01

    A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber there between. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food. 26 figs.

  19. Breeding pond selection and movement patterns by eastern spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in relation to weather and edaphic conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Cathyrn, H.; Tanner, George, W.

    2004-08-31

    Cathryn H. Greenberg and George W. Tanner. 2004. Breeding pond selection and movement patterns by eastern spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in relation to weather and edaphic conditions. J. Herp. 38(4):569-577. Abstract: Eastern Spadefoot Toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) require fish-free, isolated, ephemeral ponds for breeding but otherwise inhabit the surrounding uplands, commonly xeric longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ?wiregrass (Aristida beyrichiana). Hence both pond and upland conditions can potentially affect their breeding biology, and population persistence. Hardwood invasion due to fire suppression in sandhills could alter upland and pond suitability by higher hardwood density and increased transpiration. In this paper we explore breeding and neonatal emigration movements in relation to weather, hydrological conditions of ponds, and surrounding upland matrices. We use 9 years of data from continuous monitoring with drift fences and pitfall traps at 8 ephemeral ponds in 2 upland matrices: regularly-burned, savanna-like sandhills (n = 4), and hardwood-invaded sandhills (n = 4). Neither adult nor neonate captures differed between ponds within the 2 upland matrices, suggesting that they are tolerant of upland heterogeneity created by fire frequency. Explosive breeding occurred during 9 periods and in all seasons; adults were captured rarely otherwise. At a landscape-level rainfall, maximum change in barometric pressure, and an interaction between those 2 variables were significant predictors of explosive breeding. At a pond-level, rainfall, change in pond depth during the month prior to breeding, and days since a pond was last dry were significant predictors of adult captures. Transformation date, rather than weather, was associated with neonatal emigrations, which usually were complete within a week. Movement by first-captured adults and neonates was directional, but adult emigrations were apparently not always toward their origin. Our results suggest that Spadefoot Toads are highly adapted to breeding conditions and upland habitat heterogeneity created by weather patterns and fire frequency in Florida sandhills.

  20. Appears in Proceedings of the 2nd USENIX Conference on File and Storage Technologies (FAST '03). Pond: the OceanStore Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Ben Y.

    ). Pond: the OceanStore Prototype #3; Sean Rhea, Patrick Eaton, Dennis Geels, Hakim Weatherspoon, Ben Zhao, secure sharing, and long­term durability. Pond is the OceanStore proto­ type; it contains many­coded form. In the wide area, Pond outperforms NFS by up to a factor of 4.6 on read­ intensive phases

  1. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds rsted-DTU, Electromagnetic Systems, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds M. Lu¨thje Ørsted-DTU, Electromagnetic of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface rate beneath the melt ponds, vertical seepage, and horizontal permeability. The model is initialized

  2. Appears in Proceedings of the 2nd USENIX Conference on File and Storage Technologies (FAST '03). Pond: the OceanStore Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    ). Pond: the OceanStore Prototype£ Sean Rhea, Patrick Eaton, Dennis Geels, Hakim Weatherspoon, Ben Zhao, secure sharing, and long-term durability. Pond is the OceanStore proto- type; it contains many-coded form. In the wide area, Pond outperforms NFS by up to a factor of 4.6 on read- intensive phases

  3. Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotation and Land Preparation easures 1. Farm Ponds 2. Water Harvesting Measures 1. Checkdam/Reservoir 2Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann University of Hannover Use & Land Cover TopographyTopography Semi arid/Sub- humid Climatic Watershed Quantitative Water

  4. EA-1075: Proposed Casey's Pond Improvement Project, Batavia, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposed system upgrade to meet improved operational criteria on the current Industrial Cooling Water distribution system used in the fixed target...

  5. Novel Americium Treatment Process for Surface Water and Dust Suppression Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiepel, E.W.; Pigeon, P.; Nesta, S.; Anderson, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), a former nuclear weapons production plant, has been remediated under CERCLA and decommissioned to become a National Wildlife Refuge. The site conducted this cleanup effort under the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) that established limits for the discharge of surface and process waters from the site. At the end of 2004, while a number of process buildings were undergoing decommissioning, routine monitoring of a discharge pond (Pond A-4) containing approximately 28 million gallons of water was discovered to have been contaminated with a trace amount of Americium-241 (Am-241). While the amount of Am-241 in the pond waters was very low (0.5 - 0.7 pCi/l), it was above the established Colorado stream standard of 0.15 pCi/l for release to off site drainage waters. The rapid successful treatment of these waters to the regulatory limit was important to the site for two reasons. The first was that the pond was approaching its hold-up limit. Without rapid treatment and release of the Pond A-4 water, typical spring run-off would require water management actions to other drainages onsite or a mass shuttling of water for disposal. The second reason was that this type of contaminated water had not been treated to the stringent stream standard at Rocky Flats before. Technical challenges in treatment could translate to impacts on water and secondary waste management, and ultimately, cost impacts. All of the technical challenges and specific site criteria led to the conclusion that a different approach to the treatment of this problem was necessary and a crash treatability program to identify applicable treatment techniques was undertaken. The goal of this program was to develop treatment options that could be implemented very quickly and would result in the generation of no high volume secondary waste that would be costly to dispose. A novel chemical treatment system was developed and implemented at the RFETS to treat Am-241 contaminated pond water, surface run-off and D and D dust suppression water during the later stages of the D and D effort at Rocky Flats. This novel chemical treatment system allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment of all contaminated waste waters to the very low stream standard of 0.15 pCi/1 with strict compliance to the RFCA discharge criteria for release to off-site surface waters. The rapid development and implementation of the treatment system avoided water management issues that would have had to be addressed if contaminated water had remained in Pond A-4 into the Spring of 2005. Implementation of this treatment system for the Pond A-4 waters and the D and D waters from Buildings 776 and 371 enabled the site to achieve cost-effective treatment that minimized secondary waste generation, avoiding the need for expensive off-site water disposal. Water treatment was conducted for a cost of less than $0.20/gal which included all development costs, capital costs and operational costs. This innovative and rapid response effort saved the RFETS cleanup program well in excess of $30 million for the potential cost of off-site transportation and treatment of radioactive liquid waste. (authors)

  6. Retention of Riverine Sediment and Nutrient Loads by Coastal Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retention of Riverine Sediment and Nutrient Loads by Coastal Plain Floodplains Gregory B. Noe for their cumulative retention of the annual river loads of nutrients or sediments. Here we report measurements of sediment accretion and associated carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus accu- mulation as sedimentation over

  7. The Retention of Social Workers in the Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    professional expectations, concerns and ambitions of social workers and how these impact on their developingThe Retention of Social Workers in the Health Services: An Evidence-Based Assessment Professor COLLEGE DUBLIN #12;Foreword The Retention of Social Workers in the Health Services and Evidence Based

  8. Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond, Massachusetts (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond interpretation of the hydrogen isotope ratios of plant leaf waxes extracted from sediments requires a thor- ough at a single site to determine how leaf wax hydro- gen isotope (D/H) ratios differ in different plant types

  9. 2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  10. 2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  11. 2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  12. 2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  13. A landscape approach to reserving farm ponds for wintering bird refuges in Taoyuan, Taiwan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Wei-Ta

    2006-08-16

    Man-made farm ponds are unique geographic features of the Taoyuan Tableland. Besides irrigation, they provide refuges for wintering birds. The issue at hand is that these features are disappearing and bring with it the loss of this refuge function...

  14. Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  15. Pilot-Scale Benzene Retention and Release Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marek, J.C.

    2003-11-10

    During the initial months of In-Tank Precipitation radioactive operation in 1995 the process experienced high rates of tetraphenylborate decomposition with assumed corresponding high rates of benzene generation. In March 1996 after a two month quiescent period, a water addition to Tank 48H resulted in an unexpected benzene release to the tank vapor phase. This was the first time a low energy input resulted in a significant release rate. This led to questions about how benzene, generated in-situ by TPB decomposition, was retained in the surrounding potassium tetraphenylborate slurry. It was postulated the retention mechanism may have changed during the quiescent period prior to March so the benzene present became readily releasable to the vapor phase with low energy input to the slurry or that enough benzene accumulated that some of it was in a different, more releasable form. Readily releasable is a qualitative term defined as a rapid release of benzene at a rate approaching evaporation of a free benzene layer. It is intended to distinguish between benzene in a form with high liquid phase resistance to mass transfer diffusion controlled from benzene in a form with minimal liquid phase resistance to mass transfer free benzene layer evaporation. If a readily releasable form of benzene was present, the vapor space profile during release tests was anticipated to have an initial benzene vapor space concentration peak followed by a lower vapor concentration, longer duration release.

  16. In-Vessel Retention - Recent Efforts and Future Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe

    2004-10-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. However, it is not clear that the external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) proposed for existing and some advanced reactors would provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1400 MWe) without additional enhancements. This paper summarizes recent efforts to enhance IVR and identifies additional needs to demonstrate that there is sufficient margin for successful IVR in high power reactors.

  17. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    soil bulk density and the water retention curve, Vadose ZoneA. Bruand, A conceptual model of the soil water retentioncurve, Water Resources Research, 34 (2), 223–231, 1998.

  18. Ground-water maps of the Hanford Site Separations Area, December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, A.L.; Ammerman, J.J.

    1988-03-01

    The ground-water maps of the Separations Area are prepared by the Environmental Technology Section of the Defense Waste Management Division of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The Separations Area consists of the 200 East and 200 West Areas, where chemical processing activities are carried out. This set of ground-water maps consists of a water-table map of the unconfined aquifer, a depth-to-water map of the unconfined aquifer, and a potentiometric map of the uppermost confined aquifer (the Rattlesnake Ridge sedimentary interbed) in the area where West Lake, the deactivated Gable Mountain Pond, and the B Pond system are located. The Separations Area water-table map is prepared from water-level measurements made in June and December. For the December 1987 map approximately 200 wells were used for contouring the water table. The water-table mound beneath the deactivated U Pond has decreased in size since the June 1987 measurements were taken, reflecting the impact of shutting off flow to the pond in the fall of 1984. This mound has declined approximately 8 ft. since 1984. The water-table map also shows the locations of wells where the December 1987 measurements were made, and the data for these measurements are listed.

  19. H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the quired by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during third quarter 1994. These constituents were not analyzed during the previous quarter. Third quarter results are similar to results for first quarter 1994.

  20. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  1. An Archaeological Survey for the Bryan Towne Centre Brazos Center Pond Project in Central Brazos County Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William; Baxter, Edward

    2015-07-28

    An archaeological survey for the Bryan Towne Centre, Brazos Center Pond Project, was performed by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA) on May 22-25, 2007 under antiquities permit 4533. The project area consists of 10 ...

  2. The redox and iron-sulfide geochemistry of Salt Pond and the thermodynamic constraints on native magnetotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canovas, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    Salt pond is a meromictic system with an outlet to the sea allowing denser seawater to occupy the monimolimnion while the mixolimnion has relatively low salinity and is the site of greater mixing and microbial activity. ...

  3. Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses, North Alamo Main Canal Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

    2008-01-01

    .txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 TR-324 2008 Ponding Test Results Seepage and Total Losses, North Alamo Main Canal Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension... PONDING TEST RESULTS SEEPAGE AND TOTAL LOSSES NORTH ALAMO MAIN CANAL HIDALGO COUNTY IRRIGATION DISTRICT NO. 2 Report Prepared by: Eric Leigh and Guy Fipps,1 P.E. February 4, 2004 IRRIGATION TECHNOLOGY CENTER...

  4. Evaluation of the Eological Management and Enhancement Alernative for Remediation of the K1007-P1 Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.J.

    2005-10-31

    An evaluation of the human and ecological risks associated with the P1 Pond and surrounding environs was conducted as part of the ETTP Site-Wide Remedial Investigation. The RI provides the basis for the focus on PCBs as the most important unacceptable risk to human and ecological health in the pond. Other P1 contaminants, media, or pathways of risk to receptors are identified in the RI, but are not addressed as a major risk reduction goal for the ETTP Site-Wide Feasibility Study. Therefore, the goal of the Ecological Management alternative is to reduce unacceptable risks associated with PCBs in fish. Many of the actions proposed for this alternative, however, are likely to reduce risks associated with other contaminants and their pathways. The high PCB concentrations in fish from the P1 Pond are most certainly due in part to the current ecological condition of the pond that maximizes PCB biomagnification. This basic assumption and the factors contributing to it were evaluated by conducting an intensive field study of the P1 Pond in the summer of 2004 (for a thorough presentation of current P1 Pond biological conditions, see Peterson et al. 2005). Major hypotheses regarding the P1 Pond's current fish community, PCB fate and transport processes, pond vegetation, and limnological conditions that contribute to the high PCB levels in fish were validated by the study (Appendix A), The results of the 2004 ecological assessment, in concert with long-term datasets obtained as part of the ETTP Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) and recent abiotic sampling for the RI, provide the basis for the assessment of current conditions.

  5. New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Reset New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention Project Initiation RMR-Project-Initiation.pdf, 07/2013 ROUTING Instructions: This form is for official New Mexico State University Document

  6. Heat extraction from salinity-gradient solar ponds using heat pipe heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tundee, Sura; Terdtoon, Pradit; Sakulchangsatjatai, Phrut; Singh, Randeep; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical analysis on the heat extraction process from solar pond by using the heat pipe heat exchanger. In order to conduct research work, a small scale experimental solar pond with an area of 7.0 m{sup 2} and a depth of 1.5 m was built at Khon Kaen in North-Eastern Thailand (16 27'N102 E). Heat was successfully extracted from the lower convective zone (LCZ) of the solar pond by using a heat pipe heat exchanger made from 60 copper tubes with 21 mm inside diameter and 22 mm outside diameter. The length of the evaporator and condenser section was 800 mm and 200 mm respectively. R134a was used as the heat transfer fluid in the experiment. The theoretical model was formulated for the solar pond heat extraction on the basis of the energy conservation equations and by using the solar radiation data for the above location. Numerical methods were used to solve the modeling equations. In the analysis, the performance of heat exchanger is investigated by varying the velocity of inlet air used to extract heat from the condenser end of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE). Air velocity was found to have a significant influence on the effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger. In the present investigation, there was an increase in effectiveness by 43% as the air velocity was decreased from 5 m/s to 1 m/s. The results obtained from the theoretical model showed good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  7. Changing the Rules on Fuel Export at Sellafield's First Fuel Storage Pond - 12065

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Derek [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) was built in 1949/50 to receive, store and de-can fuel and isotopes from the Windscale Piles. Following closure of the Piles in 1957, plant operations were scaled down until fuel processing eventually ceased in 1962. The facility has held an inventory of metal fuel both from the Piles and from other programmes since that time. The pond is currently undergoing remediation and removal of the fuel is a key step in that process, unfortunately the fuel export infrastructure on the plant is no longer functional and due to the size and limited lifting capability, the plant is not compatible with today's large volume heavy export flasks. The baseline scheme for the plant is to package fuel into a small capacity flask and transfer it to another facility for treatment and repackaging into a flask compatible with other facilities on site. Due to programme priorities the repackaging facility is not available to do this work for several years causing a delay to the work. In an effort accelerate the programme the Metal Fuel Pilot Project (MFPP) was initiated to challenge the norms for fuel transfer and develop a new methodology for transferring the fuel. In developing a transfer scheme the team had to overcome challenges associated with unknown fuel condition, transfers outside of bulk containment, pyro-phoricity and oxidisation hazards as well as developing remote control and recovery systems for equipment not designed for this purpose. A combination of novel engineering and enhanced operational controls were developed which resulted in the successful export of the first fuel to leave the Pile Fuel Storage Pond in over 40 years. The learning from the pilot project is now being considered by the main project team to see how the new methodology can be applied to the full inventory of the pond. (author)

  8. WALLDYN Simulations of Global Impurity Migration and Fuel Retention in JET and Extrapolations to ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WALLDYN Simulations of Global Impurity Migration and Fuel Retention in JET and Extrapolations to ITER

  9. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Final Hazard Category Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUTH, L.L.

    2001-06-06

    The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility was designed to store 242-A Evaporator process condensate and other liquid waste streams for treatment at the 200 East Area Effluent Treatment Facility. The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility has been previously classified as a Category 3 Nonreactor Nuclear Facility. As defined in Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports (DOE 1992, DOE 1997), Category 3 Nuclear Facilities have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences. However, based on current facility design, operations, and radioactive constituent concentrations, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility does not have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences and is categorized as a Radiological Facility. This report documents the final hazard categorization process performed in accordance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. This report describes the current configuration and operations of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility. Also included is a preliminary hazard categorization, which is based on current and proposed radioactive and hazardous material inventories, a preliminary hazards and accident analysis, and a final hazard category determination. The results of the hazards and accident analysis, based on the current configuration and operations of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and the current and proposed radioactive and hazardous material inventories, demonstrate that the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility does not have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences. Based on the final hazard category analysis, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility is a Radiological Facility. The final hazard category determination is based on a comparative evaluation of the consequence basis for the Category 3 threshold quantities to the calculated consequences for credible releases The basis for the Category 3 threshold quantities is 10 rem-equivalent man at 30 meters (98 feet) (DOE 1992, DOE 1997). The calculated 12 hour consequences to an individual located at 30 meters (98 feet) for two credible scenarios, spray release and a pool release, are 3.50 rem and 1.32 rem, respectively, which based upon the original hazard categorization criteria (DOE 1992) classified the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility as a Radiological Facility. Comparison of the calculated 24 hour consequences to an individual located at 30 meters (98 feet) for two credible scenarios, spray release and a pool release, 7.00 rem and 2.64 rem respectively, confirmed the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility classification as a Radiological Facility under the current hazard categorization criteria (DOE 1997). Both result in dose consequence values less than the allowable, 10 rem, meeting the requirements for categorizing the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility as a Radiological Facility.

  10. Salinity controls on trophic interactions among invertebrates and algae of solar evaporation ponds in the Mojave Desert and relation to shorebird foraging and selenium risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbst, David B

    2006-01-01

    AMONG INVERTEBRATES AND ALGAE OF SOLAR EVAPORATION PONDS INplanktonic invertebrates and algae present along with avianof invertebrates and algae, and avian foraging were examined

  11. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  12. Retention of elemental mercury in fly ashes in different atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Lopez-Anton; M. Diaz-Somoano; M.R. Martinez-Tarazona

    2007-01-15

    Mercury is an extremely volatile element, which is emitted from coal combustion to the environment mostly in the vapor phase. To avoid the environmental problems that the toxic species of this element may cause, control technologies for the removal of mercury are necessary. Recent research has shown that certain fly ash materials have an affinity for mercury. Moreover, it has been observed that fly ashes may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its capture. However, the exact nature of Hg-fly ash interactions is still unknown, and mercury oxidation through fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. In this work, the influence of a gas atmosphere on the retention of elemental mercury on fly ashes of different characteristics was evaluated. The retention capacity was estimated comparatively in inert and two gas atmospheres containing species present in coal gasification and coal combustion. Fly ashes produced in two pulverized coal combustion (PCC) plants, produced from coals of different rank (CTA and CTSR), and a fly ash (CTP) produced in a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) plant were used as raw materials. The mercury retention capacity of these fly ashes was compared to the retention obtained in different activated carbons. Although the capture of mercury is very similar in the gasification atmosphere and N{sub 2}, it is much more efficient in a coal combustion retention, being greater in fly ashes from PCC than those from FBC plants. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Portable conduit retention apparatus for releasably retaining a conduit therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, Richard H. (West Seneca, NY)

    1998-01-01

    Portable conduit retention apparatus for releasably retaining a conduit therein. The apparatus releasably retains the conduit out of the way of nearby personnel and equipment. The apparatus includes a portable support frame defining a slot therein having an open mouth portion in communication with the slot for receiving the conduit through the open mouth portion and into the slot. A retention bar is pivotally connected to the support frame adjacent the mouth portion for releasably retaining the conduit in the slot. The retention bar freely pivots to a first position, so that the mouth portion is unblocked in order that the conduit is received through the mouth portion and into the slot. In addition, the retention bar freely pivots to a second position, so that the mouth portion is blocked in order that the conduit is retained in the slot. The conduit is released from the slot by pivoting the retention bar to the first position to unblock the mouth portion and thereafter manipulating the conduit from the slot and through the mouth portion. The apparatus may further include a mounting member attached to the support frame for mounting the apparatus on a vertical support surface. Another embodiment of the apparatus includes a shoe assembly of predetermined weight removably connected to the support frame for resting the apparatus on a floor in such a manner that the apparatus is substantially stationary on the floor.

  14. TECHNICAL NOTES Long-Term Behavior of Water Content and Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Champaign, Ill. in 1987. A pond of water 0.31 m deep was maintained on top of the 7.3 m X 14.6 m X 0.9 mTECHNICAL NOTES Long-Term Behavior of Water Content and Density in an Earthen Liner Timothy E of a compacted earthen liner by monitoring the long-term changes in water content and density. The water content

  15. Novel Adsorbent-Reactants for Treatment of Ash and Scrubber Pond Effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Batchelor; Dong Suk Han; Eun Jung Kim

    2010-01-31

    The overall goal of this project was to evaluate the ability of novel adsorbent/reactants to remove specific toxic target chemicals from ash and scrubber pond effluents while producing stable residuals for ultimate disposal. The target chemicals studied were arsenic (As(III) and As(V)), mercury (Hg(II)) and selenium (Se(IV) and Se(VI)). The adsorbent/reactants that were evaluated are iron sulfide (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Procedures for measuring concentrations of target compounds and characterizing the surfaces of adsorbent-reactants were developed. Effects of contact time, pH (7, 8, 9, 10) and sulfate concentration (0, 1, 10 mM) on removal of all target compounds on both adsorbent-reactants were determined. Stability tests were conducted to evaluate the extent to which target compounds were released from the adsorbent-reactants when pH changed. Surface characterization was conducted with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify reactions occurring on the surface between the target compounds and surface iron and sulfur. Results indicated that target compounds could be removed by FeS{sub 2} and FeS and that removal was affected by time, pH and surface reactions. Stability of residuals was generally good and appeared to be affected by the extent of surface reactions. Synthesized pyrite and mackinawite appear to have the required characteristics for removing the target compounds from wastewaters from ash ponds and scrubber ponds and producing stable residuals.

  16. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    2012-01-01

    properties  of  the  tailings  ponds  at  the  Syncrude  are  then  sent  to  a  tailing  pond.  Roughly  two  tons  then  ends  up  in   tailing  ponds  from  which  it  

  17. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1994-09-01

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

  18. Retrieval Success from a 1950's UK Fuel Storage Pond: Blazing a Trail for Early Hazard Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, S. [British Nuclear Group Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, England, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Work has begun to tackle one of the biggest challenges in the UK nuclear cleanup program: the retrieval of spent nuclear fuel from the First Generation Magnox Fuel Storage Pond at Sellafield. The UK Government regulatory body, Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) considers this pond to be the country's highest priority in terms of Hazard Reduction, a view supported by the facility owner, UK Government's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). Remotely operated submersible vehicles (ROV's) were used by British Nuclear Group to assess the condition of stored fuel in First Generation Magnox Storage Ponds (1945-60's build). The ROV survey showed fuel condition was better than expected, and engineers were able to prototype retrieval on a selected skip (container) of fuel. The retrieval and subsequent export to the Fuel Handling Plant (FHP) was executed in November 2005 and was completely successful. The next stage is to reprocess the fuel using the Magnox Reprocessing Plant. If this is successful the prototype retrieval will have demonstrated that: - British Nuclear Group can safely retrieve fuel from its legacy ponds; - British Nuclear Group can safely transport retrieved legacy fuel between facilities; - British Nuclear Group can eliminate the hazard presented by this legacy fuel by use of existing on-site reprocessing facilities. This in turn enables the option to commence larger-scale fuel retrievals from these legacy ponds years ahead of the current plan which assumes new plants to be available to handle all arisings from the legacy ponds in 2015. This hazard reduction could commence as early as 2008. (authors)

  19. In-vessel tritium retention and removal in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federici, G.; Anderl, R.A.; Andrew, P.

    1998-06-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is envisioned to be the next major step in the world`s fusion program from the present generation of tokamaks and is designed to study fusion plasmas with a reactor relevant range of plasma parameters. During normal operation, it is expected that a fraction of the unburned tritium, that is used to routinely fuel the discharge, will be retained together with deuterium on the surfaces and in the bulk of the plasma facing materials (PFMs) surrounding the core and divertor plasma. The understanding of he basic retention mechanisms (physical and chemical) involved and their dependence upon plasma parameters and other relevant operation conditions is necessary for the accurate prediction of the amount of tritium retained at any given time in the ITER torus. Accurate estimates are essential to assess the radiological hazards associated with routine operation and with potential accident scenarios which may lead to mobilization of tritium that is not tenaciously held. Estimates are needed to establish the detritiation requirements for coolant water, to determine the plasma fueling and tritium supply requirements, and to establish the needed frequency and the procedures for tritium recovery and clean-up. The organization of this paper is as follows. Section 2 provides an overview of the design and operating conditions of the main components which define the plasma boundary of ITER. Section 3 reviews the erosion database and the results of recent relevant experiments conducted both in laboratory facilities and in tokamaks. These data provide the experimental basis and serve as an important benchmark for both model development (discussed in Section 4) and calculations (discussed in Section 5) that are required to predict tritium inventory build-up in ITER. Section 6 emphasizes the need to develop and test methods to remove the tritium from the codeposited C-based films and reviews the status and the prospects of the most attractive techniques. Section 7 identifies the unresolved issues and provides some recommendations on potential R and D avenues for their resolution. Finally, a summary is provided in Section 8.

  20. Harvesting Ornamental Fish From Ponds1 Tina C. Crosby, Jeffrey E. Hill, Carlos V. Martinez, Craig A. Watson, Deborah B. Pouder, and Roy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA-117 Harvesting Ornamental Fish From Ponds1 Tina C. Crosby, Jeffrey E. Hill, Carlos V. Martinez, ornamental fish are predominantly farmed in earthen ponds. Once fish reach marketable size and are ready and physical damage during harvesting (see UF IFAS Circular 919 Stress-Its Role in Fish Disease). Overall, col

  1. Accepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 Role of Ponded Turbidity Currents in Reservoir Trap Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    by a hydraulic jump. If the interface of this muddy pond rises above any vent or overflow point at the damAccepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 1. The dam causes a sustained turbidity current to reflect and form a muddy pond bounded upstream

  2. Considerations of diet, stocking density, distribution, population estimation and economics in the pond culture of blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris Stimpson) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Mark Perry

    1981-01-01

    , unpeeled tail portions. On October 27, 10 shrimp were collected from each pond and submitted whole for further lead analyses. 23 Two final samples consisting of shrimp from the harvest (December 6-7) were tested for pesticides and a range of heavy... metals other than lead. For these analyses, a pooled sample of peeled, washed, chopped tail portions was examined. Each sample consisted of one shrimp tail from each of 9 ponds. Frozen storage of the samples took place in aluminum foil and plastic bags...

  3. The effects of fish density on wading bird use of sediment ponds on an East Texas coal mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renfrow, Donna Hubbard

    1993-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF FISH DENSITY ON WADING BIRD USE OF SEDIMENT PONDS ON AN EAST TEXAS COAL MINE A Thesis by DONNA HUBBARD RENFROW Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE EFFECTS OF FISH DENSITY ON WADING BIRD USE OF SEDIMENT PONDS ON AN EAST TEXAS COAL MINE A Thesis by DONNA HUBBARD RENFROW Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  4. Sampling and analysis plan for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. This SAP includes the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) presented in Section 2.0, and the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) described in Section 3.0. The FSP defines the sampling and analytical methodologies to be performed, and the QAPjP provides or includes information on the requirements for precision, accuracy, representativeness, comparability, and completeness of the analytical data. This sampling and analysis plan was developed using the Environmental Protection Agency`s Seven-Step Data Quality Objectives (DQO) Guidance (EPA, 1994). The purpose of the DQO meetings was (1) to identify the contaminants of concern and their cleanup levels under the Washington State Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA, WAC-173-340) Method B, and (2) to determine the number and locations of samples necessary to verify that the 100-D Ponds meet the cleanup criteria. The data collected will be used to support RCRA closure of this TSD unit.

  5. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA General Records Retention and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    #12;UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA General Records Retention and Disposition Schedule April 2007 #12;MANAGING PUBLIC RECORDS IN THE STATE-SUPPORTED UNIVERSITIES OF NORTH CAROLINA Introduction in the University of North Carolina System (UNC) to use when managing the records in their offices. It lists records

  6. PLASTICIZER RETENTION IN PVC GEOMEMBRANES T. D. Stark1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PLASTICIZER RETENTION IN PVC GEOMEMBRANES T. D. Stark1 , H. Choi2 , and P. W. Diebel3 1, Ontario, Canada, N1R 5T6; PH (519)623-1630; email: PDiebel@cgtower.com ABSTRACT: Plasticizers are used to make PVC flexible so it can be used as a geomembrane for containment purposes. Plasticizers can migrate

  7. Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio Impacts the duration of transmitter attachment and minimizing the impacts of radios on the behavior and demography of the study animal. We tested 4 methods of radio attachment for a breeding population of upland sandpipers

  8. Predicting Student Retention and Academic Success at New Mexico Tech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Predicting Student Retention and Academic Success at New Mexico Tech by Julie Luna Submitted Research and Statistics Option New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Socorro, New Mexico August at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. Joe Franklin of the Information Services Department

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Transient gut retention and persistence of Salmonella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeff

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Transient gut retention and persistence of Salmonella through metamorphosis the consumption of contaminated food. The causative organism, Salmonella, can enter the production process at any commodities, a thor- ough understanding of the on-farm ecology and epidemi- ology of Salmonella from which

  10. Presented diploma thesis concerns the chrysophyte flora and its seasonal periodicity of two floodplain pools of river Luznice in the Southern Bohemia and one pond in the Eastern Bohemia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    floodplain pools of river Luznice in the Southern Bohemia and one pond in the Eastern Bohemia. The samples (2002) and from pond Rokytnický (2003). In addition, the samples from 11 floodplain pools of river, whereas M. caudata was the most dominant in pond. Species composition changed in time of year. In pools

  11. Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres settling in sharply stratified fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Richard M.

    Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres settling in sharply OF FLUIDS 25, 081701 (2013) Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres of the sphere but does not capture the retention time at the density transition quantitatively. Entrainment

  12. Toxicity of nickel and nickel electroplating water to the freshwater cladoceran Moina macrocopa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C.K.; Wong, P.K.; Tao, H. (Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong))

    1991-09-01

    The present study investigates the effects of Ni{sup 2+} and other components of nickel electroplating water on the survival and reproductive capacity of the cladoceran Moina macrocopa, a common inhabitant of small ponds and rice paddies in Hong Kong and Southern China.

  13. In-Vessel Retention Technology Development and Use for Advanced PWR Designs in the USA and Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.G. Theofanous; S.J. Oh; J.H. Scobel

    2004-05-18

    In-Vessel Retention (IVR) of molten core debris by means of external reactor vessel flooding is a cornerstone of severe accident management for Westinghouse's AP600 (advanced passive light water reactor) design. The case for its effectiveness (made in previous work by the PI) has been thoroughly documented, reviewed as part of the licensing certification, and accepted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A successful IVR would terminate a severe accident, passively, with the core in a stable, coolable configuration (within the lower head), thus avoiding the largely uncertain accident evolution with the molten debris on the containment floor. This passive plant design has been upgraded by Westinghouse to the AP1000, a 1000 MWe plant very similar to the AP600. The severe accident management approach is very similar too, including In-Vessel Retention as the cornerstone feature, and initial evaluations indicated that this would be feasible at the higher power as well. A similar strategy is adopted in Korea for the APR1400 plant. The overall goal of this project is to provide experimental data and develop the necessary basic understanding so as to allow the robust extension of the AP600 In-Vessel Retention strategy for severe accident management to higher power reactors, and in particular, to the AP1000 advanced passive design.

  14. Post-Closure Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2004-04-02

    The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Consevation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Surface and underground features of the facilities have been removed and laboratory analyses showed that soil met the closure performance standards. These sites have been backfilled and revegetated.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-06

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  16. Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-03-17

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

  17. Intake retention functions and derived investigation levels for selected radioelements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buitron Sanchez, Susana

    1990-01-01

    , Sr. (Chair of Committee) Milton . McLain (Member) Wesl E. Bolch (Member) Dan ightower (Member) ohn W. oston, Sr (Department Head) August 1990 ABSTRACT Intake Retention Functions and Derived Investigation Levels for Selected Radioelements... for radionuclide exposure control. Here, both routes of entry into the body are considered, i. e. , inhalation and ingestion, and ALI values are tabulated for both. 2. Introduction of the term Derived Air Concentration (DAC) instead of the term (MPC)a to prevent...

  18. ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

    2011-09-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

  19. In-Vessel Retention of Molten Corium: Lessons Learned and Outstanding Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Rempe; K.Y. Suh; F. B. Cheung; S. B. Kim

    2008-03-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Advanced 600 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designed by Westinghouse (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs). However, it is not clear that the ERVC proposed for the AP600 could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe) without additional enhancements. This paper reviews efforts made and results reported regarding the enhancement of IVR in LWRs. Where appropriate, the paper identifies what additional data or analyses are needed to demonstrate that there is sufficient margin for successful IVR in high power thermal reactors.

  20. Conservation and Management of Vernal Pools/Temporary Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Jargon · Temporary ponds · Ephemeral pools · Springs pools · Woodland pools · Semi-permanent ponds · Fishless ponds · Salamander ponds · Intermittent woodland pools · Seasonal forest ponds · Seasonally astatic waters · Geographically isolated wetlands · Vernal pools · Specifics- Carolina Bays, Karst ponds

  1. Cold tolerance of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and thermal-refuge technology to protect this species from cold-kill in aquaculture ponds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorsett, Paul Wesley

    1994-01-01

    The need to protect red drum in aquaculture ponds from cold-kill led to the development of thermalrefuge technology for overwintering these fish. Successive versions of an experimental thermal refuge were installed and operated in two adjacent red...

  2. Personal Statement I grew up in a log cabin beside a pond in New Hampshire and later in a house on a river in Maine.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Personal Statement I grew up in a log cabin beside a pond in New Hampshire and later in a house in frosty months. Spurning food stamps, some years our only animal food was venison and brook trout

  3. The hydrogeochemistry of pond and rice field recharge : implications for the arsenic contaminated aquifers in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B

    2010-01-01

    The shallow aquifers in Bangladesh, which provide drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, are severely contaminated with geogenic arsenic. Water mass balance calculations show that ...

  4. Sunlight-Mediated Inactivation Mechanisms of Enteroccocus faecalis and Escherichia coli in Waste Stabilization Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadir, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    waters, high-technology oriented activated sludge treatment plantsWater Recycling Facility, a wastewater treatment plant with activated sludge and

  5. Lecture 10 AS222d/253e Intro to energy and environment 2007 slides on water in the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    parched desert. · While the predictions are not necessarily the truth, the tendency for some dry regions the ground, condensing moisture evaporated from the warm pond. It spreads on in a thin layer, squeezed Meteorological Soc 1998 #12;· Global water use: ­ irrigation 64%, industry 25%, municipal (personal) 9% ­ global

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration, site characterization plan: Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility at the Nevada Test Site which will be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division. The objectives of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and around the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site characterization and waste management purposes.

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization plan. Area 6 Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 South and North Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEPs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration Division (ERD). The purposes of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste (IDW). The scope of the characterization may include excavation, drilling, and sampling of soil in and around both ponds; sampling of the excavated material; in situ sampling of the soil at the bottom and on the sides of the excavations as well as within subsurface borings; and conducting sample analysis for both characterization and waste management purposes. Contaminants of concern include RCRA-regulated VOCs and metals.

  8. September 2012, Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant to theDepartmentWork Force Retention Work Group

  9. An Analysis of Texas Superintendents' Bilingual/ESL Teacher Recruitment and Retention Practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lara-Alecio, Rafael; Galloway, Martha; Irby, Beverly J.; Brown, Genevieve

    2010-10-22

    teaching fairs for bilingual students. Begin early to recruit through these fairs, even at the sixth grade level. One superintendent in our study pointed out, ?Bilingual/ESL teachers are in great demand and merit much more recognition than school...=ISO-8859-1 Bilingual/ESL Teacher Recruitment/Retention 1 Running Head: BILINGUAL/ESL TEACHER RECRUITMENT/RETENTION An Analysis of Texas Superintendents? Bilingual/ESL Teacher Recruitment and Retention Practices Rafael Lara...

  10. Finding a Home: A Developmental Model of Rural Physician Recruitment and Retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, Christine M

    2008-01-01

    http://www.unmc.edu/Community/mralmeded/rural_background_http://wvvw.unmc.edu/Community/ruralmeded/rural_interested_Physician retention in rural communities: the perspective of

  11. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    Turbid water Clear water pixel position cameraresponsecameraresponse pixel position ABSTRACT: A new underwater laser scanning system, providing microbathymetric information in coastal waters is described the backscatter component resulting in enhanced performance in turbid waters. The system is expected to provide

  12. 1 Reflecting Pond A popular spot to study and socialize, this campus landmark is located between the John C. Hitt Library and Millican Hall. During homecoming week, UCF hosts Spirit Splash, when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    1 Reflecting Pond A popular spot to study and socialize, this campus landmark is located between the university president, coaches, cheerleaders, the marching band and students celebrate in and around the pond-Guided Tour a d m i s s i o n s . u c f . e d u #12;1 Reflecting Pond 2 John t. Washington centeR 3 student

  13. Wetlands and Aquatic Processes Phosphorus Retention by Wetland Soils used for Treated Wastewater Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    to evaluate likely mechanisms of P removal in the soils. Intact soil cores (0-40 cm) and bulk soil samples (0Wetlands and Aquatic Processes Phosphorus Retention by Wetland Soils used for Treated Wastewater were to (i) determine the P retention capacity of representative wetland soils being used for disposal

  14. U.S. Navy Promotion and Retention by Race and Sex Amos Golan, American University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    U.S. Navy Promotion and Retention by Race and Sex Amos Golan, American University William Greene The Navy's promotion-retention process involves two successive decisions: The Navy decides whether an individual is selected for promotion, and then, conditional on the Navy's decision, the sailor decides

  15. Information Sheet for Retention Review During Third Probationary Year Short Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for a fourth probationary year: [ ] Additional comments are attached. [ ] Additional comments are not attached/Director Recommendation: I recommend retention for a fourth probationary year: [ ] Additional comments are attached. College Dean Recommendation: I recommend retention for a fourth probationary year: [ ] Additional comments

  16. Page 1 of 2 Application and Retention of Salary Savings Resulting From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Page 1 of 2 Application and Retention of Salary Savings Resulting From Sponsored Programs: Buyouts University and to provide consistency in the application and retention of salary support for externally- funded efforts across all Georgia Southern University units. II. Policy Statement Salaries charged

  17. THE IMPACT OF INCREASED EMPLOYEE RETENTION UPON PERFORMANCE IN A CUSTOMER CONTACT CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitt, Ward

    -run average performance. Keywords: contact centers, call centers, retention, employee turnover, churn, agent by low employee job satisfaction, as evidenced by high turnover, referred to as churn [11]. There is good reason to believe that churn can be reduced (retention can be increased) by increasing employee job

  18. Sunlight-Mediated Inactivation Mechanisms of Enteroccocus faecalis and Escherichia coli in Waste Stabilization Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadir, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    indicator microorganisms and pathogens commonly found inthat, like other microorganisms, pathogens in water may beof pathogenic microorganisms. Pathogen removal and

  19. Static ferroelectric memory transistor having improved data retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T. (13609 Verbena Pl., N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Warren, William L. (7716 Wm. Moyers Ave., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Tuttle, Bruce A. (12808 Lillian Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1996-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric FET structure in which the ferroelectric layer is doped to reduce retention loss. A ferroelectric FET according to the present invention includes a semiconductor layer having first and second contacts thereon, the first and second contacts being separated from one another. The ferroelectric FET also includes a bottom electrode and a ferroelectric layer which is sandwiched between the semiconductor layer and the bottom electrode. The ferroelectric layer is constructed from a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4 in sufficient concentration to impede shifts in the resistance measured between the first and second contacts with time. The ferroelectric FET structure preferably comprises Pb in the A-site. The first and second elements are preferably Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred B-site dopants are Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten at concentrations between 1% and 8%.

  20. Bisphenol A retention in the direct ultrafiltration of greywater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Nghiem, Long D.; Oschmann, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    Decentralised treatment is an increasing trend in the attempts to manage water more wisely in light of water restrictions, overconsumption and drought. Greywater is a fraction of household wastewater that offers the potential to be treated locally...

  1. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL’s WTP gas retention and release modeling.

  2. Innovative Treatment Technologies for Natural Waters and Wastewaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, Amy E.

    2011-07-01

    The research described in this report focused on the development of novel membrane contactor processes (in particular, forward osmosis (FO), pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), and membrane distillation (MD)) in low energy desalination and wastewater treatment applications and in renewable energy generation. FO and MD are recently gaining national and international attention as viable, economic alternatives for removal of both established and emerging contaminants from natural and process waters; PRO is gaining worldwide attention as a viable source of renewable energy. The interrelationship of energy and water are at the core of this study. Energy and water are inextricably bound; energy usage and production must be considered when evaluating any water treatment process for practical application. Both FO and MD offer the potential for substantial energy and resource savings over conventional treatment processes and PRO offers the potential for renewable energy or energy offsets in desalination. Combination of these novel technologies with each other, with existing technologies (e.g., reverse osmosis (RO)), and with existing renewable energy sources (e.g., salinity gradient solar ponds) may enable much less expensive water production and also potable water production in remote or distributed locations. Two inter-related projects were carried out in this investigation. One focused on membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment and PRO for renewable energy generation; the other focused on MD driven by a salinity gradient solar pond.

  3. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  4. Deuterium Retention in Beryllium Exposed to a 60kV Deuterium Beam ­ Consequences for Next Step Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deuterium Retention in Beryllium Exposed to a 60kV Deuterium Beam ­ Consequences for Next Step Devices

  5. Investigations of Altered Aquatic Ecosystems: Biomonitoring, Disease, and Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunde, Kevin Bryce

    2011-01-01

    S. J. S TANLEY . 1995. Urban stormwater quality - Summary ofW EST . 2008. Amphibian use of stormwater ponds in the Pugetcharacteristics in motorway stormwater retention ponds (

  6. A rational approach for evaluation and screening of treatment and disposal options for the solar pond sludges at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    This document consists of information about the treatment options for the sludge that is located in the evaporation ponds at the Rocky Flats Plant. The sludges are mixed low-level radioactive wastes whose composition and character were variable. Sludges similar to these are typically treated prior to ultimate disposal. Disposal of treated sludges includes both on-site and off-site options. The rational approach described in this paper is useful for technology evaluation and screening because it provides a format for developing objectives, listing alternatives, and weighing the alternatives against the objectives and against each other.

  7. A differential model for predicting growth of the upper convective zone of a solar pond due to wind speed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hullender, Todd Allan

    1991-01-01

    pond, containing less empiricism and therefore a better model of the physics. Secondly, this model is heated from below, just as the experimental wind/wave tank constructed at the Texas A8cM Energy Systems Laboratory [9[. This tank has dimensions 2... for the anisotropic component of the dissipation. The conservation equation for dissipation is of the form ? f C~2/k where the terms on the RHS account for molecular and turbulent diffusion, buoyant production or destruction, and viscous destruction. Before...

  8. submitted to Deep Sea Research II Transport and retention of dormant copepods in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    submitted to Deep Sea Research II Transport and retention of dormant copepods in the Gulf of Maine finmarchicus, copepod, dormancy, diapause, Gulf of Maine, interannual variability, zooplankton #12;Abstract and retention of dormant C. finmarchicus in the deep Gulf of Maine, in the northwestern Atlantic. Retention

  9. Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

  10. Water Clean Water Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Keep Our Water Clean Keep Our Water Clean Home and garden pesticides and fertilizers are polluting residues wash into gutters, storm drains, and streams by rain,garden watering,or cleaning up drinking water. Follow these tips to keep our rivers, creeks, and oceans clean. What can you do to protect

  11. Water, water everywhere,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    1 Water, water everywhere, but is it safe to drink? An Inquiry-based unit investigating the journey of your drinking water from source to tap of drinking water will contain different contaminants, based on surrounding land uses (guided inquiry activity

  12. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  13. In-vessel melt retention as a severe accident management strategy for the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H. [IVO International Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Theofanous, T.G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The concept of lower head coolability and in-vessel retention of corium has been approved as a basic element of the severe accident management strategy for IVO`s Loviisa Plant (VVER-440) in Finland. The selected approach takes advantage of the unique features of the plant such as low power density, reactor pressure vessel without penetrations at the bottom and ice-condenser containment which ensures flooded cavity in all risk significant sequences. The thermal analyses, which are supported by experimental program, demonstrate that in Loviisa the molten corium on the lower head of the reactor vessel is coolable externally with wide margins. This paper summarizes the approach and the plant modifications being implemented. During the approval process some technical concerns were raised, particularly with regard to thermal loadings caused by contact of cool cavity water and hot corium with the reactor vessel. Resolution of these concerns is also discussed.

  14. Bushing retention system for thermal medium cooling delivery tubes in a gas turbine rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashey, Thomas Charles (Coxsackie, NY)

    2002-01-01

    Bushings are provided in counterbores for wheels and spacers for supporting thermal medium cooling tubes extending axially adjacent the rim of the gas turbine rotor. The retention system includes a retaining ring disposed in a groove adjacent an end face of the bushing and which retaining ring projects radially inwardly to prevent axial movement of the bushing in one direction. The retention ring has a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs along its inner diameter whereby the ring is supported by the lands of the tube maintaining its bushing retention function, notwithstanding operation in high centrifugal fields and rotation of the ring in the groove into other circular orientations.

  15. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for July through December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Dennison, D.I.; Bryce, R.W.; Mitchell, P.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Krupka, K.M.; Hinman, N.W.; Jacobson, E.A.; Freshley, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality at the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Work undertaken between July and December 1987 included monitoring ground-water elevations across the Site, monitoring hazardous chemicals and radionuclides in ground water, geochemical evaluations of unconfined ground-water data, and calibration of ground-water flow and transport models. Water levels continued to rise in areas receiving increased recharge (e.g., beneath B Pond) and decline in areas where the release of water to disposal facilities has been terminated (e.g., U Pond). The major areas of ground-water contamination defined by monitoring activities are (1) carbon tetrachloride in the 200-West Area; (2) cyanide in and north of the 200-East and 200-West Areas; (3) hexavalent chromium contamination in the 100-B, 100-D, 100-F, 100-H, 100-K, and 200-West Areas; (4) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vicinity of the Central Landfill and 300 Area; (5) uranium in the 100-F, 100-H, 200-West, and 300 Areas; and (6) tritium and nitrate across the Site. The MINTEQ geochemical code was used to identify chemical reactions that may be affecting the concentrations of dissolved hazardous chemicals in the unconfined ground water. Results indicate that many cations are present mainly as dissolved carbonate complexes and that a majority of the ground-water samples are in near equilibrium with carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite, dolomite, otavite).

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Plan, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-12

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which will be conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations OffIce (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration Division (ERD). The objectives of the planned activities are to: o Obtain sufficient, ample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies maybe developed for the site. o Obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. All references to regulations contained in this plan are to the versions of the regulations that are current at the time of publication of this plan. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and Mound the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site . . characterization and waste management purposes.

  17. W W W . S O U T H B A Y R E S T O R A T I O N . O R G / I N T E R A C T I V E M A P T1 Project and Non-project Pond Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Non-project Pond Boundaries T2 Endangered/Threatened Species T4 Species of Special Concern T3 Harbor Seal Haulouts and Western Pond Turtle Habitat T5 Historical Baylands T6 Recreation T7 IKONOS Aerial Imagery I N T E R A C T I V E M A P South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project The South Bay Salt Pond

  18. Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  19. LIQUID EFFLUENT RETENTION FACILITY (LERF) BASIN 42 STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2004-10-29

    This report documents laboratory results obtained under test plan RPP-21533 for samples submitted by the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) from the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Basin 42 (Reference 1). The LERF Basin 42 contains process condensate (PC) from the 242-A Evaporator and landfill leachate. The ETF processes one PC campaign approximately every 12 to 18 months. A typical PC campaign volume can range from 1.5 to 2.5 million gallons. During the September 2003 ETF Basin 42 processing campaign, a recurring problem with 'gelatinous buildup' on the outlet filters from 60A-TK-I (surge tank) was observed (Figure 1). This buildup appeared on the filters after the contents of the surge tank were adjusted to a pH of between 5 and 6 using sulfuric acid. Biological activity in the PC feed was suspected to be the cause of the gelatinous material. Due to this buildup, the filters (10 {micro}m CUNO) required daily change out to maintain process throughput.

  20. Combating soil erosion: AgriLife scientist discovering what works for Fort Hood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    of this partnership, Dr. Dennis Hoffman, senior research scientist, and other researchers at Texas AgriLife Research Blackland Research and Extension Center began monitoring water quality. They measured nutrient and sediment losses across many of Fort Hood?s... watersheds. As a result of the monitoring NRCS and ITAM put in more than 30 sediment retention ponds to trap sediment contained in stormwater runoff. ?We then began to monitor watersheds to estimate sediment trapping as a result of the ponds,? Hoffman...

  1. Rapid Conversion of Hindered Arylsulfonates to Alkyl Chlorides with Retention of Configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepore, Salvatore D.

    Rapid Conversion of Hindered Arylsulfonates to Alkyl Chlorides with Retention of Configuration of highly efficient leaving groups containing chelating units capable of attracting incoming nucleophiles assisting leaving groups (NALGs) that contain a polyether unit (including macrocyclic) attached to the aryl

  2. Mercury retention by fly ashes from coal combustion: Influence of the unburned carbon content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Anton, M.A.; Diaz-Somoano, M.; Martinez-Tarazona, M.R.

    2007-01-31

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of unburned carbon particles present in fly ashes produced by coal combustion on mercury retention. To achieve this objective, the work was divided into two parts. The aim of the first part of the study was to estimate the amount of mercury captured by the fly ashes during combustion in power stations and the relationship of this retention to the unburned carbon content. The second part was a laboratory-scale study aimed at evaluating the retention of mercury concentrations greater than those produced in power stations by fly ashes of different characteristics and by unburned carbon particles. From the results obtained it can be inferred that the unburned carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture in fly ashes. The textural characteristics of these unburned particles and of other components of fly ashes also influence retention.

  3. Variations in the Retention and Excretion of {sup 137}Cs with Age and Sex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boni, A.L.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses the effects of age and sex on the retention and excretion of {sup 137}Cs in the body in a cross section of the general population over a four-year period.

  4. The retention and distribution of Salmonella typhimurium in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Gary Lee

    1981-01-01

    THE RETENTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN THE CHANNEL CATFISH (ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS) A Thesis by GARY LEE COON Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A8d~ University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December Ig81 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology THE RETENTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN THE CHANNEL CATFISH (ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS) A Thesis by GARY LEE COON Approved as to style and content by...

  5. The Caw Burn SUDS: performance of a settlement pond/wetland SUDS retrofit Kate Heal1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Engineering and Electronics, The University of Edinburgh, Faraday Building, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JL, U.K. 3 Institute of Aquaculture, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland 4 Scottish Water

  6. Corium Retention for High Power Reactors by An In-Vessel Core Catcher in Combination with External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; K. Y. Suh; F. -B. Cheung; S. -B. Kim

    2004-05-01

    If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel lower head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR), resulted in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, IVR of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors. However, it is not clear that currently-proposed methods to achieve ERVC will provide sufficient heat removal for higher power reactors. A US–Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project has been initiated in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) will determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe. This paper summarizes results from the first year of this 3-year project.

  7. Selecting a Green Roof Medium for Water Quality Benefits Brett Long, S. ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Selecting a Green Roof Medium for Water Quality Benefits Brett Long, S. ASCE1 ; Shirley E. Clark, F: rdb4@psu.edu ABSTRACT Green roofs are a best management practice for urban areas where land roofs that will improve roof runoff quality while maintaining the known water retention benefits

  8. Retention time and dispersion associated with submerged aquatic canopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    The shear layer at the top of a submerged canopy generates coherent vortices that control exchange between the canopy and the overflowing water. Unlike free shear layers, the vortices in a canopy shear layer do not grow ...

  9. Monazite ages in the Chesham Pond Nappe, SW New Hampshire, USA: implications for assembly of central New England thrust sheets (Revision #1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spear, Frank S.

    Monazite ages in the Chesham Pond Nappe, SW New Hampshire, USA: implications for assembly distinct monazite domains in low- pressure pelitic migmatites from southwest New Hampshire, USA; three (43.0691°N, 72.2208°W, NAD83) along New Hampshire State Highway 10, adjacent to the Ashuelot River, 1

  10. An Enhanced In-Vessel Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe

    2005-11-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the invessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

  11. Development of an Enhanced Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Condie, K.G. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Knudson, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Suh, K.Y. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Cheung, F.B. [The Pennsylvania State University (United States); Kim, S.B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the in-vessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

  12. Potential for AP600 in-vessel retention through ex-vessel flooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Allison, C.M.; Thinnes, G.L.; Atwood, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    External reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) is a new severe accident management strategy that involves flooding the reactor cavity to submerge the reactor vessel in an attempt to cool core debris that has relocated to the vessel lower head. Advanced and existing light water reactors (LWRs) are considering ERVC as an accident management strategy for in-vessel retention (IVR) of relocated debris. In the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for the AP600 design, Westinghouse credits ERVC for preventing vessel failure during postulated severe accidents with successful reactor coolant system (RCS) depressurization and reactor cavity flooding. To support the Westinghouse position on IVR, DOE contracted the University of California--Santa Barbara (UCSB) to produce the peer-reviewed report. To assist in the NRC`s evaluation of IVR of core melt by ex-vessel flooding of the AP6OO, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was tasked to perform: An in-depth critical review of the UCSB study and the model that UCSB used to assess ERVC effectiveness; An in-depth review of the UCSB study peer review comments and of UCSB`s resolution method to identify areas where technical concerns weren`t addressed; and An independent analysis effort to investigate the impact of residual concerns on the margins to failure and conclusions presented in the UCSB study. This report summarizes results from these tasks. As discussed in Sections 1.1 and 1.2, INEEL`s review of the UCSB study and peer reviewer comments suggested that additional analysis was needed to assess: (1) the integral impact of peer reviewer-suggested changes to input assumptions and uncertainties and (2) the challenge present by other credible debris configurations. Section 1.3 summarized the corresponding analysis approach developed by INEEL. The remainder of this report provides more detailed descriptions of analysis methodology, input assumptions, and results.

  13. Late-Phase Melt Conditions Affecting the Potential for In-Vessel Retention in High Power Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; K. Y. Suh; F. B.Cheung; S. B. Kim

    2004-05-01

    If cooling is inadequate during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident. In such a case, concerns about containment failure and associated risks can be eliminated if it is possible to ensure that the lower head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel. Accordingly, in-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt as a key severe accident management strategy has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and planned for some advanced light water reactors. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements can provide sufficient heat removal to assure IVR for high power reactors (i.e., reactors with power levels up to 1500 MWe). Consequently, a joint United States/Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) has been launched to develop recommendations to improve the margin of success for in-vessel retention in high power reactors. This program is initially focussed on the Korean Advanced Power Reactor—1400 MWe (APR1400) design. However, recommendations will be developed that can be applied to a wide range of existing and advanced reactor designs. The recommendations will focus on modifications to enhance ERVC and modifications to enhance in-vessel debris coolability. In this paper, late-phase melt conditions affecting the potential for IVR of core melt in the APR1400 were established as a basis for developing the I-NERI recommendations. The selection of ‘bounding’ reactor accidents, simulation of those accidents using the SCDAP/RELAP5-3D© code, and resulting late-phase melt conditions are presented. Results from this effort indicate that bounding late-phase melt conditions could include large melt masses (>120,000 kg) relocating at high temperatures (3400 K). Estimated lower head heat fluxes associated with this melt could exceed the maximum critical heat flux, indicating additional measures such as the use of a core catcher and/or modifications to enhance external reactor vessel cooling may be necessary to ensure in-vessel retention of core melt.

  14. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Cyd E.

    2014-03-25

    This white paper briefly reviews the research literature exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production via increased tolerance, resilience, and resistance to a variety of abiotic and biotic perturbations occurring within harvesting timescales. This paper identifies what data are available and whether more research utilizing complex communities is needed to explore the potential of complex algal community stability (CACS) approach as a plausible means to increase biomass yields regardless of ecological context and resulting in decreased algal-based fuel prices by reducing operations costs. By reviewing the literature for what we do and do not know, in terms of CACS methodologies, this report will provide guidance for future research addressing pond crash phenomena.

  15. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

  16. The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Richard John

    1978-01-01

    4. 5 i2 Q7 50 i6 5i Ln n e Zone [ ong+o. . . Zone I' stores;. caner&wee ~ I gooati~ Zone (8) Low water level Range Zone Lor, gtorn Zone Knotg ass-Sea twoeo Zone . . r~p+, &i?& ~+~", r ~ Tran-. ition Zone I i ~i' (g r(Pne '"' p T'ne yo, k...

  17. The Role of Aeration in Pond Management 1 Michael McGee and Charles Cichra2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    be higher for the maintenance systems, but labor cost of oxygen monitoring are reduced, risk due to low The goal of most fish farmers is to maximize production and profits while holding labor and management efforts to the minimum. Risk of fish kills, disease outbreaks, poor water quality, and reduced feed

  18. Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental Ponds1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    ENY-670 Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental fish, and supplying water for wildlife, the potential for new mosquito breeding sites is increasing. Small insectivorous fish are a valuable tool in controlling mosquitoes and midges ("blind mosquitoes

  19. In-Vessel Retention of Molten Core Debris in the Westinghouse AP1000 Advanced Passive PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scobel, James H.; Conway, L.E. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, P.O. Box 355, Pittsburgh, PA 15230-0355 (United States); Theofanous, T.G. [Center for Risk Studies and Safety, University of California Santa Barbara (United States)

    2002-07-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris via external reactor vessel cooling is the hallmark of the severe accident management strategies in the AP600 passive PWR. The vessel is submerged in water to cool its external surface via nucleate boiling heat transfer. An engineered flow path through the reactor vessel insulation provides cooling water to the vessel surface and vents steam to promote IVR. For the 600 MWe passive plant, the predicted heat load from molten debris to the lower head wall has a large margin to the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel, which is the upper limit of the cooling capability. Up-rating the power of the passive plant from 600 to 1000 MWe (AP1000) significantly increases the heat loading from the molten debris to the reactor vessel lower head in the postulated bounding severe accident sequence. To maintain a large margin to the coolability limit for the AP1000, design features and severe accident management (SAM) strategies to increase the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel wall need to be implemented. A test program at the ULPU facility at University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) has been initiated to investigate design features and SAM strategies that can enhance the critical heat flux. Results from ULPU Configuration IV demonstrate that with small changes to the ex-vessel design and SAM strategies, the peak critical heat flux in the AP1000 can be increased at least 30% over the peak critical heat flux predicted for the AP600 configuration. The design and SAM strategy changes investigated in ULPU Configuration IV can be implemented in the AP1000 design and will allow the passive plant to maintain the margin to critical heat flux for IVR, even at the higher power level. Continued testing for IVR phenomena is being performed at UCSB to optimize the AP1000 design and to ensure that vessel failure in a severe accident is physically unreasonable. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE`s predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site.

  1. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE's predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site.

  2. Why Do They Stay? Building a Conceptual Model to Understand Worker Retention and Turnover in Public Child Welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Amy Denise

    2010-01-01

    Hall. Henry, S. (1990). Non-salary retention incentives forexperiences • Caseload • Salary • Supervision • PeerCohort Extrinsic Job Factors Salary Hours % time -clients %

  3. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  4. Retention system and method for the blades of a rotary machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Poul D. (Cincinnati, OH); Glynn, Christopher C. (Hamilton, OH); Walker, Roger C. (Piedmont, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A retention system and method for the blades of a rotary machine for preventing forward or aft axial movement of the rotor blades includes a circumferential hub slot formed about a circumference of the machine hub. The rotor blades have machined therein a blade retention slot which is aligned with the circumferential hub slot when the blades are received in correspondingly shaped openings in the hub. At least one ring segment is secured in the blade retention slots and the circumferential hub slot to retain the blades from axial movement. A key assembly is used to secure the ring segments in the aligned slots via a hook portion receiving the ring segments and a threaded portion that is driven radially outwardly by a nut. A cap may be provided to provide a redundant back-up load path for the centrifugal loads on the key. Alternatively, the key assembly may be formed in the blade dovetail.

  5. Investigating Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02

    This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity...

  6. Retention by vegetation of radionuclides deposited in rainfall: A literature summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anspaugh, L.R.

    1987-06-01

    Data include the results of experiments with artificial tracers and information from direct measurements of naturally occurring and fallout-produced radionuclides washed out or rained out by storms. Individual measurements of retention varied from negative to over 100%. The conclusion is that a value of 0.4 to 0.5 would be appropriate for average retention, and a value of 1.0 would not be unreasonable if one wished to be conservative, particularly where high vegetation densities might be expected. 35 refs., 16 tabs.

  7. Influence of rainfall on the retention of sludge trace metals by the leaves of forage crops 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Stephen Grady

    1977-01-01

    INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE METALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis STEPHEN GRADY JONES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Soil Science INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE MFTALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis by STEPHEN GRADY JONES Approved a to style and content by: 1 (Chairman of Committee...

  8. Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, Michael S.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, Jose M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3•nH2O) to goethite (?-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathway’s contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ~7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 ?M, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM) coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14 to 89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ? 50 ?M when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64 to 89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within iron oxides as a retention process of U across a wide range of biogeochemical environments and the sensitivity of uranium retention processes to operative (bio)geochemical conditions.

  9. In re Kent Pond, No MLP-03-10, Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) | Open Energy

  10. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2012 through October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2013 reporting year, an estimated 9.64 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 478: Area 12 T-Tunnel Ponds, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 478, Area 12 T-Tunnel Ponds. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 478 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS): • 12-23-01, Ponds (5) RAD Area The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure in place with use restrictions for CAU 478.

  12. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for January through June 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1989-05-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality at the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Work undertaken between January and June 1988 included monitoring ground-water elevations across the Site, and monitoring hazardous chemicals and radionuclides in ground water. Water levels continued to rise in areas receiving increased recharge (e.g., beneath B Pond) and decline in areas where the release of water to disposal facilities has been terminated (e.g., U Pond). The major areas of ground-water contamination defined by monitoring activities are (1) carbon tetrachloride in the 200-West Area; (2) cyanide in and north of the 200-East and 200-West Areas; (3) hexavalent chromium contamination in the 100-B, 100-D, 100-F, 100-H, 100-K, and 200-West Areas; (4) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vicinity of the Solid Waste Landfill and 300 Area; (5) uranium in the 100-F, 100-H, 200-West, and 300 Areas; and (6) tritium and nitrate across the Site. In addition, several new analytical initiatives were undertaken during this period. These include cyanide speciation in the BY Cribs plume, inductively coupled argon plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) measurements on a broad selection of samples from the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas, and high sensitivity gas chromatography measurements performed at the Solid Waste Landfill-Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 23 figs., 25 tabs.

  13. NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, a part of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and landfill. Without the headsup, not only PVT but Oahu's entire construction industry would have been hurt, with losses in the millions of dollars. As the only construction landfill on the island, more constructed storm water retention pond at the PVT landfill in Nanakuli, Oahu, Hawai'i Road to landfill

  14. Top Photo: John A. Read/FEMA National Center for Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Top Photo: John A. Read/FEMA National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency the environmental problem of sediments and other pollutants entering surface waters but do not address public health detention basins, retention ponds, media filtration devices, below-ground devices) frequently hold standing

  15. 2005 Data Report University of New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low Impact Development (LID) designs, such as this bioreten- tion system [left] have high pollutant into small receiving streams. Thermal pollution negatively impacts the health of macro inverte- brates. Retention Pond About this Report In 1998, Phase II of the Clean Water Act broke over U.S. towns and cities

  16. Experimental Study on the Improved In-Vessel Corium Retention Concepts for the Severe Accident Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, K.H.; Park, R.J.; Koo, K.M.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150, Dukjin-Dong, Yusong-Gu, Taejon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Feasibility experiments were performed for the assessment of improved In-Vessel Corium Retention (IVR) concepts using an internal engineered gap device and also a dual strategy of In/Ex-vessel cooling using the LAVA experimental facility. The internal engineered gap device made of carbon steel was installed inside the LAVA lower head vessel and it made a uniform gap with the vessel by 10 mm. In/Ex-vessel cooling in the dual strategy experiment was performed installing an external guide vessel outside the LAVA lower head vessel at a uniform gap of 25 mm. The LAVA lower head vessel was a hemispherical test vessel simulated with a 1/8 linear scale mock-up of the reactor vessel lower plenum with an inner diameter of 500 mm and thickness of 25 mm. In both of the tests, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt was delivered into about 50 K subcooled water inside the lower head vessel under the elevated pressure. Temperatures of the internal engineered gap device and the lower head vessel were measured by K-type thermocouples embedded radially in the 3 mm depth of the lower head vessel outer surface and in the 4 mm depth of the internal engineered gap device, respectively. In the dual strategy experiment, the Ex-vessel cooling featured pool boiling in the gap between the lower head vessel and the external guide vessel. It could be found from the experimental results that the internal engineered gap device was intact and so the vessel experienced little thermal and mechanical attacks in the internal engineered gap device experiment. And also the vessel was effectively cooled via mutual boiling heat removal in- and ex-vessel in the dual strategy experiment. Compared with the previous LAVA experimental results performed for the investigation of the inherent in-vessel gap cooling, it could be confirmed that the Ex-vessel cooling measure was dominant over the In-vessel cooling measure in this study. It is concluded that the improved cooling measures using a internal engineered gap device and a dual strategy promote the cooling characteristics of the lower head vessel and so enhance the integrity of the vessel in the end. (authors)

  17. Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackledge, Todd

    Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen Department of Biology, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA Introduction Orb webs depend upon threads, the sticky spirals of orb webs perform two important functions during prey cap- ture. First

  18. Employee Retention of the X and Y Generation Employees at ABC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatto, Sean

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this Engineering Management Field Project is to gain a better understanding of how ABC is performing in the area of Employee Retention of generation X and Y employees. ABC is a high tech aerospace company that was established...

  19. The impact of combined heat and noise on short-term retention 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parent, John Scott

    1993-01-01

    This thesis reports on the impact of combined heat and noise on the performance of a short-term memory retention task with two levels of difficulty. Thirty-two males, ages 18 - 35, were exposed to four different treatment conditions during four one...

  20. MESH RETENTION OF LARVAE OF SARDINOPS CAERULEA AND ENGRAULIS MORDAX BY PLANKTON NETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . LENARZ 1 ABSTRACT Mesh retention of the standard plankton sampling gear used by the California by the standard gear with a gear that retains larvae of all sizes. The results indicate that 67% of sardine larvae and 60% of anchovy larvae are retained by the meshes of the standard gear. The standard gear was replaced

  1. Influence of plasticizer molecular weight on plasticizer retention in PVC geomembranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROOFS Influence of plasticizer molecular weight on plasticizer retention in PVC geomembranes T. D, accepted 31 October 2004 ABSTRACT: Plasticizers are used to make PVC flexible so it can be used as a geomembrane. Plasticizers can migrate from PVC geomembranes over time because of contact with air, liquid, and

  2. Finance Program Retention for FALL 2014 Instructions for Transcript Review Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Finance Program ­ Retention for FALL 2014 Instructions for Transcript Review Form College of Business at Northern Illinois University The Department of Finance Transcript Review Form should in the finance core). All NIU students are eligible to declare a major in Finance; however, students must meet

  3. Local coordination of Zn in hydroxy-interlayered minerals and implications for Zn retention in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in soils Olivier Jacquat, Andreas Voegelin *, Ruben Kretzschmar Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant-interlayered minerals (HIM) for Zn retention in contaminated soils. Published and newly collected extended X. In a second part, we determined the spe- ciation of Zn in eight contaminated soils (251­1039 mg/kg Zn

  4. RETENTION OF Cd, Cu, Pb AND Zn BY WOOD ASH, LIME AND FUME DUST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    RETENTION OF Cd, Cu, Pb AND Zn BY WOOD ASH, LIME AND FUME DUST TAIT CHIRENJE1 , LENA Q. MA2 and ecosystem health. This study investigated the effectiveness of wood ash in immobilizing the heavy metals Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn from aqueous solutions. The effects of initial metal concentrations, solution pH, ash

  5. Threshold effects of variable retention harvesting on understory plant communities in the boreal mixedwood forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Threshold effects of variable retention harvesting on understory plant communities in the boreal mixedwood forest Ashley Craig, S. Ellen Macdonald * Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta are characterized by an on-going cycle of natural disturbances and successional development at varying scales

  6. Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedarhemlock forests,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedar­hemlock forests-growth cedar­hemlock forests of the interior wet-belt of British Columbia are rich in abundance and diversity a zone of high precipitation, the so-called interior wet- belt, which favours the development of lush wet

  7. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    LBNL collected water and waste water tariffs in Californiastate. Current water and waste water tariffs for these areaswas based on water and waste water tariffs in California

  8. Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2012-02-24

    The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy's River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments began with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments. The most significant results from the current experiments are that progressively lower gas retention occurs in tests with progressively deeper sediment layers and that the method of gas generation also affects the maximum retention. Based on the results of this study, it is plausible that relatively low gas retention could occur in sufficiently deep tank waste in DSTs. The current studies and previous work, however, have not explored how gas retention and release will behave when two or more layers with different properties are present.

  9. Proposed Plan Amendment Language for the Improved Retention and Utilization program -Amendment 49 to the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands Fishery Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposed Plan Amendment Language for the Improved Retention and Utilization program - Amendment 49 to the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands Fishery Management Plan: Insert a new section 14.9 to read as follows: 14.9 Improved Retention/Improved Utilization (IR/IU) Program. 14.9.1 Minimum retention requirements All vessels

  10. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  11. Water Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  12. Morphology of rain water channelization in systematically varied model sandy soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; C. M. Cejas; R. Barrois; R. Dreyfus; D. J. Durian

    2014-03-13

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different raining conditions using a quasi-2d experimental set-up, and systematically determine the impact of soil grain diameter and surface wetting property on water channelization phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely-packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates into a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed raining condition, we combine the effects of grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to rain water channelization phenomenon, including pre-wetting sandy soils at different level before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  13. Modelling water flow and transport of contaminants from mine wastes stored in open pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    conditions. The effects of material hydraulic properties (i.e. the water retention curve and hydraulic conductivity function), fracture network characteristics, variable recharge rates and saturated hydraulic and petroleum energy resources. In addition, the search for safe storage of hazardous wastes, where the primary

  14. LUNAR SURFACE WATER IN AGGLUTINATES: ORIGIN AND ABUNDANCES. Y. Liu1 , G. R. Rossman2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossman. George R.

    -5000 ppm [1-3]. Three sources have been suggested: solar- wind origin; volatile retention from meteoritic. They also showed that D/H values of released H2 gas increased with step heating temperatures from near solar-wind impact; and degassing of indigenous water [1-4]. The relative contributions from each of these sources

  15. Margin for In-Vessel Retention in the APR1400 - VESTA and SCDAP/RELAP5-3D Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy Rempe; D. Knudson

    2004-12-01

    If cooling is inadequate during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the lower head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with such plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe pressurized water reactor (PWR) (AP600), which relied upon external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR), resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing light water reactors (LWRs). IVR of core melt is therefore a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed ERVC without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a three-year, United States (U.S.) -Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was initiated in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) explored options, such as enhanced ERVC performance and an enhanced in-vessel core catcher (IVCC), that have the potential to ensure that IVR is feasible for higher power reactors.

  16. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

    1999-02-23

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to percolati on in single-shell tank (SST) waste forms. The much higher void being currently observed in SY-101 represents essentially a new crust configuration, and the mechanisms for sudden gas release need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the situation of gas bubbles in crust based on the previous work on gas bubble retention, migration, and release in simulants and actual waste. We have also conducted some visual observations of bubble migration through simulated crusts to help understand the interaction of the various mechanisms.

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2013-03-21

    In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

  18. Retention sleeve for a thermal medium carrying tube in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Norman Douglas (Ballston Lake, NY); Czachor, Robert Paul (Cincinnati, OH)

    2003-01-01

    Multiple tubes are connected to steam supply and spent cooling steam return manifolds for supplying cooling steam to buckets and returning spent cooling steam from the buckets to the manifolds, respectively. The tubes are prevented from axial movement in one direction by flanges engaging end faces of the spacer between the first and second-stage wheels. Retention sleeves are disposed about cantilevered ends of the tubes. One end of the retention sleeve engages an enlarged flange on the tube, while an opposite end is spaced axially from an end face of the adjoining wheel, forming a gap, enabling thermal expansion of the tubes and limiting axial displacement of the tube in the opposite direction.

  19. Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

    2005-08-02

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  20. The effect of solids retention time on tertiary ozonation and carbon adsorption of petrochemical wastewaters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buys, Ronald Earl

    1980-01-01

    time of 30 days. 34 10 Correlation between measured and calculated nonadsorbable COD values for bio-oxidized samples. 37 Correlation between measured and calculated nonadsorbable COD values for bio-oxidized plus ozonated samples. 12 Effect... of solids retention time on nonadsorbable COD, with and without ozonation. 39 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Biochemical and chemical oxygen demand data. COD removal and ozone consumption data 21 26 iVon-adsorbable COD data for bio-oxidized effluent. . 3O...

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2005-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 552 is comprised of the one Corrective Action Site which is 12-23-05, Ponds. One additional CAS, 12-06-04, Muckpile (G-Tunnel Muckpile), was removed from this CAU when it was determined that the muckpile is an active site. A modification to the FFACO to remove CAS 12-06-04 was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on December 16, 2004. The G-Tunnel ponds were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites'' (REECo, 1991). Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting the corrective action alternatives for the site. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of appropriate media. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

  2. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Newcomer, D.R.; Evans, J.C.; Webber, W.D.; Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.; Opitz, B.E.

    1993-06-01

    Monitoring activities were conducted to determine the distribution of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals present in ground water as a result of Hanford Site operations and, whenever possible, relate the distribution of these constituents to Site operations. A total of 720 wells were sampled during 1992 by all Hanford ground-water monitoring activities. The Ground-Water Surveillance Project prepared water-table maps of DOE`s Hanford Site for June 1992 from water-level elevations measured in 287 wells across the Hanford Site and outlying areas. These maps are used to infer ground-water flow directions and gradients for the interpretation of contaminant transport. Water levels beneath the 200 Areas decreased as much as 0.75 m (2.5 ft) between December 1991 and December 1992. Water levels in the Cold Creek Valley decreased approximately 0.5 m in that same period. The water table adjacent to the Columbia River along the Hanford Reach continues to respond significantly to fluctuations in river stage. These responses were observed in the 100 and 300 areas. The elevation of the ground-water mound beneath B Pond did not change significantly between December 1991 and December 1992. However, water levels from one well located at the center of the mound indicate a water-level rise of approximately 0.3 m (1 ft) during the last quarter of 1992. Water levels measured from unconfined aquifer wells north and east of the Columbia River in 1992 indicate that the primary source of recharge is from irrigation practices.

  3. Teacher Participation in Professional Activities and Job Satisfaction: Prevalence and Associative Relationship to Retention for High School Science Teachers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozeman, Todd Dane

    2012-02-14

    satisfaction. Using relative risk statistics, I determined the direction and significance of multiple associative relationships involving teachers’ participation in professional activities, satisfaction with working conditions, and retention state. Finally, I...

  4. Impact of organic matrix compounds on the retention of steroid hormone estrone by a ‘loose’ nanofiltration membrane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Nghiem, L. D.; Meier, Anja; Neale, Peta A.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of solute-solute interactions on retention and membrane adsorption of the micropollutant estrone was determined in the presence of surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), natural organic matter (NOM) and ...

  5. An Exploration of How Involvement in a Freshman Retention Program Relates to Intention to Complete an Undergraduate Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clounch, Teresa Lynn

    2010-07-15

    The study examined the relationship of the level and type of involvement of freshman students in the Hawk Link Retention Program, a first-year program at the University of Kansas, to intent to return and graduate. The study ...

  6. Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

  7. Microsoft Word - S05212_2008 Post-Closure InspRpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pond Lower Little Cr. 1 Lower Little Cr. 2 James Lowe Pond Nobles Pond Howard Smith Pond Figure 7. Tritium Decay Trend and Off-Site Surface Water Sample Concentrations...

  8. Basic Engineering Research for D and D of R Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Matthews; David A. Bruce,; Thomas A. Davis; Mark C. Thies; John W. Weidner; Ralph E. White

    2002-04-01

    Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D and D operations at DOE sites across the country. The standard process for destruction of MLLW is incineration, which has an uncertain future. The extraction and destruction of PCBs from MLLW was the subject of this research Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with carbon dioxide with 5% ethanol as cosolvent and Supercritical Waster Oxidation (SCWO) were the processes studied in depth. The solid matrix for experimental extraction studies was Toxi-dry, a commonly used absorbent made from plant material. PCB surrogates were 1.2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) and 2-chlorobiphenyl (2CBP). Extraction pressures of 2,000 and 4,000 psi and temperatures of 40 and 80 C were studied. Higher extraction efficiencies were observed with cosolvent and at high temperature, but pressure little effect. SCWO treatment of the treatment of the PCB surrogates resulted in their destruction below detection limits.

  9. Concentrations of 23 trace elements in ground water and surface water at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1988--91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liszewski, M.J.; Mann, L.J.

    1993-12-31

    Analytical data for 23 trace elements are reported for ground- and surface-water samples collected at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during 1988--91. Water samples were collected from 148 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer, 18 wells completed in discontinuous deep perched-water zones, and 1 well completed in an alluvial aquifer. Surface-water samples also were collected from three streams, two springs, two ponds, and one lake. Data are categorized by concentrations of total recoverable of dissolved trace elements. Concentrations of total recoverable trace elements are reported for unfiltered water samples and include results for one or more of the following: aluminum, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and zinc. Concentrations of dissolved trace elements are reported for water samples filtered through a nominal 0.45-micron filter and may also include bromide, fluoride, lithium, molybdenum, strontium, thallium, and vanadium. Concentrations of dissolved hexavalent chromium also are reported for many samples. The water samples were analyzed at the US Geological Survey`s National Water Quality Laboratory in Arvada, Colorado. Methods used to collect the water samples and quality assurance instituted for the sampling program are described. Concentrations of chromium equaled or exceeded the maximum contaminant level at 12 ground-water quality monitoring wells. Other trace elements did not exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels.

  10. Detailed Analysis of a Late-Phase Core-Melt Progression for the Evaluation of In-vessel Corium Retention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; R. J. Park; S. B. Kim; K. Y. Suh; F. B.Cheung

    2006-12-01

    Detailed analyses of a late-phase melt progression in the advanced power reactor (APR)1400 were completed to identify the melt and the thermal-hydraulic states of the in-vessel materials in the reactor vessel lower plenum at the time of reactor vessel failure to evaluate the candidate strategies for an in-vessel corium retention (IVR). Initiating events considered included high-pressure transients of a total loss of feed water (LOFW) and a station blackout (SBO) and low-pressure transients of a 0.0009-m2 small, 0.0093-m2 medium, and 0.0465-m2 large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) without safety injection. Best-estimate simulations for these low-probability events with conservative accident progression assumptions that lead to reactor vessel failure were performed by using the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 computer code. The SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 results have shown that the pressurizer surge line failed before the reactor vessel failure, which results in a rapid decrease of the in-vessel pressure and a delay of the reactor vessel failure time of ~40 min in the high-pressure sequences of the total LOFW and the SBO transients. In all the sequences, ~80 to 90% of the core material was melted and relocated to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel at the time of reactor vessel failure. The maximum value of the volumetric heat source in the corium pool was estimated as 1.9 to 3.7 MW/m3. The corium temperature was ~2800 to 3400 K at the time of reactor vessel failure. The highest volumetric heat source sequence is predicted for the 0.0465-m2 large-break LOCA without safety injection in the APR1400, because this sequence leads to an early reactor vessel failure.

  11. Fish Pond - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    life cycle of a building, the rising demands and convenience requirements of occupants, more frequent changes of use with reconstructions, renovations and refurbishments, and rather continuous integration of new information and communication...

  12. Sediment Retention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistanceand Governmentm D mSecurityWeirs

  13. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies are used for agriculture, natural resources, salt water intrusion protection, drinking water, industry

  14. SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2012-05-08

    This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude necessary to have a dramatic impact on blending, washing, or waste loading strategies for DWPF) for the glasses studied here. In general, the concentrations of those species that significantly improve sulfate solubility in a borosilicate glass must be added in relatively large concentrations (e.g., 13 to 38 wt % or more of the frit) in order to have a substantial impact. For DWPF, these concentrations would constitute too large of a portion of the frit to be practical. Therefore, it is unlikely that specific additives may be introduced into the DWPF glass via the frit to significantly improve sulfate solubility. The results presented here continue to show that sulfate solubility or retention is a function of individual glass compositions, rather than a property of a broad glass composition region. It would therefore be inappropriate to set a single sulfate concentration limit for a range of DWPF glass compositions. Sulfate concentration limits should continue to be identified and implemented for each sludge batch. The current PCCS limit is 0.4 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass, although frit development efforts have led to an increased limit of 0.6 wt % for recent sludge batches. Slightly higher limits (perhaps 0.7-0.8 wt %) may be possible for future sludge batches. An opportunity for allowing a higher sulfate concentration limit at DWPF may lay lie in improving the laboratory experiments used to set this limit. That is, there are several differences between the crucible-scale testing currently used to define a limit for DWPF operation and the actual conditions within the DWPF melter. In particular, no allowance is currently made for sulfur partitioning (volatility versus retention) during melter processing as the sulfate limit is set for a specific sludge batch. A better understanding of the partitioning of sulfur in a bubbled melter operating with a cold cap as well as the impacts of sulfur on the off-gas system may allow a higher sulfate concentration limit to be established for the melter feed. This approach would have to be taken carefully to ensure that a

  15. Woody Shrubs for Stormwater Retention Practices 1 A portion of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    of issues including: · Sedimentation of water sources, which reduces light penetration of the water column and oceans · Pesticide poisoning of aquatic habitats when excess pesticides are washed into water systems

  16. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coenenberg, J.G.

    1997-08-15

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. 38 39 Information provided in this Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 40 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility permit application documentation is 41 current as of June 1, 1997.

  17. Method for training honeybees to respond to olfactory stimuli and enhancement of memory retention therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCade, Kirsten J.; Wingo, Robert M.; Haarmann, Timothy K.; Sutherland, Andrew; Gubler, Walter D.

    2015-12-15

    A specialized conditioning protocol for honeybees that is designed for use within a complex agricultural ecosystem. This method ensures that the conditioned bees will be less likely to exhibit a conditioned response to uninfected plants, a false positive response that would render such a biological sensor unreliable for agricultural decision support. Also described is a superboosting training regime that allows training without the aid of expensive equipment and protocols for training in out in the field. Also described is a memory enhancing cocktail that aids in long term memory retention of a vapor signature. This allows the bees to be used in the field for longer durations and with fewer bees trained overall.

  18. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  19. 7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-49 7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant can have is to be determined. Analysis The highest thermal efficiency a heat engine operating between

  20. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: May 1, 2010-October 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (#LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  1. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2011-October 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  2. Radiological Monitoring Results For Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2010-October 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond (No.LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  3. Radiological Monitoring Results for Groundwater Samples Associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond: November 1, 2012-October 31, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed on samples from specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond WRU-I-0160-01, Modification 1 (formerly LA-000160-01). The radiological monitoring was performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  4. Portable water filtration system for oil well fractionation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seibert, D. L.

    1985-08-13

    The invention comprises a portable, multi-stage filtration system utilized in filtering water for an oil and gas stimulation process commonly known as fracking. Three stages are used, the first being a straining operation reducing the size of particulate matter in the water to about three-eighths of an inch. The second stage is a centrifugal separator, reducing the particle size to about 50 microns. The final stage utilizes a cartridge-type filter giving a final particle size in the water of about 5 microns. In this manner, water which is injected into the well head during the fracking process and which is obtained from readily available sources such as ponds, streams and the like is relatively free of particulate matter which can foul the fracking process. The invention, by virtue of being mounted on a trailer, is portable and thus can be easily moved from site to site. Water flow rates obtained using the invention are between 250 and 300 gallons per minute, sufficient for processing a small to medium sized well.

  5. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and fresh water aquatic weeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    The ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvahiae has been in culture continuously for over two years. Yield for the past year has averaged 12 g ash-free dry wt/m/sup 2/ .day (17.5 t/a.y) in suspended 2600-1 aluminum tank cultures with four exchanges of enriched seawater per day and continuous aeration. Yields from nonintensive pond-bottom culture, similar to commercial Gracilaria culture methods in Taiwan, averaged 3 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day in preliminary experiments. Rope and spray cultures were not successful. Yields of water hyacinths from March 1978 to March 1979 averaged 25 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day (37 t/a.y). Season, nutrient availability (form and quantity) and stand density were found to affect the relative proportions of structural and nonstructural tissue in water hyacinths and thereby significantly affect digestibility of and methane production by the plants. Pennywort (Hydrocotyle) grew poorly in winter and its annual yield averaged only one-third that of water hyacinth. Water lettuce (Pistia) appears more comparable to hyacinths in preliminary studies and its yields will be monitored throughout a complete year. Stable, continuous anaerobic digestion of both water hyacinths and Gracilaria has been maintained with an average gas production from both species of 0.4 1/g volatile solids at 60% methane.

  6. Computerized Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    supply diversions, several hydroelectric plants and numerous environ- mental instream flow requirements. Each of these active permits is included in the datasets. Besides the commission using the WAM/WRAP modeling system in water rights permiting... actions be consistent with relevant regional plans. River authorities, water districts and other water management organizations are beginning to use the WRAP model in operational planning studies to optimize operations of their facilities...

  7. Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-26

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

  8. RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2013-06-17

    Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

  9. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  10. Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

  11. Preliminary geohydrologic site characterization and proposed water quality well locations for WAG 4, WAG 5, WAG 3, and SWSA 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baughn, D.C. [MCI/Consulting Engineers, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess general site conditions and to recommend water quality well locations at Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) 4, 5 and 3 and Solid Waste Storage Area 1 (SWSA 1) within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) complex. The subject sites are identified on the general site location map. For reference, the relationship of the subject sites to other WAGs are shown. WAGs are regions prescribed by Martin Marietta throughout the ORNL complex that require environmental assessment which will include design and installation of ground water monitoring systems. WAGs contain solid waste management units such as SWSAs, as well as pipelines, spill sites, buildings, ponds and experimental test sites. These solid waste management units are considered to be potential sources of contamination requiring further evaluation. This report recommends locations for water quality wells which will be installed at WAG boundaries in order to gather water quality data.

  12. Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

    2014-02-10

    We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

  13. An Archaeological Survey of the Temple Inland Cypress Pond Prospect Well Number 1 in Liberty County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-15

    the Principal Investigator. This project falls under Section 404(b)(1) of the Clean Water Act of 1948 as amended (latest revision February 4, 1987). The Federal Agency involved in this project is the United States Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Galveston...

  14. Model for a dune field with exposed water table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Cesar M. de M. Luna; Eric J. R. Parteli; Hans J. Herrmann

    2011-09-01

    Aeolian transport in coastal areas can be significantly affected by the presence of an exposed water table. In some dune fields, such as in Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses, northeastern Brazil, the water table oscillates in response to seasonal changes of rainfall and rates of evapotranspiration, rising above the ground during the wet season and sinking below in the dry period. A quantitative understanding of dune mobility in an environment with varying groundwater level is essential for coastal management as well as for the study of long-term evolution of many dune fields. Here we apply a model for aeolian dunes to study the genesis of coastal dune fields in presence of an oscillating water table. We find that the morphology of the field depends on the time cycle, $T_{\\mathrm{w}}$, of the water table and the maximum height, $H_{\\mathrm{w}}$, of its oscillation. Our calculations show that long chains of barchanoids alternating with interdune ponds such as found at Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses arise when $T_{\\mathrm{w}}$ is of the order of the dune turnover time, whereas $H_{\\mathrm{w}}$ dictates the growth rate of dune height with distance downwind. We reproduce quantitatively the morphology and size of dunes at Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses, as well as the total relative area between dunes.

  15. Model for a dune field with exposed water table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luna, Marco Cesar M de M; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-01-01

    Aeolian transport in coastal areas can be significantly affected by the presence of an exposed water table. In some dune fields, such as in Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses, northeastern Brazil, the water table oscillates in response to seasonal changes of rainfall and rates of evapotranspiration, rising above the ground during the wet season and sinking below in the dry period. A quantitative understanding of dune mobility in an environment with varying groundwater level is essential for coastal management as well as for the study of long-term evolution of many dune fields. Here we apply a model for aeolian dunes to study the genesis of coastal dune fields in presence of an oscillating water table. We find that the morphology of the field depends on the time cycle, $T_{\\mathrm{w}}$, of the water table and the maximum height, $H_{\\mathrm{w}}$, of its oscillation. Our calculations show that long chains of barchanoids alternating with interdune ponds such as found at Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses arise when $T_{\\mathrm{w}...

  16. Insights from Investigations of In-Vessel Retention for High Powered Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe

    2005-10-01

    In a three-year U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI), state-of-the-art analytical tools and key U.S. and Korean experimental facilities were used to explore two options, enhanced ERVC performance and the use of internal core catchers, that have the potential to increase the margin for in-vessel retention (IVR) in high power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). This increased margin has the potential to improve plant economics (owing to reduced regulatory requirements) and increase public acceptance (owing to reduced plant risk). Although this program focused upon the Korean Advanced Power Reactor -- 1400 MWe (APR 1400) design, recommentations were developed so that they can easily be applied to a wide range of existing and advanced reactor designs. This paper summarizes new data gained for evaluating the margin associated with various options investigated in this program. Insights from analyses completed with this data are also highlighted.

  17. Water Privatisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zölls, Elisa

    2011-08-17

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  18. Grabbing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Pedro Miguel

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the ...

  19. Exhibit 1C Patent Rights Retention by the Seller ITER UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exhibit 1C ­ Patent Rights ­ Retention by the Seller ­ ITER UT-B Contracts Div March 2007 Page 1 to the public on reasonable terms. (5) "Small business firm" means a small business concern as defined at section 2 of Pub. L. 85-536 (15 U.S.C. 632) and implementing regulations of the Administrator of the Small

  20. 210 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 3, NO. 1, MARCH 2004 Toward Long-Term Retention-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    210 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 3, NO. 1, MARCH 2004 Toward Long-Term Retention, nanotechnology, quantum dots. I. INTRODUCTION BOTH nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) dot [1] and oxide- silicon-controlled memory node positioning, relying on modern nanotechnologies [6], [7]. Therefore, a memory architecture

  1. Influence of pH on Phosphorus Retention in Oxidized Lake Sediments O. G. Olila* and K. R. Reddy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Influence of pH on Phosphorus Retention in Oxidized Lake Sediments O. G. Olila* and K. R. Reddy-soluble P concentration (WSP) and P sorption by suspended sediments in shallow eutrophic lakes. Labora- tory sediment suspensions from two subtropical lakes (Lake Apopka and Lake Okeechobee, Florida). The P sorption

  2. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  3. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  4. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

  5. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    in order to reduce the water and energy wasted in hot waterhot water) and 17% if hot water energy is included. The datafrom the delivered hot water energy of 66% to provide the

  6. Marketing water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info Marketing water savings.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9143 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Marketing water savings.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2... are partnering with federal and state agencies and universities to develop new programs or market existing ones. In North Central Texas, the city of McKin- ney and Texas AgriLife Research and Exten- sion Urban Solutions Center at Dallas recently began...

  7. Forest Irrigation Of Tritiated Water: A Proven Tritiated Water Management Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas, Karen; Blount, Gerald; Kmetz, Thomas; Prater, Phil

    2012-11-08

    Tritium releases from the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) at the SRS in South Carolina has impacted groundwater and surface water. Tritiated groundwater plumes discharge into Fourmile Branch which is a small tributary of the Savannah River, a regional water resource. Taking advantage of the groundwater flow paths and the local topography a water collection and irrigation system was constructed and has been used at the SRS for over a decade to reduce these tritiated water releases to Fourmile Branch. The tritiated water is transferred to the atmosphere by evaporation from the pond surface, and after irrigation, wetted surface evaporation and evapotranspiration through the forest vegetation. Over the last decade SRS has irrigated over 120,000,000 gallons of tritiated water, which diverted over 6000 curies away from Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River. The system has been effective in reducing the flux of tritiated groundwater by approximately 70%. Mass balance studies of tritium in the forest soils before operations and over the last decade indicate that approximately 90% of the tritiated water that is irrigated is transferred to the atmosphere. Dose studies indicate that exposure to site workers and offsite maximally exposed individual is very low, approximately 6 mrem/year and 0.004 mrem/year, respectively. To consistently meet the flux reduction goal of tritium into Fourmile Branch optimization activities are proposed. These efforts will increase irrigation capacity and area. An additional 17 acres are proposed for an expansion of the area to be irrigated and a planting of approximately 40 acres of pine forest plantations is underway to expand irrigation capacity. Co-mingled with the tritiated groundwater are low concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs), and 1,4-dioxane. Research studies and SRS field data indicate the forest irrigation system may have an added benefit of reducing the mass of these co-contaminants via degradation. This semi-passive system makes use of natural processes of hydrology and evapotranspiration to manage tritium-contaminated water by reducing its entrance into site streams and the Savannah River, as well as treating low levels of co-mingled VOCs. SRS expects to operate the system until the tritium decays to levels that represent a minimal impact to Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River, and meets the stakeholder expectations.

  8. Grabbing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

    2012-07-16

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

  9. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    faced with the imperative that water is vital to all life onChoy* and Leon Szeptycki Water in the West Keywords: climategreen infrastructure; water; water-energy; water governance;

  10. Enabling better water management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    CASE STUDY Enabling better water management Seasonal Streamflow Forecast Service influencing water decisions Water management decisions made with confidence Using the Bureau's streamflow forecasting, ACTEW Water confidently removed temporary water restrictions after the millennium drought. Millennium drought

  11. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meta(loid) Flux Predicitons from Lake Coeur d'Alene Sediments Using Contaminated Ponds as Mesocosms Contaminated Ponds as Mesocosms Project Number: 2003ID11B Start Date: 3/1/2004 End Date: 2/28/2005 Funding Substances, Geochemical Processes Descriptors: sediments, metal contaminants, mine tailings, contaminant flux

  12. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  13. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  14. Preliminary Study of Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.

    2010-10-12

    The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy’s River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize initial progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The work is ongoing; this report provides a summary of the initial findings. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments will begin with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments.

  15. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

  16. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

  17. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  18. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

  19. Aerosol retention during SGTR meltdown sequences: Experimental insights of the effect of size and shape of the breach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herranz, L. E.; Tardaguila, R. D.; Lopez, C. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, Avd. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    This paper summarizes the major insights gained from aerosol retention capability of a tube bundle that simulates the break stage of the secondary side of a failed steam generator under dry SGTR conditions. This scenario is highly relevant in nuclear safety since it affects the potential retention of radioactive particles in case of meltdown sequences with a SGTR. An 8-test experimental campaign has been carried out, extending the current database on the decontamination capability of the steam generator. The effects of the breach features (shape and size) and the particle nature (SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}) on the collection efficiency have been explored. The results confirmed the strong effect of the physical nature even when tube breaks in a fish-mouth mode. Loose aggregates (i.e. TiO{sub 2}) would be trapped to a limited extent (less than 25%); while single- or few-aggregates (i.e. SiO{sub 2}) would undergo a quite effective removal (i.e. over 75%). For fish-mouth breaches and SiO{sub 2} particles, the breach size has been found to moderately affect retention efficiency. Furthermore, the breach shape does not seem to have any effect on the net collection efficiency within the break stage, no matter the particle type. However, individual tube measurements indicate notably different deposition patterns, although an effect of the facility geometry cannot be disregarded as a key player in this observation. (authors)

  20. Summary of remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3), 300-FF-2 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulstrom, L.C.

    1994-06-30

    Remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3) in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site were conducted as part of the 300-FF-1 operable unit Phase 1 remedial investigation (RI) in accordance with the approved RI work plan. During the RI, the southwestern boundary of the 300-FF-1 operable unit was modified by all signatories to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, which shifted the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches to the 300-FF-3 operable unit. As a consequence, the RI results from these waste management units were not included in the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation Report for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. As a results of recent Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the 300-FF-2 operable unit now consists of the remaining 300 Area operable units within the 300 Area National Priorities List (NPL), which includes the former 300-FF-3 operable unit. Therefore, this document summarizes the RI results from the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches in the 300-FF-2 operable unit. Analysis and evaluation of these results well be included in the 300-FF-2 RI report.

  1. The Effects of Concept Mapping and Questioning on Students’ Organization and Retention of Science Knowledge While Using Interactive Read-Alouds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Jaime Leigh

    2012-10-19

    students in learning science concepts. Little or no research has combined these methods to examine its effect on learning. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare concept mapping and questioning on students' organization and retention...

  2. An Empirical Analysis of Factors That Influence the First Year to Second Year Retention of Students at One Large, Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Steven Lamar

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify how input and environmental factors impact first-to-second year retention of undergraduate students at a large Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). An additional purpose of the study was to determine...

  3. An identification of policies and practices that hinder and facilitate the admission and retention of Hispanics in institutions of higher education 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantu, Linda Valdez

    2006-04-12

    and that facilitate or hinder institutions of higher education in the recruitment, admission, retention, and graduation of students, particularly Hispanic students. The researcher utilized the Delphi method to conduct the study. This research method produces a...

  4. 5.16: LIBRARY RETENTION, TENURE AND PROMOTIONS CRITERIA Approved by Library Faculty, Department Co-Chairs, and University Librarian 9/21/06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5.16: LIBRARY RETENTION, TENURE AND PROMOTIONS CRITERIA Approved by Library Faculty, Department Co in Library Assignment and amplifications are noted below for Professional Achievement and Growth & Research Libraries (ACRL), the national organization associated with academic librarians. For tenure

  5. Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Global Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Team's Water Safety Plan Assistance 1.5 million deaths occur globally every year due to a lack of clean water, inadequate sanitation, and improper hygiene (1

  6. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    they join tributaries to the Mississippi River. · The deep ground water divide is the underground boundary Deep ground water divide Racine Kenosha Walworth Waukesha Washington Ozaukee Milwaukee LAKE MICHIGANGround water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also

  7. Hydrogen Ingress in Steels During High-Temperature Oxidation in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that hydrogen derived from water vapour can penetrate oxidizing alloys with detrimental effect. However, the complexities of tracking hydrogen in these materials have prevented the direct profiling of hydrogen ingress needed to understand these phenomena. Here we report hydrogen profiles in industrially-relevant alumina- and chromia- forming steels correlated with the local oxide-metal nano/microstructure by use of SIMS D2O tracer studies and experimental protocols to optimize D retention. The D profiles unexpectedly varied markedly among the alloys examined, which indicates mechanistic complexity but also the potential to mitigate detrimental water vapour effects by manipulation of alloy chemistry.

  8. Exhibit 1C Patent Rights-Retention by the Seller (Short Form) UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Exhibit 1C ­ Patent Rights-Retention by the Seller (Short Form) UT-B Contracts Div Mar 2001 Page 1 of 3 ex1C-mar01format2005 Exhibit 1C Ref: DEAR 952.227-11 PATENT RIGHTS - RETENTION BY THE SELLER be patentable or otherwise protectable under title 35 of the United States Code, or any novel variety of plant

  9. Unsupervised parameter optimization for automated retention time alignment of severely shifted gas chromatographic data using the piecework alignment algorithm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2007-02-02

    First, simulated chromatographic separations with declining retention time precision were used to study the performance of the piecewise retention time alignment algorithm and to demonstrate an unsupervised parameter optimization method. The average correlation coefficient between the first chromatogram and every other chromatogram in the data set was used to optimize the alignment parameters. This correlation method does not require a training set, so it is unsupervised and automated. This frees the user from needing to provide class information and makes the alignment algorithm more generally applicable to classifying completely unknown data sets. For a data set of simulated chromatograms where the average chromatographic peak was shifted past two neighboring peaks between runs, the average correlation coefficient of the raw data was 0.46 ± 0.25. After automated, optimized piecewise alignment, the average correlation coefficient was 0.93 ± 0.02. Additionally, a relative shift metric and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to independently quantify and categorize the alignment performance, respectively. The relative shift metric was defined as four times the standard deviation of a given peak’s retention time in all of the chromatograms, divided by the peak-width-at-base. The raw simulated data sets that were studied contained peaks with average relative shifts ranging between 0.3 and 3.0. Second, a “real” data set of gasoline separations was gathered using three different GC methods to induce severe retention time shifting. In these gasoline separations, retention time precision improved ~8 fold following alignment. Finally, piecewise alignment and the unsupervised correlation optimization method were applied to severely shifted GC separations of reformate distillation fractions. The effect of piecewise alignment on peak heights and peak areas is also reported. Piecewise alignment either did not change the peak height, or caused it to slightly decrease. The average relative difference in peak height after piecewise alignment was –0.20%. Piecewise alignment caused the peak areas to either stay the same, slightly increase, or slightly decrease. The average absolute relative difference in area after piecewise alignment was 0.15%.

  10. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    8 Assess California’s Small Gas Storage Water HeaterAssess California’s Small Gas Storage Water Heater Marketassess California’s small gas storage water heater market.

  11. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos/01/2012 Page 1Water Power

  12. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  13. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,Saving Water Saves Energy James E. McMahon, Camilla Dunhamavailable products. The energy savings associated with water

  14. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    paper describing produced water from production of crudeEmerging Issues Paper: Mine Water Pollution. Dep. Environ.40. Vine G. 2010. Cooling water issues and opportunities at

  15. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01

    with Subantarctic Mode Water. J. Geophys. Res. , 116,Global Climate] Stratospheric water vapor [in “State of the18 2. Total column water

  16. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial...

  17. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    connections between water and energy, advances in knowledgeimportant nexus between water and energy. The demand fortwo reports on the water and energy nexus highlighting the

  18. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,shorter showers). Water- and energy- conserving activitiesstress imposed on limited water (and energy) supplies from

  19. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  20. The retention time of inorganic mercury in the brain — A systematic review of the evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rooney, James P.K.

    2014-02-01

    Reports from human case studies indicate a half-life for inorganic mercury in the brain in the order of years—contradicting older radioisotope studies that estimated half-lives in the order of weeks to months in duration. This study systematically reviews available evidence on the retention time of inorganic mercury in humans and primates to better understand this conflicting evidence. A broad search strategy was used to capture 16,539 abstracts on the Pubmed database. Abstracts were screened to include only study types containing relevant information. 131 studies of interest were identified. Only 1 primate study made a numeric estimate for the half-life of inorganic mercury (227–540 days). Eighteen human mercury poisoning cases were followed up long term including autopsy. Brain inorganic mercury concentrations at death were consistent with a half-life of several years or longer. 5 radionucleotide studies were found, one of which estimated head half-life (21 days). This estimate has sometimes been misinterpreted to be equivalent to brain half-life—which ignores several confounding factors including limited radioactive half-life and radioactive decay from surrounding tissues including circulating blood. No autopsy cohort study estimated a half-life for inorganic mercury, although some noted bioaccumulation of brain mercury with age. Modelling studies provided some extreme estimates (69 days vs 22 years). Estimates from modelling studies appear sensitive to model assumptions, however predications based on a long half-life (27.4 years) are consistent with autopsy findings. In summary, shorter estimates of half-life are not supported by evidence from animal studies, human case studies, or modelling studies based on appropriate assumptions. Evidence from such studies point to a half-life of inorganic mercury in human brains of several years to several decades. This finding carries important implications for pharmcokinetic modelling of mercury and potentially for the regulatory toxicology of mercury.

  1. Reactions during melting of low-activity waste glasses and their effects on the retention of rhenium as a surrogate for technetium-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Tongan; Kim, Dong-Sang; Tucker, Abigail E.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-10-01

    Volatile loss of radioactive 99Tc to offgas is a concern with processing the low-activity waste (LAW) at Hanford site. We investigated the partitioning and incorporation of Re (a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc) into the glass melt during crucible melting of two simulated LAW feeds that resulted in a large difference in 99mTc/Re retention in glass from the small-scale melter tests. Each feed was prepared from a simulated liquid LAW and chemical and mineral additives (boric acid, silica sand, etc.). The as-mixed slurry feeds were dried at 105°C and heated to 600–1100°C at 5 K/min. The dried feeds and heat treated samples were leached with deionized water for 10 min at room temperature followed by 24-h leaching at 80°C. Chemical compositions of the resulting solutions and insoluble solids were analyzed. Volume expansion measurement and X-ray diffraction were performed on dried feeds and heat treated samples to characterize the progress of feed-to-glass conversion reactions. It was found that the incorporation of Re into glass melt virtually completed during the major feed-to-glass conversion reactions were going on at ? 700°C. The present results suggest that the different composition of the salt phase is responsible for the large difference in Re incorporation into glass melt during early stages of glass melting at ? 700°C. Additional studies with modified and simplified feeds are underway to understand the details on how the different salt composition affects the Re incorporation.

  2. Drinking Water Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26

    This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water...

  3. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28

    at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/water/ az9420.pdf. ?Drinking Water Treatment: Distillation.? Nebraska Cooperative Extension. Available at http://ianrpubs. unl.edu/water/g1493.htm. ?Electrodyalisis.? GE Infrastructure Water & Process Technologies. General...

  4. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    the water quality and waste water elements. At the sameAll water supply, waste water, and flood control agenciesprovide services like waste water treatment and drinking

  5. Water watch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

  6. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal . 20 Energy Used for Water Services . 20 Transporting Water 21 Pumping Groundwater. 22 Treating Wastewater 23 Desalination ..

  7. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    2004-02-19

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  8. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  9. Two-dimensional Insect Flight on an Air-Water Interface is a Chaotic Oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukundarajan, Haripriya; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional flapping wing insect flight on an air-water interface provides a successful foraging strategy to explore an ecological niche on the surface of a pond. However, the complex interplay of surface tension, aerodynamic forces, biomechanics and neural control that enables two-dimensional flight is unknown. Here we report the discovery of two-dimensional flight in the waterlily beetle Galerucella nymphaeae, which is the fastest reported propulsion mode for an insect on a fluid interface. Using kinematics derived from high-speed videography coupled with analytical models, we demonstrate that two-dimensional flight is a chaotic interfacial oscillator, thus significantly constraining the possible range of flight parameters. Discovery of this complex dynamics in two-dimensional flight on time scales similar to neural responses indicates the challenge of evolving active flight control on a fluid interface.

  10. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY Leadership Team Subcommittee: Mark Clark Karl Havens BJ Jarvis Kelly Morgan Ramesh Reddy #12;Water Quality ­ Situation (resources) Florida has extensive and diverse water resources 54,836 miles of rivers and streams 1.8 million acres of lakes, reservoirs

  11. Erika Perloff: Director of Educational Programs, Life Lab Science Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    so there would be a place to hide. And ponds, lots of water.them wanted big lakes and ponds. One kid had designed this

  12. Barney Bricmont, Founder, California Certified Organic Farmers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    now, with the percolation ponds. The water table now is atand then also into percolation ponds and put it back in the

  13. Water Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Services Homes Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water...

  14. Impact of speciation on fluoride, arsenic and magnesium retention by nanofiltration/reverse osmosis in remote Australian communities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, L. A.; Richards, B. S.; Rossiter, H.M.A.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    In order to provide safe drinking water in isolated communities where water supply and electrical infrastructure is limited, a system combining solar energy and advanced water treatment technology (a two-staged membrane ...

  15. Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cecilia Nelson; Ashok Ghosh

    2011-06-30

    Southeastern New Mexico (SENM) is rich in mineral resources, including oil and gas. Produced water is a byproduct from oil and gas recovery operations. SENM generates approximately 400 million barrels per year of produced water with total dissolved solids (TDS) as high as ~ 200,000 ppm. Typically, produced water is disposed of by transporting it to injection wells or disposal ponds, costing around $1.2 billion per year with an estimated use of 0.3 million barrels of transportation fuel. New Mexico ranks first among U.S. states in potash production. Nationally, more than 85% of all potash produced comes from the Carlsbad potash district in SENM. Potash manufacturing processes use large quantities of water, including fresh water, for solution mining. If the produced water from oilfield operations can be treated and used economically in the potash industry, it will provide a beneficial use for the produced water as well as preserve valuable water resources in an area where fresh water is scarce. The goal of this current research was to develop a prototype desalination system that economically treats produced water from oil and/or natural gas operations for the beneficial use of industries located in southeastern New Mexico. Up until now, most water cleaning technologies have been developed for treating water with much lower quantities of TDS. Seawater with TDS of around 30,000 ppm is the highest concentration that has been seriously studied by researchers. Reverse osmosis (RO) technology is widely used; however the cost remains high due to high-energy consumption. Higher water fluxes and recoveries are possible with a properly designed Forward Osmosis (FO) process as large driving forces can be induced with properly chosen membranes and draw solution. Membrane fouling and breakdown is a frequent and costly problem that drives the cost of desalination very high. The technology developed by New Mexico Tech (NMT) researchers not only protects the membrane, but has also proven to generate higher water flux, based on the series of experiments conducted. Laboratory tests at NMT demonstrated that an unprecedented water flux of 1300 l/m2/hr (where typical flux is on the order of 0-3 l/m{sup 2}/hr) can be achieved from a properly designed membrane module. The patent pending NMT system, which was designed and developed at NMT was successful in reducing the possibility for concentration polarization and thereby increasing the permeate water flux, while still maintaining a high salt rejection rate of 96% or greater. For feed solutions having a dissolved contaminant concentration greater than 10,000 ppm, preliminary economic analysis demonstrates that a well-designed FO process will outperform an RO process. Most produced water generated in SENM has TDS higher than 10,000 ppm. Therefore, it is logical to use FO to desalinate the water. Since the issues associated with concentration polarization has only recently been solved by our mechanically enhanced membrane module, the level of system maturity is not at the same level as that for RO. Our efforts going forward will be directed at taking the technology to a higher level of system maturity. With the superior cost effectiveness for FO, it is imperative that this technology reach a point that is competitive with RO in order to meet the expanding need for water for industries in SENM. NMT seeks to demonstrate the greater cost effectiveness by proving the process through a scaled up model. To ensure success, NMT feels it is important to demonstrate this technology in a larger system, (~ 100,000 GPD), before venturing to the commercial scale. This will build confidence in the process with the commercial sector. In addition, it will be possible to develop some of the operational processes around renewable energy sources for the scaled up model. This will further lower the operating costs and enhance the environmentally clean aspect of the process.

  16. Trends in nutrient and sediment retention in Great Plains reservoirs (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodds, Walter

    no evidence of temporal changes in the yearly mean upstream and downstream discharges. The ratio upstream/downstream materials inputs from upstream waters through sedi- mentation, biological assimilation and other biogeo suspended solids (TSS) from six reservoirs and estimated overall remov- al efficiencies from upstream

  17. JOURNAL OF GEOTECHNICAL AND GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / JULY 1999 / 583 RETENTION OF FREE LIQUIDS IN LANDFILLS UNDERGOING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    - ther measured or estimated hydraulic properties. In this ap- proach, the hydraulic properties-situ moisture distribution, and the unit weight profiles of the waste in the case history landfill capacity of waste is the quantity of water per unit volume that can be held within the refuse against

  18. The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu Jun

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive methods of measuring water content in soils have been extensively developed in the last decades, especially in soil science. Among these methods, the measurements based on the electrical resistivity are simple and reliable thanks to the clear relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical resistivity probe was developed to monitor the change in local water content in the triaxial apparatus. The probe is composed of two-pair of electrodes, and an electrical current is induced through the soil at the vicinity of the contact between the probe and the specimen. Some experimental data on the changes in resistivity with the degree of saturation were obtained in specimens of a natural unsaturated loess from Northern France. Two theoretical models of resistivity were also used to analyze the obtained data. Results are finally discussed with respect to the loess's water retention properties.

  19. Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benemann, J.R.

    1998-03-31

    This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that these are highly preliminary, incomplete, and optimistic estimates. Biophotolysis processes, indirect or direct, clearly require considerable basic and applied R and D before a more detailed evaluation of their potential and plausible economics can be carried out. For example, it is not yet clear which type of algae, green algae, or cyanobacteria, would be preferred in biophotolysis. If lower-cost photobioreactors can be developed, then small-scale (<1 ha) single-stage biophotolysis processes may become economically feasible. A major basic and applied R and D effort will be required to develop such biophotolysis processes.

  20. Methodology for assessing alternative water-acquisition-and-use strategies for energy facilities in the American West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, J.J.; Adams, E.E.; Harleman, D.R.F.; Marks, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    A method for assessing alternative strategies for acquiring and using water at western energy plants was developed. The method was tested in a case study of cooling-water use for a hypothetical steam-electric power plant on the Crazy Woman Creek, an unregulated stream in Wyoming. The results from the case study suggest a careful analysis of reservoir design and water-right purchase strategies can reduce the cost of acquiring and using water at an energy facility. The method uses simulation models to assess the capital and operating costs and expected monthly water-consumption rates for different cooling-system designs. The method also uses reservoir operating algorithms to select, for a fixed cooling-system design, the optimal tradeoff between building a make-up water reservoir and purchasing water rights. These tradeoffs can be used to derive the firm's true demand curve for different sources of water. The analysis also reveals the implicit cost of selecting strategies that minimize conflicts with other water users. Results indicate that: (1) cooling ponds are as good as or preferred to wet towers because their costs already include provisions for storing water for use during the normally dry summer months and during occasional drought years; (2) the energy firm's demand for overall water consumption in the cooling system was found to be inversely proportional to both the cost of installing make-up water reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility; and (3) the firm's willingness to pay for existing rights is proportional to both the cost of installing reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility.