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Sample records for water resources control

  1. California Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources Control Board Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control Board Place: Sacramento, California Coordinates:...

  2. California State Water Resources Control Board Storm Water Homepage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Water Resources Control Board Storm Water Homepage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State Water Resources Control Board...

  3. California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    401 Water Quality Certification Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water...

  4. California State Water Resources Control Board | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. California State Water Resources Control Board is an organization based in Sacramento, California. References "SWRCB...

  5. State Water Resources Control Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: State Water Resource Control Board1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  6. State Water Resources Control Board Order No. 2009-009-DWQ |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources Control Board Order No. 2009-009-DWQ Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: State Water Resources Control...

  7. Water resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Corps of Engineers built and operates six dams and lakes on the upper Missouri River in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska for the purposes of flood control, hydropower, irrigation, and navigation. The Corps did not evaluate streambank erosion problems when the dams were planned because it was not required to study, before construction, such problems that the project might create. Corps studies show that bank erosion between Garrison Dam and Lake Oahe is less now than before the dam was built but since construction of the dam there now is a continuous net loss of lands. Among other streambank erosion problems, this report notes that the river banks will continue to erode, but at lesser rate than in the past, between Garrison Dam and Lake Oahe. The Corps has authority to provide erosion protection structures but these have to be economically justified and environmentally acceptable.

  8. Oregon Water Resources Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Water Resources Department Name: Oregon Water Resources Department Address: 725 Summer Street NE, Suite A Place:...

  9. Water Resources Council FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES For...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Resources Council FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES For Implementing E.O. 11988 43 FR 6030 February 10, 1978 (Second Reprinting) i- ' 1': : 8410-01 WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL...

  10. Oregon Water Resources Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name: Oregon Water Resources Commission Abbreviation: OWRC Address: 725 Summer Street NE, Suite A Place: Salem, Oregon Zip:...

  11. Resource Recovery Opportunities at America's Water Resource Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities | Department of Energy Resource Recovery Opportunities at America's Water Resource Recovery Facilities Resource Recovery Opportunities at America's Water Resource Recovery Facilities Breakout Session 3A-Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste (Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025?) Resource Recovery Opportunities at America's Water Resource Recovery Facilities Todd Williams, Deputy Leader for Wastewater Infrastructure Practice, CH2M HILL PDF icon

  12. Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Substitute Water Supply Plans Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply...

  13. WSDE Water Resources website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: WSDE Water Resources websiteLegal Abstract The Washington...

  14. Resource Recovery Opportunities at America's Water Resource Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Resource Recovery Facilities Todd Williams, Deputy Leader for Wastewater Infrastructure Practice, CH2M HILL PDF icon williamsbiomass2014.pdf More Documents & ...

  15. Idaho Department of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Idaho Department of Water Resources Name: Idaho Department of Water Resources Address: 322 East Front Street, PO Box 83720 Place:...

  16. Colorado Division of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Division of Water Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colorado Division of Water Resources Name: Colorado Division of Water Resources Address: 1313 Sherman St., Suite 818...

  17. Water Power Information Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Power Information Resources Water Power Information Resources How Hydropower Works How Hydropower Works See a detailed view of the inside of a hydropower energy generation system. Read more Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database on OpenEI Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database on OpenEI The DOE Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy. Read more The following resources about water power technologies

  18. Water resource opportunity assessment: Fort Dix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Hostick, D.J.; Elliott, D.B.; Fitzpatrick, Q.K.; Dahowski, R.T.; Dison, D.R

    1996-12-01

    This report provides the results of the water resource opportunity assessments performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Fort Dix facility located in Fort Dix, New Jersey.

  19. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentations Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations PDF icon McCormick4-28-2015.pdf PDF icon LuthyNSF-EPA-DOELuthyworkshop4-28v2.pdf PDF icon ...

  20. Kangding Hualong Water Resources Electric Power Investment Co...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hualong Water Resources Electric Power Investment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kangding Hualong Water Resources & Electric Power Investment Co., Ltd. Place: Ganzi...

  1. Gansu Linhai Water Resource and Hydropower Investment Co Ltd...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resource and Hydropower Investment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gansu Linhai Water Resource and Hydropower Investment Co., Ltd. Place: Lanzhou, Gansu Province,...

  2. Oregon Water Resource Department Forms Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Water Resource Department Forms Webpage Abstract Provides access to water resource...

  3. Nevada Division of Water Resources Forms Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    library Web Site: Nevada Division of Water Resources Forms Webpage Abstract Provides access to State of Nevada Division of Water Resources forms. Author State of Nevada Division...

  4. Xiaojin County Xinghua Water Resource and Hydropower Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xinghua Water Resource and Hydropower Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xiaojin County Xinghua Water Resource and Hydropower Development Co., Ltd. Place: Aba...

  5. Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability Dr. ...

  6. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before...

  7. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power...

  8. Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Executive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report Executive Summary Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Executive Summary Executive summary workshop report for the for the Energy-Positive Water Resource ...

  9. NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Characterization Building on its success in wind resource characterization and assessment, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has extended its capabilities to the field of water power. NREL's team of scientists, engineers and computer experts has broad experience in physical oceanography, meteorology, modeling, data analysis, and Geographic Information Systems. Many years of experience in wind assessment have enabled NREL to develop the skills and methodologies to evaluate

  10. Water heater control module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerstrom, Donald J

    2013-11-26

    An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

  11. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations Presentations: Keynote 1: Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Facilities Ed McCormick, President, WEF Keynote 2: Energy-Positive Wastewater Treatment and Re-Use Dr. Dick Luthy, Director, ReNUWIt, Stanford University Panel Discussion: Achieving Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Facilities Tom Speth, Director, Water Supply/Resources Division,

  12. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  13. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  14. Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

  15. Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources PDF icon Primer FINAL.PDF More Documents & Publications Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources 2015 GTO Peer Review | Poster Session Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants

  16. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar Water Heating

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transcript | Department of Energy Solar Water Heating Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar Water Heating Transcript Video recording transcript of a Webinar on Nov. 16, 2010 about residential solar water heating applications PDF icon solar_water_heating_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water Heaters Sustainable

  17. ORS 536 - Water Resources Administration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    36 - Water Resources Administration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ORS 536 - Water Resources AdministrationLegal...

  18. Nevada Division of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Division of Water Resources Name: Nevada Division of Water Resources Address: 901 S. Stewart St., Suite 2002 Place: Carson city, Nevada Zip: 89701 Phone Number: 775-684-2800...

  19. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Section 401 Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    document outlines the Agency of Natural Resources coordination process with respect to Clean Water Act Section 401 water quality certification decisions. Author Vermont...

  20. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Water Heating Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar Water Heating Transcript Video recording transcript of a Webinar on Nov. 16, 2010 about ...

  1. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testimony28SEPA2928Legg29.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before The Subcommittee on Water and...

  2. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural...

  3. New Report Outlines Potential of Future Water Resource Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and the National Science Foundation (NSF) outlines a range of research and actions needed to transform today's water treatment plants into water resource recovery facilities. ...

  4. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report View the workshop presentations. Workshop Report: Water Resource Cover.jpg This report captures the proceedings of the Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery (EPWRR) Workshop hosted jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) on April 28-29, 2015. The workshop gathered stakeholders

  5. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee | Department of Energy House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Christopher M. Turner, Administrator SWPA Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee PDF icon 4-16-13_Christopher_Turner FT HNR More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural

  6. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Committee | Department of Energy House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator SEPA PDF icon 4-16-13_Kenneth_Legg FT HNR More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House

  7. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Administrator, SWPA Subject: DOE Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request PDF icon 3-15-11_Final_Testimony_(Worthington)_(SWPA).pdf More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources

  8. Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Report Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Workshop report for the Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop hosted by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Department of Energy on April 28-29, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. PDF icon epwrr_workshop_report.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Executive Summary Resource Recovery Opportunities at America's

  9. Water Resources Data Nevada Water Year 2002 Water-Data Report NV-02-1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Data Nevada Water Year 2002 By Steven N. Berris, E. James Crompton, Joseph D. Joyner, and Roslyn Ryan Water-Data Report NV-02-1 Prepared in cooperation with the State of Nevada and with other agencies UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GALE A. NORTON, Secretary U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Charles G. Groat, Director For information regarding water-resources investigations in Nevada, write to: District Chief, Water Resources Division U.S.

  10. Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy PDF icon Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources.PDF More Documents & Publications Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources 2015 GTO Peer Review | Poster Session Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants

  11. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Adminstrator, SWPA Subject: FY 2011 Budget Requests PDF icon 3-4-10_Final_Testimony_28SWPA29_28Worthingon29.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources

  12. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Presentations: Keynote 1: Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Facilities Ed McCormick, President, WEF Keynote 2: Energy-Positive Wastewater Treatment and Re-Use Dr. Dick Luthy, Director, ReNUWIt, Stanford University Panel Discussion: Achieving Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Facilities Tom Speth, Director, Water Supply/Resources Division, ORD-NRMRL, EPA (Moderator) Dr. Brent Giles, Senior Analyst, Lux Research Dr. Kartik Chandran, Director WWTP and Climate Change,

  13. New Report Outlines Potential of Future Water Resource Recovery Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Report Outlines Potential of Future Water Resource Recovery Facilities New Report Outlines Potential of Future Water Resource Recovery Facilities November 3, 2015 - 12:19pm Addthis New Report Outlines Potential of Future Water Resource Recovery Facilities A new report from a workshop held jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) outlines a range of research and actions

  14. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Kenneth Legg, Administrator, SEPA Subject: DOE Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request PDF icon 3-15-11_Final_Testimony_(Legg)_(SEPA).pdf More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources Committee

  15. Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Executive Summary |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Report Executive Summary Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Executive Summary Executive summary workshop report for the for the Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop hosted by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Department of Energy on April 28-29, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. PDF icon epwrr_workshop_executive_summary.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy-Positive Water Resource

  16. Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management Webpage Citation State of...

  17. California Department of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Twitter: @CADWR Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCalifornia-Department-of-Water-Resources Outage Hotline: (916) 845-8911 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data...

  18. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility...

  19. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    K. Drummond, Administrator, Bonneville Power Administration Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee 4-16-13WilliamDrummond FT HNR More...

  20. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power, Committee on Natural Resources, U.S. House of Representatives By: Mr. Stephen J. Wright, Administrator BPA Subject: DOE Fiscal...

  1. Current Practices of the Department of Water Resources in Supervision...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Current Practices of the Department of Water Resources in Supervision of...

  2. Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability May Wu Ph.D. ... 15, 2012 Biofuel Is a Key Component in Water-Energy Nexus 1 2 Potential Cellulosic ...

  3. Student Intern: Non-Traditional Water Resources | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Non-Traditional Water Resources Share Argonne intern Nicole Virella Maldonado from the University of Puerto Rico-San Juan, Río Piedras campus, worked with Argonne mentor Margaret MacDonell in studying the use of nontraditional waters for energy and agriculture, including impaired and reclaimed waters. This research will help communities preserve their limited fresh water resources for other uses. Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels

  4. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Timothy Meeks, Administrator, WAPA Subject: FY 2011 Budget Requests PDF icon 3-4-10_Final_Testimony_%28WAPA%29_%28Meeks%29.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power

  5. Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M

    2009-07-08

    Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

  6. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2012-07-22

    In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

  7. Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Denver Basin Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage Abstract This is the...

  8. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro ...

  9. 18 CFR Conservation of Power and Water Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conservation of Power and Water Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 18 CFR Conservation of Power and...

  10. Title 10 Chapter 37 Wetlands Protection and Water Resources Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    37 Wetlands Protection and Water Resources Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 10 Chapter 37...

  11. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Related Documents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Documents Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Related Documents PDF icon WTE-Workshop-Report-Executive-Summary-DRAFT.pdf PDF icon WERF.ENER1C12-Executive-Summa...

  12. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Christopher M. Turner, Administrator SWPA Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee PDF icon 4-16-13ChristopherTurner FT HNR More Documents & ...

  13. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Related Documents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Related Documents Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Related Documents PDF icon WTE-Workshop-Report-Executive-Summary-DRAFT.pdf PDF icon WERF.ENER1C12-Executive-Summary.pdf PDF icon FCTO-BETO-2015-Workshop-Summary-Outline.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Waste-to-Energy Workshop Summary Report "Wet" Waste-to-Energy in the Bioenergy Technologies Office

  14. Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy

  15. Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GTO

    2015-06-01

    Water consumption in geothermal energy development occurs at several stages along the life cycle of the plant, during construction of the wells, piping, and plant; during hydroshearing and testing of the reservoir (for EGS); and during operation of the plant. These stages are highlighted in the illustration above. For more information about actual water use during these stages, please see the back of this sheet..

  16. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heaters | Department of Energy Water Heaters Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water Heaters PDF icon 20110222_webinar_transcript.pdf More Documents & Publications Overcoming Persistent Barriers to Energy Efficiency in Multifamily Housing through Partnerships overcoming_persistent_barriers_energy_efficiency_multifamily_housing.doc Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics

  17. Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, J.P.

    1990-08-01

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

  18. STATE OF MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES MISSOURI CLEAN WATER COMMISSION

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    STATE OF MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES MISSOURI CLEAN WATER COMMISSION MISSOURI STATE OPERATING PERMIT In compliance with the Missouri Clean Water Law, (Chapter 644 R.S. Mo. as amended, hereinafter, the Law), and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Public Law 92-500, 92 nd Congress) as amended, Permit No.: MO-0004863 Owner: United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Address: P.O. Box 410202, Kansas City, MO 64141-0202 Continuing Authority: United States Department of Energy

  19. Resource Recovery OpportunitiesatAmericas Water Resource Recovery Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2013 by CH2M HILL, Inc. CH2MHILL® Resource Recovery Opportunities at America's Water Resource Recovery Facilities By Todd Williams, PE, BCEE Wastewater Global Service Team Deputy Leader Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Washington, DC July 30, 2014 CH2MHILL Today  Operations on all continents  Approximately 28,000 employees  100 percent owned by our employees  Broadly diversified across multiple business sectors  US$7 billion in revenue We are an industry leader in

  20. Controlling user access to electronic resources without password

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Fred Hewitt

    2015-06-16

    Described herein are devices and techniques for remotely controlling user access to a restricted computer resource. The process includes pre-determining an association of the restricted computer resource and computer-resource-proximal environmental information. Indicia of user-proximal environmental information are received from a user requesting access to the restricted computer resource. Received indicia of user-proximal environmental information are compared to associated computer-resource-proximal environmental information. User access to the restricted computer resource is selectively granted responsive to a favorable comparison in which the user-proximal environmental information is sufficiently similar to the computer-resource proximal environmental information. In at least some embodiments, the process further includes comparing user-supplied biometric measure and comparing it with a predetermined association of at least one biometric measure of an authorized user. Access to the restricted computer resource is granted in response to a favorable comparison.

  1. Water Resource Assessment of Geothermal Resources and Water Use in Geopressured Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Troppe, W. A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical report from Argonne National Laboratory presents an assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation and an analysis of fresh water use in low-temperature geopressured geothermal power generation systems.

  2. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  3. Oregon General Industrial Water Pollution Control Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Industrial Water Pollution Control Facilities Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon General Industrial Water Pollution...

  4. Integrated system dynamics toolbox for water resources planning.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Marissa Devan; Passell, Howard David; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Peplinski, William J.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Coursey, Don; Hanson, Jason; Grimsrud, Kristine; Thacher, Jennifer; Broadbent, Craig; Brookshire, David; Chemak, Janie; Cockerill, Kristan; Aragon, Carlos , Socorro, NM); Hallett, Heather , Socorro, NM); Vivoni, Enrique , Socorro, NM); Roach, Jesse

    2006-12-01

    Public mediated resource planning is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Unfortunately, supporting tools are lacking that interactively engage the public in the decision-making process and integrate over the myriad values that influence water policy. In the pages of this report we document the first steps toward developing a specialized decision framework to meet this need; specifically, a modular and generic resource-planning ''toolbox''. The technical challenge lies in the integration of the disparate systems of hydrology, ecology, climate, demographics, economics, policy and law, each of which influence the supply and demand for water. Specifically, these systems, their associated processes, and most importantly the constitutive relations that link them must be identified, abstracted, and quantified. For this reason, the toolbox forms a collection of process modules and constitutive relations that the analyst can ''swap'' in and out to model the physical and social systems unique to their problem. This toolbox with all of its modules is developed within the common computational platform of system dynamics linked to a Geographical Information System (GIS). Development of this resource-planning toolbox represents an important foundational element of the proposed interagency center for Computer Aided Dispute Resolution (CADRe). The Center's mission is to manage water conflict through the application of computer-aided collaborative decision-making methods. The Center will promote the use of decision-support technologies within collaborative stakeholder processes to help stakeholders find common ground and create mutually beneficial water management solutions. The Center will also serve to develop new methods and technologies to help federal, state and local water managers find innovative and balanced solutions to the nation's most vexing water problems. The toolbox is an important step toward achieving the technology development goals of this center.

  5. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Statement Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power, Committee on Natural Resources, U.S. House of Representatives By: Stephen J. Wright, Administrator Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Federal Power Marketing Administration Borrowing Authority PDF icon 3-10-09_Final_Testimony_(Wright).pdf More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10_v2 Bonneville Power Administration Program Specific Recovery Plan EIS-0183:

  6. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  7. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1995. Water data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1996-05-01

    Water resources data for the 1995 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 65 gaging stations; stage only for 40 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 23 gage stations) and 76 wells; and water levels for 217 observation wells. Also included are data for 113 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  8. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1994. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1995-03-01

    Water resources data for the 1994 water year for Louisiana consists of records for stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 45 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 51 surface-water stations (including 24 gage stations) and 84 wells; and water levels for 209 observations wells. Also included are data for 115 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  9. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: Water Resources Bills, S. 499 and S. 519 By: Derrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration

  10. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaskas North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaskas North Slope.

  11. An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

    2011-04-30

    This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

  12. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Presentations Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations PDF icon McCormick_4-28-2015.pdf PDF icon Luthy_NSF-EPA-DOE_Luthy_workshop_4-28_v2.pdf PDF icon Giles_Washington_DC_April_2015_WW.pdf PDF icon Kartik_Chandran_DOE_EPA_NSF_Workshop_Presentation_Slides.pdf PDF icon Kohl_2014-04-28_Kohl_NSF_slides_for_Tom_Speth.pdf PDF icon Fillmore_WERF_NSF_panel.4.29.2015.pdf PDF icon Shuman_NSF_Conference_2015.pdf PDF icon

  13. Using FRAMES to Manage Environmental and Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Millard, W. David; Gelston, Gariann M.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Pelton, Mitch A.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Lee, Cheegwan; Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Alex J.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Castleton, Karl J.

    2007-05-16

    The Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems FRAMES) is decision-support middleware that provides users the ability to design software solutions for complex problems. It is a software platform that provides seamless and transparent communication between modeling components by using a multi-thematic approach to provide a flexible and holistic understanding of how environmental factors potentially affect humans and the environment. It incorporates disparate components (e.g., models, databases, and other frameworks) that integrate across scientific disciplines, allowing for tailored solutions to specific activities. This paper discusses one example application of FRAMES, where several commercialoff-the-shelf (COTS) software products are seamlessly linked into a planning and decision-support tool that helps manage water-based emergency situations and sustainable response. Multiple COTS models, including three surface water models, and a number of databases are linked through FRAMES to assess the impact of three asymmetric and simultaneous events, two of which impact water resources. The asymmetric events include 1) an unconventional radioactive release into a large potable water body, 2) a conventional contaminant (oil) release into navigable waters, and 3) an instantaneous atmospheric radioactive release.

  14. Instrumentation and control for resource management at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Resource management at facilities dealing with nuclear reactors and waste processing includes the conservation of storage space, reduction of radiation exposure, and improvement of operational efficiency. The application of current control and display technology is a significant asset in the performance improvement of these facilities. Four examples of such applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented.

  15. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee | Department of Energy House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Elliot E. Mainzer, Administrator, Bonneville Power Administration Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee PDF icon 3-24-15_Elliot_Mainzer FT HNR.pdf More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before the

  16. WATER POLLUTION CONTROL GENERAL PERMIT GNEV93001

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    _________________________ GNEV 93001, revision v Page 1 of 21 WATER POLLUTION CONTROL GENERAL PERMIT GNEV93001 In accordance with the provisions of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended, and the Nevada Revised Statutes, the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Agency Nevada Site Office P. O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8518 is authorized to discharge from the sewage treatment works located at and within the Nevada Test Site to receiving waters named

  17. Proceedings of the Radionuclide Contamination in Water Resources Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, J H; Duisebayev, B; Janecky, D R; Knapp, R; Rosenburg, N D; Smith, D K; Tompson, A F B; Tyupkina, O; Veselov, V V

    2001-07-26

    A workshop entitled ''Radionuclide Contamination in Water Resources'' was held in Almaty, Kazakhstan from Tuesday 29 May through Friday 1 June. This workshop was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and three organizations from the Republic of Kazakhstan: the Institute of Nonproliferation, the Institute of Hydrogeology and Hydrophysics, and KazAtomProm. Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy, three national laboratories, and 13 different organizations from the Republic of Kazakhstan attended the workshop. A complete list of attendees, the workshop program, and information on the background and motivation for this workshop are provided in this report. The objective of the workshop was to identify critical problems, discover what is known about the problems related to radionuclide contamination of groundwater resources, form collaborative teams, and produce a small number proposals that both address further characterization and assess risk via contaminant fate and transport modeling. We plan to present these proposals to U.S. government agencies and international sponsors for funding.

  18. Water energy resources of the United States with emphasis on low head/low power resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas G.; Cherry, Shane J.; Reeves, Kelly S.; Lee, Randy D.; Carroll, Gregory R.; Sommers, Garold L.; Verdin, Kristine L.

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for each of the 20 hydrologic regions are presented in Appendix A, and similar presentations for each of the 50 states are made in Appendix B.

  19. Resource Form Factor and Installation of GFA Controllers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2009-11-15

    The focus of this task is to optimize the form and placement of a controller comprising the Grid Friendly appliance (GFA) controller, power supply and power relay (and/or a solid-state power electronic switch) that would command a domestic water heater to shed its load in response to stress on the electric power grid. The GFA controller would disconnect the water heater from its supply circuit whenever it senses a low voltage signal or other indicators of system stress communicated via the electric power distribution system. Power would be reconnected to the appliance when the GFA controller senses the absence of these signals. This project has also considered more frequent cycling of this controllers relay switch to perform demand-side frequency regulation. The principal criteria considered in this optimization are reliability, cost and life expectancy of the GFA components. The alternative embodiments of the GFA equipment under consideration are: Option 1- installation inside the insulation space of the water heater between the tank and jacket Option 2 containment in a separate nearby electrical enclosure Option 3 - as a modification or adjunct to the distribution panel housing and/or the breaker that protects the water heater supply circuit.

  20. California Construction Storm Water Program Website | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California's Construction Storm Water Program. Author California State Water Resources Control Board Published California State Water Resources Control Board, Date Not Provided DOI...

  1. Developing a cost effective environmental solution for produced water and creating a ''new'' water resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doran, Glenn; Leong, Lawrence Y.C.

    2000-05-01

    The project goal is to convert a currently usable by-product of oil production, produced water, into a valuable drinking water resource. The project was located at the Placate Oil Field in Santa Clarita, California, approximately 25 miles north of Los Angeles. The project included a literature review of treatment technologies; preliminary bench-scale studies to refine a planning level cost estimate; and a 10-100 gpm pilot study to develop the conceptual design and cost estimate for a 44,000 bpd treatment facility. A reverse osmosis system was constructed, pilot tested, and the data used to develop a conceptual design and operation of four operational scenarios, two industrial waters levels and two irrigation/potable water.

  2. The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners | Department of Energy The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners August 4, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Diana Bauer Office Director for Energy Systems Analysis and Integration On May 28th and 29th, a

  3. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Timothy Meeks, Administrator, Western Area Power Administration Subject: Subject: FY 2013 Spending and Missions of the Power Marketing Administrations PDF icon 3-20-12_ Meeks_WAPA_FT_1.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power

  4. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources By: Kenneth Legg, Administrator, Southeastern Area Power Administration Subject: Subject: FY 2013 Spending and Missions of the Power Marketing Administrations PDF icon 3-20-12_Legg_SEPA_FT_1.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural

  5. Getting into hot water: the law of geothermal resources in Colorado...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Getting into hot water: the law of geothermal resources in Colorado Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Periodical: Getting into hot water: the law...

  6. NRS 445A Water Controls | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NRS 445A Water ControlsLegal Abstract General provisions for water pollution control and water quality of the public water systems in Nevada. Published NA Year Signed or...

  7. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  8. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackman, Thomas; Minor, Timothy; Pohll, Gregory

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during Phase I, in which the hydrologic framework was investigated and the development initiated. Phase II concentrates on practical implementation of the earlier work but emphasizes applications to the hydrology of the Lake Tahoe basin. Phase 1 efforts have been refined and extended by creating a toolset for geographic information systems (GIS) that is usable for disparate types of geospatial and geo-referenced data. The toolset is intended to serve multiple users for a variety of applications. The web portal for internet access to hydrologic and remotely sensed product data, prototyped in Phase I, has been significantly enhanced. The portal provides high performance access to LANDSAT-derived data using techniques developed during the course of the project. The portal is interactive, and supports the geo-referenced display of hydrologic information derived from remotely sensed data, such as various vegetative indices used to calculate water consumption. The platform can serve both internal and external constituencies using inter-operating infrastructure that spans both sides of the DRI firewall. The platform is intended grow its supported data assets and to serve as a template for replication to other geographic areas. An unanticipated development during the project was the use of ArcGIS software on a new computer system, called the IBM PureSytems, and the parallel use of the systems for faster, more efficient image processing. Additional data, independent of the portal, was collected within the Sagehen basin and provides detailed information regarding the processes that control hydrologic responses within mountain watersheds. The newly collected data include elevation, evapotranspiration, energy balance and remotely sensed snow-pack data. A Lake Tahoe basin hydrologic model has been developed, in part to help predict the hydrologic impacts of climate change. The model couples both the surface and subsurface hydrology, with the two components having been independently calibrated. Results from the coupled simulations involving both surface water and groundwater processes

  9. Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Information Webpage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Water Pollution Control System Information Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System...

  10. Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Facility Stockton Regional...

  11. Environmental Controls on Water Use Efficiency during Severe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Environmental Controls on Water Use Efficiency during Severe Drought in an Ozark Forest in Missouri, USA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Environmental Controls on Water ...

  12. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid ...

  13. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A | Department of Energy Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Main Report and Appendix A evaluate water

  14. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A | Department of Energy Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Main Report and Appendix A: Evaluates water

  15. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy James McDonald Administrator, Southwestern Area Power Administration Subject: Subject: FY 2013 Spending and Missions of the Power Marketing Administrations PDF icon 3-20-12_McDonald_SWPA_FT_0.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural R

  16. Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Availability | Department of Energy Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability Dr. May Wu, ANL, 8/15/12 webinar presentation on the environmental impacts attributable to wastewater from biofuels production. PDF icon wu_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic

  17. NAC 445A Water Controls | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: NAC 445A Water ControlsLegal Abstract Regulations for ground water controls and water...

  18. Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization ... There is great untapped potential for water conservation. ...

  19. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy PDF icon solar_thermal_transcript.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics

  20. Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case studies and additional resources on implementing renewable energy in Federal new construction and major renovations are available.

  1. Superseded- Floodplain Management Guidelines for Implementing EO 11988 (Water Resources Council, 1978)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Resources Council adopted these guidelines in 1978 following the signing of Executive Order 11988.  The guidelines provide an introduction to key terms and concepts in floodplain...

  2. Colorado Division of Water Resources Policy 2010-4 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy 2010-4 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Colorado Division of Water Resources Policy 2010-4Legal Published NA...

  3. 2 C.C.R. 402 - Division of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 2 C.C.R. 402 - Division of Water ResourcesLegal Abstract Under this article of the Colorado...

  4. South Asia Water Resources Workshop: An effort to promote water quality data sharing in South Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAJEN,GAURAV; BIRINGER,KENT L.; BETSILL,J. DAVID

    2000-04-01

    To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group comprised of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the US convened at the Soaltee Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, September 12 to 14, 1999. The workshop was sponsored in part by the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The CMC promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in regions throughout the world as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. In the long term, the workshop organizers and participants are interested in the significance of regional information sharing as a means to build confidence and reduce conflict. The intermediate interests of the group focus on activities that might eventually foster regional management of some aspects of water resources utilization. The immediate purpose of the workshop was to begin the implementation phase of a project to collect and share water quality information at a number of river and coastal estuary locations throughout the region. The workshop participants achieved four objectives: (1) gaining a better understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of existing regional organizations promoting environmental cooperation in South Asia; (3) identifying sites within the region at which data is to be collected; and (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process.

  5. Water resources protection strategy: Revision 1, Attachment 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-10

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) must provide a demonstration of compliance with the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards for inactive mill sites pursuant to 40 CFR Part 192. This plan outlines the proposed strategy to demonstrate compliance with the ground water standards at the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This demonstration consists of (1) the ground water protection standard, (2) a performance assessment, (3) a closure performance demonstration, and (4) a performance monitoring and corrective action program.

  6. Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

    2007-01-10

    This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility need business model and an independent energy aggregator-business model. The approach of developing two group models of DER energy participation in the market is unique. The Detroit Edison (DECo, Utility)-led team includes: DTE Energy Technologies (Dtech, DER provider), Electrical Distribution Design (EDD, Virginia Tech company supporting EPRIs Distribution Engineering Workstation, DEW), Systems Integration Specialists Company (SISCO, economic scheduling and real-time protocol integrator), and OSIsoft (PI software system for managing real-time information). This team is focused on developing the application engineering, including software systems necessary for DERs integration, control and sale into the market place. Phase II Highlights Installed and tested an ICCP link with SSL (security) between DECo, the utility, and DTE Energy Technologies (DTECH), the aggregator, making DER data available to the utility for both monitoring and control. Installed and tested PI process book with circuit & DER operational models for DECo SOC/ROC operators use for monitoring of both utility circuit and customer DER parameters. The PI Process Book models also included DER control for the DECo SOC/ROC operators, which was tested and demonstrated control. The DER Tagging and Operating Procedures were developed, which allowed that control to be done in a safe manner, were modified for required MOC/MISO notification procedures. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) was modified to include temperature normalized load research statistics, using a 30 hour day-ahead weather feed. This allowed day-ahead forecasting of the customer load profile and the entire circuit to determine overload and low voltage problems. This forecast at the point of common coupling was passed to DTech DR SOC for use in their economic dispatch algorithm. Standard Work Instructions were developed for DER notification, sale, and operation into the MISO market. A software mechanism consisting of a suite of new and revised functionality was developed that integrated with the local ISO such that offers can be made electronically without human intervention. A suite of software was developed by DR SOC enabling DER usage in real time and day-ahead: Generation information file exchange with PI and the utility power flow A utility day-ahead information file Energy Offer Web Service Market Result Web Service Real-Time Meter Data Web Service Real-Time Notification Web Service Registered over 20 DER with MISO in Demand Response Market and demonstrated electronic sale to MISO.

  7. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator SEPA PDF icon 4-16-13KennethLegg FT HNR More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural ...

  8. Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  9. GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

    2012-09-30

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as baseline data for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a baseline data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION of this report.

  10. Treatment of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control Carbon Capture and Enhanced Oil Recovery. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Treatment of Difficult Waters:...

  11. Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application Forms Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Ground Water Pollution...

  12. EPA - Ground Water Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Water Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control Program) webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - Ground Water...

  13. WC 26 - Water Quality Control Administrative Provisions | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    26 - Water Quality Control Administrative Provisions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WC 26 - Water Quality...

  14. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Resources Policies, Manuals & References Map Transportation Publications ⇒ Navigate Section Resources Policies, Manuals & References Map Transportation Publications Getting Help or Information IT Help Desk (or call x4357) Facilities Work Request Center Telephone Services Travel Site Info Laboratory Map Construction Updates Laboratory Shuttle Buses Cafeteria Menu News and Events Today at Berkeley Lab News Center Press Releases Feature Stories Videos Contact Calendar Health and

  15. Colorado Water Quality Control Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Colorado Water Quality Control ActLegal Abstract Statute setting forth laws for water quality control...

  16. Regional Water Quality Control Boards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Regional Water Quality Control BoardsLegal Abstract California Regional Water Quality Control Boards,...

  17. Title 10 Chapter 47 Water Pollution Control | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    7 Water Pollution Control Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 10 Chapter 47 Water Pollution ControlLegal...

  18. Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act Published Publisher...

  19. NAC 445A - Water Controls | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RegulationRegulation: NAC 445A - Water ControlsLegal Abstract This regulation sets forth the rules governing water controls in Nevada. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  20. NRS 445A - Water Controls | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Document- StatuteStatute: NRS 445A - Water ControlsLegal Abstract This chapter sets forth the rules governing water controls in Nevada. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  1. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Corrie E.; Harto, Christopher B.; Schroeder, Jenna N.; Martino, Louis E.; Horner, Robert M.

    2013-11-05

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2 describes the approach and methods for this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS binary plant, a 50-MW EGS binary plant, a 10-MW hydrothermal binary plant, and a 50-MW hydrothermal flash plant. The methods focus on (1) the collection of data to improve estimation of EGS stimulation volumes, aboveground operational consumption for all geothermal technologies, and belowground operational consumption for EGS; and (2) the mapping of the geothermal and water resources of the western United States to assist in the identification of potential water challenges to geothermal growth. Chapters 3 and 4 present the water requirements for the power plant life cycle. Chapter 3 presents the results of the current data collection effort, and Chapter 4 presents the normalized volume of fresh water consumed at each life cycle stage per lifetime energy output for the power plant scenarios evaluated. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, the majority of water is consumed by plant operations. For the EGS binary scenarios, where dry cooling was assumed, belowground operational water loss is the greatest contributor depending upon the physical and operational conditions of the reservoir. Total life cycle water consumption requirements for air-cooled EGS binary scenarios vary between 0.22 and 1.85 gal/kWh, depending upon the extent of belowground operational water consumption. The air-cooled hydrothermal binary and flash plants experience far less fresh water consumption over the life cycle, at 0.04 gal/kWh. Fresh water requirements associated with air- cooled binary operations are primarily from aboveground water needs, including dust control, maintenance, and domestic use. Although wet-cooled hydrothermal flash systems require water for cooling, these plants generally rely upon the geofluid, fluid from the geothermal reservoir, which typically has high salinity and total dissolved solids concentration and is much warmer than normal groundwater sources, for their cooling water needs; thus, while there is considerable geofluid loss at 2.7 gal/kWh, fresh water consumption during operations is similar to that of aircooled binary systems. Chapter 5 presents the assessment of water demand for future growth in deployment of utility-scale geothermal power generation. The approach combines the life cycle analysis of geothermal water consumption with a geothermal supply curve according to resource type, levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), and potential growth scenarios. A total of 17 growth scenarios were evaluated. In general, the scenarios that assumed lower costs for EGSs as a result of learning and technological improvements resulted in greater geothermal potential, but also significantly greater water demand due to the higher water consumption by EGSs. It was shown, however, that this effect could be largely mitigated if nonpotable water sources were used for belowground operational water demands. The geographical areas that showed the highest water demand for most growth scenarios were southern and northern California, as well as most of Nevada. In addition to water demand by geothermal power production, Chapter 5 includes data on water availability for geothermal development areas. A qualitative analysis is included that identifies some of the basins where the limited availability of water is most likely to affect the development of geothermal resources. The data indicate that water availability is fairly limited, especially under drought conditions, in most of the areas with significant near- and medium-term geothermal potential. Southern California was found to have the greatest potential for water-related challenges with its combination of high geothermal potential and limited water availability. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 6. Overall, this work highlights the importance of utilizing dry cooling systems for binary and EGS systems and minimizing fresh water consumption throughout the life cycle of geothermal power development. The large resource base for EGSs represents a major opportunity for the geothermal industry; however, depending upon geology, these systems can require large quantities of makeup water due to belowground reservoir losses. Identifying potential sources of compatible degraded or low-quality water for use for makeup injection for EGS and flash systems represents an important opportunity to reduce the impacts of geothermal development on fresh water resources. The importance of identifying alternative water sources for geothermal systems is heightened by the fact that a large fraction of the geothermal resource is located in areas already experiencing water stress. Chapter 7 is a glossary of the technical terms used in the report, and Chapters 8 and 9 provide references and a bibliography, respectively.

  2. VIRTUAL HYDROPOWER PROSPECTING: A FOUNDATION FOR WATER ENERGY RESOURCE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Lee; Sera White; Julie Brizzee; Shane Cherry; Douglas Hall

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the gross power potential of the natural stream water energy resources of the United States was performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models (DEMs) and geographic information system (GIS) tools. Water energy resource sites (stream segments) assessed in the basic resource assessment were further evaluated to identify which can be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of each site was refined to determine its developable hydropower potential using a set of development criteria corresponding to a damless low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) project. The methodologies for performing the basic resource assessment and subsequent feasibility assessment are described and the summary results for the nation are presented.

  3. Multi-resolution integrated modeling for basin-scale water resources management and policy analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Hoshin V. (Hoshin Vijai),; Brookshire, David S.; Springer, E. P.; Wagener, Thorsten

    2004-01-01

    Approximately one-third of the land surface of the Earth is considered to be arid or semi-arid with an annual average of less than 12-14 inches of rainfall. The availability of water in such regions is of course, particularly sensitive to climate variability while the demand for water is experiencing explosive population growth. The competition for available water is exerting considerable pressure on the water resources management. Policy and decision makers in the southwestern U.S. increasingly have to cope with over-stressed rivers and aquifers as population and water demands grow. Other factors such as endangered species and Native American water rights further complicate the management problems. Further, as groundwater tables are drawn down due to pumping in excess of natural recharge, considerable (potentially irreversible) environmental impacts begin to be felt as, for example, rivers run dry for significant portions of the year, riparian habitats disappear (with consequent effects on the bio-diversity of the region), aquifers compact resulting in large scale subsidence, and water quality begins to suffer. The current drought (1999-2002) in the southwestern U.S. is raising new concerns about how to sustain the combination of agricultural, urban and in-stream uses of water that underlie the socio-economic and ecological structure in the region. The water stressed nature of arid and semi-arid environments means that competing water uses of various kinds vie for access to a highly limited resource. If basin-scale water sustainability is to be achieved, managers must somehow achieve a balance between supply and demand throughout the basin, not just for the surface water or stream. The need to move water around a basin such as the Rio Grande or Colorado River to achieve this balance has created the stimulus for water transfers and water markets, and for accurate hydrologic information to sustain such institutions [Matthews et al. 2002; Brookshire et al 2003; Krause, Chermak Brookshire, 2003].

  4. Oversight Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Oversight Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans. Testimony of Claudia Andrews, Chief Operating Officer, Bonneville Power Administration, and Mark Gabriel, Administrator, Western Area Power Administration. Statements for the record by Scott Carpenter, Administrator, Southwestern Power Administration, and Kenneth Legg, Administrator, Southeastern Power Administration.

  5. A Coupled Modeling System to Simulate Water Resources in the Rio Grande Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossert, J.E.; Breshears, D.D.; Campbell, K.; Costigan, K.R.; Greene, R.K.; Keating, E.H.; Kleifgen, L.M.; Langley, D.L.; Martens, S.N.; Sanderson, J.G.; Springer, E.P.; Stalker, J.R.; Tartakovsky, D.M.; Winter, C.L.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1999-01-11

    Limited availability of fresh water in arid and semi-arid regions of the world requires prudent management strategies from accurate, science-based assessments. These assessments demand a thorough understanding of the hydrologic cycle over long time periods within the individual water-sheds that comprise large river basins. Measurement and simulation of the hydrologic cycle is a tremendous challenge, involving a coupling between global to regional-scale atmospheric precipitation processes with regional to local-scale land surface and subsurface water transport. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a detailed modeling system of the hydrologic cycle and applying this tool at high resolution to assess the water balance within the upper Rio Grande river basin. The Rio Grande is a prime example of a river system in a semiarid environment, with a high demand from agricultural, industrial, recreational, and municipal interests for its water supply. Within this river basin, groundwater supplies often augment surface water. With increasing growth projected throughout the river basin, however, these multiple water users have the potential to significantly deplete groundwater resources, thereby increasing the dependence on surface water resources.

  6. RCW - 90.48 - Water Pollution Control | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 90.48 - Water Pollution Control Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: RCW - 90.48 - Water Pollution...

  7. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  8. Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources: Appendix C - Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Surveys Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated.

  9. Water-Efficient Technology Opportunity: Advanced Cooling Tower Controls |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Advanced Cooling Tower Controls Water-Efficient Technology Opportunity: Advanced Cooling Tower Controls The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) identified advanced cooling tower controls as a water-saving technology that is relevant to the federal sector, is commercially available, and offers significant water-savings potential. This overview provides agencies with key information to deploy innovative products and systems that may otherwise be overlooked. It also

  10. Water Outlet Control Mechanism for Fuel Cell System Operation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Water Outlet Control Mechanism for Fuel Cell...

  11. Treatment of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Difficult Waters: Arsenic Removal Silica Control Carbon Capture and Enhanced Oil Recovery. Brady, Patrick Vane Abstract not provided. Sandia National Laboratories...

  12. Alaska Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Control Strategy | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Control Strategy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Alaska Nonpoint...

  13. WAC - 173-225 Federal Water Pollution Control Act - Establishment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    225 Federal Water Pollution Control Act - Establishment of Implementation Procedures of Application for Certification Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  14. Predictive Control of Hot Water Heaters - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search Predictive Control of Hot Water Heaters National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This...

  15. Energy-Efficient Controls for Multifamily Domestic Hot Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controls for Multifamily Domestic Hot Water Jordan Dentz and Eric Ansanelli The Levy Partnership, Inc. New York, NY 2 Research Sponsors * The ARIES Collaborative is a ...

  16. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailing site Maybell, Colorado. Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental regulations to correct and prevent ground water contamination resulting from former uranium processing activities at inactive uranium processing sites (40 CFR Part 192 (1993)) (52 FR 36000 (1978)). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has decided that each assessment will include information on hydrogeologic site characterization. The water resources protection strategy that describes the proposed action compliance with the EPA ground water protection standards is presented in Attachment 4, Water Resources Protection Strategy. Site characterization activities discussed in this section include the following: (1) Definition of the hydrogeologic characteristics of the environment, including hydrostratigraphy, aquifer parameters, areas of aquifer recharge and discharge, potentiometric surfaces, and ground water velocities. (2) Definition of background ground water quality and comparison with proposed EPA ground water protection standards. (3) Evaluation of the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant source and/or residual radioactive materials. (4) Definition of existing ground water contamination by comparison with the EPA ground water protection standards. (5) Description of the geochemical processes that affect the migration of the source contaminants at the processing site. (6) Description of water resource use, including availability, current and future use and value, and alternate water supplies.

  17. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

  18. Title Trip Report: Hydrologic Field Reconnaissance Led by Robert Coache, Water Resources

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Trip Report: Hydrologic Field Reconnaissance Led by Robert Coache, Water Resources Division, Nevada Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, April 24,1986 Technical Reference Document Author Giampaoli, MaryEllen 1 00991 Document Date ERC Index number 4/24/86 05.09.035 Doc u ment Type Box N u m ber Memo 1684-1 Recipients J. Younker HQS. 880517. 1765 Soonco Applications kitomotional Corporation M86-GEO-MEG-054 ADMIN RECORD # 5. DATE: TO: May 7, 1986 J. Younker ADMINISTRATIVE FROM: M.

  19. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1996. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1997-05-01

    The report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 41 gaging stations and 5 lakes; water quality for 38 surface-water stations (including 22 gage stations) and 100 wells; and water levels for 235 observation wells. Also included are data for 117 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations.

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters Affecting Protection of Water Resources at Hanford WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, J.D.

    2002-02-08

    The scope of this analysis was to assess the sensitivity of contaminant fluxes from the vadose zone to the water table, to several parameters, some of which can be controlled by operational considerations.

  1. Effects of climate change on Pacific Northwest water-related resources: Summary of preliminary findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Sands, R.D.; Vail, L.W.; Chatters, J.C.; Neitzel, D.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Case Study is a multi-agency analysis of atmospheric/climatic change impacts on the Pacific Northwest (which includes Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and portions of the Columbia River Basin in Western Montana). The purpose of the case study, which began in fiscal year 1991, was to develop and test analytical tools, as well as to develop an assessment of the effects of climate change on climate-sensitive natural resources of the Pacific Northwest and economic sectors dependent on them. The overall study, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency, was a broad-based, reconnaissance-level study to identify potential climate impacts on agriculture, coastal resources, forest resources, and irrigation in the Pacific Northwest. DOE participated in the reconnaissance study, with responsibility for hydroelectric and water supply issues. While this report briefly discusses a broader array of water issues, attention is mainly focused on three aspects of the water study: (1) the effects of the region`s higher temperatures on the demand for electric power (which in turn puts additional demand on hydroelectric resources of the region); (2) the effects of higher temperatures and changes, both in precipitation amounts and seasonality, on river flows and hydroelectric supply; and (3) the effect of higher temperatures and changed precipitation amounts and seasonality on salmonid resources -- particularly the rearing conditions in tributaries of the Columbia River Basin. Because the meaning of regional climate forecasts is still quite uncertain, most of the preliminary findings are based on sensitivity analyses and historical analog climate scenarios.

  2. Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate Electricity Using Geothermal Water Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Awardee: City of Klamath Falls, Oregon Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate Electricity Using Geothermal Water Resources Brian Brown, Brian Brown Engineering LLC Steve Anderson, Evergreen Energy May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Insert photo of your choice 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov * Timeline - Project start date: 1/29/2010 - Assistance Agreement Signed: 4/22/2010 -

  5. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  6. Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  7. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; et al

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richnessmore » in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.« less

  8. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; Johnson, D.; Monier, Erwan; Strzepek, J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richness in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.

  9. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01

    The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

  10. Water Energy Resource Data from Idaho National Laboratory's Virtual Hydropower Prospector

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hydropower Program is to conduct research and development (R&D) that will improve the technical, societal, and environmental benefits of hydropower and provide cost-competitive technologies that enable the development of new and incremental hydropower capacity, adding diversity to the nation's energy supply. The Virtual Hydropower Prospector is a GIS application to locate and evaluate natural stream water energy resources. In the interactive data map the U.S. is divided into 20 hydrologic regions. The Prospector tool applies an analytical process to determine the gross power potential of these regions and helps users to site potential hydropower projects.

  11. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-01-07

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  12. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-04-03

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  13. ''A ground water resources study of a Pacific Ocean atoll - Tarawa, Gilbert Islands,'' by J. W. Lloyd, J. C. Miles, G. R. Chessmand, and S. F. Bugg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatcraft, S.W.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-10-01

    Several inherent problems in the methodology employed in the ground water resource study of Tarawa Atoll (Lloyd, et al., 1981) are described. Studies of Enewetak Atoll have provided data that require a significantly different conceptual model of the atoll hydrogeology system. Comparison of well, lagoon, and ocean tidal observations with a mathematical model that assumes horizontal tidal propagation indicates that the observed results are more consistent with a system that is controlled by vertical coupling between the unconsolidated surface aquifer and an underlying aquifer of more permeable limestone. This indicates that most fresh water recharged to the aquifer migrates downward and mixes with the sea water in a deeper aquifer providing easy exchange with the ocean. Lloyd, et al., do not take tidal mixing or vertical transport into account and it therefore seems likely that fresh water inventories are significantly overestimated. Failure to include these significant loss terms in the island water budget may also account for calculated heads above ground level. (JMT)

  14. Coal mine wastes. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning coal mining wastes, refuse dumps, and spoil. The disposal, environmental impact, waste treatment, utilization, and pollution control of these wastes are discussed. The revegetation of mined lands using waste water sludge is also considered. (Contains a minimum of 138 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

    2012-02-15

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources in Berkeley, June 12, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPAs mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}brine might occur.

  16. Control Strategies for Distributed Energy Resources to Maximize the Use of Wind Power in Rural Microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Samaan, Nader A.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Chunlian; Zhang, Yu

    2011-10-10

    The focus of this paper is to design control strategies for distributed energy resources (DERs) to maximize the use of wind power in a rural microgrid. In such a system, it may be economical to harness wind power to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels for electricity production. In this work, we develop control strategies for DERs, including diesel generators, energy storage and demand response, to achieve high penetration of wind energy in a rural microgrid. Combinations of centralized (direct control) and decentralized (autonomous response) control strategies are investigated. Detailed dynamic models for a rural microgrid are built to conduct simulations. The system response to large disturbances and frequency regulation are tested. It is shown that optimal control coordination of DERs can be achieved to maintain system frequency while maximizing wind power usage and reducing the wear and tear on fossil fueled generators.

  17. Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

  18. A modeling study of irrigation effects on global surface water and groundwater resources under a changing climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-08-25

    Abstract In this study, the effects of irrigation on global surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) resources are investigated by performing simulations using Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4) at 0.5-degree resolution driven by downscaled/bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from five General Circulation Models (GCMs) for 1950-2099. For each climate scenario, three sets of numerical experiments were configured: (1) a control experiment (CTRL) in which all crops are assumed to be rainfed; (2) an irrigation experiment (IRRIG) in which the irrigation module using only SW for irrigation is activated; and (3) a groundwater pumping experiment (PUMP) in which a groundwater pumping scheme coupled with the irrigation module is activated for conjunctive use of SW and GW for irrigation. The parameters associated with irrigation and groundwater pumping are calibrated based on a global inventory of census-based SW and GW use compiled by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Our results suggest that irrigation could lead to two major opposing effects: SW depletion/GW accumulation in regions with irrigation primarily fed by SW, and SW accumulation/GW depletion in regions with irrigation fed primarily by GW. Furthermore, irrigation depending primarily on SW tends to have larger impacts on low-flow than high-flow conditions, suggesting the potential to increase vulnerability to drought. By the end of the 21st century (2070-2099), climate change significantly increases (relative to 1971-2000) irrigation water demand across the world. Combined with the increased temporal-spatial variability of water supply, this may lead to severe issues of local water scarcity for irrigation. Regionally, irrigation has the potential to aggravate/alleviate climate-induced changes of SW/GW although such effects are negligible when averaged globally. Our results emphasize the importance of accounting for irrigation effects and irrigation sources in regional climate change impact assessment.

  19. Understanding barotrauma in fish passing hydro structures: a global strategy for sustainable development of water resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Boys, Craig A.; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Silva, Luiz G.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mallen-Cooper, Martin; Phonekhampeng, Oudom; Thorncraft, Garry; Singhanouvong, Douangkham

    2014-03-24

    Freshwater fishes are one of the most imperiled groups of vertebrates and species declines have been linked to a number of anthropogenic influences. This is alarming as the diversity and stability of populations are at risk. In addition, freshwater fish serve as important protein sources, particularly in developing countries. One of the focal activities thought to influence freshwater fish population declines is water resource development, which is anticipated to increase over the next several decades. For fish encountering hydro structures, such as passing through hydroturbines, there may be a rapid decrease in pressure which can lead to injuries commonly referred to as barotraumas. The authors summarize the research to date that has examined the effects of rapid pressure changes on fish and outline the most important factors to consider (i.e., swim bladder morphology, depth of acclimation, migration pattern and life stage) when examining the susceptibility of barotraumas for fish of interest.

  20. Northern Cheyenne Reservation Coal Bed Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis of Produced Water Disposal Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaochang Wo; David A. Lopez; Jason Whiteman Sr.; Bruce A. Reynolds

    2004-07-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is currently one of the most active gas plays in the United States. Monthly production in 2002 reached about 26 BCF in the Wyoming portion of the basin. Coalbed methane reserves for the Wyoming portion of the basin are approximately 25 trillion cubic feet (TCF). Although coal beds in the Powder River Basin extend well into Montana, including the area of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, the only CBM development in Montana is the CX Field, operated by the Fidelity Exploration, near the Wyoming border. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located on the northwest flank of the PRB in Montana with a total land of 445,000 acres. The Reservation consists of five districts, Lame Deer, Busby, Ashland, Birney, and Muddy Cluster and has a population of 4,470 according to the 2000 Census. The CBM resource represents a significant potential asset to the Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Methane gas in coal beds is trapped by hydrodynamic pressure. Because the production of CBM involves the dewatering of coalbed to allow the release of methane gas from the coal matrix, the relatively large volume of the co-produced water and its potential environmental impacts are the primary concerns for the Tribe. Presented in this report is a study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) in partnership with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe to assess the Tribes CBM resources and evaluate applicable water handling options. The project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Native American Initiative of the National Petroleum Technology Office, under contract DEAC07- 99ID13727. Matching funds were granted by the MBMG in supporting the work of geologic study and mapping conducted at MBMG.

  1. Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

    2012-07-22

    Abstract Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

  2. Water treatment facilities (excluding wastewater facilities). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, costs, and operation of water treatment facilities. Facilities covered include those that provide drinking water, domestic water, and water for industrial use. Types of water treatment covered include reverse osmosis, chlorination, filtration, and ozonization. Waste water treatment facilities are excluded from this bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources at Detroit Edison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haukur Asgeirsson; Richard Seguin

    2004-01-31

    The project objective was to create the communication and control system, the process and the economic procedures that will allow owners (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) connected in parallel to the electric distribution to have their resources operated in a manner that protects the electric utility distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) (a power flow and short circuit modeling tool) was modified to calculate the real-time characteristics of the distribution network based on the real-time electric distribution network information and provide DER operating suggestions to the Detroit Edison system operators so that regional electric stability is maintained. Part of the suggestion algorithm takes into account the operational availability of DERs, which is known by the Energy Aggregator, DTE Energy Technologies. The availability information will be exchanged from DTE Energy Technologies to Detroit Edison. For the calculated suggestions to be used by the Detroit Edison operators, procedures were developed to allow an operator to operate a DER by requesting operation of the DER through DTE Energy Technologies. Prior to issuing control of a DER, the safety of the distribution network and personnel needs to be taken into account. This information will be exchanged from Detroit Edison to DTE Energy Technologies. Once it is safe to control the DER, DTE Energy Technologies will issue the control signal. The real-time monitoring of the DECo system will reflect the DER control. Multi-vendor DER technologies representing approximately 4 MW of capacity was monitored and controlled using a web-based communication path. The DER technologies included are a photovoltaic system, energy storage, fuel cells and natural gas/diesel internal combustion engine generators. This report documents Phase I result for the Detroit Edison (Utility) led team, which also includes: DTE Energy Technology (DER provider & Aggregator), Electrical Distribution Design (Virginia Tech company supporting DEW); Systems Integration Specialists Company (real-time protocol integrator); and OSIsoft (software system for managing real-time information). This work was performed in anticipation of being selected for Phase II of the Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources project.

  4. Integration of Water Resource Models with Fayetteville Shale Decision Support and Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cothren, Jackson; Thoma, Greg; DiLuzio, Mauro; Limp, Fred

    2013-06-30

    Significant issues can arise with the timing, location, and volume of surface water withdrawals associated with hydraulic fracturing of gas shale reservoirs as impacted watersheds may be sensitive, especially in drought years, during low flow periods, or during periods of the year when activities such as irrigation place additional demands on the surface supply of water. Significant energy production and associated water withdrawals may have a cumulative impact to watersheds over the short-term. Hence, hydraulic fracturing based on water withdrawal could potentially create shifts in the timing and magnitude of low or high flow events or change the magnitude of river flow at daily, monthly, seasonal, or yearly time scales. These changes in flow regimes can result in dramatically altered river systems. Currently little is known about the impact of fracturing on stream flow behavior. Within this context the objective of this study is to assess the impact of the hydraulic fracturing on the water balance of the Fayetteville Shale play area and examine the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on river flow regime at subbasin scale. This project addressed that need with four unique but integrated research and development efforts: 1) Evaluate the predictive reliability of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model based at a variety of scales (Task/Section 3.5). The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to simulate the across-scale water balance and the respective impact of hydraulic fracturing. A second hypothetical scenario was designed to assess the current and future impacts of water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing on the flow regime and on the environmental flow components (EFCs) of the river. The shifting of these components, which present critical elements to water supply and water quality, could influence the ecological dynamics of river systems. For this purpose, we combined the use of SWAT model and Richter et al.s (1996) methodology to assess the shifting and alteration of the flow regime within the river and streams of the study area. 2) Evaluate the effect of measurable land use changes related to gas development (well-pad placement, access road completion, etc.) on surface water flow in the region (Task/Section 3.7). Results showed that since the upsurge in shale-gas related activities in the Fayetteville Shale Play (between 2006 and 2010), shale-gas related infrastructure in the region have increase by 78%. This change in land-cover in comparison with other land-cover classes such as forest, urban, pasture, agricultural and water indicates the highest rate of change in any land-cover category for the study period. A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) flow model of the Little Red River watershed simulated from 2000 to 2009 showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. A forecast scenario based on the assumption that 2010 land-cover does not see any significant change over the forecast period (2010 to 2020) also showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. Further analyses showed that this change in the stream-flow regime for the forecast period is attributable to the increase in land-cover as introduced by the shale-gas infrastructure. 3) Upgrade the Fayetteville Shale Information System to include information on watershed status. (Tasks/Sections 2.1 and 2.2). This development occurred early in the project period, and technological improvements in web-map APIs have made it possible to further improve the map. The current sites (http://lingo.cast.uark.edu) is available but is currently being upgraded to a more modern interface and robust mapping engine using funds outside this project. 4) Incorporate the methodologies developed in Tasks/Sections 3.5 and 3.7 into a Spatial Decision Support System for use by regulatory agencies and producers in the play. The resulting system is available at http://fayshale.cast.uark.edu and is under review the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission.

  5. GIS-based Geospatial Infrastructure of Water Resource Assessment for Supporting Oil Shale Development in Piceance Basin of Northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew D; Mattson, Earl D; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle E.

    2015-04-01

    Oil shale deposits of the Green River Formation (GRF) in Northwestern Colorado, Southwestern Wyoming, and Northeastern Utah may become one of the first oil shale deposits to be developed in the U.S. because of their richness, accessibility, and extensive prior characterization. Oil shale is an organic-rich fine-grained sedimentary rock that contains significant amounts of kerogen from which liquid hydrocarbons can be produced. Water is needed to retort or extract oil shale at an approximate rate of three volumes of water for every volume of oil produced. Concerns have been raised over the demand and availability of water to produce oil shale, particularly in semiarid regions where water consumption must be limited and optimized to meet demands from other sectors. The economic benefit of oil shale development in this region may have tradeoffs within the local and regional environment. Due to these potential environmental impacts of oil shale development, water usage issues need to be further studied. A basin-wide baseline for oil shale and water resource data is the foundation of the study. This paper focuses on the design and construction of a centralized geospatial infrastructure for managing a large amount of oil shale and water resource related baseline data, and for setting up the frameworks for analytical and numerical models including but not limited to three-dimensional (3D) geologic, energy resource development systems, and surface water models. Such a centralized geospatial infrastructure made it possible to directly generate model inputs from the same database and to indirectly couple the different models through inputs/outputs. Thus ensures consistency of analyses conducted by researchers from different institutions, and help decision makers to balance water budget based on the spatial distribution of the oil shale and water resources, and the spatial variations of geologic, topographic, and hydrogeological Characterization of the basin. This endeavor encountered many technical challenging and hasn't been done in the past for any oil shale basin. The database built during this study remains valuable for any other future studies involving oil shale and water resource management in the Piceance Basin. The methodology applied in the development of the GIS based Geospatial Infrastructure can be readily adapted for other professionals to develop database structure for other similar basins.

  6. Reconnaissance of ground-water quality in the Papio-Missouri river natural resources district, Eastern Nebraska, July through September 1992. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verstraeten, I.M.; Ellis, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe the water quality of the principal aquifers in the study area. Wells representative of the geology and land use in the study area were selected for water-quality sampling. Variations in constituent concentration among aquifers are discussed. The report describes the spatial distributions of dissolved nitrite plus-nitrate as nitrogen and triazine and other acetanilide herbicides and evaluates the effects of cropland application of nitrogen and herbicides on the ground-water quality within the study area. The report also summarizes the concentrations of dissolved major and trace constituents including radionuclide activity and concentration.

  7. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2013-08-31

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  8. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  9. Control and Size Energy Storage for Managing Energy balance of Variable Generation Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Xinda; Lu, Ning; Jin, Chunlian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents control algorithms and sizing strategies for using energy storage to manage energy balance for variable generation resources. The control objective is to minimize the hourly generation imbalance between the actual and the scheduled generation of the wind farm. Three control algorithms are compared: tracking power imbalance, post-compensation, and pre-compensation. Measurement data from a wind farm located in South-central Washington State are used in the study. The results show that tracking power imbalance yields the best performance by keeping the hourly energy imbalances zero. However, the energy storage system (ESS) will be significantly oversized. Post-compensation reduces power rating of the ESS but the hourly imbalance may not be kept as zero when large and long-lasting energy imbalances occur. A linear regression forecasting algorithm is developed for the pre-compensation algorithm to pre-charge or pre-discharge the ESS based on predicted energy imbalances. The performance comparison shows that the pre-compensation method significantly reduces the size of the ESS while maintaining satisfactory performance.

  10. Evaluation of the US Geological Survey ground-water data-collection program in Hawaii, 1992. Water-resources investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, S.S.

    1997-12-31

    This report describes an evaluation of the 1992 USGS ground-water data-collection program in Hawaii. The occurrence of ground water in the Hawaiian islands is briefly described. Objectives for the data-collection program are identified followed by a description of well networks needed to prepare maps of water levels and chloride concentrations. For the islands of Oahu, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii, the wells in the 1992 ground-water data-collection program are described followed by maps showing the distribution and magnitude of pumpage, and the distribution of proposed pumped wells. Wells in the 1992 USGS ground-water data-collection program that provide useful data for mapping water levels and chloride concentrations are identified followed by locations where additional wells are needed for water-level and chloride-concentration data. In addition, a procedure to store and review data is described.

  11. Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BPL Global

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application. As we began to implement the Phase II ACCP system, we upgraded the real-world demonstration sites from Phase I of the project as well as added additional sites to broaden the types of DER the platform was tested with. We worked with the owners and operators of these sites to understand how the system was meeting their needs and made modifications throughout the project as needed. This also included an effort to continue to understand the barriers to commercial adoption of the ACCP architecture and standardized communication protocols. The final aspect of this phase of the project was to prepare resources to aid in the commercial adoption of the ACCP architecture and standardized communication protocols. This entailed: presentations at conferences, published articles and papers, and web-based technical resources to provide tools to aid in the design and implementation of ACCP systems.

  12. AAC R18-9 Water Pollution Control | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8-9 Water Pollution Control Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: AAC R18-9 Water Pollution ControlLegal Abstract...

  13. A.A.C. R18-9: Water Pollution Control | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9: Water Pollution Control Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: A.A.C. R18-9: Water Pollution ControlLegal...

  14. File:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf Size of this preview: 463 ...

  15. H.A.R. 11-55 - Water Pollution Control | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 - Water Pollution Control Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: H.A.R. 11-55 - Water Pollution ControlLegal...

  16. ARS Title 49-200 Water Quality Control | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -200 Water Quality Control Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ARS Title 49-200 Water Quality ControlLegal Abstract...

  17. Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-04-03

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

  18. Spinning Reserve from Pump Load: A Technical Findings Report to the California Department of Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, BJ

    2005-05-06

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at the request of the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, is investigating opportunities for electrical load to provide the ancillary service of spinning reserve to the electric grid. The load would provide this service by stopping for a short time when there is a contingency on the grid such as a transmission line or generator outage. There is a possibility that a significant portion of the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO's) spinning reserve requirement could be supplied from the California Department of Water Resources (CDWR) pumping load. Spinning reserve has never been supplied from load before, and rule changes would be needed to allow it. In this report, we are presenting technical findings on the possibility of supplying spinning reserve from pumping system load. In parallel, we are pursuing the needed rule changes with the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), and the CAISO. NERC and FERC have agreed that they have no prohibition against supplying spinning reserve from load. The WECC Minimum Operability Reliability Criteria working group has agreed that the concept should be considered, and they are presently discussing the needed tariff and rule changes. Presently, spinning reserve is provided by generation that is actually spinning but is operating at low power levels and can be ramped up quickly to provide reserve power. In a sense, this is an inefficient and environmentally unfriendly way of providing reserves because it requires the generator to operate at a low power level that may be inefficient and may discharge more pollutants per kW than operating at rated power. It would be better if this generation capacity were in a position to bid into the energy market. Providing an additional supply of spinning reserve would tend to reduce prices for both reserves and the regular electric energy market. The CAISO is presently in the process of redesigning its market rules for ancillary services. The time is right to pursue this opportunity to supply spinning reserve from load. It is our hope that the CDWR will endorse this recommendation. ORNL will then work with FERC, NERC, WECC, and the CAISO to obtain the needed rule changes. This project would provide the CDWR with another option in the complex process of obtaining its energy at the lowest possible cost, while at the same time providing more flexibility to the ISO and relief to the energy market. After this project is implemented in California, we hope that the practice spreads across the nation, allowing much more flexibility in energy markets and increasing the availability of reserve services.

  19. Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources: Appendix A - Assessment Results by Hydrologic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for each of the 20 hydrologic regions are presented in Appendix A

  20. Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources: Appendix B - Assessment Results by State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Surveys Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for for each of the 50 states are made in Appendix B.

  1. Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate Electricity Using Geothermal Water Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Demonstrate technical and financial feasibility of the use of an existing low-temperature geothermal resource for combined heat and power; and Maintain and enhance existing geothermal district heating operation.

  2. Wastewater and water treatment: Anion exchange. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the theory and methods of anion exchange in the treatment of potable water and wastewaters. Citations discuss anion exchange resins and membranes, desalination techniques, and process evaluations. Methods for anion analysis using chromatographic techniques are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 74 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Wastewater and water treatment: Anion exchange. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the theory and methods of anion exchange in the treatment of potable water and wastewaters. Citations discuss anion exchange resins and membranes, desalination techniques, and process evaluations. Methods for anion analysis using chromatographic techniques are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 74 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Polyelectrolytes: Wastewater and sewage treatment. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning polyelectrolytes in wastewater and water treatment. Topics include flocculation, coagulation, separation techniques, pollutant identification, water pollution sources, and sludge dehydration. Hospital wastewater processing, methods of synthesizing polyelectrolyte complexes, and performance evaluations of polyelectrolytes are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Polyelectrolytes: Wastewater and sewage treatment. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning polyelectrolytes in wastewater and water treatment. Topics include flocculation, coagulation, separation techniques, pollutant identification, water pollution sources, and sludge dehydration. Hospital wastewater processing, methods of synthesizing polyelectrolyte complexes, and performance evaluations of polyelectrolytes are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Promoting plumbing fixture and fitting replacement: Recommendations and review for state and local water resource authorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunham, C.; Lutz, J.D.; Pickle, S.J.

    1995-06-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has prepared this report to facilitate compliance with the requirements of Section 123 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT). Section 123 requires the Department of Energy to issue recommendations for establishing state and local incentive programs to encourage acceleration of voluntary consumer replacement of existing water closets, urinals, showerheads and faucets with water-saving products meeting EPACT standards. The authors recommend that state and local authorities working together and also with utilities: (A) investigate the cost-effectiveness of voluntary replacement of plumbing fixtures and fittings as an effective component of a water efficiency incentive program; (B) allow utilities to distribute the costs of water saving products by billing at pre-installation rates until devices have been paid for; (C) encourage decreased water usage by establishing rate structures such as increasing block rates or seasonal pricing; (D) add additional incentive to rebate programs by making the rebates untaxable income. (E) require municipalities or utilities to exhaust every reasonable method of water conservation before applying for permits to construct water supply or water treatment systems; (F) require high-efficiency toilets, urinals, showerheads, and faucets in new construction and changing plumbing codes to incorporate different pipe sizing needs; and (G) and mandate installation of meters to correctly measure water consumption. Following the introduction, a general overview of these recommendations is presented. Each recommendation is discussed briefly. After determining the cost-effectiveness of a plumbing replacement program (or plumbing replacement aspect of a larger program) states can encourage replacement of toilets, urinals, showerheads, and faucets in a number of ways. This report lists both legislative and economic measures that can be implemented on the state level that impact local programs.

  7. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melody, Moya; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Richard

    2010-09-30

    As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

  8. Modeling the Impacts of Solar Distributed Generation on U.S. Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda, Smith; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Jaron, Peck

    2015-01-01

    Distributed electric power generation technologies typically use little or no water per unit of electrical energy produced; in particular, renewable energy sources such as solar PV systems do not require cooling systems and present an opportunity to reduce water usage for power generation. Within the US, the fuel mix used for power generation varies regionally, and certain areas use more water for power generation than others. The need to reduce water usage for power generation is even more urgent in view of climate change uncertainties. In this paper, we present an example case within the state of Tennessee, one of the top four states in water consumption for power generation and one of the states with little or no potential for developing centralized renewable energy generations. The potential for developing PV generation within Knox County, Tennessee, is studied, along with the potential for reducing water withdrawal and consumption within the Tennessee Valley stream region. Electric power generation plants in the region are quantified for their electricity production and expected water withdrawal and consumption over one year, where electrical generation data is provided over one year and water usage is modeled based on the cooling system(s) in use. Potential solar PV electrical production is modeled based on LiDAR data and weather data for the same year. Our proposed methodology can be summarized as follows: First, the potential solar generation is compared against the local grid demand. Next, electrical generation reductions are specified that would result in a given reduction in water withdrawal and a given reduction in water consumption, and compared with the current water withdrawal and consumption rates for the existing fuel mix. The increase in solar PV development that would produce an equivalent amount of power, is determined. In this way, we consider how targeted local actions may affect the larger stream region through thoughtful energy development. This model can be applied to other regions, other types of distributed generation, and used as a framework for modeling alternative growth scenarios in power production capacity in addition to modeling adjustments to existing capacity.

  9. ARM 17-30-10 - Ground Water Pollution Control System | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Ground Water Pollution Control System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 17-30-10 - Ground Water...

  10. Title 10 V.S.A. Chapter 47 Water Pollution Control | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    V.S.A. Chapter 47 Water Pollution Control Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 10 V.S.A. Chapter 47 Water...

  11. Water pollution control in low density areas (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Water pollution control in low density areas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water pollution control in low density areas Twenty-eight papers are included on water pollution in the rural environment. The book is divided into six sections: land treatment of wastewater, septic tanks and their effects on the environment, groundwater problems, rural water supply problems, non-point pollution, and low-cost wastewater treatment facilities for rural

  12. Environmental Controls on Water Use Efficiency during Severe Drought in an

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ozark Forest in Missouri, USA (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Environmental Controls on Water Use Efficiency during Severe Drought in an Ozark Forest in Missouri, USA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Environmental Controls on Water Use Efficiency during Severe Drought in an Ozark Forest in Missouri, USA Environmental control of canopy-level water use efficiency (WUE) during drought was studied at an eddy flux site in an oak-hickory forest in central Missouri, USA. Two

  13. Sandia Energy - Resource Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Assessment Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power Resource Assessment Resource AssessmentAshley Otero2016-01-05T19:06:04+00:00 Characterizing wave...

  14. Strategies for Controlling Energy and Water Use in Leased Spaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Are you wondering how to tackle energy and water efficiency in leased tenant spaces? A representative from DOE will discuss technological barriers, opportunities, and collaborative approaches to...

  15. Electric power grid control using a market-based resource allocation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chassin, David P.

    2015-07-21

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for distributing a resource (such as electricity) using a resource allocation system. In one exemplary embodiment, a plurality of requests for electricity are received from a plurality of end-use consumers. The requests indicate a requested quantity of electricity and a consumer-requested index value indicative of a maximum price a respective end-use consumer will pay for the requested quantity of electricity. A plurality of offers for supplying electricity are received from a plurality of resource suppliers. The offers indicate an offered quantity of electricity and a supplier-requested index value indicative of a minimum price for which a respective supplier will produce the offered quantity of electricity. A dispatched index value is computed at which electricity is to be supplied based at least in part on the consumer-requested index values and the supplier-requested index values.

  16. Electric power grid control using a market-based resource allocation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chassin, David P

    2014-01-28

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for distributing a resource (such as electricity) using a resource allocation system. In one exemplary embodiment, a plurality of requests for electricity are received from a plurality of end-use consumers. The requests indicate a requested quantity of electricity and a consumer-requested index value indicative of a maximum price a respective end-use consumer will pay for the requested quantity of electricity. A plurality of offers for supplying electricity are received from a plurality of resource suppliers. The offers indicate an offered quantity of electricity and a supplier-requested index value indicative of a minimum price for which a respective supplier will produce the offered quantity of electricity. A dispatched index value is computed at which electricity is to be supplied based at least in part on the consumer-requested index values and the supplier-requested index values.

  17. Research on water proportioning for dust control at Longwalls. Phase II report. [For dust control by water sprays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pimentel, R.A.

    1983-01-07

    After the Quarto Mining Corporation had offered its cooperation, the face equipment at the South Longwall of Quarto's Powhatan No. 4 mine was studied in detail. It was decided not to increase the water system's capacity. Thus, only modifications on the shearer had to be made. The sharer is an Eickhoff 300. Some modifications had been made to the water distribution system on this machine by the mine. The water distribution, cooling and spray system as we found it is shown in Figure 4. To enable the water proportioning tests, modifications were designed as shown in Figure 5. Valve and gauge assemblies were installed in each of the water supply lines to the drums. In addition, gauges were installed to measure the flow and pressure of the water supplied to the shearer. It was decided to incorporate the existing distribution block in the design and not to change the water supply system to the motor. This could safely be done, because the modifications would not decrease the flow to the motor. Consequently, the modifications could be kept simple. All hardware necessary for the tests at Quarto was procured and the valve systems pre-assembled. A detailed sampling strategy was developed, geared toward the data collection effort at Quarto.

  18. Fuzzy Logic Controller Architecture for Water Level Control in Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generator (SG) Using ANFIS Training Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vosoughi, Naser; Naseri, Zahra

    2002-07-01

    Since suitable control of water level can greatly enhance the operation of a power station, a Fuzzy logic controller architecture is applied to show desired control of the water level in a Nuclear steam generator. with regard to the physics of the system, it is shown that two inputs, a single output and the least number of rules (9 rules) are considered for a controller, and the ANFIS training method is employed to model functions in a controlled system. By using ANFIS training method, initial member functions will be trained and appropriate functions are generated to control water level inside the steam generators while using the stated rules. The proposed architecture can construct an input output mapping based on both human knowledge (in from of Fuzzy if then rules) and stipulated input output data. In this paper with a simple test it has been shown that the architecture fuzzy logic controller has a reasonable response to one step input at a constant power. Through computer simulation, it is found that Fuzzy logic controller is suitable, especially for the water level deviation and abrupt steam flow disturbances that are typical in the existing power plant. (authors)

  19. Neutron economic reactivity control system for light water reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.; Gregurech, Steve

    1989-01-01

    A neutron reactivity control system for a LWBR incorporating a stationary seed-blanket core arrangement. The core arrangement includes a plurality of contiguous hexagonal shaped regions. Each region has a central and a peripheral blanket area juxapositioned an annular seed area. The blanket areas contain thoria fuel rods while the annular seed area includes seed fuel rods and movable thoria shim control rods.

  20. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Appendix B of Attachment 3: Groundwater hydrology report, Attachment 4: Water resources protection strategy, Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Attachment 3 Groundwater Hydrology Report describes the hydrogeology, water quality, and water resources at the processing site and Dry Flats disposal site. The Hydrological Services calculations contained in Appendix A of Attachment 3, are presented in a separate report. Attachment 4 Water Resources Protection Strategy describes how the remedial action will be in compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater standards.

  1. The clean water act -- (Federal Water Pollution Control Act), what it means to utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talt, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    Departing from previous policy, in August 1993 the USEPA`s Water Office recommended that the agency regulate a proposed electric power plant`s cooling pond as a water of the US. At issue was a proposal by Florida Power corp. to build a new electric power plant in Polk County, Florida. A 2,600 acre cooling pond to collect heated and discharged water was included in the proposal. Region 4 USEPA staff asked USEPA Headquarters in Washington, DC to decide whether the pond was exempt from the CWA or a water of the US. The pond could be a habitat for migratory birds according to a memo prepared by Region 4 staff. The USEPA Water Office used the presence of migratory birds to claim a nexus to interstate commerce and therefore concluded that the pond should be regulated under the CWA. Electric power industry proponents have argued that an overly expansive definition of waters of the US may result in any new power plant being required to construct cooling towers. Cooling towers are said to be a more expensive and wasteful method to cool heated water. Region 4 ultimately recanted its earlier position after considerable discussions with various other Environmental Protection Agency offices and, no doubt industry pressure. Florida Power Corp. was not required to obtain an NPDES permit for the cooling pond. The lesson of Florida Power Corp. is that the regulatory environment for utilities can be uncertain under the Clean Water Act even in the face of a relatively straightforward exemption from regulation.

  2. Identification and preliminary characterization of global water resource issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.; Cohen, M.L.; Currie, J.W.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives were to: (1) identify, characterize, and define existing or projected regional and global water resource management issues which may be affected by CO/sub 2/-induced climate changes; and (2) develop research priorities for acquiring additional information about the potential effects of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on the availability and allocation of freshwater supplies. The research was broken into four work elements: (1) identification of water resource management issues on a global and regional basis; (2) identification of a subset of generic CO/sub 2/-related water resource management issues believed to have the highest probability of being affected, beneficially or adversely, by a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change; (3) selection of specific sites for examining the potential effect of a CO/sub 2/-induced climate change on these issues; and (4) conducting detailed case studies at these sites, the results from which will be used to identify future research and data needs in the area of water resources. This report summarizes the research related to the first three work elements. 6 figures, 9 tables.

  3. NMS 74-6-4 Duties and Powers of the Water Quality Control Commission...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -4 Duties and Powers of the Water Quality Control Commission Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: NMS 74-6-4 Duties...

  4. Environmental control technology for mining and milling low-grade uranium resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weakley, S.A.; Blahnik, D.E.; Long, L.W.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1981-04-01

    This study examined the type and level of wastes that would be generated in the mining and milling of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ from four potential domestic sources of uranium. The estimated costs of the technology to control these wastes to different degrees of stringency are presented.

  5. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy

    2010-06-01

    We take the perspective of a microgrid that has installed distribution energy resources (DER) in the form of distributed generation with combined heat and power applications. Given uncertain electricity and fuel prices, the microgrid minimizes its expected annual energy bill for various capacity sizes. In almost all cases, there is an economic and environmental advantage to using DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected annualized energy bill is reduced by 9percent while CO2 emissions decline by 25percent. Furthermore, the microgrid's risk is diminished as DER may be deployed depending on prevailing market conditions and local demand. In order to test a policy measure that would place a weight on CO2 emissions, we use a multi-criteria objective function that minimizes a weighted average of expected costs and emissions. We find that greater emphasis on CO2 emissions has a beneficial environmental impact only if DR is available and enough reserve generation capacity exists. Finally, greater uncertainty results in higher expected costs and risk exposure, the effects of which may be mitigated by selecting a larger capacity.

  6. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Porous Media? (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media? Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid

  7. Natural resources law handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book covers legal topics ranging from ownership-related issues (including disposition, use and management of privately and publicly-owned lands, resources, minerals and waters) to the protection and maintenance of our nation's natural resources. It contains chapters on oil and gas resources, coal resources, and minerals and mining.

  8. Protection of the Groundwater Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection of the Groundwater Resource Protection of the Groundwater Resource Monitoring wells act as sentinels between suspected LANL contamination and the water supply. August 1,...

  9. Resources | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Resources Machine Control Center Display Jefferson Lab's accelerator is operated from the Machine Control Center. The MCC features a full-wall display that allows operators to monitor every function of the accelerator and to make adjustments as needed. JEFFERSON LAB RESOURCES Read more Policymakers Resources U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu Former U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu speaks during Jefferson Lab's 25th Anniversary celebration. Read more News Media Resources Jefferson Lab

  10. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Water Resource Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Address: Kalanimoku...

  11. Feasibility assessment of the water energy resources of the United States for new low power and small hydro classes of hydroelectric plants: Appendix B - Assessment results by state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in Appendix B. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

  12. Feasibility assessment of the water energy resources of the United States for new low power and small hydro classes of hydroelectric plants: Main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas G.; Reeves, Kelly S.; Brizzee, Julie; Lee, Randy D.; Carroll, Gregory R.; Sommers, Garold L.

    2006-01-01

    Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

  13. Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Hall

    2006-01-01

    Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MW) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MW) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

  14. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ID-11263 January 2006 Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies A Strong Energy Portfolio for a Strong America Energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy will mean a stronger economy, a cleaner environment, and greater energy independence for America. By investing in technology breakthroughs today,

  15. Water Pollution Control Plant Solar Site Evaluation: San José

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the findings of a solar site evaluation conducted at the San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant (Site) in the City of San Jose, California (City). This evaluation was conducted as part of a larger study to assess solar potential at multiple public facilities within the City.

  16. One-way coupling of an integrated assessment model and a water resources model: evaluation and implications of future changes over the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-18

    An integrated model is being developed to advance our understanding of the interactions between human activities, terrestrial system and water cycle, and how system interactions will be affected by a changing climate at the regional scale. As a first step towards that goal, a global integrated assessment model including a waterdemand model is coupled offline with a land surface hydrology routing water resources management model. A spatial and temporal disaggregation approach is developed to project the annual regional water demand simulations into a daily time step and subbasin representation. The model demonstrated reasonable ability to represent the historical flow regulation and water supply over the Midwest (Missouri, Upper Mississippi and Ohio). Implications for the future flow regulation, water supply and supply deficit are investigated using a climate change projection with the B1 emission scenario which affects both natural flow and water demand. Over the Midwest, changes in flow regulation are mostly driven by the change in natural flow due to the limited storage capacity over the Ohio and Upper Mississippi river basins. The changes in flow and demand have a combined effect on the Missouri Summer regulated flow. The supply deficit tends to be driven by the change in flow over the region. Spatial analysis demonstrates the relationship between the supply deficit and the change in demand over urban areas not along a main river or with limited storage, and over areas upstream of groundwater dependent fields with therefore overestimated demand.

  17. Human Resources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Human Resources Human Resources and Administration (HRA) HRA Home About Human Resources Administration SC Correspondence Control Center (SC CCC) Contact Information Human Resources...

  18. Jefferson Lab - Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.jlab.orgresources

    Control Center Display" src"sitesdefaultfileslandingPageResources04.png"...

  19. Effects of coal fly-ash disposal on water quality in and around the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana. Water-resources investigations (final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, M.A.

    1981-04-01

    Dissolved constituents in seepage from fly-ash settling ponds bordering part of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (the Lakeshore) have increased trace elements, and gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity in ground water and surface water downgradient from the settling ponds. Data suggest that concentrations of some dissolved trace elements may be greater beneath interdunal pond 2 than in the pond. The soil system downgradient from the settling ponds seems to have affected the concentrations of dissolved ions in the settling-pond seepage. Calcium concentrations were greater in ground water downgradient from the settling ponds than in the ponds. Where organic material was present downgradient from the settling ponds, concentrations of arsenic, fluoride, molybdenum, potassium, sulfate, and strontium were greater in the ground water than in the ponds. In contrast, the concentrations of cadmium, copper, nickel, aluminum, cobalt, lead, and zinc were less.

  20. Heat Pump Water Heaters: Controlled Field Research of Impact on Space Conditioning and Demand Response Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Widder, Sarah H.; Eklund, Ken; Petersen, Joseph M.; Sullivan, Greg

    2015-10-05

    A new generation of heat pump water heaters (HPWH) has been introduced into the U.S. market that promises to provide significant energy savings for water heating. Many electric utilities are promoting their widespread adoption as a key technology for meeting energy conservation goals and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. There is, however, considerable uncertainty regarding the space conditioning impact of an HPWH installed in a conditioned space. There is also uncertainty regarding the potential for deployment of HPWHs in demand response (DR) programs to help manage and balance peak utility loads in a similar manner as conventional electric resistance water heaters (ERWH). To help answer these uncertainties, controlled experiments have been undertaken over 30 months in a matched pair of unoccupied Lab Homes located on the campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington.

  1. Criminal sanctions applicable to Federal water pollution control measures. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.C.

    1991-09-30

    Overkill or not enough: Two decades ago, Congress realized that a system of civil remedies alone, devoid of any lasting punitive consequences, was inadequate to insure compliance with environmental protection statutes. Other than the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899, which was designed to protect navigation, Federal criminal sanctions were not applicable to water pollution offenses. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, more commonly known as the Clean Water Act (CWA), was twenty-four years old before Federal criminal enforcement of its provisions was allowed. But since the early 1970's, the criminal provisions of the CWA have been strengthened, the United States Department of Justice has beefed up its environmental enforcement efforts, and environmental polluters have been prosecuted. This Federal effort is now approaching overkill.

  2. ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2003-11-15

    This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

  3. NREL's Controllable Grid Interface Saves Time and Resources, Improves Reliability of Renewable Energy Technologies (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a controllable grid interface (CGI) test system that can significantly reduce certification testing time and costs. The CGI also provides system engineers with a better understanding of how wind turbines, photovoltaic (PV) inverters, and energy storage systems interact with the grid and react to grid disturbances. For the energy industry, this will save time and resources while minimizing integration issues, improve

  4. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Webinar Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofits (Presentation) Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for ...

  5. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Geothermal Heat ...

  6. Extending the authorization of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 through the end of Fiscal Year 1993: report to accompany H. R. 5010. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, August 8, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the bill is to extend the authorization of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984. The bill extends the authorization of appropriations for assistance to the water resources research institutes through the end of 1993, clarifies the non-Federal matching requirements for institutes, and initiates a new $5 million program directed at regional and interstate water problems. The Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, to whom the bill was referred, reports favorably on the bill with an amendment and recommends its passage.

  7. Wastewater treatment: Ozonation processes and equipment. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of ozone for wastewater disinfection. The citations cover system descriptions and evaluations, comparisons with the chlorination disinfection process, reaction kinetics, and the combination of ozonation with other wastewater treatment methods. The treatment of organic and inorganic compounds in wastewater and municipal water supplies is also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Wastewater treatment: Ozonation processes and equipment. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of ozone for wastewater disinfection. The citations cover system descriptions and evaluations, comparisons with the chlorination disinfection process, reaction kinetics, and the combination of ozonation with other wastewater treatment methods. The treatment of organic and inorganic compounds in wastewater and municipal water supplies is also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program A Reference Plan for Control Room Modernization: Planning and Analysis Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo; Ronald Boring; Lew Hanes; Kenneth Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is collaborating with a U.S. nuclear utility to bring about a systematic fleet-wide control room modernization. To facilitate this upgrade, a new distributed control system (DCS) is being introduced into the control rooms of these plants. The DCS will upgrade the legacy plant process computer and emergency response facility information system. In addition, the DCS will replace an existing analog turbine control system with a display-based system. With technology upgrades comes the opportunity to improve the overall human-system interaction between the operators and the control room. To optimize operator performance, the LWRS Control Room Modernization research team followed a human-centered approach published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-0711, Rev. 3, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (OHara et al., 2012), prescribes four phases for human factors engineering. This report provides examples of the first phase, Planning and Analysis. The three elements of Planning and Analysis in NUREG-0711 that are most crucial to initiating control room upgrades are: Operating Experience Review: Identifies opportunities for improvement in the existing system and provides lessons learned from implemented systems. Function Analysis and Allocation: Identifies which functions at the plant may be optimally handled by the DCS vs. the operators. Task Analysis: Identifies how tasks might be optimized for the operators. Each of these elements is covered in a separate chapter. Examples are drawn from workshops with reactor operators that were conducted at the LWRS Human System Simulation Laboratory HSSL and at the respective plants. The findings in this report represent generalized accounts of more detailed proprietary reports produced for the utility for each plant. The goal of this LWRS report is to disseminate the technique and provide examples sufficient to serve as a template for other utilities projects for control room modernization.

  10. Computerized map-based information management system for natural resource management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K.

    1995-12-01

    Federal agencies, states and resource managers have control and stewardship responsibility over a significant inventory of natural resources. A number of federal regulations require the review, protection and preservation of natural resource protection. Examples of such actions include the reauthorization of the Clean Water Act and the modification of the National Contingency Plan to incorporate the requirements of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. To successfully preserve conserve and restore natural resources on federal reservations, and state and private lands, and to comply with Federal regulations designed to protect natural resources located on their sites, and the type of information on these resources required by environmental regulations. This paper presents an approach using a computerized, graphical information management system to catalogue and track data for the management of natural resources under Federal and state regulations, and for promoting resource conservation, preservation and restoration. The system is designed for use by Federal facility resource managers both for the day-to-day management of resources under their control, and for the longer-term management of larger initiatives, including restoration of significant or endangered resources, participation in regional stewardship efforts, and general ecosystem management. The system will be valuable for conducting natural resource baseline inventories an implementing resource management plans on lands other than those controlled by the Federal government as well. The system can provide a method for coordinating the type of natural resource information required by major federal environmental regulations--thereby providing a cost-effective means for managing natural resource information.

  11. Protection of the Groundwater Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection of the Groundwater Resource Protection of the Groundwater Resource Monitoring wells act as sentinels between suspected LANL contamination and the water supply. August 1, 2013 Where to place a sentinel well Where

  12. Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-10-01

    One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

  13. Oversight Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oversight Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans Oversight Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power, and ...

  14. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

  15. Geochemical Water and Sediment Data: Reformatted Data from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) Program

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Smith, Steven M. [USGS

    The National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program was initiated by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1973 with a primary goal of identifying uranium resources in the United States. The Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program (initiated in 1975) was one of nine components of NURE. Planned systematic sampling of the entire United States began in 1976 under the responsibility of four DOE national laboratories: Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The NURE program effectively ended about 1983-84 when funding disappeared. Out of a total of 625 quadrangles that cover the entire lower 48 States and Alaska, only 307 quadrangles were completely sampled, some were partially completed, and many had not been done at all. Over the years various efforts have been made to finish the original task or analyze the stored samples or complete final reports. The sample archive was transferred to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1985. The archive reportedly contained about 380,000 original sediment samples from all four laboratories, about 250,000 replicates, splits, size fractions or other samples and approximately 500,000 resin samples of waters.

  16. An Update of the Analytical Groundwater Modeling to Assess Water Resource Impacts at the Afton Solar Energy Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, John J.; Greer, Christopher B.; Carr, Adrianne E.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to update a one-dimensional analytical groundwater flow model to examine the influence of potential groundwater withdrawal in support of utility-scale solar energy development at the Afton Solar Energy Zone (SEZ) as a part of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) Solar Energy Program. This report describes the modeling for assessing the drawdown associated with SEZ groundwater pumping rates for a 20-year duration considering three categories of water demand (high, medium, and low) based on technology-specific considerations. The 2012 modeling effort published in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (Solar PEIS; BLM and DOE 2012) has been refined based on additional information described below in an expanded hydrogeologic discussion.

  17. Marketing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expand Utility Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Marketing Resources Marketing Portal Reports, Publications, and Research Utility Toolkit...

  18. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Energy technology scenarios for use in water resources assessments under Section 13a of the Federal Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    This document presents two estimates of future growth of emerging energy technology in the years 1985, 1990, and 2000 to be used as a basis for conducting Water Resources Council assessments as required by the Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act of 1974. The two scenarios are called the high world oil price (HWOP) and low world oil price (LWOP) cases. A national-level summary of the ASA tabulations is shown in Appendix A; the scenarios are presented at the ASA level of detail in Appendix B. The two scenarios were generally derived from assumptions of the Second National Energy Plant (NEP II), including estimates of high and low world oil price cases, growth rate of GNP, and related economic parameters. The overall national energy growth inherent in these assumptions was expressed as a detailed projection of various energy fuel cycles through use of the Fossil-2 model and regionalized through use of the Strategic Environmental Assessment System (SEAS). These scenarios are for the use of regional analysts in examining the availability of water for and the potential impacts of future growth of emerging energy technology in selected river basins of the Nation, as required by Section 13(a).

  20. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  1. Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Control Centers for Reliable Grid Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Lawrence E.

    2011-11-01

    This report provides findings from the field regarding the best ways in which to guide operational strategies, business processes and control room tools to support the integration of renewable energy into electrical grids.

  2. Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Control Centers for Reliable Grid Operations. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Lawrence E.

    2011-11-01

    This is the executive summary for a report that provides findings from the field regarding the best ways in which to guide operational strategies, business processes and control room tools to support the integration of renewable energy into electrical grids.

  3. Geothermal Resource Classification | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothermal Resource Classification.PDF More Documents & Publications Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants Water Use in the Development and...

  4. Thermohaline pore water trends of southeastern Louisiana: Geologic applications and controls on fluid movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlin, D.; Schramm, B.

    1995-10-01

    Previous research has suggested that dissolution of salt diapirs and the formation of dense, saline brines at shallow depths are concurrent with large scale fluid migration. A critical foundation of these studies is the determination of salinity from the spontaneous potential (SP) log and the ability to drive fluid vertically through the sediment. Derivation of salinity using the perfect shale model and contouring iso-salinity values over intervals of Lower Miocene and Upper Oligocene sediments that contain thick, impermeable carbonate deposits cloud these findings. The calculation of salinity is based on water resistivity (Rw) variations and the geological constraints on derivation of this variable. Application of the imperfect shale membrane model to determine Rw from the SP log provided a closer approximation to Rw from produced water samples over St. Gabriel Field in Ascension and Iberville parishes, La than past SP models. Further analyses of temperature, pressure, salinity, and freshwater hydraulic head trends of Lower Miocene and Upper Oligocene deposits over the field and surrounding area suggest that dissolution of salt occurred prior to hydrocarbon generation and large scale fluid migration is not dynamic at present. An important control that should be used in future studies of thermohaline fluid movement is the identification of local structure, stratigraphic variation, shale membrane efficiency, and time of salt diapirism.

  5. CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS RESOURCES | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS RESOURCES CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS RESOURCES The following resources provide information about outdoor lighting control systems. PDF icon 2014 Presentation: What to Look for Today in Control Systems PDF icon 2015 Presentation: Outdoor Lighting Control System Fundamentals PDF icon 2015 Presentation: Lessons Learned from Networked Outdoor Lighting Control System Pilot Projects PDF icon Emerging Technology Primer: Networked Outdoor Lighting Control Systems

  6. Human Resources and Administration Homepage | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Home Human Resources and Administration (HRA) HRA Home About Human Resources Administration SC Correspondence Control Center (SC CCC) Contact Information Human Resources and...

  7. S. 1635: A Bill to extend the authorization of appropriations for the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 through the end of fiscal year 1994. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, September 18, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 1635 is a bill to extend the authorization of appropriations for the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 through the end of fiscal year 1994.

  8. Testimony Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: Energy Development and Water Resources Carl Bauer, Director, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water Resources Control Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal CaseHearing: California...

  10. Resources | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Machine Control Center Display Jefferson Lab's accelerator is operated from the Machine Control Center. The MCC features a full-wall display that allows operators to monitor every function of the accelerator and to make adjustments as needed. JEFFERSON LAB RESOURCES Founded in 1985, Jefferson Lab is a world-leading nuclear physics research facility whose mission it is to explore the nucleus of the atom. The lab employs more than 800 physicists, engineers, computer specialists,

  11. Contacts & Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts & Resources Contacts & Resources Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 envoutreach@lanl.gov Public...

  12. Teacher Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teachers » Teacher Resources Teacher Resources The Bradbury Science Museum offers teacher resources for your visit. Scavenger Hunts Scavenger Hunt (pdf) Scavenger Hunt Key (pdf) Bradbury Science Museum newsletter The current issue can be found at the Newsletter page. Los Alamos Teachers' Resource Book Informal educators throughout the Los Alamos School District gather periodically to share ideas and collaborate. We have assembled a collection of flyers about our programs that serve classroom

  13. Resources - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Resources Hero.jpg Resources Research Introduction Thrusts Library Resources Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database JCAP offers a number of databases and simulation tools for solar-fuel generator researchers and developers. User Facilities Expert Team solarfuels1.jpg

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  15. LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  16. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? ?r)/(?s ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  17. Analysis of alternative modifications for reducing backwater flooding at the Honey Creek coal strip-mine reclamation site in Henry County, Missouri. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Studies to determine the hydrologic conditions in mined and reclaimed mine areas, as well as areas of proposed mining, have become necessary with the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Honey Creek in Henry County, Missouri, has been re-routed to flow through a series of former strip mining pits which lie within the Honey Creek coal strip mine reclamation site. During intense or long duration rainfalls within the Honey Creek basin, surface runoff has caused flooding on agricultural land near the upstream boundary of the reclamation site. The calculated existing design discharge (3,050 cubic feet per second) water-surface profile is compared to the expected water-surface profiles from three assumed alternative channel modifcations within the Honey Creek study area. The alternative channel modifications used in these analyses include (1) improvement of channel bottom slope, (2) relocation of spoil material, and (3) improved by-pass channel flow conditions. The alternative 1, 2, and 3 design discharge increase will reduce the agricultural field current (1990) frequency of backwater flooding from a 3-year to a 6.5-year event.

  18. Virginia coastal resources management program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Approval of a coastal management plan for coastal land and water use activities on the coast of Virginia is proposed. The coastal management area would embrace all of Tidewater Virginia, approximately 5000 miles long, and would extend to the three-mile outer limit of the United States territorial sea. The core regulatory program would include fisheries management, subaqueous lands management, wetland management, dunes management, nonpoint source pollution control, point source pollution control, shoreline sanitation, and air pollution control. Geographic areas of particular concern would be designated as worthy of special consideration in any planning or management process. These areas would include natural resource areas, such as wetlands, spawning areas, coastal sand dunes, barrier islands, and special wildlife management areas. Natural hazard areas would include areas vulnerable to erosion and areas subject to damage from wind, tides, and storm-related events. Geographic areas of special concern would include those with particular conservation, recreational, ecological, and aesthetic values. Waterfront development areas would include ports, commercial fishing piers, and community waterfronts. Shorefront access planning would provide access to the shoreline and water for recreational activities. Each year, two additional boat ramps would be planned for construction. Energy facility planning would focus on facilities involved in the production of electricity and petroleum, and in the export of coal. Shoreline erosion mitigation planning would identify, control, and mitigate erosion.

  19. Subcontractor Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment » Environmental Stewardship » Subcontactor Resources Subcontractor Resources We make it easy for you to work for Environmental Programs. Contact Environmental Programs Directorate Office (505) 606-2337 Points of Contact Subcontracts Manager Robin Reynolds Badging LANL TRU Program (LTP) - Mary Thronas Corrective Actions Program (CAP) - Tammie Fredenburg Records Debi Guffee Training Lisarae Lattin Resources Badge request form (docx) Injury illness card (pdf) Laboratory

  20. Business resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Business resources Business resources Setting new standards and small business initiatives within NNSA that will contribute to developing and strengthening our strategic partners for national security challenges. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email Broaden your market-find more resources with other labs, organizations LANL encourages business owners to fully research the Laboratory and to also market their services and products to other businesses, small business programs of other

  1. Additional Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources are focused on Federal new construction and major renovation projects, sustainable construction, and the role of renewable energy technologies in such facilities. These...

  2. Subcontractor Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robin Reynolds Badging LANL TRU Program (LTP) - Mary Thronas Corrective Actions Program (CAP) - Tammie Fredenburg Records Debi Guffee Training Lisarae Lattin Resources Badge...

  3. Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization Projects | Department of Energy Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's Wind integration, transmission, and resource assessment and characterization projects from fiscal years 2006 to 2014. PDF icon Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects

  4. Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment andCharacteri...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's Wind integration, transmission, and resource assessment...

  5. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight Sustainable ...

  6. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon sercmthighlight.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - ...

  7. IDAPA 37.03.04 Drilling For Geothermal Resources Rules | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rules for drilling Geothermal Resources released by the State of Idaho Department of Water Resources Geothermal Resource Program in Boise, Idaho. Published NA Year Signed or...

  8. Coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically controlled accumulator fuel injection system: Break-up distances and times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caton, J.A.; Payne, S.E.; Terracina, D.P.; Kihm, K.D.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions (50% (by man) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}), the break-up time was 0.30 ms. An empirical correlation for spray tip penetration, break-up time and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.

  9. Quasielastic neutron scattering with in situ humidity control: Water dynamics in uranyl fluoride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miskowiec, A.; Kirkegaard, M. C.; Herwig, K. W.; Trowbridge, L.; Mamontov, E.; Anderson, B.

    2016-03-04

    The authors confirm that water vapor pressure is the driving thermodynamic force for the conversion of the anhydrous structure to [(UO2F2)(H2O)]7 ? (H2O)4, and they demonstrate the feasibility of extending this approach to aqueous forms of UO2F2+ xH2O. This method has general applicability to systems in which water content itself is a driving variable for structural or dynamical phase transitions.

  10. Environmental Evaluation for Installation of Solar Arrays at San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this technical memorandum (TM) is to review the options to develop a potential solar array development (Project) within or adjacent to western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) habitat in the buffer lands that surround the San José/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and to determine if there is a ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) configuration that would enable a workable co-existence between the burrowing owl habitat and the PV arrays.

  11. Factors controlling physico-chemical characteristics in the coastal waters off Mangalore-A multivariate approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirodkar, P.V. Mesquita, A.; Pradhan, U.K.; Verlekar, X.N.; Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.

    2009-04-15

    Water quality parameters (temperature, pH, salinity, DO, BOD, suspended solids, nutrients, PHc, phenols, trace metals-Pb, Cd and Hg, chlorophyll-a (chl-a) and phaeopigments) and the sediment quality parameters (total phosphorous, total nitrogen, organic carbon and trace metals) were analysed from samples collected at 15 stations along 3 transects off Karnataka coast (Mangalore harbour in the south to Suratkal in the north), west coast of India during 2007. The analyses showed high ammonia off Suratkal, high nitrite (NO{sub 2}-N) and nitrate (NO{sub 3}-N) in the nearshore waters off Kulai and high nitrite (NO{sub 2}-N) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}-N) in the harbour area. Similarly, high petroleum hydrocarbon (PHc) values were observed near the harbour, while phenols remained high in the nearshore waters of Kulai and Suratkal. Significantly, high concentrations of cadmium and mercury with respect to the earlier studies were observed off Kulai and harbour regions, respectively. R-mode varimax factor analyses were applied separately to surface and bottom water data sets due to existing stratification in the water column caused by riverine inflow and to sediment data. This helped to understand the interrelationships between the variables and to identify probable source components for explaining the environmental status of the area. Six factors (each for surface and bottom waters) were found responsible for variance (86.9% in surface and 82.4% in bottom) in the coastal waters between Mangalore and Suratkal. In sediments, 4 factors explained 86.8% of the observed total variance. The variances indicated addition of nutrients and suspended solids to the coastal waters due to weathering and riverine transport and are categorized as natural sources. The observed contamination of coastal waters indicated anthropogenic inputs of Cd and phenol from industrial effluent sources at Kulai and Suratkal, ammonia from wastewater discharges off Kulai and harbour, PHc and Hg from boat traffic and harbour activities of New Mangalore harbour. However, the strong seasonal currents and the seasonal winds keep the coastal waters well mixed and aerated, which help to disperse the contaminants, without significantly affecting chlorophyll-a concentrations. The interrelationship between the stations as shown by cluster analyses and depicted in dendograms, categorize the contamination levels sector-wise.

  12. Archaeological Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archaeological Resources Archaeological Resources Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will cleanup the past, minimize impacts for current environmental operations, and create a sustainable future. April 12, 2012 Nake'muu Standing and previously collapsed walls at Nake'muu - note the window opening in the wall in the forefront of the photograph. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The results of the

  13. Online Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Online Resources Fusion and Plasma Physics Fusion Energy Education FuseEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education A Webby-award-winning site sponsored by LLNL and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory with information and links to the world of fusion and plasma physics. General Atomics Fusion Education General Atomics Fusion Education Fusion education resources for teachers and students from General Atomics. Lasers and Photon Science Optics for Kids Optics 4 Kids Learn about optics-the "science of

  14. PV Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water ... Infrastructure Hydrogen Production Market Transformation ... Tribal Energy Program Intellectual Property Current EC ...

  15. Controlling Accumulation of Fermentation Inhibitors in Biorefinery Recycle Water Using Microbial Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Leak, David; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Andras, Calin

    2009-01-01

    Background Microbial fuel cells (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cells are electrical devices that treat water using microorganisms and convert soluble organic matter into electricity and hydrogen, respectively. Emerging cellulosic biorefineries are expected to use large amounts of water during production of ethanol. Pretreatment of cellulosic biomass results in production of fermentation inhibitors which accumulate in process water and make the water recycle process difficult. Use of MFCs to remove the inhibitory sugar and lignin degradation products from recycle water is investigated in this study. Results Use of an MFC to reduce the levels of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, vanillic acid, 4- hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxyacetophenone while simultaneously producing electricity is demonstrated here. An integrated MFC design approach was used which resulted in high power densities for the MFC, reaching up to 3700mW/m2 (356W/m3 net anode volume) and a coulombic efficiency of 69%. The exoelectrogenic microbial consortium enriched in the anode was characterized using a 16S rRNA clone library method. A unique exoelectrogenic microbial consortium dominated by -Proteobacteria (50%), along with -Proteobacteria (28%), -Proteobacteria (14%), -Proteobacteria (6%) and others was identified. The consortium demonstrated broad substrate specificity, ability to handle high inhibitor concentrations (5 to 20mM) with near complete removal, while maintaining long-term stability with respect to power production. Conclusions Use of MFCs for removing fermentation inhibitors has implications for: 1) enabling higher ethanol yields at high biomass loading in cellulosic ethanol biorefineries, 2) improved water recycle and 3) electricity production up to 25% of total biorefinery power needs.

  16. CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS RESOURCES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS RESOURCES CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS RESOURCES The following resources provide information about outdoor lighting control systems. PDF icon 2014 Presentation: What to Look for Today in Control Systems PDF icon 2015 Presentation: Outdoor Lighting Control System Fundamentals PDF icon 2015 Presentation: Lessons Learned from Networked Outdoor Lighting Control System Pilot Projects PDF icon Emerging Technology Primer: Networked Outdoor Lighting Control Systems Solid-State

  17. Quebec: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Canada) Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Hydro-Quebec Distribution -...

  18. Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tankless Water Heater Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Minnesota Energy Resources Website http:www.minnesotaenergyresources.comhomerebates.aspx State Minnesota...

  19. Physicochemical controls on absorbed water film thickness in unsaturated geological media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokunaga, T.

    2011-06-14

    Adsorbed water films commonly coat mineral surfaces in unsaturated soils and rocks, reducing flow and transport rates. Therefore, it is important to understand how adsorbed film thickness depends on matric potential, surface chemistry, and solution chemistry. Here, the problem of adsorbed water film thickness is examined through combining capillary scaling with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Novel aspects of this analysis include determining capillary influences on film thicknesses, and incorporating solution chemistry-dependent electrostatic potential at air-water interfaces. Capillary analysis of monodisperse packings of spherical grains provided estimated ranges of matric potentials where adsorbed films are stable, and showed that pendular rings within drained porous media retain most of the 'residual' water except under very low matric potentials. Within drained pores, capillary contributions to thinning of adsorbed films on spherical grains are shown to be small, such that DLVO calculations for flat surfaces are suitable approximations. Hamaker constants of common soil minerals were obtained to determine ranges of the dispersion component to matric potential-dependent film thickness. The pressure component associated with electrical double layer forces was estimated using the compression and linear superposition approximations. The pH-dependent electrical double layer pressure component is the dominant contribution to film thicknesses at intermediate values of matric potential, especially in lower ionic strength solutions (< 10 mol m{sup -3}) on surfaces with higher magnitude electrostatic potentials (more negative than - 50 mV). Adsorbed water films are predicted to usually range in thickness from 1 to 20 nm in drained pores and fractures of unsaturated environments.

  20. Biophysical controls on carbon and water vapor fluxes across a grassland climatic gradient in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagle, Pradeep; Xiao, Xiangming; Scott, Russell L.; Kolb, Thomas E.; Cook, David R.; Brunsell, Nathaniel; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Basara, Jeffrey; Matamala, Roser; Zhou, Yuting; Bajgain, Rajen

    2015-12-01

    Understanding of the underlying causes of spatial variation in exchange of carbon and water vapor fluxes between grasslands and the atmosphere is crucial for accurate estimates of regional and global carbon and water budgets, and for predicting the impact of climate change on biosphereatmosphere feedbacks of grasslands. We used ground-based eddy flux and meteorological data, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from 12 grasslands across the United States to examine the spatial variability in carbon and water vapor fluxes and to evaluate the biophysical controls on the spatial patterns of fluxes. Precipitation was strongly associated with spatial and temporal variability in carbon and water vapor fluxes and vegetation productivity. Grasslands with annual average precipitation <600 mm generally had neutral annual carbon balance or emitted small amount of carbon to the atmosphere. Despite strong coupling between gross primary production (GPP)and evapotranspiration (ET) across study sites, GPP showed larger spatial variation than ET, and EVI had a greater effect on GPP than on ET. Consequently, large spatial variation in ecosystem water use efficiency (EWUE = annual GPP/ET; varying from 0.67 0.55 to 2.52 0.52 g C mm?ET) was observed. Greater reduction in GPP than ET at high air temperature and vapor pressure deficit caused a reduction in EWUE in dry years, indicating a response which is opposite than what has been reported for forests. Our results show that spatial and temporal variations in ecosystem carbon uptake, ET, and water use efficiency of grasslands were strongly associated with canopy greenness and coverage, as indicated by EVI.

  1. Training Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learning and Workforce Development » Training Resources Training Resources Training Resources Type Training Resources

  2. Hydrothermal Resources Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This constitutes the majority of current global geothermal resource developments. Low-Temperature Resources Low-temperature resources are hydrothermal resources with temperatures ...

  3. Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

    1990-03-01

    Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO[sub x] concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

  4. Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

    1990-03-01

    Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO{sub x} concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

  5. Climate change: Effects on reef island resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberdorfer, J.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1988-06-27

    The salinity, depth, quantity, and reliability of fresh groundwater resources on coral reef islands and coastlines are environmentally important parameters. Groundwater influences or controls the terrestrial flora, salinity, and nutrient levels in the near-shore benthic environment, the rate and nature of sediment diagenesis, and the density of human habitation. Data from a number of Indo-Pacific reef islands suggest that freshwater inventory is a function of rainfall and island dimensions. A numerical model (SUTRA) has been used to simulate the responses of atoll island groundwater to changes in recharge (precipitation), sea level, and loss of island area due to flooding. The model has been calibrated for Enjebi Island, Enewetak Atoll, where a moderately permeable, water-table aquifer overlies a high-permeability formation. Total freshwater inventory is a monotonic but nonlinear function of recharge. If recharge and island area are constant, rising sea level increases the inventory of fresh water by increasing the useful volume of the aquifer above the high-permeability zone. Flooding of land area reduces the total freshwater inventory approximately in proportion to the loss of recharge area. The most significant results of the model simulation, however, are the findings that the inventory of low-salinity water (and by extrapolation, potable water) is disproportionately sensitive to changes in recharge, island dimensions, or recharge. Island freshwater resources may therefore be unexpectedly vulnerable to climate change.

  6. Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

  7. Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Vi H.; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-03-01

    The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with “ultra low-NO{sub X}” burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

  8. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics ...

  9. Facilities, Partnerships, and Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities, Partnerships, and Resources - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  10. Distributed Energy Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Resources - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  11. NATURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.F. Fenster

    2000-12-11

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the scientific work that was performed to evaluate and assess the occurrence and economic potential of natural resources within the geologic setting of the Yucca Mountain area. The extent of the regional areas of investigation for each commodity differs and those areas are described in more detail in the major subsections of this report. Natural resource assessments have focused on an area defined as the ''conceptual controlled area'' because of the requirements contained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation, 10 CFR Part 60, to define long-term boundaries for potential radionuclide releases. New requirements (proposed 10 CFR Part 63 [Dyer 1999]) have obviated the need for defining such an area. However, for the purposes of this report, the area being discussed, in most cases, is the previously defined ''conceptual controlled area'', now renamed the ''natural resources site study area'' for this report (shown on Figure 1). Resource potential can be difficult to assess because it is dependent upon many factors, including economics (demand, supply, cost), the potential discovery of new uses for resources, or the potential discovery of synthetics to replace natural resource use. The evaluations summarized are based on present-day use and economic potential of the resources. The objective of this report is to summarize the existing reports and information for the Yucca Mountain area on: (1) Metallic mineral and mined energy resources (such as gold, silver, etc., including uranium); (2) Industrial rocks and minerals (such as sand, gravel, building stone, etc.); (3) Hydrocarbons (including oil, natural gas, tar sands, oil shales, and coal); and (4) Geothermal resources. Groundwater is present at the Yucca Mountain site at depths ranging from 500 to 750 m (about 1,600 to 2,500 ft) below the ground surface. Groundwater resources are not discussed in this report, but are planned to be included in the hydrology section of future revisions of the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c).

  12. Economic analysis for controlling water pollution in the paint manufacturing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The document is the result of a study of the paint manufacturing industry. It will serve as guidance for State and local authorities in controlling the discharge of pollutants by plants within the paint manufacturing industry as the Agency has exempted the industry from regulation under Paragraph 8(a) (iv) of the Settlement Agreement.

  13. OTEC resource assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OTEC resource assessment OTEC resource assessment OTEC resource assessment Office presentation icon 44_ocea-lmco-ascari.ppt More Documents & Publications Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Sub-System Dynamic Interaction Validation (OPPSDIV)

  14. Wave Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wave Energy Resource Assessment Office presentation icon 52_wave_resource_assessment_epri_jacobson.ppt More Documents & Publications OTEC resource assessment OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Sub-System Dynamic Interaction Validation (OPPSDIV) Whitestone Power & Communications (TRL 1 2 3 System) - Whitestone Poncelet RISEC Project

  15. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  16. Computing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cluster-Image TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Computing Resources The TRACC Computational Clusters With the addition of a new cluster called Zephyr that was made operational in September of this year (2012), TRACC now offers two clusters to choose from: Zephyr and our original cluster that has now been named Phoenix. Zephyr was acquired from Atipa technologies, and it is a 92-node system with each node having two AMD

  17. Legal Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of the General Counsel provides legal advice, counsel, and support to the Secretary, the Deputy Secretary, and program offices throughout DOE to further the Department’s mission of advancing the national, economic, and energy security of the United States through scientific and technological innovation and the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. A collection of relevant legal resources can be found below.

  18. Dust control at longwalls with water infusion and foam. Technical progress report through November 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Foam spray equipment and materials for dust suppression on longwall double drum shearer faces have been procured. This equipment includes metering pumps, foam generators and mounting brackets, foam solutions, flow meters, real time and gravimetric sampling equipment, hoses and valve banks. Initial tests have been conducted in the laboratory with three types of generators and five types of foam solutions. Based on these tests, Senior Conflow's cluster spray and Onyx Chemical Company's millifoam solution have been selected. For pumping foam solution to the shearer, Jon Bean's 2 hp, 120 VAC single-phase ceramic lined piston pump has been selected. For field tests, equipment has been installed underground in Dobbin mine in Upper Freeport seam on Eickhoff EDW 300 double drum shearer. Foamspray tests have been conducted. Real time and gravimetric dust samples have been collected. Real time sampling results indicate a dust level reduction of up to 37 percent with foam spray compared to the base case of water sprays.

  19. Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources » Resources Resources Filter by Agency Filter by Audience Filter by Resource Type description partner_agency resource_type stakeholder_group publication_date node_url link

  20. The Energy - Water Connection: Can We Sustain Critical Resources and Make them Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound?(LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMahon, Jim

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Jim McMahon of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) is head of the Energy Analysis Department in EETD, which provides technical analysis to the Department of Energy on things like energy efficiency appliance standards. McMahon and his colleagues helped the nation save tens of billions of dollars in energy costs since the standards program began. Now his Water-Energy Technology Team (WETT) is applying its expertise to the linked problem of energy and water. Each of us requires more than 500 gallons per person per day for food production, plus an additional 465 gallons to produce household electricity. WETT hopes to mine some of the numerous opportunities to save energy and water by applying new technologies.

  1. Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

    1996-07-01

    The underground testing of nuclear devices has generated substantial volumes of radioactive and other chemical contaminants below ground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Many of the more radioactive contaminants are highly toxic and are known to persist in the environment for thousands of years. In response to concerns about potential health hazards, the US Department of Energy, under its Environmental Restoration Program, has made NTS the subject of a long-term investigation. Efforts will assess whether byproducts of underground testing pose a potential hazard to the health and safety of the public and, if necessary, will evaluate and implement steps to remediate any of the identified dangers. Ground-water flow is the primary mechanism by which contaminants can be transported significant distances away from the initial point of injection. Flow paths between contaminant sources and potential receptors are separated by remote areas that span tens of miles. The diversity and structural complexity of the rocks along these flow paths complicates the hydrology of the region. Although the hydrology has been studied in some detail, much still remains uncertain about flow rates and directions through the fractured-rock aquifers that transmit water great distances across this arid region. Unique to the hydrology of NTS are the effects of underground testing, which severely alter local rock characteristics and affect hydrologic conditions throughout the region. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. 113 refs.

  2. Tidal Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tidal Energy Resource Assessment Tidal Energy Resource Assessment Tidal Energy Resource Assessment Office presentation icon 51_tidalresource_gtrc_haas.ppt More Documents & Publications Ocean current resource assessment Free Flow Energy (TRL 1 2 3 Component) - Design and Development of a Cross-Platform Submersible Generator Optimized for the Conditions of Current Energy Conversion Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web

  3. Ocean Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Resource Basics Ocean Energy Resource Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:34pm Addthis Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource assessment for the United States. To address this problem, the U.S. Department of Energy announced in 2008 that it would fund several resource-assessment projects for advanced water power. Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy-Related

  4. Geothermal Resource Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy » Geothermal » Geothermal Resource Basics Geothermal Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production facilities in the United States are located in the west, where the geothermal resource base is concentrated. Current drilling technology limits the development of geothermal resources to relatively shallow water- or steam-filled reservoirs, most of which are found in the

  5. Computing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources This page is the repository for sundry items of information relevant to general computing on BooNE. If you have a question or problem that isn't answered here, or a suggestion for improving this page or the information on it, please mail boone-computing@fnal.gov and we'll do our best to address any issues. Note about this page Some links on this page point to www.everything2.com, and are meant to give an idea about a concept or thing without necessarily wading through a whole website

  6. Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Mark Gabriel,...

  7. Mechanical properties of water-assembled graphene oxide Langmuir monolayers: Guiding controlled transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Katharine L.; Biedermann, Laura B.; Zavadil, Kevin R.

    2015-08-24

    Liquid-phase transfer of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayers is investigated from the perspective of the mechanical properties of these films. Monolayers are assembled in a LangmuirBlodgett trough, and oscillatory barrier measurements are used to characterize the resulting compressive and shear moduli as a function of surface pressure. GO monolayers are shown to develop a significant shear modulus (1025 mN/m) at relevant surface pressures while RGO monolayers do not. The existence of a shear modulus indicates that GO is acting as a two-dimensional solid driven by strong interaction between the individual GO sheets. The absence of such behavior in RGO is attributed to the decrease in oxygen moieties on the sheet basal plane, permitting RGO sheets to slide across one another with minimum energy dissipation. Knowledge of this two-dimensional solid behavior is exploited to successfully transfer large-area, continuous GO films to hydrophobic Au substrates. The key to successful transfer is the use of shallow-angle dipping designed to minimize tensile stress present during the insertion or extraction of the substrate. A shallow dip angle on hydrophobic Au does not impart a beneficial effect for RGO monolayers, as these monolayers do not behave as two-dimensional solids and do not remain coherent during the transfer process. As a result, we hypothesize that this observed correlation between monolayer mechanical properties and continuous film transfer success is more universally applicable across substrate hydrophobicities and could be exploited to control the transfer of films composed of two-dimensional materials.

  8. Mechanical properties of water-assembled graphene oxide Langmuir monolayers: Guiding controlled transfer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harrison, Katharine L.; Biedermann, Laura B.; Zavadil, Kevin R.

    2015-08-24

    Liquid-phase transfer of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayers is investigated from the perspective of the mechanical properties of these films. Monolayers are assembled in a Langmuir–Blodgett trough, and oscillatory barrier measurements are used to characterize the resulting compressive and shear moduli as a function of surface pressure. GO monolayers are shown to develop a significant shear modulus (10–25 mN/m) at relevant surface pressures while RGO monolayers do not. The existence of a shear modulus indicates that GO is acting as a two-dimensional solid driven by strong interaction between the individual GO sheets. The absence of suchmore » behavior in RGO is attributed to the decrease in oxygen moieties on the sheet basal plane, permitting RGO sheets to slide across one another with minimum energy dissipation. Knowledge of this two-dimensional solid behavior is exploited to successfully transfer large-area, continuous GO films to hydrophobic Au substrates. The key to successful transfer is the use of shallow-angle dipping designed to minimize tensile stress present during the insertion or extraction of the substrate. A shallow dip angle on hydrophobic Au does not impart a beneficial effect for RGO monolayers, as these monolayers do not behave as two-dimensional solids and do not remain coherent during the transfer process. As a result, we hypothesize that this observed correlation between monolayer mechanical properties and continuous film transfer success is more universally applicable across substrate hydrophobicities and could be exploited to control the transfer of films composed of two-dimensional materials.« less

  9. Sandia Energy - Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources ResourcesTara Camacho-Lopez2015-06-10T19:29:54+00:00...

  10. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources The Critical Materials Institute offers connections to resources, including: List of resources U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table Government agency contacts CMI unique...

  11. ORISE Resources: Consumer Health Resource Information Service...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Health Resource Information Service (CHRIS) guide The Consumer Health Resource Information Service (CHRIS) guide for faith-based organizations and communities was...

  12. Stormwater Controls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Controls Stormwater Controls Originally built to provide drinking water, the Los Alamos Canyon Reservoir now serves to keep flow at safe levels and slow down flood...

  13. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand Tankless

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Heaters | Department of Energy On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters. PDF icon serc_webinar_presentation_20111004.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot

  14. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface water, storm water and springs. April 12, 2012 Quarterly Groundwater monitoring attended by LANL managers and the Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board LANL scientists brief the Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board during quarterly groundwater monitoring of the well network around Area G. Contact

  15. Controlling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling chaos in low- and high-dimensional systems with periodic parametric perturbations K. A. Mirus and J. C. Sprott Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 29 June 1998͒ The effect of applying a periodic perturbation to an accessible parameter of various chaotic systems is examined. Numerical results indicate that perturbation frequencies near the natural frequencies of the unstable periodic orbits of the chaotic systems can result in limit

  16. NREL’s Controllable Grid Interface Saves Time and Resources, Improves Reliability of Renewable Energy Technologies; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) controllable grid interface (CGI) test system at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is one of two user facilities at NREL capable of testing and analyzing the integration of megawatt-scale renewable energy systems. The CGI specializes in testing of multimegawatt-scale wind and photovoltaic (PV) technologies as well as energy storage devices, transformers, control and protection equipment at medium-voltage levels, allowing the determination of the grid impacts of the tested technology.

  17. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department of Energy Transcript of a presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps. PDF icon serc_ghp_webinar_transcript.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Geothermal Heat Pump

  18. Hydropower Resource Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy » Hydropower » Hydropower Resource Basics Hydropower Resource Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:06pm Addthis Hydropower is used throughout the United States, but it is most common on the west coast-especially in the northwest. Although most of the best hydropower production sites have already been developed, many more potential sites have not. Learn more about the hydropower resource potential from the EERE Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. Addthis Related Articles Glossary

  19. Using wastes as resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakasam, T.B.S.; Lue-Hing, C. )

    1992-09-01

    The collection, treatment, and disposal of domestic and industrial wastewater, garbage, and other wastes present considerable problems in urban and semiurban areas of developing countries. Major benefits of using integrated treatment and resource recovery systems include waste stabilization, recovering energy as biogas, producing food from algae and fish, irrigation, improved public health, and aquatic weed control and use. Information and research are needed, however, to assesss the appropriateness, benefits, and limitations of such technology on a large scale. System configuration depends on the types and quantities of wastes available for processing. There must be enough collectable waste for the system to be viable. Information should be gathered to asses whether there is a net public health benefit by implementing a waste treatment and resource recovery system. Benefits such as savings in medical expenses and increased worker productivity due to improved health may be difficult to quantify. The potential health risks created by implementing a resource recovery system should be studied. The most difficult issues to contend with are socioeconomic in nature. Often, the poor performance of a proven technology is attributed to a lack of proper understanding of its principles by the operators, lack of community interest, improper operator training, and poor management. Public education to motivate people to accept technologies that are beneficial to them is important.

  20. Stormwater Control Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater control structures are engineered to control run-on and runoff water from suspected contaminated sites....

  1. Geologic mapping for groundwater resource protection and assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M. . Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.); Berg, R.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater is a vital natural resource in the US and around the world. In order to manage and protect this often threatened resource one must better understand its occurrence, extent, and susceptibility to contamination. Geologic mapping is a fundamental approach to developing more detailed and accurate assessments of groundwater resources. The stratigraphy and lithology of earth materials provide the framework for groundwater systems, whether they are deep confined aquifers or shallow, water table environments. These same earth materials control, in large part, the rates of migration of water and contaminants into and through groundwater systems thus establishing the potential yields of the systems and their vulnerability to contamination. Geologic mapping is used to delineate and display the vertical sequencing of earth materials either in cross-section or over lateral areas as in the stack-unit geologic map. These geologic maps, along with supportive hydrogeologic information, are used to identify the three-dimensional positioning and continuity of aquifer and non-aquifer earth materials. For example, detailed stack-unit mapping to a depth of 30 meters has been completed for a portion of a northern Illinois county. Groundwater contamination potentials were assigned to various vertical sequences of materials. Where aquifers are unconfined, groundwater contamination potentials are greatest. Conversely, other considerations being equal, the thicker the confining unit, the lower the contamination potential. This information is invaluable for land use decision-making; water supply assessment, development, and management; and environmental protection planning.

  2. Selecting a new water heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This fact sheet describes the types of water heaters available (storage water heaters, demand water heaters, heat pump water heaters, tankless coil and indirect water heaters, and solar water heaters). The criteria for selection are discussed. These are capacity, efficiency rating, and cost. A resource list is provided for further information.

  3. Solar Resource Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE solar resource research focuses on understanding historical solar resource patterns and making future predictions, both of which are needed to support reliable power system operation. As solar...

  4. Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon 2011 Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting More Documents & Publications Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects 2014 Water Power Peer Review ...

  5. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. ...

  6. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Solar Hot Water. PDF ...

  7. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This document provides an overview of the successes acheived by Idaho's Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) through Tankless Hot Water Systems, Solar Photovoltaics ...

  8. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Biomass Resource Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data The following biomass resource data collections can be found in the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC). Current Biomass Resource Supply An estimate of biomass resources...

  9. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Wind Resource Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Printable Version RReDC Home Biomass Resource Information Geothermal Resource Information Solar Resource Information Wind Resource Information Wind Data Models & Tools Publications...

  10. Recommended Practice for Patch Management of Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Tom; Dale Christiansen; Dan Berrett

    2008-12-01

    A key component in protecting a nations critical infrastructure and key resources is the security of control systems. The term industrial control system refers to supervisory control and data acquisition, process control, distributed control, and any other systems that control, monitor, and manage the nations critical infrastructure. Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) consists of electric power generators, transmission systems, transportation systems, dam and water systems, communication systems, chemical and petroleum systems, and other critical systems that cannot tolerate sudden interruptions in service. Simply stated, a control system gathers information and then performs a function based on its established parameters and the information it receives. The patch management of industrial control systems software used in CIKR is inconsistent at best and nonexistent at worst. Patches are important to resolve security vulnerabilities and functional issues. This report recommends patch management practices for consideration and deployment by industrial control systems owners.

  11. Water Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    emissions-free, and cost-effective water power open new possibilities for this reliable, renewable resource. Explore EERE's water power success stories below. July 29, 2015 The...

  12. Solar Works in Seattle: Domestic Hot Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seattle's residential solar hot water workshop. Content also covers general solar resource assessment, siting, and financial incentives.

  13. Sandia Energy - Solar Resource Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Resource Assessment Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Resource Assessment Solar Resource AssessmentTara...

  14. The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits ...

  15. Fermilab Office of General Counsel - Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Links Documents

  16. NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with EPRI to study the in-stream (free-flow, zero-head) energy potential of major rivers in the continental United States and Alaska. Information from this assessment will be ...

  17. Water Wars

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-11

    Sandia National Laboratories and Intel Corporation are cooperating on a project aimed at developing serious games to assist in resource planners in conducting open and participatory projects. Water Wars serves as a prototype game focused on water issues. Water Wars is a multi-player, online role-playing "serious game" combining large-scale simulation (e.g. SimCity), with strategy and interpersonal interaction (e.g. Diplomacy). The game is about water use set in present-day New Mexico. Players enact various stakeholder rolesmore » and compete for water while simultaneously cooperating to prevent environmental collapse. The gamespace utilizes immersive 3D graphics to bring the problem alive. The game integrates Intel's OpenSim visualization engine with Sandia developed agent-based and system dynamics models.« less

  18. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (<200 fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 39 mm), after which average lengths increased to 294 {+-} 145 mm for mid-November though early December. Fish behavior analysis indicates milling in front of the intake tower was the most common behavior observed throughout the study period (>50% of total fish events). The next most common movement patterns were fish traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east. The proportion of fish events seen moving into (forebay to tower) or out of (tower to forebay) the tower was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall for both directions combined. From mid-December 2010 through the end of the study, the combined proportions of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher than previous months of this study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring from late April through mid-June. Schooling events were present in 30 - 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak in mid-May. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring, fall, and winter months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours. No schooling was observed at night. Predator activity was observed during late spring, when fish abundance and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months. For the two days of BlueView data analyzed for vertical distribution in the forebay, a majority of fish (>50%) were present in the middle of the water column (10 - 20 m deep). Between 20 and 41 % of total fish abundance were found in the bottom of the water column (20 - 30 m deep). Few fish were observed in the top 10 m of the water column.

  19. Novel, band-controlled metal oxide compositions for semiconductor-mediated photocatalytic splitting of water to produce H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Narendra M.

    2013-02-05

    Semiconductor-mediated photo-catalytic dissociation of water offers a unique opportunity for the production of H{sub 2}, a sustainable source of energy. More efficient and chemically stable photo-catalysts, however, remain a vital requirement for commercial viability of this process. The recent research in my group has focused on the synthesis of several new metal oxide (MO) photo-catalysts, such as: LaInO{sub 3}, GaFeO{sub 3}, InVO{sub 4}, In{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} and nanotubular TiO{sub 2}. These samples of controlled grain morphology have been synthesized by using different synthesis protocols and with and without coating of a noble metal co-catalyst. The doping of an impurity, either at cationic or at anionic lattice site, has helped in the tailoring of band structure and making these oxides visible-light-sensitive. Our study has revealed that the surface characteristics, grain morphology, band structure, and doping-induced lattice imperfections control the photo-physical properties and overall photo-catalytic water splitting activity of these metal/MO composites [1-6]. We have demonstrated that, besides promoting certain charge-transfer steps, metal-semiconductor interfaces influence the adsorption of water molecules and their subsequent interaction with photo-generated electron-hole pair at the catalyst surface. The role played by the above-mentioned micro-structural properties in photo-catalytic water splitting process will be discussed.

  20. Geothermal resource assessment of the Animas Valley, Colorado. Resource Series 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, K.P.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Colorado Geological Survey, has been engaged in assessing the nature and extent of Colorado's geothermal resources. The program has included geologic and hydrogeologic reconnaissance, and geophysical and geochemical surveys. In the Animas Valley, in southwestern Colorado, two groups of thermal springs exist: Pinkerton Springs to the north, and Tripp-Trimble-Stratten Springs about 5 miles (8.1 Km) south of Pinkerton. The geothermal resources of the Animas Valley were studied. Due to terrain problems in the narrow valley, a soil mercury survey was conducted only at Tripp-Trimble Stratten, while an electrical D.C. resistivity survey was limited to the vicinity of Pinkerton. Although higher mercury values tended to be near a previously mapped fault, the small extent of the survey ruled out conclusive results. Consistent low resistivity zones interpreted from the geophysical data were mapped as faults near Pinkerton, and compared well with aerial photo work and spring locations. This new information was added to reconnaissance geology and hydrogeology to provide several clues regarding the geothermal potential of the valley. Hydrothermal minerals found in faults in the study area are very similar to ore mined in a very young mountain range, nearby. Groundwater would not need to circulate very deeply along faults to attain the estimated subsurface temperatures present in the valley. The water chemistry of each area is unique. Although previously incompletely manned, faulting in the area is extensive. The geothermal resources in the Animas Valley are fault controlled. Pinkerton and Tripp-Trimble-Stratten are probably not directly connected systems, but may have the same source at distance. Recharge to the geothermal system comes from the needle and La Plata Mountains, and the latter may also be a heat source. Movement of the thermal water is probably primarily horizontal, via the Leadville Limestone aquifer.

  1. Non-Powered Dams Resource Assessment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Non-Powered Dams Resource Assessment Non-Powered Dams Resource Assessment Non-Powered Dams Resource Assessment File 65_2011_water_power_peer_review_npd_ornl_october_2011.pptx More Documents & Publications An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States NSD Methodology Report New Stream-reach Development (NSD) Final Report and Fact Sheet

  2. Stormwater Controls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Controls Stormwater Controls Originally built to provide drinking water, the Los Alamos Canyon Reservoir now serves to keep flow at safe levels and slow down flood impacts. August 1, 2013 Los Alamos Canyon Reservoir Los Alamos Canyon Reservoir

  3. Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Resources | Department of Energy Mark Gabriel, Administrator WAPA Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources PDF icon 4-16-13_Mark_Gabriel FT HNR More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources

  4. Montana Pending Water Right Application Status Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rights application status system. Author Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation - Water Resources Division Published State of Montana, Date Not Provided DOI...

  5. Hawaii Revised Statutes 174C, State Water Code | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Statute released by the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resource Commission on Water Resource Management. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013 Legal Citation...

  6. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Elliot E. Mainzer, Administrator, Bonneville...

  7. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  8. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  9. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Success Story: Montana Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana This document contains information on how Montana SERC Program Delivers Strong Changes through Targeted Low-Income Weatherization Efforts. PDF icon serc_mt_highlight.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Operator Performance Metrics for Control Room Modernization: A Practical Guide for Early Design Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Thomas Ulrich; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-03-01

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate the operator performance using these systems as part of a verification and validation process. There are no standard, predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages of a new system. This report identifies the process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The report includes background information on design and evaluation, a thorough discussion of human performance measures, and a practical example of how the process and metrics have been used as part of a turbine control system upgrade during the formative stages of design. The process and metrics are geared toward generalizability to other applications and serve as a template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  11. Solar Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

    2008-02-01

    This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

  12. Before House Natural Resources Committee | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    House Natural Resources Committee Before House Natural Resources Committee Before House Natural Resources Committee By: Lauren Azar, Senoir Advisor to Secretary Chu Subject: Secretary Chu's March 16, 2012 Memorandum to the Power Marketing Administrations PDF icon 9-11-2012_Lauren_Azar_FT More Documents & Publications Before the House Committee on Natural Resources QER - Comment of American Public Power Association 5 Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural

  13. State & Local Renewable Power Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Power Resources State & Local Renewable Power Resources State & Local Renewable Power Resources The DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provides tools, resources, and more on solar, geothermal, wind, and water to help state and local governments use renewable energy technologies to produce sustainable, clean energy that has the potential to strengthen a community's energy security, improve environmental quality by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and

  14. Business Planning Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business Planning Resources, a presentation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  15. Women's Employee Resource Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group Women's Employee Resource Group The Women's Employee Resource Group encourages women's contributions, professional development opportunities, and shared support across the Laboratory. Contact Us Office of Diversity and Strategic Staffing (505) 667-2602 Email Computational scientist Hai Ah Nam, a member of the Women's Employee Resource Group Computational scientist Hai Ah Nam, a member of the Women's Employee Resource Group, works on the Laboratory's new Trinity supercomputing system.

  16. Hydrothermal Resources Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2012-08-31

    This two-page fact sheet provides an overview of hydrothermal resources and hydrothermal reservoir creation and operation.

  17. Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Resources The Office of Technology Transitions links to the following resources to assist industry, government, academia, small business and other organizations to make use of the many innovations from the Department of Energy and its National Laboratories. Energy Innovation Portal The Energy Innovation Portal (http://techportal.eere.energy.gov/) is a one-stop resource to locate energy-related technologies developed with EERE funding and available for licensing from national

  18. General Resources - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beryllium Program General Resources About Us Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs Beryllium Related Links Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program Feedback Beryllium Health Advocates Primary Contractors/Employers Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities General Resources General Resources Email Email Page | Print Print Page

  19. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department of Energy This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps. PDF icon geothermal_groundsource_heatpumps.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Webinar … Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofits (Presentation) Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy

  20. Additional Better Plants Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Assistance » Better Plants » Additional Better Plants Resources Additional Better Plants Resources The Better Plants Program hosted a webinar on January 22, 2015 to review accomplishments to date and detail new initiatives to save partners energy and water. Question and answer session is included. Download the presentation slides. Read the text version. Legrand's CEO John Selldorff discusses the importance of focusing on energy efficiency and remaining competitive while being a part

  1. Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items. For use in reentry decision-making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

  2. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Solar Resource Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data The following solar resource data collections can be found in the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC). Cooperative Networks for Renewable Resource Measurements (CONFRRM)...

  3. Water | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Water This map demonstrates the potential capacity to generate clean hydroelectric energy at existing non-powered dams across the U.S. Learn more. America has vast wave, tidal and hydropower resources - but much of this energy remains untapped. The Energy Department is committed to driving critical research and development efforts to expand electricity generation from these clean energy resources. This includes investments in existing hydropower facilities to equip them with the necessary

  4. Geothermal-resource assessment of Ranger Warm Spring, Colorado. Resources Series 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharakis, T.G.; Pearl, R.H.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    In 1977 a program was initiated to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of geothermal resources in Colorado. This program consisted of literature search, reconnaissance geologic and hydrogeologic mapping and geophysical and geochemical surveys. During 1980 and 1981 geothermal resource assessment efforts were conducted in the Cement Creek Valley south of Crested Butte. In this valley are two warm springs, Cement Creek and Ranger, about 4 mi (6.4 km) apart. The temperature of both springs is 77 to 79/sup 0/F (25 to 26/sup 0/C) and the discharge ranges from 60 to 195 gallons per minute. Due to access problems no work was conducted in the Cement Creek Warm Springs area. At Ranger Warm Springs electrical resistivity and soil mercury surveys were conducted. The warm springs are located in the Elk Mountains of west central Colorado. The bedrock of the area consists of sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Recent. Several faults with displacements of up to 3000 ft (194 m) are found in the area. One of these faults passes close to the Ranger Warm Springs. The electrical resistivity survey indicated that the waters of Ranger Warm Springs are moving up along a buried fault which parallels Cement Creek.

  5. Michigan's 9th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Conversion Devices Inc aka ECD Ovonics Friction Control Solutions Inc FriCSo Guardian Industries Guardian Industries Corp Luma Resources LLC Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC...

  6. High Impact Technology HQ - Resources for Evaluators - General...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HQ - Resources for Evaluators - General Measurement and Verification Plans High Impact ... Microsoft Office document icon Advanced Lighting Controls More Documents & Publications ...

  7. Gradient Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gradient Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Gradient Resources Name: Gradient Resources Address: 9670 Gateway Drive, Suite 200 Place: Reno, Nevada Zip: 89521 Region:...

  8. Orchestrating Distributed Resource Ensembles for Petascale Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldin, Ilya; Mandal, Anirban; Ruth, Paul; Yufeng, Xin

    2014-04-24

    Distributed, data-intensive computational science applications of interest to DOE scientific com- munities move large amounts of data for experiment data management, distributed analysis steps, remote visualization, and accessing scientific instruments. These applications need to orchestrate ensembles of resources from multiple resource pools and interconnect them with high-capacity multi- layered networks across multiple domains. It is highly desirable that mechanisms are designed that provide this type of resource provisioning capability to a broad class of applications. It is also important to have coherent monitoring capabilities for such complex distributed environments. In this project, we addressed these problems by designing an abstract API, enabled by novel semantic resource descriptions, for provisioning complex and heterogeneous resources from multiple providers using their native provisioning mechanisms and control planes: computational, storage, and multi-layered high-speed network domains. We used an extensible resource representation based on semantic web technologies to afford maximum flexibility to applications in specifying their needs. We evaluated the effectiveness of provisioning using representative data-intensive ap- plications. We also developed mechanisms for providing feedback about resource performance to the application, to enable closed-loop feedback control and dynamic adjustments to resource allo- cations (elasticity). This was enabled through development of a novel persistent query framework that consumes disparate sources of monitoring data, including perfSONAR, and provides scalable distribution of asynchronous notifications.

  9. Synthesis of Zn/Co/Fe-layered double hydroxide nanowires with controllable morphology in a water-in-oil microemulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Hongyu; Jiao Qingze; Zhao Yun; Huang Silu; Li Xuefei; Liu Hongbo; Zhou Mingji

    2010-02-15

    The Zn/Co/Fe-layered double hydroxide nanowires were synthesized via a reverse microemulsion method by using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) /n-hexane/n-hexanol/water as Soft-Template. ZnSO{sub 4}, CoSO{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and urea were used as raw materials. The influence of reaction temperature, time, urea concentration and Cn (molar ratio of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide to water) on the structure and morphology of Zn/Co/Fe-layered double hydroxides was investigated. The samples were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Infrared Absorption Spectrum (IR). The results indicate that higher temperature is beneficial to the formation of layered double hydroxides, but particles apart from nanowires could be produced if temperature is up to 120 deg. C. By varying the temperature, reaction time, urea concentration and Cn, we got the optimum conditions of synthesizing uniform Zn/Co/Fe-layered double hydroxide nanowires: 100 deg. C, more than 12 h, Cn: 30-33, urea concentration: 0.3 M.

  10. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, P.

    2012-12-12

    This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The technically recoverable resource does not account for all technical constraints on energy capture and conversion.

  11. Resource capture by single leaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, S.P.

    1992-05-01

    Leaves show a variety of strategies for maximizing CO{sub 2} and light capture. These are more meaningfully explained if they are considered in the context of maximizing capture relative to the utilization of water, nutrients and carbohydrates reserves. There is considerable variation between crops in their efficiency of CO{sub 2} and light capture at the leaf level. Understanding of these mechanisms indicate some ways in which efficiency of resource capture could be level cannot be meaningfully considered without simultaneous understanding of implications at the canopy level. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Building America Case study: Advanced Controls Improve Performance of Combination Space and Water Heating Systems, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controls Improve Performance of Combination Space- and Water-Heating Systems Minneapolis, Minnesota PROJECT INFORMATION Combined Space and Water Heating: Next Steps to Improved Performance Location: Minneapolis, MN Partners: University of Minnesota and The Energy Conservatory Center for Energy and Environment, mncee.org NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Building Component: Space conditioning and water heating Application: New and retrofit; single-family Year Tested: 2011-2014 Applicable

  13. Taxonomy for Modeling Demand Response Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Daniel; Kiliccote, Sila; Sohn, Michael; Dunn, Laura; Piette, Mary, A

    2014-08-01

    Demand response resources are an important component of modern grid management strategies. Accurate characterizations of DR resources are needed to develop systems of optimally managed grid operations and to plan future investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. The DOE Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study (DRESIS) project researched the degree to which demand response (DR) and energy storage can provide grid flexibility and stability in the Western Interconnection. In this work, DR resources were integrated with traditional generators in grid forecasting tools, specifically a production cost model of the Western Interconnection. As part of this study, LBNL developed a modeling framework for characterizing resource availability and response attributes of DR resources consistent with the governing architecture of the simulation modeling platform. In this report, we identify and describe the following response attributes required to accurately characterize DR resources: allowable response frequency, maximum response duration, minimum time needed to achieve load changes, necessary pre- or re-charging of integrated energy storage, costs of enablement, magnitude of controlled resources, and alignment of availability. We describe a framework for modeling these response attributes, and apply this framework to characterize 13 DR resources including residential, commercial, and industrial end-uses. We group these end-uses into three broad categories based on their response capabilities, and define a taxonomy for classifying DR resources within these categories. The three categories of resources exhibit different capabilities and differ in value to the grid. Results from the production cost model of the Western Interconnection illustrate that minor differences in resource attributes can have significant impact on grid utilization of DR resources. The implications of these findings will be explored in future DR valuation studies.

  14. Resource characterization and residuals remediation, Task 1.0: Air quality assessment and control, Task 2.0: Advanced power systems, Task 3.0: Advanced fuel forms and coproducts, Task 4.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Timpe, R.C.; Hartman, J.H.

    1994-02-01

    This report addresses three subtasks related to the Resource Characterization and Residuals Remediation program: (1) sulfur forms in coal and their thermal transformations, (2) data resource evaluation and integration using GIS (Geographic Information Systems), and (3) supplementary research related to the Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) UCG (Underground Coal Gasification) test program.

  15. Residential Water Heaters Webinar | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Water Heaters Webinar Residential Water Heaters Webinar PDF icon 20110224_residential_water_heater_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters 2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures and Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Solar Water Heaters; Request for Information Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes

  16. Human Resources | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employee Relations Human Resources Installation Of A Cryomodule Workers prepare to install a cryomodule in Jefferson Lab's accelerator. Read more Business Services Human Resources Jefferson Lab Business Services Jefferson Lab provides opportunities for both large and small businesses to engage with the lab and its scientific mission. Read more Training Human Resources Training Programs at Jefferson Lab There exist many exciting career opportunities at Jefferson Lab, and the lab provides training

  17. Contacts & Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts & Resources Contacts & Resources Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 envoutreach@lanl.gov Public Information LANL environmental website Public meetings and tours Mailing and emailing lists Public notification in local newspapers Events calendar Intellus database Information repositories Resources Illustrated Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability (pdf) Annual Sitewide

  18. Energy Resource Potential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Potential of Methane Hydrate Energy Resource Potential An introduction to the science and energy potential of a unique resource Disclaimer Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

  19. LANSCE | User Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From the initial proposal process to the completion of the experiment, LANSCE provides its users with resources critical to their experiements and their experience. Lujan Resources WNR Resources Submit a proposal for beam time Visit Registration Schedules Experiment Reports User Satisfaction Survey Reviews Submit a proposal for beam time Visit Registration Schedules Experiment Reports User Satisfaction Survey Reviews User Program Administration lujan-uo@lanl.gov Ph: 505.667.6069 User Program

  20. ARM - CHAPS: Campaign Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHAPS: Campaign Resources Campaign Details News Field Participants Resources Status and Actions ARM Data Discovery Browse Data CHAPS: Campaign Resources CHAPS Status 4-4-2007 ASP Lessons Learned 2007 CHAPS Fact Sheet Daily Flight Plan Schedule Overview of Protocol and Flight Plans for the NASA King Air G-1 Floorplan G-1 Flight Hours G-1 Flight Plan G-1 Stack Patterns G-1 Calendar of Activities G-1 Payload Instruments and the Probes to which they are attached HSRL Fact Sheet

  1. Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Resources The following tools and resources have been useful to DOE programs and partners as they build and maintain their residential energy efficiency programs. Home Energy Pros Online Community Better Buildings Network View Current Issue Past Issues Voluntary Initiative Toolkits Social Media Toolkit Designing Incentives Toolkit Partnerships Toolkit Tools Solution Center Cost-Effectiveness Tool (Beta Version) Home Energy Advisor Publications Peer Exchange Call Summaries Lessons

  2. Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Resources The Office of Indian Energy provides the following resources to assist Tribes with energy development, capacity building, energy infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. Alaska Native Villages Get information about the Office of Indian Energy's programs and initiatives to advance community energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska. Education and Training Access renewable energy curriculum, webinars,

  3. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington voters passed Initiative 937 in 2006, creating a renewable energy standard and an energy efficiency resource standard for the state's electric utilities. Initiative 937, enacted as th...

  4. Renewable Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eligible Technologies Eligible renewable resources include wind; solar; geothermal; existing hydroelectric projects (10 megawatts or less); certain new hydroelectric projects (up to 15 megawatts...

  5. Resources for Local Policymakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEE Action

    2012-06-01

    Provides a summary of State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) information resources available to local policymakers, organized by topic.

  6. Resources for Utility Regulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEE Action

    2012-06-01

    Provides a summary of State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) information resources available to utility regulators, organized by topic.

  7. Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Career Postdoctoral Factsheet: Before You Arrive Newsletters Professional Development Mentoring Resources Postdoctoral Society of Argonne LinkedIn Group National Postdoctoral...

  8. Central American resource studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Eeckhout, E.; Laughlin, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working with five Central American countries to assist in the development of their energy and mineral resources. Since 1985, mineral resources in Costa Rica, peat resources in Costa Rica and Panama, geothermal energy resources in Honduras and Guatemala, and geothermal field development in El Salvador and Costa Rica have been topics of study. This paper presents an overview of this work -- within these proceedings are papers that deal with specific aspects of each topic, and these will be duly noted. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  9. I/O Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I/O Resources I/O Resources Motivation Many users must run jobs that read datasets that are too large to transfer to the /scratch directory. When large numbers of these jobs run simultaneously, it can have an adverse affect on the performance of the disks serving the data causing your jobs to run very inefficiently. We have configured a resource in the batch system that should help manage the amount of concurrent access. These are called IO resources, and they depend on the bandwidth available

  10. NETL: Natural Gas Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas Resources Useful for heating, manufacturing, and as chemical feedstock, natural gas has the added benefit of producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions than other fossil...

  11. Visual Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Visual Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleVisualResources&oldid612333...

  12. Range Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Range Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleRangeResources&oldid612320...

  13. Accounting Resources | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounting Resources Ames Laboratory Human Resources Forms Ames Laboratory Travel Forms Ames Laboratory Forms (Select Department) ISU Intramural PO Request...

  14. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Committee | Department of Energy - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator Southeastern Power Administration Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee PDF icon 3-24-15_Kenneth_Legg FT HNR.pdf More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources

  15. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2012-04-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (<200 fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (<100 fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with forebay elevation, velocity over the WTC tower intake gate weirs, and river flows into the reservoir. A subsequent multiple regression analysis resulted in a model (R2=0.70) predicting fish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

  16. Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center WELCOME TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP RESOURCE CENTER The purpose of this web site is to provide the public and the Department of Energy's (DOE) community with a variety of information resources for long-term stewardship (LTS) responsibilities. LTS includes the physical controls, institutions, information and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites or

  17. Geothermal Resources Council's ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) applications recommend lifting 300C geothermal water ... Therefore artificial lift techniques must be employed to return the high temperature water ...

  18. Zoning and Permitting Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zoning and Permitting Resources Zoning and Permitting Resources Zoning and permitting is commonly controlled by local governments and may be applicable to both residential and commercial properties. However, the state may regulate the scope of local zoning laws. For instance, some states have passed laws limiting the ability of local governments to prohibit or unreasonably regulate the installation and operation of renewable energy systems. Zoning laws may also be structured to encourage energy

  19. Title 11 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 93 Water Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chapter 93 Water ManagementLegal Abstract This administrative code chapter governs water management by the State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources. Published NA Year...

  20. Oregon Water Rights Public Notice Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Water Rights Public Notice Webpage Abstract Provides access to Oregon Water Resources...

  1. Water Power Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE Water Power Program About Key Activities Plans,...

  2. Water related environmental decision-making in Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daane, J.; Bilotkach, U.

    1995-12-01

    Ukraine is reshaping its approach to addressing environmental concerns. This paper will describe past and current water-related environmental decision-making in Ukraine and identify efforts being made to improve such decision-making. Numerous water related agencies survived the break-up of the former Soviet Union (FSU). Their ability to analyze water quality, and make good environmental decisions with regard to surface and ground water resources, drinking water supply, pesticide management, water-related recreational activities, and wastewater disposal issues (especially those related to industries), is questionable. Poor quality assurance and quality control have hampered water monitoring endeavors. The quality of testing and pollutant monitoring is affected by the state of development of monitoring techniques. Environmental policy decisions based on these data are then suspect. Decisions were made in the past at much higher levels, often in Moscow. Local and regional monitoring agencies were encouraged to perform innumerable tests, but were not necessarily encouraged to make informed decisions as a result of test data. Large-scale capital-intensive infrastructure projects were planned in the past to solve many of the water shortage problems in southern Ukraine. More than 1,000 reservoirs and six major canal systems were constructed and more were designed. Also, industrial waste ponds were constructed to capture toxic wastes, heavy metals, and other pollutants from large industrial facilities. New methods are necessary to change problem-solving from large infrastructure solutions to smaller more efficient uses of resources through technologically efficient improvements, assigning economic value to resources, and conservation of those resources.

  3. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

    2012-12-20

    This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities The average baseline demand at the Southeast facility was approximately 4 MW. During the rainy season (October-March) the facility treated 40% more wastewater than the dry season, but demand only increased by 4%. Submetering of the facility's lift pumps and centrifuges predicted load shifts capabilities of 154 kW and 86 kW, respectively, with large lift pump shifts in the rainy season. Analysis of demand data during maintenance events confirmed the magnitude of these possible load shifts, and indicated other areas of the facility with demand response potential. Load sheds were seen to be possible by shutting down a portion of the facility's aeration trains (average shed of 132 kW). Load shifts were seen to be possible by shifting operation of centrifuges, the gravity belt thickener, lift pumps, and external pump stations These load shifts were made possible by the storage capabilities of the facility and of the city's sewer system. Large load reductions (an average of 2,065 kW) were seen from operating the cogeneration unit, but normal practice is continuous operation, precluding its use for demand response. The study also identified potential demand response opportunities that warrant further study: modulating variable-demand aeration loads, shifting operation of sludge-processing equipment besides centrifuges, and utilizing schedulable self-generation.

  4. EFRC Resources-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRC Resources EFRC map Last update 30 April 2015. The following links mostly provide information about accessing specialty equipment and the main instrument facilities that were created by PHaSE during 2009-2015. The last three links guide readers to information that is useful to anyone seriously interested in photovoltaics. Photovoltaic & Spectroscopy Facility Specialty Equipment for Electronic Materials Facility User Reservation Site NREL AM1.5 Solar Radiance Standard NREL Solar Cell

  5. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

    2009-08-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation. As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 2021, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industrys needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

  6. Decision support for integrated water-energy planning.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Castillo, Cesar; Hart, William Eugene; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2009-10-01

    Currently, electrical power generation uses about 140 billion gallons of water per day accounting for over 39% of all freshwater withdrawals thus competing with irrigated agriculture as the leading user of water. Coupled to this water use is the required pumping, conveyance, treatment, storage and distribution of the water which requires on average 3% of all electric power generated. While water and energy use are tightly coupled, planning and management of these fundamental resources are rarely treated in an integrated fashion. Toward this need, a decision support framework has been developed that targets the shared needs of energy and water producers, resource managers, regulators, and decision makers at the federal, state and local levels. The framework integrates analysis and optimization capabilities to identify trade-offs, and 'best' alternatives among a broad list of energy/water options and objectives. The decision support framework is formulated in a modular architecture, facilitating tailored analyses over different geographical regions and scales (e.g., national, state, county, watershed, NERC region). An interactive interface allows direct control of the model and access to real-time results displayed as charts, graphs and maps. Ultimately, this open and interactive modeling framework provides a tool for evaluating competing policy and technical options relevant to the energy-water nexus.

  7. SLURM Resource Manager is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SLURM Resource Manager is Coming to NERSC - 1 - Helen He NUG Meeting, 11/06/2015 What is SLURM * In simple word, SLURM is a workload manager, or a batch scheduler. * SLURM stands for Simple Linux U?lity for Resource Management. * SLURM unites the cluster resource management (such as Torque) and job scheduling (such as Moab) into one system. Avoids inter-tool complexity. * As of June 2015, SLURM is used in 6 of the top 10 computers, including the #1 system, Tianhe-2, with over 3M cores. - 2 -

  8. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continental United States | Department of Energy and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. More Documents & Publications Assessment and Mapping of the

  9. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Photovoltaics |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Solar Photovoltaics Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Photovoltaics This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Solar Photovoltaics. PDF icon serc_webinar_20111020_solar_pv.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar

  10. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continental United States | Department of Energy Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. PDF icon Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic

  11. Hydropower Resource Assessment and Characterization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    » Hydropower Resource Assessment and Characterization Hydropower Resource Assessment and Characterization The Water Power Program has released reports and maps that assess the total technically recoverable energy available in the nation's powered dams, non-powered dams, and untapped stream-reaches. These resource assessments are pivotal to understanding hydropower's potential for future electricity production. Hydropower already provides 6-8% of the nation's electricity, but more potential

  12. Low-Temperature and Coproduced Resources Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Fact Sheet Low-Temperature and Coproduced Resources Fact Sheet Geothermal waters bubble up to the surface in a natural hot spring. Source: Ted Clutter Geothermal waters bubble up to the surface in a natural hot spring. Source: Ted Clutter Low-temperature and coproduced resources represent a growing sector of development in the geothermal industry. These underutilized resources, considered unconventional below 300°F, are bringing valuable returns on investment in the near-term through

  13. Alaska Department of Natural Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    It is also responsible for the development of the state's geothermal and coalbed methane resources. Division of Mining, Land & Water (ML&W) ML&W is the primary manager of...

  14. Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources' Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conservation and Natural Resources' Nevada Water Law 101 Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Department of Conservation and...

  15. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Derrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration Subject: Water Resources Bills, S. 499 and S. 519 PDF icon 5-19-11FinalTestimony(Moe).pdf More Documents &...

  16. H. R. 3052: This Act may be cited as the Coal Field Water Protection and Replacement Act, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the protection of water resources during coal mining operations. Sections of the bill describe probable hydrologic consequences; surface and ground water monitoring plan; performance bonds; protection of water resources for permit approval; effect of underground coal mining operations; inspection and monitoring; penalty for failure of representative of Secretary or state regulatory authority to carry out certain duties; release of performance bond; water rights and replacement; regulations; and state programs.

  17. Stormwater Control Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater control structures are engineered to control run-on and runoff water from suspected contaminated sites. Structures trap sediment, keep water on-site, slow water flow and redirect water around problem areas. Rock check dams Rock check dams Silt tence Silt fence Sediment trap Sediment trap Wood mulch and native seed Wood mulch and native seed Gabion Gabion Concrete lined swales Concrete lined swales Hydroseeding Hydroseeding

  18. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Natural Resources Atlas ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Natural Resources Atlas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Natural...

  19. Resource Evaluation and Site Selection for Microalgae Production in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Jarvis, E.

    2010-09-01

    The study evaluates climate conditions, availability of CO2 and other nutrients, water resources, and land characteristics to identify areas in India suitable for algae production. The purpose is to provide an understanding of the resource potential in India for algae biofuels production and to assist policymakers, investors, and industry developers in their future strategic decisions.

  20. Human Resource Management Delegation

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-06-28

    The notice is to clarifies and updates existing Human Resource Management Delegation Authorities and the levels to which they are delegated. Expired 6-28-97. Does not cancel any directives.

  1. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2008, New Mexico enacted H.B. 305, the Efficient Use of Energy Act, which created an Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS) for New Mexico’s electric utilities, and a requirement that all ...

  2. Save Energy Now Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides information resources to industrial energy users and partnering organizations to help the nations industrial sector save energy and improve productivity.

  3. Distributed Energy Resource Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: A series of orders issued on July 15, 2015 in  Docket 2015-53-E, Docket 2015-54-E, and Docket 2015-55-E approved the incentive programs for South Carolina's Distributed Energy Resource...

  4. Office of Information Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Joanne Csordas (HS-1.21), Office of Business Operations, Office of Resource ... DOE has not previously employed (e.g., monitoring software, Smart Cards, Caller-ID)? No. ...

  5. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab Diversity Policies 200 Human Resources 202 Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action 203 Employment 208 Employee Performance and Conduct 209 Staff Development 210 Employee Concerns and Grievances Employee Concerns Program (EDP)

  6. Utility Metering- AGL Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the Spring 2013 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingdiscusses AGL Resources metering, including interruptible rate customers, large users, and meeting federal metering goals.

  7. Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management.

  8. Manhattan Project: Resources

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RESOURCES RELATING TO THE MANHATTAN PROJECT In addition to the events, people, places, processes, and science pages that comprise the bulk of this web site, a number of additional resources are also provided: Reference Materials Maps Photo Gallery To Learn More Library Suggested Readings Background on this Site About this Site How to Navigate this Site Site Map Sources Note on Sources, A Nuclear Energy and the Public's Right to Know Sources and Notes (for each page) Sources and notes for this

  9. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources The Human Resources team is fully integrated with Jefferson Lab's mission, committed to providing quality customer service based on expertise, innovation and integrity. For general HR inquiries, contact (757) 269-7598. Announcements TIAA-CREF Retirement Counseling Session: To sign up for an appointment with Robert Jean, the TIAA-CREF Individual Consultant, go to http://www.tiaa-cref.org click on Meetings & Counseling and follow the menu. The sessions will be held in Support

  10. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources Human Resources Forms Benefits 2011 Anthem Information Anthem General Mail Order Form (For KeyCare, BlueCare & HealthKeepers) Anthem Customer Claim Form Anthem Enrollment Form Anthem HealthKeepers Vision Claim Form Anthem Member Change Form Anthem Vision Services Claim Form (For KeyCare & BlueCare) 2011 Optima Information Optima Enrollment Form Prescription Home Delivery Order Form (For Optima) 2011 Delta Dental Information Delta Dental Change Form Delta Dental

  11. ARM - Other Science Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SitesOther Science Resources Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Other Science Resources AIMS Education Foundation This website offers tools, activities, and information "designed by teachers for teachers." AIMS activities and curricula are extensively field tested and

  12. Fermilab | Resources for ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    feature photo feature photo feature photo feature photo feature photo Resources for ... Navbar Toggle About Quick Info Science History Organization Photo and video gallery Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and environment Contact Newsroom Spotlight Press releases Fact sheets and brochures symmetry Interactions.org Photo and video archive Resources for ... Employees Researchers, Postdocs and Graduate Students Job Seekers Neighbors Industry K-12 Students, Teachers and Undergraduates Media

  13. Fermilab | Resources | Industrial Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Navbar Toggle About Quick Info Science History Organization Photo and video gallery Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and environment Contact Newsroom Spotlight Press releases Fact sheets and brochures symmetry Interactions.org Photo and video archive Resources for ... Employees Researchers, Postdocs and Graduate Students Job Seekers Neighbors Industry K-12 Students, Teachers and Undergraduates Media Science Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the LHC Dark matter and dark

  14. WINDExchange: Information Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Resources A range of WINDExchange resources are available, including links to relevant publications, podcasts, and webinars about wind energy topics. Annual Reports Cover of the 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report. 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report The report provides a comprehensive overview of 2014 trends in the U.S. wind industry and wind power market. DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory draws from a variety of data sources and covers a broad range of topics. Cover of

  15. Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Resources About one in every three federal employees is a military Veteran. At the Department of Energy, 21 percent of our workforce is made up of preference veterans. Veterans, their spouses, and dependent children are eligible for a variety of benefits provided by the Federal government. Some of these benefits are connected with service disabilities; others depend on amount of time served and in what capacity. Regardless, any Veteran seeking employment with a Federal agency should be

  16. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Biomass Resource Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Resource Information Photo of corn stover biomass resource Corn stover The Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC) offers a collection of data and tools to assist with biomass resource research. Learn more about RReDC's biomass resource: Data Models and tools Publications Related links Biomass Resource Assessment is available for the United States by county and includes the following feedstock categories: crop residues, forest residues, primary and secondary mill residues, urban wood

  17. Energy Efficiency Resource Standards Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resource Standards Resources Energy Efficiency Resource Standards Resources Energy efficiency resource standards (EERS) mandate a quantified energy efficiency goal for an energy provider or jurisdiction within a predetermined timeframe. The standards may encourage more efficient energy use or generation, may include a demand-side management program, and may be coupled with a state's renewable portfolio standard. Find EERS resources below. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  18. Energy Resources for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hurricane Season Energy Resources for Hurricane Season This aerial photo of New Orleans from August 29, 2005, shows a flooded neighborhood with a roadway going down into flood waters. Photo courtesy of FEMA/Jocelyn Augustino This aerial photo of New Orleans from August 29, 2005, shows a flooded neighborhood with a roadway going down into flood waters. Photo courtesy of FEMA/Jocelyn Augustino Find helpful resources for incorporating energy into disaster planning, response, and rebuilding.

  19. 2006 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of both the Federal system and the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This surplus energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These energy deficits will be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due to economic conditions or closures, additional contract purchases, and/or the addition of new generating resources. This study incorporates information on Pacific Northwest (PNW) regional retail loads, contract obligations, and contract resources. This loads and resources analysis simulates the operation of the power system in the PNW. The simulated hydro operation incorporates plant characteristics, streamflows, and non-power requirements from the current Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). Additional resource capability estimates were provided by BPA, PNW Federal agency, public agency, cooperative, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers furnished through annual PNUCC data submittals for 2005 and/or direct submittals to BPA. The 2006 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary document of Federal system and PNW region loads and resources, and (2) a technical appendix which presents regional loads, grouped by major PNW utility categories, and detailed contract and resource information. The technical appendix is available only in electronic form. Individual customer information for marketer contracts is not detailed due to confidentiality agreements. The 2006 White Book analysis updates the 2004 White Book. This analysis shows projections of the Federal system and region's yearly average annual energy consumption and resource availability for the study period, OY 2007-2016. The study also presents projections of Federal system and region expected 1-hour monthly peak demand, monthly energy demand, monthly 1-hour peak generating capability, and monthly energy generation for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. BPA is investigating a new approach in capacity planning depicting the monthly Federal system 120-hour peak generating capability and 120-hour peak surplus/deficit for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. This document analyzes the PNW's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger PNW regional power system loads and resources that include the Federal system as well other PNW entities.

  20. Controlling the Actuation Rate of Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Controlling the Actuation Rate of Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams in Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlling the Actuation Rate of Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams in Water Authors: Singhal, P ; Boyle, T ; Infanger, S ; Letts, S ; Small, W ; Maitland, D J ; Wilson, T S Publication Date: 2012-07-06 OSTI Identifier: 1122257 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-564236 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource

  1. How information resources are used by state agencies in risk assessment applications - Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, C.S.

    1990-12-31

    The Environmental Protection Agency of the State of Illinois (Illinois EPA) has programs in water, air, and land pollution and water supplies paralleling those of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The organization is part of a tripartite arrangement in which the Pollution Control Board is the judicial arm, the Department of Energy and Natural Resources is the research arm, and the Illinois EPA is the enforcement arm. Other state agencies are also concerned with various aspects of the environment and may do risk assessments for chemicals. Although there are various risk assessment activities, both formal and informal, in our agency and in others, this paper will discuss only recent initiatives in water quality criteria.

  2. Fisheries Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fisheries Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFisheriesResources&oldid612306" Feedback Contact needs updating Image...

  3. Sage Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sage Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sage Resources Place: Missoula, Montana Zip: 59803 Sector: Geothermal energy, Solar Product: A company specializing in geothermal...

  4. BPA Resource Program Announcement Letter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    types available to fill any projected deficits. The Resource Program will analyze the costs, risks and environmental characteristics of resource portfolios BPA could pursue and...

  5. Paleontological Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePaleontologicalResources&oldid647801" Feedback Contact needs updating Image...

  6. Fire Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fire Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFireResources&oldid612392" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  7. Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildlifeResources&oldid612286" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  8. resource | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    overview cleanweb hackathon resource webinar Today, Ian Kalin, a presidential innovation fellow, and the OpenEI team recorded an "energy resource" overview for developers of...

  9. Wind Career Map: Resource List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources were used in the development of the Wind Career Map, associated job profile information, or are potential resources for interested Wind Career Map viewers.

  10. Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects, Fiscal Years 2006-2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-04-01

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects from 2006 to 2014.

  11. Energy-Water Overview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emerging Issues and Challenges DOE/EIA 2010 Energy Conference Mike Hightower Sandia National Laboratories mmhight@sandia.gov, 505-844-5499 Energy and Water are ... Interdependent Water for Energy and Energy for Water Energy and power production require water: * Thermoelectric cooling * Hydropower * Energy minerals extraction/mining * Fuel Production (fossil fuels, H 2 , biofuels) * Emission control Water production, processing, distribution, and end-use require energy: * Pumping * Conveyance and

  12. California Water Code | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: California Water CodeLegal Abstract Code governing the usage of water resources in the state of...

  13. Explore Water Power Careers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Water Power Careers Explore Water Power Careers America's oldest and largest source of renewable power is water. To this end, the Water Power Program, part of the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office, researches, tests, evaluates, and deploys a portfolio of innovative technologies for clean, domestic power generation from resources such as hydropower, waves, and tides. America's oldest and largest source of renewable power is water. To this end, the Water Power Program, part of the Wind and

  14. Solar Energy Resource Center | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Resource Center Solar Energy Resource Center Sub Program Topic Resource Search Results Title Date Author SubProgram Topic Description

  15. SC Correspondence Control Center (SC CCC) | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    SC Correspondence Control Center (SC CCC) Human Resources and Administration (HRA) HRA Home About Human Resources Administration SC Correspondence Control Center (SC CCC) Contact...

  16. Employee, Retiree Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources /about/_assets/images/icon-70th.jpg Employee, Retiree Resources Employees and retirees are the building blocks of the Lab's success. Our employees get to contribute to the most pressing issues facing the nation. Clearances» New-Hire Process» Payroll, Taxes» Benefits Plan Reports & Notices» Retiree Benefits» Travel Reimbursement» Verification of Employment» TOP STORIES - highlights of our science, people, technologies close If you map it, they will come When the Weapon

  17. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Geothermal Resource Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Data The following geothermal resource data collections can be found in the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC). Geothermal Resource Data The datasets on this page offer a qualitative assessment of geothermal potential for the U.S. using Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) and based on the levelized cost of electricity, and the Texas Geopressured Geothermal Resource Estimate. Geothermal data sites Data related to geothermal technology and energy

  18. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Printable Version RReDC Home Biomass Resource Information Geothermal Resource Information Solar Resource Information Wind Resource Information Did you find what you needed? Yes 1...

  19. Resources | Energy Frontier Research Centers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Home Click here to visit the Department of Energy, EFRC Website

  20. Information Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Information Resources Information Resources Information Resources EGS Data Library Data includes fact sheets, reports, and webinars developed through the Geothermal Technologies Office. Multimedia View and download recent infographics and additional visuals created through FORGE. For other Information Resources, please visit the Geothermal Technologies Office website at energy.gov/geothermal.

  1. Information Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources Information Resources Information Resources Photo of NREL employee Michael Deru using a desktop computer. The Geothermal Technologies Office is a source of current, relevant information about enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) technologies and other geothermal technologies and applications. On these pages you'll find helpful publications, software, and websites for the geothermal community and stakeholders. Geothermal information resources: Publications Technical Roadmaps

  2. Facilities, Partnerships, and Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water ...

  3. Management Control Cover

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assess- ing Natural Resource Damage at Rocky Flats OAS-M-06-02 November 2005 REPORT ON MANAGEMENT CONTROLS OVER ASSESSING NATURAL RESUORCE DAMAGE AT ROCKY FLATS TABLE OF CONTENTS Natural Resource Damage Assessment at Rocky Flats Details of Finding 1 Recommendation and Comments 3 Appendices Objective, Scope, and Methodology 5 Prior Audit Reports 6 Management Comments 7 NATURAL RESURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AT ROCKY FLATS Page 1 Details of Finding Natural Resource The Rocky Flats Project Office

  4. World Shale Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deputy Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources 2 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0...

  5. NM Energy Minerals & Natural Resources Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Minerals & Natural Resources Department - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  6. Water Conservation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Conservation Water Conservation Mission The team facilitates the reduction of water consumption intensity at LM sites, as deemed appropriate for LM operations and approved by LM, as defined in: Executive Order (EO) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability The team advocates natural resource sustainability by continually improving water use efficiencies. Scope LM and the contractor evaluate, make recommendations, and

  7. Hanford Cultural Resources - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford's Tribal Program Hanford Cultural Resources About Us Hanford's Tribal Program Home Hanford Cultural Resources DOE American Indian Tribal Government Policy (PDF) Hanford Cultural Resources Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Cultural Resources Hanford Cultural Resources Tribal staffs are regularly consulted at the earliest opportunity for recommendations and advice on DOE-RL activities potentially affecting

  8. Developer Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developer Resources Developer Resources Apps for Energy Apps for Energy The Energy Department is challenging developers to use the Green Button data access program to bring residential and commercial utility data to life with fun and creative apps. Read more Learn about Green Button Learn about Green Button Apps for Energy submissions must use Green Button data. To learn more, start here. Read more NREL Resources NREL Resources NREL offers a number resources for Green Button app developers. Find

  9. Valuation of ecological resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

    1995-04-01

    Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

  10. Geothermal resource assessment of Idaho Springs, Colorado. Resource series 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Repplier, F.N.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Located in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains approximately 30 miles west of Denver, in the community of Idaho Springs, are a series of thermal springs and wells. The temperature of these waters ranges from a low of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C) to a high of 127/sup 0/F (53/sup 0/C). To define the hydrothermal conditions of the Idaho Springs region in 1980, an investigation consisting of electrical geophysical surveys, soil mercury geochemical surveys, and reconnaissance geological and hydrogeological investigations was made. Due to topographic and cultural restrictions, the investigation was limited to the immediate area surrounding the thermal springs at the Indian Springs Resort. The bedrock of the region is faulted and fractured metamorphosed Precambrian gneisses and schists, locally intruded by Tertiary age plutons and dikes. The investigation showed that the thermal waters most likely are fault controlled and the thermal area does not have a large areal extent.

  11. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee By: Steve Chalk, Chief Operating Officer and Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Subject: Renewable Energy Legislation PDF icon 3-31-11_Final_Testimony_(Chalk).pdf More Documents & Publications Water Power Program: 2011 Peer Review Report Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resourses 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report

  12. Lignocellulosic feedstock resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rooney, T.

    1998-09-01

    This report provides overall state and national information on the quantity, availability, and costs of current and potential feedstocks for ethanol production in the United States. It characterizes end uses and physical characteristics of feedstocks, and presents relevant information that affects the economic and technical feasibility of ethanol production from these feedstocks. The data can help researchers focus ethanol conversion research efforts on feedstocks that are compatible with the resource base.

  13. The Resource Hierarchy Relationship

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Resource Hierarchy Relationship Troy Cook September 27, 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. WORKING PAPER SERIES September 2015 Troy Cook | U.S. Energy Information Administration This paper is released to

  14. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Resources The links below describe equipment, laboratories, capabilities, and sample environments that are available to users. Users must plan ahead and specify their needs when they submit beamtime proposals so that proper coordination can be planned. For more information about a specific area you would like to use, please contact the appropriate listed lead person: Chemical and Sample Preparation Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions Ancillary Equipment and Sample Environment

  15. Jefferson Lab Information Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Search Online Catalog Subject Pathfinders Databases E-Books Online Journals Print Journals/Backfiles Ask a Librarian Interlibrary Loan Request Additional Resources Library Information Location and Hours Staff Circulation Policy Lab Libraries Give us your Feedback AVS Historical Book Collection Whats New ! Mobile Catalog Access Cryocooler fundamentals and space applications course notes AIP Digital Archives Applied Physics Letters Journal of Applied Physics Review of Scientific

  16. Response Resources Demonstration

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY Final Technical Report Award Number: DE-FC26-08NT02869 Project Type: Regional Demonstration Principal Investigator: Andre Wellington, Project Manager, Smart Grid Implementation Group Recipient: Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Team members: Innoventive Power and Verizon Communications Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Taxpayer ID Number: 13-5009340 Organizational DUNS: 00-698-2359 4 Irving Place New York,

  17. Information technology resources assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    This year`s Information Technology Resources Assessment (ITRA) is something of a departure from traditional practice. Past assessments have concentrated on developments in fundamental technology, particularly with respect to hardware. They form an impressive chronicle of decreasing cycle times, increasing densities, decreasing costs (or, equivalently, increasing capacity and capability per dollar spent), and new system architectures, with a leavening of operating systems and languages. Past assessments have aimed -- and succeeded -- at putting information technology squarely in the spotlight; by contrast, in the first part of this assessment, we would like to move it to the background, and encourage the reader to reflect less on the continuing technological miracles of miniaturization in space and time and more on the second- and third-order implications of some possible workplace applications of these miracles. This Information Technology Resources Assessment is intended to provide a sense of technological direction for planners in projecting the hardware, software, and human resources necessary to support the diverse IT requirements of the various components of the DOE community. It is also intended to provide a sense of our new understanding of the place of IT in our organizations.

  18. Information technology resources assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    This year's Information Technology Resources Assessment (ITRA) is something of a departure from traditional practice. Past assessments have concentrated on developments in fundamental technology, particularly with respect to hardware. They form an impressive chronicle of decreasing cycle times, increasing densities, decreasing costs (or, equivalently, increasing capacity and capability per dollar spent), and new system architectures, with a leavening of operating systems and languages. Past assessments have aimed -- and succeeded -- at putting information technology squarely in the spotlight; by contrast, in the first part of this assessment, we would like to move it to the background, and encourage the reader to reflect less on the continuing technological miracles of miniaturization in space and time and more on the second- and third-order implications of some possible workplace applications of these miracles. This Information Technology Resources Assessment is intended to provide a sense of technological direction for planners in projecting the hardware, software, and human resources necessary to support the diverse IT requirements of the various components of the DOE community. It is also intended to provide a sense of our new understanding of the place of IT in our organizations.

  19. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Geothermal Resource Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Resource Information Geothermal Prospector Start exploring U.S. geothermal resources with an easy-to-use map by selecting data layers that are NGDS compatible. Photo of...

  20. Hazardous waste contamination of water resources (Superfund clean-up policy and the Seymour recycling case). Hearing before the Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight of the Committee on Public Works and Transportation, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, December 20, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency in charge of enforcing waste programs and the Department of Justice testified at a hearing on the Seymour, Indiana recycling center, which has become a toxic waste dump. The committee's purpose was to determine how the situation developed, why the federal government was slow to litigate against parties in the case who did not settle, and why those who did settle were released without further liability. The ultimate objective is to assure adequate resources to address ground water problems through the Superfund program and to avoid similar situations in the future. The witnesses described their role in the enforcement procedure. Material received from witnesses and other interested parties for the record follows their testimony.