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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

California State Water Resources Control Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California State Water Resources Control Board California State Water Resources Control Board Name California State Water Resources Control Board Address 1001 I Street Place Sacramento, California Zip 95814 Phone number 916-341-5455 Website http://www.swrcb.ca.gov/ Coordinates 38.58181°, -121.492159° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.58181,"lon":-121.492159,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

California Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control Board |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control Board Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control Board Place Sacramento, California Coordinates 38.5815719°, -121.4943996° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5815719,"lon":-121.4943996,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Pages that link to "California State Water Resources Control...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification ( links) GRRSection 6-CA-b - Construction Storm Water Program ( links) GRRSection 7-CA-d - CPCN for Small Power...

4

The geopressured geothermal resources of Texas: regulatory controls over water pollution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are presented: an overview of the control framework, Federal pollution control of surface waters, state water pollution control in Texas, new Federal standards for underground injection control, and a summary assessment. (MHR)

Rogers, K.E.; Oberbeck, A.W.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Urea for SCR-based NOx Control Systems and Potential Impacts to Ground Water Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key challenges facing manufacturers of diesel engines for light- and heavy-duty vehicles is the development of technologies for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides, In this regard, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems represent control technology that can potentially achieve the NOx removal efficiencies required to meet new U.S. EPA standards. SCR systems rely on a bleed stream of urea solution into exhaust gases prior to catalytic reduction. While urea's role in this emission control technology is beneficial, in that it supports reduced NOx emissions, it can also be an environmental threat to ground water quality. This would occur if it is accidentally released to soils because once in that environmental medium, urea is subsequently converted to nitrate--which is regulated under the U.S. EPA's primary drinking water standards. Unfortunately, nitrate contamination of ground waters is already a significant problem across the U.S. Historically, the primary sources of nitrate in ground waters have been septic tanks and fertilizer applications. The basic concern over nitrate contamination is the potential health effects associated with drinking water containing elevated levels of nitrate. Specifically, consumption of nitrate-contaminated water can cause a blood disorder in infants known as methemoglobinemia.

Layton, D.

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

6

Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institutes Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

Gerald Sehlke

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Water Resources Restoration and Preservation Act (Florida) |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Resources Restoration and Preservation Act (Florida) Water Resources Restoration and Preservation Act (Florida) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer...

8

Pacific Gas and Electric Companys Comments on the State Water Resources Control Boards Proposed Policy Water Quality Control Policy on the Use of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) supports the protection of Californias marine resources through development of a consistent statewide policy implementing Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act. As we have previously stated, we support efforts to transition away from once through cooling and have clearly demonstrated that support through the

Estuarine Waters; Power Plant Cooling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

WATER QUALITY CONTROL POLICY ON THE USE OF COASTAL AND ESTUARINE WATERS FOR POWER PLANT COOLING Draft Final Substitute Environmental Document State Water Resources Control Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Water Board also contributed to this documents preparation. The authors also wish to acknowledge previous contributions to this project by Ms. Sheila Vassey (State Water Board), Mr. Adam Laputz (currently

California Environmental; Protection Agency; Ms. Kim Ward; Mr. Michael Gjerde; Mr. Frank Roddy Of The

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

118 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / MAY/JUNE 2000 LINEAR PROGRAMMING FOR FLOOD CONTROL IN THE IOWA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

118 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / MAY/JUNE 2000 LINEAR PROGRAMMING a popular area of research for >30 years. Yeh (1985) and Wurbs (1993) pre- sented in-depth reviews

Lund, Jay R.

11

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system for the .Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company which will accept models of ground-water conditions operations on the Hanford ground-water regime which moves through ancient sand and gravel channels deep under environmental impacts as essential factors in the planning, design and construction of water resources projects

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

12

Water Resource Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Management (Indiana) Water Resource Management (Indiana) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial InstallerContractor Investor-Owned...

13

Conservation of Water Resources (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The State Water Control Board is responsible for formulating and implementing a comprehensive water use policy for the Commonwealth of Virginia. Implemented by the Department of Environmental...

14

Oregon Water Resources Department | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Water Resources Department Oregon Water Resources Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Water Resources Department Name Oregon Water Resources Department Address 725 Summer Street NE, Suite A Place Salem, Oregon Zip 97301 Phone number 503-986-0900 Website http://www.oregon.gov/owrd/Pag Coordinates 44.945748°, -123.028013° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.945748,"lon":-123.028013,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nutrients are available. Blowdown - the water discharged from a boiler or cooling tower to dispose and explains the procedures the owner/operator intends to take to perform assessment monitoring. Attenuation procedures. Equipotential Line - a line in a two-dimensional ground-water flow field such that the total

Soerens, Thomas

16

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alluvial Aquifer, that has resulted from oil and gas operations in the area, particularly in south, discharge from poultry and hog plants, and leaky landfills, among others. Saline water intrusion and near

Soerens, Thomas

17

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111111 Massive Rock Well Fractured Basalt WT Soil of fractured basalt. Fractures and layer-junctions important for seepage. Note seepage face. Soil layers lined, and is typically pebbles. The water collects in the main column and is fed up through the delivery pipe

Sohoni, Milind

18

Water Resource Districts (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Districts (North Dakota) Resource Districts (North Dakota) Water Resource Districts (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider North Dakota State Water Commission Water Resource Districts are created throughout the state of North Dakota to manage, conserve, protect, develop, and control water resources. Each

19

GLOSSARY OF WATER RESOURCES TERMS Compiled by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;GLOSSARY OF WATER RESOURCES TERMS Compiled by WRRC Staff D.C. Water Resources Research Center.........................................................................................................................03 Part I Glossary of Terms;PREFACE The glossary of water research terms was compiled from a variety of other glossaries, dictionaries

District of Columbia, University of the

20

Resources on Water Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency » Resources on Water Efficiency Water Efficiency » Resources on Water Efficiency Resources on Water Efficiency October 8, 2013 - 10:03am Addthis Many helpful resources about water efficiency are available. Also see Contacts. Federal Resources Reverse Osmosis Optimization Technology Evaluation: -This FEMP technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis systems to increase system performance and water efficiency. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers (Full Report): Comprehensive document assessing side stream filtration options for cooling towers, with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings along with providing information on specific technology and implementation options. Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers (Fact

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural Resources in China Water resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Large reserves of coal, but natural gas and oil are becoming scarce. Import approximately the same, petroleum, natural gas, uranium, etc. Metallic mineral resources include iron, copper, tungsten, aluminum in the production of petrochemicals Materials produced from natural gas or crude oil, such as plastics

Pan, Feifei

22

Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication is a guide to finding the many resources available to help managers of small water systems in Texas. Details are provided about sources of financial assistance, tools for capacity building, training programs and educational resources.

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

WATER RESOURCES Water Resources is a unit concerned with the development of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Institutional Aspects of Water Resources Management," 1975 background paper produced by the Food and Agricultureq SECTION II WATER RESOURCES Water Resources is a unit concerned with the development of public policy and the use or misuse of the national water supply. Subsection topics in this unit are general

US Army Corps of Engineers

24

Water Resources (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources (Montana) Resources (Montana) Water Resources (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The state policy of Montana requires that water resources of the state be put to optimum beneficial use and not wasted. The state must promote the

25

NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Characterization Resource Characterization Building on its success in wind resource characterization and assessment, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has extended its capabilities to the field of water power. NREL's team of scientists, engineers and computer experts has broad experience in physical oceanography, meteorology, modeling, data analysis, and Geographic Information Systems. Many years of experience in wind assessment have enabled NREL to develop the skills and methodologies to evaluate the development potential of many different water-based energy technologies. Read about NREL's current water power resource characterization projects. Printable Version Water Power Research Home Capabilities Design Review & Analysis Device & Component Testing

26

Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 11:49am Addthis Photo of a standalone solar hot water system standing in front of a clothesline with a backdrop of evergreen trees. This solar hot water system tracks sunlight using a standalone, single-axis mount to optimize hot water production for residential applications. This page provides a brief overview of solar hot water (SHW) technologies supplemented by specific information to apply SHW within the Federal sector. Overview Although a large variety of solar hot water systems exist, the basic technology is simple. A collector absorbs and transfers heat from the sun to water, which is stored in a tank until needed. Active solar heating systems use circulating pumps and controls. These are more expensive but

27

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 24, NO. 8, PAGES 1345-1359, AUGUST 1988 Gradient Dynamic Programming for StochasticOptimal Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water quality maintenance in rivers [e.g., Dracupand Fogarty, 1974; Changand Yeh, 1973], to mention only programming ap- plicationsin water resourcescan be found in the works by Yakowitz [1982] and Yeh [1985WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 24, NO. 8, PAGES 1345-1359, AUGUST 1988 Gradient Dynamic Programming

Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

28

Energy-water nexus : sustainability of coal and water resources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy and water are two precious natural resources with which demand will continue to grow with increased population growth. Coal provides a cheap and abundant (more)

Hebel, Anna Kathleen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources on Water Resources on Water Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics Federal Requirements Best Management Practices Analysis and Evaluation Case Studies Resources

30

Water Resource Impacts of Alternative Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Commission also has produced large number of reports on California's water ­ energy relationship. NRDC and other NGOs also have produced reports on similar issues #12;8 Modeling Water Resources within per unit (gallon or mmBtu) of ethanol produced NAS (07), Fingerman (08): Net water changes from

California at Davis, University of

31

Water Resources Planning and Coordination Act (South Carolina...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources Planning and Coordination Act (South Carolina) Water Resources Planning and Coordination Act (South Carolina) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial...

32

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Natural Resources Commission on Water and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Address Kalanimoku Building 1151 Punchbowl Street Room 227 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/cwrm/in Coordinates 21.305788°, -157.855682° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.305788,"lon":-157.855682,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

China's Water Resources: Crisis and Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China's Water Resources: Crisis and Opportunity China's Water Resources: Crisis and Opportunity Speaker(s): Ma Jun Date: June 17, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The rivers in China, and the hundreds of millions who depend on them, are in trouble. A water crisis looms large in most parts of China. In his book, China Water Crisis, Ma Jun traces 4,000 years of the history of China's watersheds, and their mis/management. Armed with scientific data and compelling stories, Ma reveals the causes and character of the looming ecological disaster. His book has been quoted in The Economist and many western media. Limited water resources pose a major threat to social and economic development in the 21st century. Three Gorges Dam and redirecting water from south to north occupy the main focus of the efforts to increase

34

Colorado Division of Water Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division of Water Resources Division of Water Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colorado Division of Water Resources Name Colorado Division of Water Resources Address 1313 Sherman St., Suite 818 Place Denver, Colorado Zip 80203 Coordinates 39.7370973°, -104.9851154° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7370973,"lon":-104.9851154,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Water Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Efficiency Many helpful resources about water efficiency are available. Federal Resources Reverse Osmosis Optimization Technology Evaluation: -This FEMP technology evaluation...

36

Water Resources Act (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Resources Act (Ontario, Canada) Water Resources Act (Ontario, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility MunicipalPublic Utility Rural...

37

Nevada Division of Water Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division of Water Resources Division of Water Resources Name Nevada Division of Water Resources Address 901 S. Stewart St., Suite 2002 Place Carson city, Nevada Zip 89701 Phone number 775-684-2800 Website http://water.nv.gov/ Coordinates 39.1580849°, -119.7644949° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1580849,"lon":-119.7644949,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scenario to Climatic Changes. Water Resources Management 19:2006) Quantifying the Urban Water Supply Impacts of Climateto the Shape of Supply? Water Demand Under Heterogeneous

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Water heater control module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

Hammerstrom, Donald J

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

40

Idaho Department of Water Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Department of Water Resources Idaho Department of Water Resources Name Idaho Department of Water Resources Address 322 East Front Street, PO Box 83720 Place Boise, Idaho Zip 83720 Phone number 208-287-4800 Website http://www.idwr.idaho.gov/ Coordinates 43.608919°, -116.193931° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.608919,"lon":-116.193931,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Water Resources Protection and Management Act (West Virginia...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources Protection and Management Act (West Virginia) Water Resources Protection and Management Act (West Virginia) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural...

42

Texas Water Resources: Vulnerability from Contaminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical models of flow and transport are commonly applied for the sustainable management of water resources and for the selection of appropriate remediation techniques. However, these numerical models are not always accurate due to uncertain parameters and the disparity of scales across which observations are made, hydrological processes occur, and modeling is conducted. The modeling framework becomes further complex because hydrologic processes are coupled with chemical and biological processes. This dissertation focuses on the most widespread contaminants of surface and ground water, which are E. coli and nitrate, respectively. Therefore, this research investigates the linkages between bio-chemical and hydrologic processes for E. coli transport, explores the spatio-temporal variability of nitrate, quantifies uncertainty, and develops models for both E. coli and nitrate transport that better characterize these biogeochemical linkages. A probabilistic framework in the form of Bayesian Neural Networks (BNN) was used to estimate E. coli loads in surface streams and was compared with a conventional model LOADEST. This probabilistic framework is crucial when water quality data are scarce, and most models require a large number of mechanistic parameters to estimate E. coli concentrations. Results indicate that BNN provides better characterization of E. coli at higher loadings. Results also provide the physical, chemical, and biological factors that are critical in the estimation of E. coli concentrations in Plum Creek, Texas. To explore model parameters that control the transport of E. coli in the groundwater (GW) and surface water systems, research was conducted in Lake Granbury, Texas. Results highlight the importance of flow regimes and seasonal variability on E. coli transport. To explore the spatio-temporal variability of nitrate across the Trinity and Ogallala aquifers in Texas, an entropy-based method and a numerical study were employed. Results indicate that the overall mean nitrate-N has declined from 1940 to 2008 in the Trinity Aquifer as opposed to an increase in the Ogallala Aquifer. The numerical study results demonstrate the effect of different factors like GW pumping, flow parameters, hydrogeology of the site at multiple spatial scales. To quantify the uncertainty of nitrate transport in GW, an ensemble Kalman filter was used in combination with the MODFLOW-MT3DMS models. Results indicate that the EnKF notably improves the estimation of nitrate-N concentrations in GW. A conceptual modeling framework with deterministic physical processes and stochastic bio-chemical processes was devised to independently model E. coli and nitrate transport in the subsurface. Results indicate that model structural uncertainty provides useful insights to modeling E. coli and nitrate transport.

Dwivedi, Dipankar

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Monthly spatial distributed water resources assessment: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water resource conservation is of utmost importance, especially for agriculture in developing countries. Frequent occurrences of water shortage have driven more social efforts in researching on water resources spatial distribution, as the land cover ... Keywords: Han river basin, Land cover, Routing, Soil texture, Water resources distribution

Yuhui Wang; Xiaohui Lei; Weihong Liao; Yunzhong Jiang; Xiaomin Huang; Jianshe Liu; Xinshan Song; Hao Wang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources The Department of Natural Resources is responsible for ensuring that the quality and quantity of the water resources of the state are maintained at the highest level practicable to support present and future beneficial uses. The Department maintains an ongoing statewide surface and groundwater monitoring program and is authorized to enact regulations and restrict uses

46

Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Hot Water Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

47

Water Use, Reuse and Conservation Strategies for Resource Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, COM 2011. Symposium, WORLD GOLD. Presentation Title, Water Use, Reuse and Conservation Strategies for Resource Projects.

48

Water Power Program: Hydropower Resource Assessment and Characterizati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and other environmental services can affect the availability of water resources for energy production, and competing uses are taken into consideration when developing water...

49

Sustainability in Water Resources Management: Changes in Meaning and Perception  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability in Water Resources Management Changes inAbstract: The meaning of sustainability in the context ofwider water reuse, today sustainability must include a whole

Hermanowicz, S W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York) Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605:...

51

Mineral and water resources of Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The mineral and water resources of Nevada are summarily described in this report. Following a general description of the mineral industry and of the geology of the State as a whole, the occurrence, distribution, and relative importance of individual commodities are discussed in some detail. All mineral commodities are described that are known to occur in Nevada and that might have economic significance in the foreseeable future, whether or not they have been mined. In the description of the geology of the State, a section on economic geology describes the distribution of the metallic and nonmetallic mineral deposits both areally and with respect to the general geologic features. A knowledge of the pattern of distribution of known mineral deposits of various types is essential to the successful search for new ore bodies. A section on mineral exploration discusses the methods and problems of exploration, and also considers which commodities in Nevada offer the greatest promise of new discoveries in the future. Water resources are described rather fully in this report; water in this generally arid part of the Great Basin is vital to the economy of the State and to the well-being of its people. Sources of waterpower and geothermal power are also discussed. (auth)

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee) Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee) Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Tennessee Water Resources Information Act is designed to prevent the lowering of the ground water table by requiring that adequate information

53

Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) is a set of environmental regulations and permitting requirements that comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Georgia Water Quality Control Act is enforced by the Georgia

54

GRR/Section 14 - Water Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Water Resource Assessment - Water Resource Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14 - Water Resource Assessment 14 - WaterResourceAssessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Bureau of Land Management US Army Corps of Engineers Federal Emergency Management Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Coastal Zone Management Act Coastal Barrier Resources Act Safe Drinking Water Act Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 NPDES Rules National Flood Insurance Act Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14 - WaterResourceAssessment.pdf

55

Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2009" 3-18-2010-WAPA Meeks FinTestimony.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources...

56

Water Resource Trends and Implications for the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water resources, both surface and groundwater, are subject to significant variation and change with respect to volume, flow, and quality. This report evaluates observed water resource trends within the United States and their implications for electric power generation. The report also addresses how individual companies have responded to these changes. The report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies, government agencies, and water resource stakeholders ...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Dictionary.png Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Extensional-tectonic, fault-controlled resources typically result from a

58

The Foreseer Tool - Analysing Energy, Land and Water Resource...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Foreseer Tool - Analysing Energy, Land and Water Resource Futures through Sankey Diagrams Speaker(s): Bojana Bajzelj Grant Kopec Julian Allwood Liz Curmi Date: November 10,...

59

Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power By: Sonya Baskerville, Manager of National Relations Bonneville Power Administration Subject: Investment in Small...

60

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule requires an eight month advance notice period whenever a consumer-owned water utility intends to transfer water resource land, defined as any land or real property owned by a water utility for the purposes of providing a source of supply, storing water or protecting sources of supply or water storage, including reservoirs, lakes, ponds, rivers or streams, wetlands and watershed areas. The rule also provides an assignable right of first refusal to the municipality or municipalities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-15-11FinalTestimony(Legg)(SEPA).pdf More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the Subcommittee on Water and...

62

Analysis of U.S. Water Resources under Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework, extended to include a Water Resource System (WRS) component, is applied to an integrated assessment of effects of alternative climate policy scenarios on U.S. water ...

Blanc, E.

63

Atmospheric Issues Identified in State Water Resource Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Illinois is completing a comprehensive statewide water plan. The plan selects three atmospheric issues, among the 11 identified as key issues facing the state's water resources. The issues selected include climate change and prediction, ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.; Richard G. Semonin

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

NREL: Learning - Student Resources on Solar Hot Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Hot Water Solar Hot Water Photo of a school building next to a pond. Roy Lee Walker Elementary School in Texas incorporates many renewable energy design features, including solar hot water heating. The following resources will help you learn more about solar water heating systems. If you are unfamiliar with this technology, see the introduction to solar hot water. Grades 7-12 NREL Educational Resources Educational resources available to students from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. High School and College Level U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Savers: Solar Water Heaters Features comprehensive basic information and resources. U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Savers: Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Features comprehensive basic information and resources. U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon

65

PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......... . MINERAL RESOURCES .............. . General .................. . Energy Minerals .............. . SOLAR ......... Central and Southern Pacific Central Valley ....... Pacific Northwest ...... Alaska --Hawaii-- Puerto Rico

Gilbes, Fernando

66

Long-term fuzzy management of water resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present context of water resource scarcity, a complete approach for long-term storage/transfer/distribution system management is proposed. The main management objective of such a kind of system is to manage reserves and releases so as to minimize ... Keywords: fuzzy logic, modeling, optimization, water resource management

Roger Marcelin Faye; Salam Sawadogo; Claude Lishou; Flix Mora-Camino

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Review of water resource potential for developing geothermal resource sites in the western United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water resources at 28 known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in the western United States are reviewed. Primary emphasis is placed upon examination of the waer resources, both surface and ground, that exist in the vicinity of the KGRAs located in the southwestern states of California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico. In most of these regions water has been in short supply for many years and consequently a discussion of competing demands is included to provide an appropriate perspective on overall usage. A discussion of the water resources in the vicinity of KGRAs in the States of Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington are also included.

Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Florida Water Resources Act (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Water Resources Act (Florida) Florida Water Resources Act (Florida) Florida Water Resources Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection It is the policy of the state of Florida: (a) To provide for the management

69

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 April, 2013. (4) 2010 Water Use Survey Summary Estimates State Totals; Texas Water Development Board: Austin, TX,indicators for urban water systems. Urban Water. 2004, 4,

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Water Power Program: Resource Assessment and Characterization  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report, created by the Electric Power Research Institute, assesses ocean wave energy potential along the U.S. coasts....

71

Water Resources In Nepal: Institutional Analysis Based On Legal Provisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-pricing approach is used. While pricing for urban s. THAPA MAGAR: Water Resources in Nepal 221 water supply and electricity, traditional accounting approach of costing is practised. The most recent electricity tariff fixation is, however, a departure from... for the implications on the enactment of the Canal and Electricity. The policy on irrigation was first adopted in 2045 focusing on people's participatory management from the HMG level. In 2049, HMG came up with overall management of water resources with umbrella...

Magar, Shyamu Thapa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Department of Natural Resources and Water Divisions (Nebraska) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Natural Resources and Water Divisions (Nebraska) Department of Natural Resources and Water Divisions (Nebraska) Department of Natural Resources and Water Divisions (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources This chapter describes the duties of the Department of Natural Resources

73

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 March 2013. (12) Water Conservation Master Plan; East Baywww.ebmud.com/for-customers/water-conservation- rebates-and-services/water-conservation-master-plan, accessed 15

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

ARAC: A unique command and control resource  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a centralized federal facility designed to provide real-time, world-wide support to military and civilian command and control centers by predicting the impacts of inadvertent or intentional releases of nuclear, biological, or chemical materials into the atmosphere. ARAC is a complete response system consisting of highly trained and experienced personnel, continually updated computer models, redundant data collection systems, and centralized and remote computer systems. With over 20 years of experience responding to domestic and international incidents, strong linkages with the Department of Defense, and the ability to conduct classified operations, ARAC is a unique command and control resource.

Bradley, M.M.; Baskett, R.L.; Ellis, J.S. [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Foreseer Tool - Analysing Energy, Land and Water Resource Futures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Foreseer Tool - Analysing Energy, Land and Water Resource Futures The Foreseer Tool - Analysing Energy, Land and Water Resource Futures through Sankey Diagrams Speaker(s): Bojana Bajzelj Grant Kopec Julian Allwood Liz Curmi Date: November 10, 2011 - 1:30pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner Larry Dale The BP funded Foreseer project at the University of Cambridge is creating a tool to visualise the influence of future demand and policy choices on the coupled physical requirements for energy, water and land resources in a region of interest. The basis of the tool is a set of linked physical descriptions of energy, water and land, plus the technologies that transform those resources into final services - e.g. housing, food, transport and goods. The tool has a modular structure, with the potential to incorporate specialised analyses or models to calculate future demand,

76

Criteria for an effective water resource planning process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In examining the present status of water resource planning in the Pacific Northwest, numerous critical inadequacies become readily apparent. One method of minimizing some of these inadequacies is through administrative ...

Bowers, James Myron

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Water heater secondary control device  

SciTech Connect

A secondary control device for gas water heaters is described having a tank, cold water inlet, hot water outlet and a heater thermostat, the control device comprising: valve means for controlling the flow of gas from a source thereof to the heater thermostat, the valve means connected between the gas source and the heater thermostat; means attached to the outside of the cold water inlet for sensing the temperature of water in the cold water inlet and providing an electrical signal representative thereof, the signal generated by the temperature sensing means being connected to the valve means; means for opening the valve means for transmitting the gas to the heater thermostat when the signal is representative of the temperature of the cold water being less than a predetermined temperature; and means for closing the valve means for preventing transmission of the energy to the heater thermostat when the signal is representative of the temperature of the cold water being equal to or greater than the predetermined temperature.

Subherwal, B.R.

1987-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Water Treatment Strategies: Microorganism Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the fundamental concepts of microorganism control and a discussion about how these concepts can be applied for optimizing current prevention and mitigation strategies in nuclear power plant service water systems. A database has been established to facilitate development of treatment and operation strategies that meet the requirement for preventing microbiological problems while overcoming limitations with current water treatment technologies.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Predicting and Controlling Resource Usage in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... To lower resource comsumption by AVNMP, we can consider application of the Minimum Data Length (MDL) [8] estimate for Kolmogorov ...

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Resource Letter PSNAC-1: Physics and society: Nuclear arms control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on nuclear arms control for the nonspecialist. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: nuclear weapons

Alexander Glaser; Zia Mian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Reinforcement learning techniques for controlling resources in power networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As power grids transition towards increased reliance on renewable generation, energy storage and demand response resources, an effective control architecture is required to harness the (more)

Kowli, Anupama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Review of Water Resources and Desalination Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods to desalinate brackish water and sea water can help reverse this destabilizing trend. Desalination has now been practiced on a large scale for more than 50 years. During this time continual improvements have been made, and the major technologies are now remarkably efficient, reliable, and inexpensive. For many years, thermal technologies were the only viable option, and multi-stage flash (MSF) was established as the baseline technology. Multi-effect evaporation (MEE) is now the state-of-the-art thermal technology, but has not been widely implemented. With the growth of membrane science, reverse osmosis (RO) overtook MSF as the leading desalination technology, and should be considered the baseline technology. Presently, RO of seawater can be accomplished with an energy expenditure in the range of 11-60 kJ/kg at a cost of $2 to $4 per 1000 gallons. The theoretical minimum energy expenditure is 3-7 kJ/kg. Since RO is a fairly mature technology, further improvements are likely to be incremental in nature, unless design improvements allow major savings in capital costs. Therefore, the best hope to dramatically decrease desalination costs is to develop ''out of the box'' technologies. These ''out of the box'' approaches must offer a significant advantage over RO (or MEE, if waste heat is available) if they are to be viable. When making these comparisons, it is crucial that the specifics of the calculation are understood so that the comparison is made on a fair and equivalent basis.

MILLER, JAMES E.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

California Department of Water Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Resources Water Resources Place California Utility Id 3255 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=California_Department_of_Water_Resources&oldid=409152" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

85

Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

Cox, J.P.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upgrades, and different water sources (desalination).Desalination and sewage treatment upgrades were found tolater in this chapter. Desalination proved to have 2-18

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Controllers for solar domestic hot-water systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended as a resource for designers and installers of solar domestic hot water systems. It provides key functional control strategy and equipment alternatives and equipment descriptions adequate for writing effective DHW controller specifications. It also provides the installer with adequate technical background to understand the functional aspects of the controller. Included are specific instructions to install, check out, and troubleshoot the controller installation.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Resource Management Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New York) Resource Management Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations provide procedures to propose a reclassification of State waters for permitting purposes. Requests must address the factual basis for reclassification, including the size, depth, surface area covered, volume, direction and rate of flow, stream gradient and temperature of the water; character of the district bordering said waters and its suitability for

89

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 600: Applications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

provide instructions for applications proposing the construction, repair, or operation of hydropower sources. Applications are reviewed by the Water Power and Control Commission...

90

Grid Friendly Water Heater Controller - Available ...  

Summary. The Grid Friendly Water Heater Controller is a device that provides smart grid services from existing, installed electric water heaters.

91

Effectiveness of a participatory modeling effort to identify and advance community water resource goals in St. Albans, Vermont  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural resource managers face complex challenges in addressing non-point source water pollution. A participatory modeling approach was applied in the St. Albans Bay watershed to identify the most effective phosphorus control options to achieve the load ... Keywords: Lake Champlain, Natural resource planning, Participatory modeling, Social dynamics, Watershed model

Erica J. Brown Gaddis; Hilary Harp Falk; Clare Ginger; Alexey Voinov

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Water Quality Control (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control (Texas) Water Quality Control (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility StateProvincial Govt Industrial Construction...

93

Water Pollution Control and Abatement (Maryland) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control and Abatement (Maryland) Water Pollution Control and Abatement (Maryland) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local...

94

Water Pollution Control (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Indiana) Water Pollution Control (Indiana) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer Industrial Installer...

95

A Smart Energy System: Distributed Resource Management, Control and Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Smart Energy System: Distributed Resource Management, Control and Optimization Yong Ding, Student of distributed energy resource and consumption management, which proposes to design a networked and embedded and energy data can be acquired and processed in a distributed manner in real time. In order to improve

Beigl, Michael

96

Effects of Climate Variability and Change on Mountain Water Resources in the Western U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The western U.S. derives its water resources predominantly from cold season precipitation and storage in snowpack along the narrow Cascades and Sierra ranges, and the Rocky Mountains. Hydroclimate is modulated by the diverse orographic features across the region. Precipitation, runoff, and water demand generally peaks during winter, spring, and summer respectively. Such phase differences between water supply and demand create a necessity for water management, which is reflected by major development in irrigation, hydropower production, and flood control during the past 50 years. Because water resources have been essential to the economic development and environmental well being of the western states, it is worrisome that recent studies suggest that global warming may exert significant impacts on snowpack and streamflow, which may seriously affect water resources in the western U.S. in the 21st century (e.g., Leung and Wigmosta 1999; Leung and Ghan 1999; Mile et al. 2000; Leung et al. 2002a; Miller et al. 2002). To understand how climate change may affect mountain water resources, we have taken the approach of ?end-to-end? assessment where simulations of current and future climate produced by global climate models (GCMs) are downscaled using regional climate models (RCMs), which then provide atmospheric conditions for assessing water impacts using hydrologic models (e.g., Leung and Wigmosta 1999; Miller et al. 2000; Wood et al. 2002) and water management models (e.g., Hamlet and Lettenmaier 1999; Payne et al. 2002). This suite of models guides us through a comprehensive and global view of the effects of greenhouse warming on the atmosphere-ocean-land system to regional climate change, hydrologic response in river basins and watersheds, and reservoir management. The latter converts hydrologic response to impacts on water management objectives and enables the evaluation of adaptation strategies through modifications to existing reservoir operating rules.

Leung, Lai R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Sila...

98

Radiation and Uranium Resources Exposure Control (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The public policy of South Dakota is to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, the proper development of uranium resources, and the control of any associated harmful effects. The disposal of...

99

Integrated system dynamics toolbox for water resources planning.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public mediated resource planning is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Unfortunately, supporting tools are lacking that interactively engage the public in the decision-making process and integrate over the myriad values that influence water policy. In the pages of this report we document the first steps toward developing a specialized decision framework to meet this need; specifically, a modular and generic resource-planning ''toolbox''. The technical challenge lies in the integration of the disparate systems of hydrology, ecology, climate, demographics, economics, policy and law, each of which influence the supply and demand for water. Specifically, these systems, their associated processes, and most importantly the constitutive relations that link them must be identified, abstracted, and quantified. For this reason, the toolbox forms a collection of process modules and constitutive relations that the analyst can ''swap'' in and out to model the physical and social systems unique to their problem. This toolbox with all of its modules is developed within the common computational platform of system dynamics linked to a Geographical Information System (GIS). Development of this resource-planning toolbox represents an important foundational element of the proposed interagency center for Computer Aided Dispute Resolution (CADRe). The Center's mission is to manage water conflict through the application of computer-aided collaborative decision-making methods. The Center will promote the use of decision-support technologies within collaborative stakeholder processes to help stakeholders find common ground and create mutually beneficial water management solutions. The Center will also serve to develop new methods and technologies to help federal, state and local water managers find innovative and balanced solutions to the nation's most vexing water problems. The toolbox is an important step toward achieving the technology development goals of this center.

Reno, Marissa Devan; Passell, Howard David; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Peplinski, William J.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Coursey, Don (University of Chicago, Chicago, IL); Hanson, Jason (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Grimsrud, Kristine (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Thacher, Jennifer (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Broadbent, Craig (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brookshire, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chemak, Janie (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockeril Consulting, Boone, NC); Aragon, Carlos (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Hallett, Heather (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Vivoni, Enrique (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Roach, Jesse

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Water Pollution Control (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Pollution Control (South Dakota) Water Pollution Control (South Dakota) Water Pollution Control (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to conserve the waters of the state and to protect, maintain, and improve their quality for water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Managing Water Resource Requirements for Growing Electric Generation Demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a general guide to analytical techniques used to address water resource management as related to long-term sustainability planning, and short-term regulatory requirements, including total maximum daily loads, endangered species, and relicensing of hydropower facilities. The example applications presented in the report highlight the capability of the techniques, and help electric power company and government regulatory staffs identify the best approach for a specific need.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: 5: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York) Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These rules apply to all applications for a license or a permit to take, divert, appropriate or otherwise use the waters of the State, except applications for hydro-electric power projects. Applications are reviewed

103

Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air-conditioning system including investment, operating fee and pay-back time. The results show that waste water resource heat pump air-conditioning system has a low investment, low operating fee and short payback time.

Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Supply Reliability. Sacramento, CA, California EnergyWater Resources. Sacramento, CA, California Department ofUse in California. Sacramento, CA, California Department of

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Information Resources: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Street Lighting Controls Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components. In Part I, presenters Amy Olay of the City of San Jose, CA, and Kelly Cunningham of the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis discussed their experiences as early adopters of these smart street lighting systems. In Part II, presenters Laura Stuchinsky of the City of San Jose, CA, and Michael Poplawski of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory explored the MSSLC's recently released Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires. Part I: Experiences and Benefits June 11, 2013 View the presentation slides Part II: Reviewing the MSSLC's Model Specification

106

An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale  

SciTech Connect

This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and DemandRenewable Energy, former Distributed Energy Program of theOptimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Institute of Environment & Resources Online monitoring and control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Environment & Resources Online monitoring and control of the biogas process Kanokwan Boe #12;#12;Online monitoring and control of the biogas process Kanokwan Boe Ph.D. Thesis May 2006 of the biogas process Cover: Torben Dolin & Julie Camilla Middleton Printed by: DTU tryk Institute

109

Emission Control Options for Distributed Resource Generators: A White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the performance and cost of conventional and emerging emission control technologies for distributed resource generators (combustion turbines, microturbines, and reciprocating engines). The performance is benchmarked against the proposed California Air Resources Board (CARB) small generator certification standards for 2007, the most stringent of several emissions certification standards adopted or being considered. The costs are provided as capital cost and cost of electricity for emi...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

Using FRAMES to Manage Environmental and Water Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems FRAMES) is decision-support middleware that provides users the ability to design software solutions for complex problems. It is a software platform that provides seamless and transparent communication between modeling components by using a multi-thematic approach to provide a flexible and holistic understanding of how environmental factors potentially affect humans and the environment. It incorporates disparate components (e.g., models, databases, and other frameworks) that integrate across scientific disciplines, allowing for tailored solutions to specific activities. This paper discusses one example application of FRAMES, where several commercialoff-the-shelf (COTS) software products are seamlessly linked into a planning and decision-support tool that helps manage water-based emergency situations and sustainable response. Multiple COTS models, including three surface water models, and a number of databases are linked through FRAMES to assess the impact of three asymmetric and simultaneous events, two of which impact water resources. The asymmetric events include 1) an unconventional radioactive release into a large potable water body, 2) a conventional contaminant (oil) release into navigable waters, and 3) an instantaneous atmospheric radioactive release.

Whelan, Gene; Millard, W. David; Gelston, Gariann M.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Pelton, Mitch A.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Lee, Cheegwan; Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Alex J.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Castleton, Karl J.

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

112

Radio resources allocation for decentrally controlled relay stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To enhance throughput and to extend coverage of wireless networks based on IEEE 802.16 standards, relay stations can be implemented. The crucial point influencing the overall system performance is allocation of appropriate amount of resources to individual ... Keywords: Decentrally controlled relay, Packet delays, Signaling overhead, WiMAX

Pavel Mach; Robert Bestak

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

JXTA resource access control by means of advertisement encryption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JXTA is an open-source initiative that provides a middleware for the creation and deployment of peer-to-peer (P2P) applications. Resources in a JXTA network are accessed through advertisements, special metadata documents published by its owner. By controlling ... Keywords: Distributed systems, JXTA, Peer group, Peer-to-peer, Privacy, Security, XMLenc

Joan Arnedo-Moreno; Jordi Herrera-Joancomart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Regional systems development for geothermal energy resources: Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation, topical report appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The appendices for the water resources evaluation report are included for the Imperial Valley KGRA's, Coso, Mono-Long Valley, Geysers Calistoga, Surprise Valley, Wendell Amedee, Glass Mountain, Lassen, Puna, and for power plant case studies. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

Water Power Program: Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Tidal Streams Resource Map. Tidal Streams Resource Assessment The Assessment of the Energy Production from Tidal Streams in the United States report, created by Georgia Tech,...

116

Negotiating contentious claims to water : shifting institutional dynamics for the allocation of water between the Eel and Russian river basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Power Commission, Sonoma County Water Contractors, California State Water Resources Control Board, California Department of Water Resources, National MarinePower Commission, the US Army Corps of Engineers, the State Water Resources Control Board, the National Marine

Gilless, J. Keith; Langridge, Ruth

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can play an active role in power systems via Demand Response (DR). Recent DR programs have focused on peak load reduction in commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities). We present a regression-based baseline model, which allows us to quantify DR performance. We use this baseline model to understand the performance of C&I facilities participating in an automated dynamic pricing DR program in California. In this program, facilities are

118

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

119

Sustainable water resources development in Kuwait : an integrated approach with comparative analysis of the case of Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis assesses the water resource status of Kuwait and Singapore, both countries considered as water scarce. The institutional aspect of Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) efforts in both countries is closely ...

Nazerali, Nasruddin A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes constructing desalination plants, recycling water,include water recycling, desalination, underground aquifers,

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Active Power and Nonactive Power Control of Distributed Energy Resources  

SciTech Connect

Distributed energy resources (DE) have been widely used in the power systems to supply active power, and most of the present DE resources are operated with limited or without nonactive power capability. This paper shows that with a slight modification in hardware configuration and a small boost in the power ratings, as well as proper implementation of control strategies, a DE system with a power electronics converter interface can provide active power and nonactive power simultaneously and independently. A DE can provide dynamic voltage regulation to the local bus because of its nonactive power capability. Furthermore, the proposed DE control method in this paper can effectively compensate the unbalance in the local voltage. The system requirements such as the inverter current rating and the dc voltage rating are discussed. The analysis of the system requirements to provide nonactive power shows that it is cost-effective to have DE provide voltage regulation.

Xu, Yan [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Modeling the Global Water Resource System in an Integrated Assessment Modeling Framework: IGSM-WRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of water resources affects energy, agricultural and environmental systems, which are linked together as well as to climate via the water cycle. As such, watersheds and river basins are directly impacted ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

123

Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Resource Data, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands,WATER RESOUCES IN PUERTO RICO Eric W. Harmsen 1 , Norman L.Engineering, Univ. of Puerto Rico Mayagez Campus, email:

Harmsen, E.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Resource Form Factor and Installation of GFA Controllers  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this task is to optimize the form and placement of a controller comprising the Grid Friendly appliance (GFA) controller, power supply and power relay (and/or a solid-state power electronic switch) that would command a domestic water heater to shed its load in response to stress on the electric power grid. The GFA controller would disconnect the water heater from its supply circuit whenever it senses a low voltage signal or other indicators of system stress communicated via the electric power distribution system. Power would be reconnected to the appliance when the GFA controller senses the absence of these signals. This project has also considered more frequent cycling of this controllers relay switch to perform demand-side frequency regulation. The principal criteria considered in this optimization are reliability, cost and life expectancy of the GFA components. The alternative embodiments of the GFA equipment under consideration are: Option 1- installation inside the insulation space of the water heater between the tank and jacket Option 2 containment in a separate nearby electrical enclosure Option 3 - as a modification or adjunct to the distribution panel housing and/or the breaker that protects the water heater supply circuit.

DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Essays on Water Resource Economics and Agricultural Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fixed fixed Residential water demand3.2 Residential Water Demand Estimation . . . . . . . . .Value of Supply Reliability in Urban Water Systems 3.1 Loss

Buck, Steven Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conservation since water and conservation investment areAre They Effective Water Conservation Tools in the Long Run?investment G :Water conservation (function) V :Social cost

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

D.C. WRRC No. 56 DESIGN OF A WATER RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;D.C. WRRC No. 56 DESIGN OF A WATER RESOURCES TRAINING PROGRAM FOR OPERATION, MAINTENANCE, the analysis of job and performance functions, the development and design of the curriculum, and finally...............................................................................................1 BACKGROUND RESEARCH 1. HISTORY OF TRAINING PROGRAMS CONDUCTED FOR THE WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

District of Columbia, University of the

129

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the resulting constraints on potentially developable electrical power in each geothermal resource area. Analyses were completed for 11 major geothermal areas in California: four in the Imperial Valley, Coso, Mono-Long Valley, Geysers-Calistoga, Surprise Valley, Glass Mountain, Wendel Amedee, and Lassen. One area in Hawaii, the Puna district, was also included in the analysis. The water requirements for representative types of energy conversion processes were developed using a case study approach. Cooling water requirements for each type of energy conversion process were estimated based upon a specific existing or proposed type of geothermal power plant. The make-up water requirements for each type of conversion process at each resource location were then estimated as a basis for analyzing any constraints on the megawatts which potentially could be developed.

Sakaguchi, J.L.

1979-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

130

Developing the Resource Potential of a Shallow Water Table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

apply compara Also, soil water intake rates tend deliveryabove the water table at which plant intake and upward

Grimes, D. W; Henderson, D. W

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...

132

Water Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) Water Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State...

133

Colorado Water Quality Control Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Quality Control Act Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Colorado Water Quality Control Act edit Details Activities (0) Areas...

134

Strategic Energy and Water Resource Planning for Federal Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

310 Strategic Resource Planning Leading by example, saving energy and taxpayer dollars in federal facilities Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant,...

135

Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Committee on Natural Resources, U.S. House of Representatives By: Timothy J. Meeks Administrator, Western Area Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy Subject:...

136

ZERO WATER DISCHARGE SYSTEM FOR THE BABYLON RESOURCE RECOVERY FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plant, involves a complex series of water users and wastewater producers. The water quality of each will be produced and 23,000 gal!day (87 m3/d) of extracted water will be returned to the Well Water Treatment description of each of the subsystems: BOILER FEEDWATER TREATMENT High purity boiler makeup water is produced

Columbia University

137

Resource Recovery of Coal Bed Methane Formation Water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the excavation of natural gas, petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted brine water, termed production water, is drawn from the coal bed methane formations (CBMF) along with the (more)

Bishop, Catherine Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Tracking Demands in Optimal Control of Managerial Systemswith Continuously-Divisible, Doubly Constrained Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper addresses problems of allocating continuously divisible resources among multiple production activities. The resources are allowed to be doubly constrained, so that both usage at every point of time and cumulative consumption over a planning horizon ... Keywords: Optimal control, Resource constrained scheduling, renewable and nonrenewable resources

Konstantin Kogan; Eugene Khmelnitsky

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Water dynamics in controlled pore silica glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water in porous silica glass is a suitable system for investigating the effect of confinement on translational diffusion. These systems are important because of their relevance in catalytic and separation processes. Two factors are to be considered in the case of confined water: (1) the effects of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces on interfacial water and (2) how the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network changes due to the volume of confinement. Here quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments at room temperature on water filled controlled pore glasses with radius of 15, 24 and 32 {angstrom}, are presented and analyzed using the random-jump diffusion model. Both the average residence time and the mean jump distance increase with decreasing pore radius.

Bordallo, H. N.; Herwig, K. W.; Dozier, W. D.; Drake, F.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of available saline water resources in New Mexico for the production of microalgae  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers evaluated saline water resources in New Mexico for their suitability as sites for large-scale microalgae production facilities. Production of microalgae could provide a renewable source of fuel, chemicals, and food. In addition, making use of the unused saline water resources would increase the economic activity in the state. After analyzing the 15 billion acre-ft of unused saline water resources in the state, scientists narrowed the locations down to six sites with the most potential. With further analysis, they chose the Tularosa Basin in southern New Mexico as the best-suited area for 100-hectare microalgae production facility. 34 refs., 38 figs., 14 tabs.

Lansford, R.; Hernandez, J.; Enis, P.; Truby, D.; Mapel, C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most significant environmental challenges of the new millen- nium. According to the 2010 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List, there are 318 bacterially impaired water bodies in Texas. Nonpoint sources (NPS

142

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most significant environmental challenges of the new millen- nium. According to the 2008 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List, there are 274 bacterially impaired water bodies in Texas. Nonpoint sources (NPS

Wilkins, Neal

143

Optimization of Water Resources Planning for Jordan's Aqaba Special Economic Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss the development of a water resources planning decision support system (DSS) for Jordan's Aqaba Special Economic Zone (ASEZ). Our objectives are to conserve fresh water supplies and minimize overall water production and ... Keywords: capacity expansion, decision support systems, integer programming, networks

Abdelghani A. Elimam; Maurice A. Girgis

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The design of a water jet drill for development of geothermal resources. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water jet drilling of rock is shown to be a feasible method for potential improvement in gaining access to the earth's resources. Drilling rates of up to 280 in./min in sandstone and 40 in./min in granite have been achieved. While the addition of polymers to the jet stream is found advantageous the low (15%) level of improvement and the difficulty in maintaining concentrate negated further development. The application of confining pressure was found to reduce jet performance, but this was found to be a function more of the rock response than of the jet parameters. Field tests of water jets underground indicated the jet system could be modified to cope with this change. Water jets were found to be more effective, for drilling larger holes, where a combined water jet:roller bit system was developed and laboratory and field trials of this are described. As well as determining the controlling parameters affecting jet drilling performance, and proving that rock compressive strength is not one of them, the research examined other methods of improving jet cutting performance. At jet pressures below 10,000 psi abrasive laden jets were found most advantageous while, for drilling granite, a cavitating flow proved more effective at pressures above 10,000 psi. A reason for this is postulated. Experiments to develop a standardized cavitation resistance test for rock specimens have also been undertaken.

Summers, David A.; Lehnhoff, Terry F.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

VIDEO SEMINAR of Ma Jun's 6/17/02 presentation: China's Water Resources:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VIDEO SEMINAR of Ma Jun's 6/17/02 presentation: China's Water Resources: VIDEO SEMINAR of Ma Jun's 6/17/02 presentation: China's Water Resources: Crisis and Opportunity Speaker(s): Ma Jun Date: July 3, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The rivers in China, and the hundreds of millions who depend on them, are in trouble. A water crisis looms large in most parts of China. In his book, China Water Crisis, Ma Jun traces 4,000 years of the history of China's watersheds, and their mis/management. Armed with scientific data and compelling stories, Ma reveals the causes and character of the looming ecological disaster. His book has been quoted in The Economist and many western media. Limited water resources pose a major threat to social and economic development in the 21st century. Three Gorges Dam and redirecting water from south to north occupy the main focus of the efforts to increase

146

WATER CONSUMPTION OF ENERGY RESOURCE EXTRACTION, PROCESSING, AND CONVERSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review of the literature for estimates of water intensity of energyresource extraction, processing to fuels, and conversion to electricity

Erik Mielke; Laura Diaz Anadon; Venkatesh Narayanamurti; Erik Mielke; Laura Diaz Anadon; Venkatesh Narayanamurti

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sustainable Water Resources Management, Volume 1: Executive Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of a three-phase research project investigating sustainable water management. The report will be of value to all parties interested in the water aspects of sustainable development. As it contains information at various scales of water management, the report will be of interest for those involved with green building projects, the public water supply, stormwater management, wastewater treatment and the electric power sector. In addition, the report provides valuable insi...

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Understanding the Climate-Sensitive Decisions and Information Needs of Fresh Water Resource Managers in Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding how climate science can be useful in decisions about the management of fresh water resources requires knowledge of decision makers, their climate-sensitive decisions, and the context in which the decisions are being made. A mixed-...

Melissa L. Finucane; Rachel Miller; L. Kati Corlew; Victoria W. Keener; Maxine Burkett; Zena Grecni

149

Rainfall and Water Resources Variability in Sub-Saharan Africa during the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin rainfall series and extensive river flow records are used to characterize and improve understanding of spatial and temporal variability in sub-Saharan African water resources during the last century. Nine major international river ...

Declan Conway; Aurelie Persechino; Sandra Ardoin-Bardin; Hamisai Hamandawana; Claudine Dieulin; Gil Mah

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Planning Investments in Water Resources by Mixed-Integer Programming: The Vardar-Axios River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mixed integer programming model for planning water resources investments is presented. The model is a sequencing model applied to the Vardar-Axios river basin in Yugoslavia and Greece. The structure of the model is ...

Elliot, Dorothy P.

151

Trading zones : cooperating for water resource and ecosystem management when stakeholders have apparently irreconcilable differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disputes over the management of water resources in the United States often seem irreconcilable because stakeholders' differences in values, beliefs, and identities are so hard to resolve. Yet, while many efforts to resolve ...

Fuller, Boyd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Incoherent light as a control resource: a route to complete controllability of quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the use of incoherent light as a resource to control the atomic dynamics and review the proposed in Phys. Rev. A 84, 042106 (2011) method for a controlled transfer between any pure and mixed states of quantum systems using a combination of incoherent and coherent light. Formally, the method provides a constructive proof for an approximate open-loop Markovian state-transfer controllability of quantum system in the space of all density matrices---the strongest possible degree of quantum state control.

Alexander Pechen

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources / Related Web Sites Resources / Related Web Sites Buildings-Related Resources Windows & Glazing Resources Energy-Related Resources International Resources Telephone Directories Buildings-Related Resources California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) Center for Building Science (CBS) at LBNL Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Energy Efficiency home page Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clearinghouse Fact sheets in both HTML for standard web browsers and PDF format using Adobe Acrobat Reader (free). National Fenestration Rating Council home page Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EREN) back to top... Windows & Glazing Resources National Glass Association (NGA) LBNL Building Technologies Fenestration R&D news LBNL Center for Building Science (CBS) Newsletter

154

Plenary lecture 7: circuit analysis to natural resources and environmental economic dynamics and control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study extends to the natural resource and environmental economics the use of the conventionalcircuit analysis and control in engineering. Resources and environmental management problemsare investigated with help of continuous-time and discrete-time ...

Andre A. Keller

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Managing Nicaraguan Water Resources Definition and Relative Importance of Information Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the results of the Vital the Nicaraguan Water Resources Management Initiative, Issues process as implemented for a collaborative effort between the Nicaraguan Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources and Sandia National Laboratories. This initiative is being developed to assist in the development of an efficient and sustainable water resources management system for Nicamgua. The Vital Issues process was used to provide information for developing a project that will develop and implement an advanced information system for managing Nicaragua's water resources. Three Vital Issues panel meetings were convened to 1) develop a mission statement and evaluation criteria for identifying and ranking the issues vital to water resources management in Nicaragua 2) define and rank the vital issues; and 3) identify a preliminary list of information needed to address the vital issues. The selection of panelists from the four basic institutional perspectives- government, industiy, academe, and citizens' groups (through nongovernmental organizations (NGOs))-ensured a high level of stakeholder representation on the panels. The already existing need for a water resource management information system has been magnified in the aftemnath of Hurricane Mitch. This information system would be beneficial for an early warning system in emergencies, and the modeling and simulation capabilities of the system would allow for advanced planning. Additionally, the outreach program will provide education to help Nicaraguan improve their water hygiene practices.

Engi, D.; Guillen, S.M.; Vammen, K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Sustainable Water Resources Management, Volume 2: Green Building Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates how well green building rating systems address sustainable water management practices at the community level by applying three widely used rating systems to three diverse commercial green building projects. The case studies provide insight into the efficacy of green building water management practices and the relative strengths and limitations of rating systems with respect to achieving water sustainability at the community level. The intended audience for this report includes decis...

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

South Asia Water Resources Workshop: An effort to promote water quality data sharing in South Asia  

SciTech Connect

To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group comprised of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the US convened at the Soaltee Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, September 12 to 14, 1999. The workshop was sponsored in part by the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The CMC promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in regions throughout the world as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. In the long term, the workshop organizers and participants are interested in the significance of regional information sharing as a means to build confidence and reduce conflict. The intermediate interests of the group focus on activities that might eventually foster regional management of some aspects of water resources utilization. The immediate purpose of the workshop was to begin the implementation phase of a project to collect and share water quality information at a number of river and coastal estuary locations throughout the region. The workshop participants achieved four objectives: (1) gaining a better understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of existing regional organizations promoting environmental cooperation in South Asia; (3) identifying sites within the region at which data is to be collected; and (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process.

RAJEN,GAURAV; BIRINGER,KENT L.; BETSILL,J. DAVID

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Controlling collective dynamics in complex, minority-game resource-allocation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource allocation takes place in various kinds of real-world complex systems, such as the traffic systems, social services institutions or organizations, or even the ecosystems. The fundamental principle underlying complex resource-allocation dynamics is Boolean interactions associated with minority games, as resources are generally limited and agents tend to choose the least used resource based on available information. A common but harmful dynamical behavior in resource-allocation systems is herding, where there are time intervals during which a large majority of the agents compete for a few resources, leaving many other resources unused. Ac- companying the herd behavior is thus strong fluctuations with time in the number of resources being used. In this paper, we articulate and establish that an intuitive control strategy, namely pinning control, is effective at harnessing the herding dynamics. In particular, by fixing the choices of resources for a few agents while leaving majority of the agents free, h...

Zhang, Ji-Qiang; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Huang, Tie-Qiao; Lai, Ying-Cheng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility need business model and an independent energy aggregator-business model. The approach of developing two group models of DER energy participation in the market is unique. The Detroit Edison (DECo, Utility)-led team includes: DTE Energy Technologies (Dtech, DER provider), Electrical Distribution Design (EDD, Virginia Tech company supporting EPRIs Distribution Engineering Workstation, DEW), Systems Integration Specialists Company (SISCO, economic scheduling and real-time protocol integrator), and OSIsoft (PI software system for managing real-time information). This team is focused on developing the application engineering, including software systems necessary for DERs integration, control and sale into the market place. Phase II Highlights Installed and tested an ICCP link with SSL (security) between DECo, the utility, and DTE Energy Technologies (DTECH), the aggregator, making DER data available to the utility for both monitoring and control. Installed and tested PI process book with circuit & DER operational models for DECo SOC/ROC operators use for monitoring of both utility circuit and customer DER parameters. The PI Process Book models also included DER control for the DECo SOC/ROC operators, which was tested and demonstrated control. The DER Tagging and Operating Procedures were developed, which allowed that control to be done in a safe manner, were modified for required MOC/MISO notification procedures. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) was modified to include temperature normalized load research statistics, using a 30 hour day-ahead weather feed. This allowed day-ahead forecasting of the customer load profile and the entire circuit to determine overload and low voltage problems. This forecast at the point of common coupling was passed to DTech DR SOC for use in their economic dispatch algorithm. Standard Work Instructions were developed for DER notification, sale, and operation into the MISO market. A software mechanism consisting of a suite of new and revised functionality was developed that integrated with the local ISO such that offe

Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

A computationally efficient open-source water resource system simulator - Application to London and the Thames Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interactive River-Aquifer Simulation-2010 (IRAS-2010) is a generalized water resource system simulation model. IRAS-2010 is a new release of IRAS previously released by Cornell University in 1995. Given hydrological inflows, evaporation rates, water ... Keywords: Conjunctive use water resource systems, Decision support systems (DSS), Open-source, Simulation models, Water management models

Evgenii S. Matrosov; Julien J. Harou; Daniel P. Loucks

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ZERO WATER DISCHARGE SYSTEM FOR THE BABYLON RESOURCE RECOVERY FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on page 257. I have a question about the cooling towers. Evap orative towers are a means of handling water, as the authors point out, a good percentage of the treated water winds up in the cooling tower and is evaporated streams in the plant, such as cooling tower blowdown and boiler blowdown, are reprocessed and reused

Columbia University

162

Water resources protection strategy: Revision 1, Attachment 4  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) must provide a demonstration of compliance with the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards for inactive mill sites pursuant to 40 CFR Part 192. This plan outlines the proposed strategy to demonstrate compliance with the ground water standards at the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This demonstration consists of (1) the ground water protection standard, (2) a performance assessment, (3) a closure performance demonstration, and (4) a performance monitoring and corrective action program.

NONE

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

A Neglected Water Resource: The Camanchaca of South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many parts of the world are currently suffering water shortages. Few areas, however, have as little precipitation and groundwater available to alleviate the problem as does the northern coast of Chile. The historical background of the attempts to ...

Robert S. Schemenauer; Humberto Fuenzalida; Pilar Cereceda

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Water Valley, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

165

Water Valley, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

166

Conservation of Water Resources (Virginia) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

167

Big Water, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

168

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider

169

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.2.1 Individual TCL model . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2.2 Plant: The TCL population . . . . . . . .5 TCL Resource, Revenues & Costs 5.1 Chapter

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Montana Rangeland Resources Act (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Montana Rangeland Resources Act establishes a program of rangeland management, to preserve Montana rangeland for livestock, wildlife habitat, high-quality water production, pollution control,...

171

Louisiana Water Control Law (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control Law. This law states regulations for water quality control and states the powers and duties of the secretary of environmental quality. It provides information about...

172

Interactions of woody biofuel feedstock production systems with water resources: Considerations for sustainability.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Water resources are important for the production of woody biofuel feedstocks. It is necessary to ensure that production systems do not adversely affect the quantity or quality of surface and ground water. The effects of woody biomass plantations on water resources are largely dependent on the prior land use and the management regime. Experience from both irrigated and non-irrigated systems has demonstrated that woody biofuel production systems do not impair water quality. Water quality actually improves from conversion of idle or degraded agricultural lands to woody biomass plantations. Site water balance may be altered by cultivation of woody biomass plantations relative to agricultural use, due to increases in evapostranspiration (ET) and storage. Incorporation of woody biomass production plantations within the landscape provides an opportunity to improve the quality of runoff water and soil conservation. Given the centrality of water resources to the sustainability of ecosystem services and other values derived, the experience with woody biofuels feedstock production systems is positive. Keywords. Short rotation woody crop, forest hydrology, water quality, hardwood plantation.

Trettin, Carl,C.; Amatya, Devendra; Coleman, Mark.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 600: Applications for Licenses and Preliminary Permits Under the Water Power Act (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations provide instructions for applications proposing the construction, repair, or operation of hydropower sources. Applications are reviewed by the Water Power and Control Commission.

174

Program on Technology Innovation: Water Resources for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to severe drought conditions in the Southwest in recent years, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory have sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Two of the studies assess the use of saline waters in power plants. The third describes the adaptation of a deterministic watershed model to forecast the impact of climate change on river hydrology in t...

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

Assessment of water resources for nuclear energy centers  

SciTech Connect

Maps of the conterminous United States showing the rivers with sufficient flow to be of interest as potential sites for nuclear energy centers are presented. These maps show the rivers with (1) mean annual flows greater than 3000 cfs, with the flow rates identified for ranges of 3000 to 6000, 6000 to 12,000, 12,000 to 24,000, and greater than 24,000 cfs; (2) monthly, 20-year low flows greater than 1500 cfs, with the flow rates identified for ranges of 1500 to 3000, 3000 to 6000, 6000 to 12,000, and greater than 12,000 cfs; and (3) annual, 20-year low flows greater than 1500 cfs, with the flow rates identified for ranges of 1500 to 3000, 3000 to 6000, 6000 to 12,000, and greater than 12,000 cfs. Criteria relating river flow rates required for various size generating stations both for sites located on reservoirs and for sites without local storage of cooling water are discussed. These criteria are used in conjunction with plant water consumption rates (based on both instantaneous peak and annual average usage rates) to estimate the installed generating capacity that may be located at one site or within a river basin. Projections of future power capacity requirements, future demand for water (both withdrawals and consumption), and regions of expected water shortages are also presented. Regional maps of water availability, based on annual, 20-year low flows, are also shown. The feasibility of locating large energy centers in these regions is discussed.

Samuels, G.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Networked control of distributed energy resources: application to solid oxide fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a model-based networked control approach for managing Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) over communication networks. As a model system, we consider a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that communicates with the central controller ...

Yulei Sun; Sathyendra Ghantasala; Nael H. El-Farra

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources The DOE Information Center's current collection has more than 40,000 documents consisting of technical reports and historical materials that relate to DOE operations....

178

Agent-Based Control Framework for Distributed Energy Resources Microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DERs) provide many benefits for the electricity users and utilities. However, the electricity distribution system traditionally was not designed to accommodate active power generation and storage at the distribution level. ...

Zhenhua Jiang

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Agent-Based Wave Computation: Towards Controlling the Resource Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the mobile agent paradigm has received significant consideration in the context of large complex decentralized systems. Tasks such as system monitoring, load balancing and resource management have been successfully mapped onto this paradigm. ...

Armin R. Mikler; Vivek S. Chokhani

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open-Standard Wireless Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ensemble Precipitation and Water-Level Forecasts for Anticipatory Water-System Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for testing weather forecast products for applications in anticipatory water-system control. The applicability of the ensemble prediction system (EPS) of the ECMWF is tested for flood control in a regional water system in ...

Schalk Jan van Andel; Roland K. Price; Arnold H. Lobbrecht; Frans van Kruiningen; Robert Mureau

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY An ENERGY STAR Resource Guidedrinking water supply industry to reduce energy consumptionenergy is used in the public drinking water supply industry.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Water reservoir control under economic, social and environmental constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although great progress has been made in the last 40 years, efficient operation of water reservoir systems still remains a very active research area. The combination of multiple water uses, non-linearities in the model and in the objectives, strong uncertainties ... Keywords: Multiobjective optimisation, Multipurpose water reservoirs, Nonlinear control, Stochastic control, Uncertain dynamic systems

Andrea Castelletti; Francesca Pianosi; Rodolfo Soncini-Sessa

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Development of KM System for Intergrated Management of Water Resources and Environment in Zhangweinan Subbasin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge Management (KM) system for Integrated Management of Water Resources and Environment is developed in the paper, which includes spatial database, properties database, thematic database and met abase. The database can be used for integrated management ... Keywords: Zhangweinan Subbasin, knowledge management system(KM), database

Weidong Yu; Chunhui Li; Junxiang Jia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Putting humans in the loop: Social computing for Water Resources Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of online services, social networks, crowdsourcing, and serious Web games has promoted the emergence of a novel computation paradigm, where complex tasks are solved by exploiting the capacity of human beings and computer platforms in an integrated ... Keywords: Crowdsourcing, Games with a purpose, Human Computation, Social computation, Water resources planning and management

P. Fraternali; A. Castelletti; R. Soncini-Sessa; C. Vaca Ruiz; A. E. Rizzoli

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BCWUA BWR C&C CEDARE CEH COMEST DEWA DOE DPSEEA DPSIR EEAA ENB ENCID ENSAP EPADP EPA EPI ESI EVI EWP FAO the Water Resources System Source: Bossel, 1999 Moreover, trans-boundary river basins-as with our case- fuel effort must be placed on the development of indices than we have in the past. Failure to do so

Richner, Heinz

187

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

SciTech Connect

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Design and Application of Solar Water Heater Intelligent Control System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar water heater intelligent control system is made up of four modules which are data acquisition module, single-chip control module, the implementation and regulation module and human- machine interaction module. The problems of automatic detection ... Keywords: Solar Water Heater, Hardware Design, Detection and Control

Yu Gui Yin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Resource Management Services, Part 608: Use and Protection of Waters (New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Use and Protection of 8: Use and Protection of Waters (New York) Resource Management Services, Part 608: Use and Protection of Waters (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation

191

Summary of resources available to small water systems for meeting the 10 ppb arsenic drinking water limit.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the lowering of the EPA maximum contaminant level of arsenic from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb, many public water systems in the country and in New Mexico in particular, are faced with making decisions about how to bring their system into compliance. This document provides detail on the options available to the water systems and the steps they need to take to achieve compliance with this regulation. Additionally, this document provides extensive resources and reference information for additional outreach support, financing options, vendors for treatment systems, and media pilot project results.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Thomson, Bruce M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ziegler, Matt (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Susan (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Himmelberger, Heather (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Economically Optimum Agricultural Utilization of a Reclaimed Water Resource in the Texas Rolling Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) has proposed a project that would reduce the flow from saline springs and seeps within the groundwater alluvium of the Red River Basin. While the amount of salts moving through the alluvium would be controlled by the project, total water quantity would not be appreciably affected. Presently, salinity levels in the basin are quite high, making irrigated agriculture an infeasible alternative. In areas affected by salinity, salts accumulate in the active root zone, thereby restricting the availability of soil moisture to the crop and reducing yield. To counteract the deleterious presence of the salts, extra irrigation water is applied to "leach" the salts below the active root zone thus maintaining the yield at some specified level. Waters containing over 13,000 parts per million (ppm) salts have been sampled by the COE in the Pease River watershed (a subsector of the entire area to be impacted by the project). It is estimated that installation of the project would reduce this level to approximately 3000 ppm. Although 3000 ppm is not below the tolerance threshold of most plants, rainfall in the area is sufficient to act as a natural leaching agent. The purpose of this study was to estimate the response of the agricultural sector to the project. A recursive linear program was designed in such a manner that the time path of producer adjustments to the reclaimed water source could be estimated. The Pease River watershed was chosen due to the sizable reduction in the salinity due to the proposed project, relative to other areas within the basin. By considering only a single watershed, the adoption process could be more closely studied. Two scenarios were considered in the analysis in an attempt to better understand the effects of the initial assumptions on the measure of project benefits. The first scenario applied guidelines established by the Water Resources Council (WRC). WRC guidelines required the use of OBERS SERIES E' yield projections, normalized prices, and an interest rate of 7.125 percent to discount future costs and benefits. The second scenario applied in alternative criteria, which assumed no trend in yield, a three-year average of current prices, and a real interest rate of 2.5 percent. Since probabilistic estimates indicating the improvement in water quality through time were unavailable from the COE, it was assumed that all improvement in water quality occurred linearly over time, with full water quality improvement in the tenth year. The adjustment process was then evaluated over a twenty year horizon. Several irrigation strategies were considered for each crop, thereby allowing the model to select an optimal leaching policy given the level of water quality for any point in time. The linear programming model maximized expected net returns from representative crop enterprises on the basis of a three-year moving average of past actual yields. This means expected yield in the linear programming model was slightly less than actual yield for any particular year. When all improvements in water quality had taken place and the model achieved steady state, the economically optimal allocation of the water resource had been determined. Results from the study indicated that a policy of rapid adoption should be undertaken. In the initial year, a 40 percent leaching fraction was economically feasible on limited acreage. Dryland production then shifted quickly to irrigation as water quality improved. Water use also shifted, moving from a 40 percent to a 20 percent leaching fraction. By the ninth year of the analysis, all adjustment's had occurred and a 10 percent leaching fraction was economically optimal on all irrigated acreage. Due to its profitability and for relative salt tolerance, cotton was the only irrigated activity chosen by the model. An optimal cropping pattern of 55,121 acres of irrigated cotton, 14,437 acres of dryland cotton and 7,728 acres of native pasture was selected by the model under the first scenario. For the second, sc

Zacharias, T.; Taylor, C. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Scenario development for water resources planning and watershed management: Methodology and semi-arid region case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilizing the scenario development framework from Mahmoud et al. (2009), a set of scenarios were developed for and applied in the Verde River Watershed in Arizona, USA. Through a scenario definition exercise, three dimensions of future change with respective ... Keywords: Scenario development, Scenario planning, Scenarios, Water resources management, Water resources planning

Mohammed I. Mahmoud; Hoshin V. Gupta; Seshadri Rajagopal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development of an interval-valued fuzzy linear-programming method based on infinite ?-cuts for water resources management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An interval-valued fuzzy linear-programming (IVFL) method based on infinite @a-cuts is developed for water resources management in this study. The introduction of interval parameters and interval-valued fuzzy parameters into the objective function and ... Keywords: Agricultural irrigation, Fuzzy linear-programming, Infinite ?-cuts, Interval, Uncertainty, Water resources

H. W. Lu; G. H. Huang; L. He

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

196

Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee) Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) establishes the water pollution

197

Assessment of Emission Control Technologies for Distributed Resource Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed resources (DR) are projected to be an expanding part of the power generation mix in the future as the market shifts from a strong reliance on large, central power plants to greater use of smaller, more dispersed power generation sources located closer to load centers. This report assesses the current environmental regulatory situation for DR technologies and describes a range of combustion and post-combustion strategies to address environmental requirements. Such information will benefit ener...

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

199

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011), pp. 411419. [31] EERE. EnergyPlus energy simulationcfm/weather_data.cfm. [32] EERE. Estimating appliance andmytopic=10040. [33] EERE. Lower water heater temperature for

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Flour moisture control for maximum water addition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines flour moisture control and how this control can be an effective tool for cost minimization in a flour mill. Specifically, this thesis (more)

Bontrager, Chad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sustainable Water Resources Management, Volume 3: Case Studies on New Water Paradigm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies and evaluates the foundation and requirements for a sustainable water infrastructure at the community and watershed scales. The report will be of value not only to the public water supply, stormwater management, and wastewater treatment sectors, but also the electric power sector, given the strong interdependencies among the four sectors. In addition, the report will of value to government agencies involved in water regulations and policy.

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluating Thermoelectric, Agricultural, and Municipal Water Consumption in a National Water Resources Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than a decade ago, EPRI identified water availability constraints as a major issue facing current operations and future development of the electric power sector in the United States and internationally. As a result, EPRI initiated research to assess and reduce both current and future vulnerabilities to water shortages. This report derives and applies algorithms for calculating water consumption by the U.S. electric power, municipal, and agricultural sectors. Using the most recent available ...

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

Water Pollution Control Permit Regulations (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations outline the permits and permitting processes for point discharges to surface waters and outline the monitoring and reporting requirements.

204

Scoping Document: Water Quality Control Policy on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INTRODUCTION Background Annually, thermal electric power plants take in billions of gallons 8 One measure of the plant thermal efficiency used by the power industry is the Net Plant Heat Rate for Power Plant Cooling. March 2008 ii LIST OF PREPARERS The following staff of the State Water Resources

205

Reading Comprehension - Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the planet Earth. Food, water, and sunlight are all examples of a natural resource unnatural resource science resource . A natural resource is a material found in...

206

A reverse osmosis treatment process for produced water: optimization, process control, and renewable energy application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fresh water resources in many of the world's oil producing regions, such as western Texas, are scarce, while produced water from oil wells is plentiful, though unfit for most applications due to high salinity and other contamination. Disposing of this water is a great expense to oil producers. This research seeks to advance a technology developed to treat produced water by reverse osmosis and other means to render it suitable for agricultural or industrial use, while simultaneously reducing disposal costs. Pilot testing of the process thus far has demonstrated the technology's capability to produce good-quality water, but process optimization and control were yet to be fully addressed and are focuses of this work. Also, the use of renewable resources (wind and solar) are analyzed as potential power sources for the process, and an overview of reverse osmosis membrane fouling is presented. A computer model of the process was created using a dynamic simulator, Aspen Dynamics, to determine energy consumption of various process design alternatives, and to test control strategies. By preserving the mechanical energy of the concentrate stream of the reverse osmosis membrane, process energy requirements can be reduced several fold from that of the current configuration. Process control schemes utilizing basic feedback control methods with proportional-integral (PI) controllers are proposed, with the feasibility of the strategy for the most complex process design verified by successful dynamic simulation. A macro-driven spreadsheet was created to allow for quick and easy cost comparisons of renewable energy sources in a variety of locations. Using this tool, wind and solar costs were compared for cities in regions throughout Texas. The renewable energy resource showing the greatest potential was wind power, with the analysis showing that in windy regions such as the Texas Panhandle, wind-generated power costs are approximately equal to those generated with diesel fuel.

Mareth, Brett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is authorized to review and

208

DND: a model for forecasting electrical energy usage by water-resource subregion  

SciTech Connect

A forecast methodology was derived from principles of econometrics using exogenous variables, i.e., cost of electricity, consumer income, and price elasticity as indicators of growth for each consuming sector: residential, commercial, and industrial. The model was calibrated using forecast data submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) by the nine Regional Electric Reliability Councils. Estimates on electrical energy usage by specific water-resource subregion were obtained by normalizing forecasted total electrical energy usage by state into per capita usage. The usage factor and data on forecasted population were applied for each water resource subregion. The results derived using the model are self-consistent and in good agreement with DOE Energy Information Administration projections. The differences that exist are largely the result of assumptions regarding specific aggregations and assignment of regional-system reliability and load factors. 8 references, 2 figures, 13 tables.

Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Chilled Water and Hot Water Building Differential Pressure Setpoint Calculation - Chilled Water and Hot Water Pump Speed Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More and more variable frequency devices (VFD) are being installed on the chilled water and hot water pumps on the TAMU campus. Those pump speeds are varied to maintain chilled water or hot water building deferential pressure (DP) or return temperature or flow rate at their setpoints. The chilled water and hot water DP setpoint or return temperature setpoint or flow rate setpoint was a constant value or reset based on outside air temperature. In some buildings, the chilled water and hot water DP setpoints were reset based on flow rate, but in many instances those setpoint schedules were either too low to maintain enough building DP requirement or too high and consumed excess energy. The building DP reset schedule based on flow rate is studied and compared with the other pump speed control methods. Because the building DP setpoint based on flow rate method is achieved by tracking the load change, it saves energy than the other methods. In this paper its calculation procedure is generated and the example of the building DP calculation is given.

Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H., Jr.; Claridge, D.; Liu, C.; Deng, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Energy Technologies for the West: possible effects of energy technology on land, water, and air resources. Workshop held in San Francisco, California, 21 September 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

John Fraser, Association of California Water Agencies, spoke on the effect of energy technology on California's water resources. He pointed out that by the year 2000, a water deficiency of about 2,250,000 acre-feet will exist in California; therefore, many agencies will not indefinitely commit supplies of fresh water for power plant cooling. Legislation for siting power plants along the coastline is summarized. Dr. James Liverman, ERDA, noted a remark by Mr. Fraser that, in its national plan, ERDA ''does not appear to pay much attention to the water issue''; he agrees, but says ERDA is committed to working with the Water Resources Council, with establishments in each state. Professor Robert Hagan, Univ. of California, reports on a program to investigate the energy required to develop water, or, in short, to move water to where it is to be used; water which may be associated with the use and conservation of water; the energy associated with waste-water treatment; and waste-water reuse. Speaker Zock Willey, Environmental Defense Fund, briefly evaluated the environmental impact of an energy technology by saying that the public has a right to know and say what the risks are in terms of the trade-offs. Russ Freeman, EIA, says he doesn't believe it possible to have an energy program in the traditional concept of a government program. EPA has learned that energy is an input to every societal process and pollution is an output from virtually everything that society does. The final speaker, Fayne L. Tucker, Lake County Air Pollution Control District, reviewed the potential of geothermal resources, saying that it is believed the Lake County government can, with the state and Federal government, plan geothermal development. It is also believed the Geysers should be considered as a payoff area. An extensive question and answer session completed the workshop. (MCW)

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute applies to a city, sanitary district, or other governmental subdivision or public corporation. The statute gives the Pollution Control Agency the authority to prepare and enforce a long-range plan pertaining to

212

Water Pollution Control Act (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Act (Minnesota) Pollution Control Act (Minnesota) Water Pollution Control Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This Act gives the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency broad responsibility to establish pollution standards for state waters; monitor water conditions and sources of pollution; review construction, installation, and

213

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

214

Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Functional Definition for Communication and Control Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. A functional definition of DR for defining communication and control requirements in electric utility distribution systems is provided. The report is a tool that readers can use in developing communication and control strategies for DR in specific distribution systems.

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

216

Evaluation Model Analysis of the Control Efficiency of Environmental Resource Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exterior of Environmental resources decide that the Energy consumption and reducing pollutant emissions can restrict and improve the way of Production and life by means of energy and environmental control policy. Because the existing environmental ... Keywords: BP neural network, Cluster Analysis, control policy

Linxiu Wang; Kun Cheng

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Hybrid PID-fuzzy control scheme for managing energy resources in buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both indoor temperature regulation and energy resources management in buildings require the design and the implementation of efficient and readily adaptable control schemes. One can use standard schemes, such as ''on/off'' and PID, or ''advanced'' schemes, ... Keywords: Control scheme, Energy performance of buildings, Hybrid PIDfuzzy, Multi-energy buildings, Thermal comfort

Benjamin Paris; Julien Eynard; Stphane Grieu; Monique Polit

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Oxygen Control in PWR Makeup Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three fixed-bed processes can accelerate hydrazine-oxygen reactions in PWR makeup water and reduce oxygen levels to below 5 ppb. In this comparative-test project, activated carbon based systems offered the best combination of low cost, effectiveness, and commercial availability. A second process, employing palladium-coated anion resin, is also commercially available.

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Facility Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project (Project) was developed to provide improved access to regional water resources data in the Paso del Norte region for regional water stakeholders to make timely decisions in water operations and flood control. Tasks accomplished in Phase II include the complete migration of the Project Website and related databases to the ArcIMS software, which provides a better spatial query capacity. The database was enhanced by incorporating more gauge stations, limited groundwater data (well information, water levels, water quality, and pumpage) and other new data, and strengthened data sharing by implementing FGDC classic metadata. Protocols were explored for data sharing and spatial queries and opportunities for more active participation of volunteer regional data providers in the Project. The linkage of the PdNWC database with future groundwater and surface water model development was also assessed. Based on the experiences gained in the Project, the following recommendations for future Project work include: * Continued compilation of new data sources not yet included in the Project to enhance data sharing, * Installation of additional new monitoring stations and equipment and inclusion of these monitoring sites in future ArcIMS map products to fill data gaps and provide additional real-time data, * Strengthening the links with the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) being advanced by the USACE. Special focus will be given to serving DEM and orthophoto data recently transferred from the USACE to NMWRRI and enhancing direct Web linkages with USACE and URGWOM project activities to improve model development capacity and enhance sharing of modeling results, * Development and implementation of a user needs survey focusing on new data sets of interest, enhanced access mechanisms, and other suggestions to improve the Project Website, * Development and making available online for download a Microsoft Access database of Project water resource data to provide search and query functions, * Development of an online help tutorial that would support online searches of the database, making the site easier for end users to navigate and utilize, and * Continuity in the exploration of future funding opportunities for Project activities, especially through linkages with other regional data compilation and modeling projects. Part I of this report presents major historical and technical components of the Phase II development of the Database and GIS prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon. Groundwater elements of interest, relevant to the development of the coordinated database and to the integral comprehension of the watersheds mission and planning are also included as Part II of this report. This part, prepared by Z. Sheng and others, presents the sources of regional groundwater resources data compiled by different federal and state entities and outlines suggestions for regional groundwater data to be implemented with an ArcIMS interface so that this data can be shared and accessed by all Paso del Norte Watershed Council stakeholders. Part III, prepared by R. Srinivasan, presents the technical challenges posed to data sharing by multiple data collectors and sources and summarizes the different protocols available for an effective transfer and sharing of data through a GIS ArcIMS interface. Part IV, prepared by Z. Sheng and D. Zhang, explores the possibility to link the Database Project to a comprehensive development of regional hydrological models within the Rio Grande reach between Elephant Butte Dam, in New Mexico, and Fort Quitman, Texas. Finally, Part V, prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon, presents closing comments as well as a summary of the recommendations made throughout the document. Dr. Hanks provided assistance in summarizing preliminary user survey results

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Rapidly Expanding Uses of Climate Data and Information in Agriculture and Water Resources: Causes and Characteristics of New Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last 20 years the use of climate data and information in agriculture and water resources has increased dramatically. This has resulted from vastly improved access to comprehensive datasets and climate information made available by wide ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Kenneth E. Kunkel

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Knowledge-Based Decision Support for Integrated Water Resources Management with an application for Wadi Shueib, Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This book takes a two-staged approach to contribute to the contemporary Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) research. First it investigates sub-basin-scale IWRM modelling and scenario (more)

Riepl, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection It is the policy of the state of Florida to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the air and waters of the state. This Act authorizes the Department of Environmental Protection to enact and implement regulations designed to control and abate activities which may contribute to air and

224

Water Pollution Control Act (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Pollution Control Act (New Jersey) Water Pollution Control Act (New Jersey) Water Pollution Control Act (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This act states the rules and regulations to prevent and control pollution

225

Water pollution Control Permit Fee Schedules (West Virginia) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

pollution Control Permit Fee Schedules (West Virginia) pollution Control Permit Fee Schedules (West Virginia) Water pollution Control Permit Fee Schedules (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Fees Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule establishes schedules of permit application fees and annual permit fees for state water pollution control permits and national

226

Modeling of Inverter Control with Distribution Management System for Distributed Energy Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A distribution energy resource management system (DERMS) has been added as an external control to the OpenDSS software. This report discusses that control and provides case studies illustrating the feeder response. The visual interpretation of the feeder in the external control is similar to that of an operators control interface.The DERMS uses meters on a feeder to provide power flow data. This data is processed and used to update the control of the inverter-based generation. The ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

Remote sensing in a water-resources study of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the usefulness of remote-sensing data in a water-resources study of Yellowstone National Park by delineating warm and cool ground-water areas. Remote-sensing data from aircraft missions in August 1966, September 1967, August 1969, and May 1970 were compared with reconnaissance, ground-temperature surveys, and test-hole data. Thermal-water discharge areas can be determined from infrared imagery and photography from the aircraft missions. Contrasts on infrared imagery caused by differences in vegetative cover, particularly between forested and nonforested areas, often mask the effects of ground-water temperature differences. The imagery, however, shows relatively warm and cool land surface in some areas. Color and color infrared photographs have been useful in reconnaissance. Aerial photographs and field studies of snowpack conditions indicated the usefulness of aerial photography taken during spring snowmelt to determine relatively cool and warm land-surface areas. A snowline in Nez Perce Creek Valley corresponds to a boundary between cool and warm ground water that was determined from augered test holes and ground-temperature surveys. Remnants of the snowpack correlate well with cool areas interpreted from infrared imagery. Relatively cool areas are easier to determine from photographs of snowpack than they are from infrared imagery. Thermal-contour maps could be made from a series of aerial photographs or repetitive data from a satellite taken during the melting of the snowpack.

Cox, E.R.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection A person may not construct, or cause to be constructed, a project that

230

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than relying on central-station electricity generation and purchase of natural gas for heating and DER under uncertain electricity and natural gas prices · Section 5 summarizes the findings Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty 3 · FPt: wholesale natural

231

Strategies to Reduce Water Consumption in SO2 Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost-effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems to remove multiple pollutants and require significant process water. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have potential to reduce multiple pollutants simultaneou...

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

LANSCE Drift Tube Linac Water Control System Refurbishment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are several refurbishment projects underway at the Los Alamos National Laboratory LANSCE linear accelerator. Systems involved are: RF, water cooling, networks, diagnostics, timing, controls, etc. The Drift Tube Linac (DTL) portion of the accelerator consists of four DTL tanks, each with three independent water control systems. The systems are about 40 years old, use outdated and non-replaceable equipment and NIM bin control modules, are beyond their design life and provide unstable temperature control. Insufficient instrumentation and documentation further complicate efforts at maintaining system performance. Detailed design of the replacement cooling systems is currently in progress. Previous design experience on the SNS accelerator water cooling systems will be leveraged, see the SNS DTL FDR. Plans call for replacement of water piping, manifolds, pumps, valves, mix tanks, instrumentation (flow, pressure and temperature) and control system hardware and software. This presentation will focus on the control system design with specific attention on planned use of the National Instruments Compact RIO platform with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control system (EPICS) software toolkit.

Marroquin, Pilar S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

World Environmental and Water Resources Congress, ASCE/EWRI Omaha, Nebraska, May 21 26, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the long-term accumulation of pollutants and those caused by short-term (event-related) problems. Long-term. Selecting a design that is optimal in terms of pollutant control, receiving water impacts, and cost of the long-term rainfall record. Figure 1 is an example of observed rainfall and runoff observed at Milwaukee

Pitt, Robert E.

234

Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

SciTech Connect

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources in Berkeley, June 12, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPAs mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}brine might occur.

Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources  

SciTech Connect

Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Water Pollution Control Facilities, Tax exemption (Michigan) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Water Pollution Control Facilities, Tax exemption (Michigan) Water Pollution Control Facilities, Tax exemption (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Department of Treasury The Water Pollution Control Exemption, PA 451 of 1994, Part 37, as amended, affords a 100% property and sales tax exemption to facilities that are

238

Apparatus and method for controlling a heat pump water heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the operation of an add-on heat pump water heater unit is disclosed. A combination of a thermally conductive tube having a flattened portion and a thermostat mounted thereto is utilized to sense the temperature level of water in a tank to which the heater unit is connected. The tube and thermostat are additionally insulated from the ambient. A circulating pump is provided and connected to the water thermostat such that the pump is energized only when it is necessary to operate the heat energy adding unit.

Whitwell, R. J.; Schafer, J. P.

1984-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is internationally recognized as a key NASA resource for the global assessment of terrestrial water and energy conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, evapotranspiration, streamflow, soil moisture, etc.) is being used to improve water resource and Hydro-energy NASA resource for the global assessment of terrestrial water and energy conditions and fluxes results to address multiple national application solutions. Knowledge of terrestrial water, energy

Houser, Paul R.

240

Water Energy Resource Data from Idaho National Laboratory's Virtual Hydropower Prospector  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hydropower Program is to conduct research and development (R&D) that will improve the technical, societal, and environmental benefits of hydropower and provide cost-competitive technologies that enable the development of new and incremental hydropower capacity, adding diversity to the nation's energy supply. The Virtual Hydropower Prospector is a GIS application to locate and evaluate natural stream water energy resources. In the interactive data map the U.S. is divided into 20 hydrologic regions. The Prospector tool applies an analytical process to determine the gross power potential of these regions and helps users to site potential hydropower projects.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Northern Cheyenne Reservation Coal Bed Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis of Produced Water Disposal Options  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is currently one of the most active gas plays in the United States. Monthly production in 2002 reached about 26 BCF in the Wyoming portion of the basin. Coalbed methane reserves for the Wyoming portion of the basin are approximately 25 trillion cubic feet (TCF). Although coal beds in the Powder River Basin extend well into Montana, including the area of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, the only CBM development in Montana is the CX Field, operated by the Fidelity Exploration, near the Wyoming border. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located on the northwest flank of the PRB in Montana with a total land of 445,000 acres. The Reservation consists of five districts, Lame Deer, Busby, Ashland, Birney, and Muddy Cluster and has a population of 4,470 according to the 2000 Census. The CBM resource represents a significant potential asset to the Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Methane gas in coal beds is trapped by hydrodynamic pressure. Because the production of CBM involves the dewatering of coalbed to allow the release of methane gas from the coal matrix, the relatively large volume of the co-produced water and its potential environmental impacts are the primary concerns for the Tribe. Presented in this report is a study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) in partnership with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe to assess the Tribes CBM resources and evaluate applicable water handling options. The project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Native American Initiative of the National Petroleum Technology Office, under contract DEAC07- 99ID13727. Matching funds were granted by the MBMG in supporting the work of geologic study and mapping conducted at MBMG.

Shaochang Wo; David A. Lopez; Jason Whiteman Sr.; Bruce A. Reynolds

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

243

Water Pollution Control Authority (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Authority (Alabama) Authority (Alabama) Water Pollution Control Authority (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Loan Program The Water Pollution Control Revolving Loan Fund, is maintained in perpetuity and operated by the department as agent for the authority for the purposes stated herein. Grants from the federal government or its agencies allotted to the state for capitalization of the revolving loan fund, state matching funds where required, and loan principal, interest, and penalties shall be deposited as required by the terms of the federal grant directly in the revolving loan fund. Money in the revolving loan fund

244

Control Strategies for Distributed Energy Resources to Maximize the Use of Wind Power in Rural Microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this paper is to design control strategies for distributed energy resources (DERs) to maximize the use of wind power in a rural microgrid. In such a system, it may be economical to harness wind power to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels for electricity production. In this work, we develop control strategies for DERs, including diesel generators, energy storage and demand response, to achieve high penetration of wind energy in a rural microgrid. Combinations of centralized (direct control) and decentralized (autonomous response) control strategies are investigated. Detailed dynamic models for a rural microgrid are built to conduct simulations. The system response to large disturbances and frequency regulation are tested. It is shown that optimal control coordination of DERs can be achieved to maintain system frequency while maximizing wind power usage and reducing the wear and tear on fossil fueled generators.

Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Samaan, Nader A.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Chunlian; Zhang, Yu

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Integration of Water Resource Models with Fayetteville Shale Decision Support and Information System  

SciTech Connect

Significant issues can arise with the timing, location, and volume of surface water withdrawals associated with hydraulic fracturing of gas shale reservoirs as impacted watersheds may be sensitive, especially in drought years, during low flow periods, or during periods of the year when activities such as irrigation place additional demands on the surface supply of water. Significant energy production and associated water withdrawals may have a cumulative impact to watersheds over the short-term. Hence, hydraulic fracturing based on water withdrawal could potentially create shifts in the timing and magnitude of low or high flow events or change the magnitude of river flow at daily, monthly, seasonal, or yearly time scales. These changes in flow regimes can result in dramatically altered river systems. Currently little is known about the impact of fracturing on stream flow behavior. Within this context the objective of this study is to assess the impact of the hydraulic fracturing on the water balance of the Fayetteville Shale play area and examine the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on river flow regime at subbasin scale. This project addressed that need with four unique but integrated research and development efforts: 1) Evaluate the predictive reliability of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model based at a variety of scales (Task/Section 3.5). The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to simulate the across-scale water balance and the respective impact of hydraulic fracturing. A second hypothetical scenario was designed to assess the current and future impacts of water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing on the flow regime and on the environmental flow components (EFCs) of the river. The shifting of these components, which present critical elements to water supply and water quality, could influence the ecological dynamics of river systems. For this purpose, we combined the use of SWAT model and Richter et al.s (1996) methodology to assess the shifting and alteration of the flow regime within the river and streams of the study area. 2) Evaluate the effect of measurable land use changes related to gas development (well-pad placement, access road completion, etc.) on surface water flow in the region (Task/Section 3.7). Results showed that since the upsurge in shale-gas related activities in the Fayetteville Shale Play (between 2006 and 2010), shale-gas related infrastructure in the region have increase by 78%. This change in land-cover in comparison with other land-cover classes such as forest, urban, pasture, agricultural and water indicates the highest rate of change in any land-cover category for the study period. A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) flow model of the Little Red River watershed simulated from 2000 to 2009 showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. A forecast scenario based on the assumption that 2010 land-cover does not see any significant change over the forecast period (2010 to 2020) also showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. Further analyses showed that this change in the stream-flow regime for the forecast period is attributable to the increase in land-cover as introduced by the shale-gas infrastructure. 3) Upgrade the Fayetteville Shale Information System to include information on watershed status. (Tasks/Sections 2.1 and 2.2). This development occurred early in the project period, and technological improvements in web-map APIs have made it possible to further improve the map. The current sites (http://lingo.cast.uark.edu) is available but is currently being upgraded to a more modern interface and robust mapping engine using funds outside this project. 4) Incorporate the methodologies developed in Tasks/Sections 3.5 and 3.7 into a Spatial Decision Support System for use by regulatory agencies and producers in the play. The resulting system is available at http://fayshale.cast.uark.edu and is under review the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission.

Cothren, Jackson; Thoma, Greg; DiLuzio, Mauro; Limp, Fred

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Linking science with environmental decision making: Experiences from an integrated modeling approach to supporting sustainable water resources management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The call for more effective integration of science and decision making is ubiquitous in environmental management. While scientists often complain that their input is ignored by decision makers, the latter have also expressed dissatisfaction that critical ... Keywords: Decision support, Integrated modeling, Scenario analysis, Sustainability, Water resources management

Yuqiong Liu; Hoshin Gupta; Everett Springer; Thorsten Wagener

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sustainable biofuel production." Ecotoxicology Dimensions in Biofuel Production. Rome, Italy, UN resource impact of biofuel production and trade By Kevin

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Estimation of Offshore Wind Resources in Coastal Waters off Shirahama Using ENVISAT ASAR Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Offshore wind resource maps for the coastal waters off Shirahama, Japan were made based on 104 images of the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the ENVISAT satellite. Wind speed fields were derived from the SAR images with the geophysical model function CMOD5.N. Mean wind speed and energy density were estimated using the Weibull distribution function. These accuracies were examined in comparison with in situ measurements from the Shirahama offshore platform and the Southwest Wakayama buoy (SW-buoy). Firstly, it was found that the SAR-derived 10 m-height wind speed had a bias of 0.52 m/s and a RMSE of 2.33 m/s at Shirahama. Secondly, it was found that the mean wind speeds estimated from SAR images and the Weibull distribution function were overestimated at both sites. The ratio between SAR-derived and in situ measured mean wind speeds at Shirahama is 1.07, and this value was used for a long-termRemote Sens. 2013, 5 2884

Yuko Takeyama; Teruo Ohsawa; Tomohiro Yamashita; Katsutoshi Kozai; Yasunori Muto; Yasuyuki Baba; Koji Kawaguchi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources at Detroit Edison  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective was to create the communication and control system, the process and the economic procedures that will allow owners (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) connected in parallel to the electric distribution to have their resources operated in a manner that protects the electric utility distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) (a power flow and short circuit modeling tool) was modified to calculate the real-time characteristics of the distribution network based on the real-time electric distribution network information and provide DER operating suggestions to the Detroit Edison system operators so that regional electric stability is maintained. Part of the suggestion algorithm takes into account the operational availability of DERs, which is known by the Energy Aggregator, DTE Energy Technologies. The availability information will be exchanged from DTE Energy Technologies to Detroit Edison. For the calculated suggestions to be used by the Detroit Edison operators, procedures were developed to allow an operator to operate a DER by requesting operation of the DER through DTE Energy Technologies. Prior to issuing control of a DER, the safety of the distribution network and personnel needs to be taken into account. This information will be exchanged from Detroit Edison to DTE Energy Technologies. Once it is safe to control the DER, DTE Energy Technologies will issue the control signal. The real-time monitoring of the DECo system will reflect the DER control. Multi-vendor DER technologies representing approximately 4 MW of capacity was monitored and controlled using a web-based communication path. The DER technologies included are a photovoltaic system, energy storage, fuel cells and natural gas/diesel internal combustion engine generators. This report documents Phase I result for the Detroit Edison (Utility) led team, which also includes: DTE Energy Technology (DER provider & Aggregator), Electrical Distribution Design (Virginia Tech company supporting DEW); Systems Integration Specialists Company (real-time protocol integrator); and OSIsoft (software system for managing real-time information). This work was performed in anticipation of being selected for Phase II of the Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources project.

Haukur Asgeirsson; Richard Seguin

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Instantaneous Active and Nonactive Power Control of Distributed Energy Resources with Current Limiter  

SciTech Connect

Abstract -- Distributed energy resources (DER) with a power electronics inverter interface can provide both active power and nonactive power simultaneously and independently. A decoupled control algorithm of active power and nonactive power is developed based on the instantaneous active power and nonactive power theory. A current limiter is combined to the control algorithm, and it ensures that the inverter is not overloaded. During the normal system operation, the active power has higher priority over the nonactive power so that the energy from a DER can be fully transferred to the grid. Within the inverter s capability, nonactive power is provided to the grid as required. With this control algorithm, the inverter s capabilities are taken full advantage at all times, both in terms of functionality as well as making use of its full KVA rating. Through the algorithm, the inverter s active power and nonactive power are controlled directly, simultaneously, and independently. Several experimental results fully demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of this new control algorithm. As evidenced by the fast dynamic response that results, a DER system with the control algorithm can provide full services to the grid in both steady state and during transient events.

Xu, Yan [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty AfzalEnergy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty ?DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

WaterHUB: a resource for students and educators for learning hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of surface water hydrology involves understanding the occurrence, distribution and movement of water on the surface of the earth. Because of human impacts in the form of landuse change, the hydrologic processes at one geographic location may ... Keywords: HUBzero, WaterHUB, soil water assessment tool, surface water hydrology

Venkatesh Merwade; Wei Feng; Lan Zhao; Carol X. Song

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Ground water control for an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale. An open base of operation is excavated in the formation above the retort site, and an access drift is excavated to the bottom of the retort site. Formation is explosively expanded to form the fragmented mass between the access drift and an elevation spaced below the bottom of the base of operation, leaving a horizontal sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the top of the fragmented mass and the bottom of the base of operation. The sill pillar provides a safe base of operation above the fragmented mass from which to control retorting operations. A plurality of blasting holes used in explosively expanding the formation extend from the base of operation, through the sill pillar, and open into the top of the fragmented mass. Trenches are formed in the base of operation for collecting ground water which enters the base of operation prior to and during retorting operations, and collected ground water is withdrawn from the base of operation. Casings can be placed in the blasting holes and adapted for controlling gas flow through the fragmented mass during retorting operations. The casings extend above the floor of the base of operation to inhibit flow of ground water through the blasting holes into the fragmented mass, and other blasting holes not having such casings are sealed. After retorting is completed, the floor of the base of operation can be covered with a layer of concrete and/or the blasting holes can be sealed with concrete to inhibit leakage of ground water into treated oil shale particles in the fragmented mass.

Ridley, R.D.

1979-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

254

California Secretary for Natural Resources Reasserts State of California's Strong Opposition to Flawed Federal Water Legislation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Secretary for Natural Resources Reasserts State of California's Strong Opposition, (916) 653-7402 SACRAMENTO, Calif. ­ California Natural Resources Secretary John Laird sent and Power Subcommittee in opposition to H.R. 1837. At the time, the state of California objected

255

Technical Basis for Water Chemistry Control of IGSCC in Boiling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems Water Reactors ... However, even the utilization of near theoretical conductivity water cannot prevent...

256

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on development of biomass supply systems as a new Future biomass energy supply: The consumptive water

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

258

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Spinning Reserve from Pump Load: A Technical Findings Report to the California Department of Water Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at the request of the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, is investigating opportunities for electrical load to provide the ancillary service of spinning reserve to the electric grid. The load would provide this service by stopping for a short time when there is a contingency on the grid such as a transmission line or generator outage. There is a possibility that a significant portion of the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO's) spinning reserve requirement could be supplied from the California Department of Water Resources (CDWR) pumping load. Spinning reserve has never been supplied from load before, and rule changes would be needed to allow it. In this report, we are presenting technical findings on the possibility of supplying spinning reserve from pumping system load. In parallel, we are pursuing the needed rule changes with the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), and the CAISO. NERC and FERC have agreed that they have no prohibition against supplying spinning reserve from load. The WECC Minimum Operability Reliability Criteria working group has agreed that the concept should be considered, and they are presently discussing the needed tariff and rule changes. Presently, spinning reserve is provided by generation that is actually spinning but is operating at low power levels and can be ramped up quickly to provide reserve power. In a sense, this is an inefficient and environmentally unfriendly way of providing reserves because it requires the generator to operate at a low power level that may be inefficient and may discharge more pollutants per kW than operating at rated power. It would be better if this generation capacity were in a position to bid into the energy market. Providing an additional supply of spinning reserve would tend to reduce prices for both reserves and the regular electric energy market. The CAISO is presently in the process of redesigning its market rules for ancillary services. The time is right to pursue this opportunity to supply spinning reserve from load. It is our hope that the CDWR will endorse this recommendation. ORNL will then work with FERC, NERC, WECC, and the CAISO to obtain the needed rule changes. This project would provide the CDWR with another option in the complex process of obtaining its energy at the lowest possible cost, while at the same time providing more flexibility to the ISO and relief to the energy market. After this project is implemented in California, we hope that the practice spreads across the nation, allowing much more flexibility in energy markets and increasing the availability of reserve services.

Kirby, BJ

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

260

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fermentation. Biorefineries consume water of biomass removal. Biorefineries can also improve and design of biorefineries will minimize conflicts

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States' Biofuel Policies and Compliance Water Impacts of Biofuel Extend Beyond Irrigation." for assessing sustainable biofuel production."

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Feasibility study for automation of the Central Laboratories, Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey  

SciTech Connect

This study of the feasibility of further automating the Central Laboratories deals specifically with the combined laboratory operations in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Denver, Colorado and is prepared with the understanding that such a system will also be implemented at the Central Laboratories in Atlanta, Georgia, and Albany, New York. The goals of automation are defined in terms of the mission of a water analysis laboratory, propose alternative computer systems for meeting such goals, and evaluate these alternatives in terms of cost effectiveness and other specified criteria. It is found that further automation will be beneficial and an in-house system that incorporates dual minicomputers is recommended: one for time-shared data acquisition, processing, and control; the second for data management. High-use analytical instruments are placed on-line to the time-shared minicomputer, with a terminal at each instrument and backup data storage on magnetic tape. A third, standby computer is switched in manually should the time-shared computer go down. Field-proven, modular hardware and software are chosen. Also recommended is the incorporation of the highly developed, computer-integrated instruments that are commercially available for determining petrochemicals and other organic substances, and are essential to the Laboratories' mission. (auth)

Morris, W.F.; Peck, E.S.; Fisher, E.R.; Barton, G.W. Jr.

1976-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

263

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Water Resource Topics (#1-2) 1. Changes in drought patterns with elevation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indirectly through additional health care costs, loss of ecosystem services, etc. · Project will involve of Social Costs of Resource Use · Social costs of our activities (burning fossil fuels, production and use of toxic chemicals, deforestation, etc) are not collected at point of sale · Society pays these costs

265

Water and energy are not only our most important and precious natural resources, they  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loads, simulated hourly wind capacity factors, and monthly hydroelectric availability over the Western and Extra Electrification load profiles, while solar, wind and hydroelectric resource #12;3 availability pumped hydroelectric projects HG h non-pumped hydroelectric projects GaG -- set of generators in load

Cushing, Jim. M.

266

Subtask 1.24 - Optimization of Cooling Water Resources for Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed an interactive, Web-based decision support system (DSS{copyright} 2007 EERC Foundation) to provide power generation utilities with an assessment tool to address water supply issues when planning new or modifying existing generation facilities. The Web-based DSS integrates water and wastewater treatment technology and water law information with a geographic information system-based interactive map that links to state and federal water quality and quantity databases for North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Iowa.

Daniel Stepan; Richard Shockey; Bethany Kurz; Wesley Peck

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fracturing, or fracking. In this process, fluids a coal bed through fracking requires between 50,000 gallons of water. Fracking to create a well in a

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

On implementing a market-based agent-mediated resource control framework for middle-scale smart grids: A preliminary study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present our preliminary implementation of a market-based agent-mediated resource control framework for dynamic electric power allocation. Although market-based approach is promising in the researches for effective resource allocation ... Keywords: Resource management,Engines,Production facilities,Power systems,Electricity,Approximation methods,smart grids,auction,agent platform

Naoki Fukuta, Takayuki Ito

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Stakeholder driven update and improvement of a national water resources model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is generally acknowledged that water management must be based on an integrated approach, considering the entire freshwater cycle. This has in particularly been endorsed in Europe by the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) imposing integrated ... Keywords: Denmark, Groundwater, Integrated modelling, Model updating, National model, Stakeholder involvement

Anker Lajer HJberg; Lars Troldborg; Simon Stisen; Britt B. S. Christensen; Hans JRgen Henriksen

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Informa(on and Resources Water Quality and Mi/ga/on: Bifenthrin and Fipronil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategy, Pesticides fluxes, Surface water, Vineyard Introduction The intensive use of pesticides for crop on the mobilisation of pesticides and total fluxes in surface water. Moreover, the effect of the sampling strategy ranged from 1.0 to 60 g. Effect of sampling strategy on the estimation of pesticides fluxes in the river

Hammock, Bruce D.

271

Abstract--A scalable multi-agent paradigm is presented for control of distributed energy resources to achieve higher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Abstract-- A scalable multi-agent paradigm is presented for control of distributed energy these new distributed energy resources (DER) and providing new ancillary services that can improve or to reduce system operation costs. Power electronics have not only made grid connection of distributed energy

Tolbert, Leon M.

272

Natural circulation steam generator model for optimal steam generator water level control  

SciTech Connect

Several authors have cited the control of steam generator water level as an important problem in the operation of pressurized water reactor plants. In this paper problems associated with steam generator water level control are identified, and advantages of modern estimation and control theory in dealing with these problems are discussed. A new state variable steam generator model and preliminary verification results using data from the loss of fluid test (LOFT) plant are also presented.

Feeley, J.J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Early Adoption of Climate Information: Lessons Learned from South Florida Water Resource Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal climate forecasting skill has improved over the past decades, accompanied by expectations that these forecasts, along with other climate information, will be increasingly used by water managers in certain regions of the United States. ...

Jessica Bolson; Kenneth Broad

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

275

A spatial location-allocation GIS framework for managing water resources in a savanna nature reserve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dry season. Ryan & Getz: GIS framework for managing waterpolygons ver 2.6 for ArcView GIS. Avenue script available atspatial locationallocation GIS framework for managing water

Ryan, Sadie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Complex Adaptive Systems Simulation-Optimization Framework for Adaptive Urban Water Resources Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population growth, urbanization and climate change threaten urban water systems. The rise of demands caused by growing urban areas and the potential decrease of water availability caused by the increase of frequency and severity of droughts challenge the continued well-being of society. Due to increasing environmental and financial constraints, water management paradigms have shifted from supply augmentation to demand management, and water conservation initiatives may efficiently decrease water demands to more sustainable levels. To provide reliable assessment of the efficiencies of different demand management strategies, new modeling techniques are needed that can simulate decentralized decisions of consumers and their interactions with the water system. An integrated simulation-optimization framework, based on the paradigm of Complex Adaptive Systems, is developed here to model dynamic interactions and adaptations within social, built, and natural components of urban water systems. The framework goes beyond tradition engineering simulations by incorporating decentralized, heterogeneous and autonomous agents, and by simulating dynamic feedback loops among modeling components. The framework uses modeling techniques including System Dynamics, Cellular Automata, and Agent-based Modeling to simulate housing and population growth, a land use change, residential water consumption, the hydrologic cycle, reservoir operation, and a policy/decision maker. This research demonstrates the applicability of the proposed framework through a series of studies applied to a water supply system of a large metropolitan region that is located in a semi-arid region and suffers recurrently from severe droughts. A set of adaptive demand management strategies, that apply contingency restrictions, land use planning, and water conservation technologies, such as rainwater harvesting systems, are evaluated. A multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm is coupled with the CAS simulation framework to identify optimal strategies and explore conflicting objectives within a water system. The results demonstrate the benefits of adaptive management by updating management decisions to changing conditions. This research develops a new hydrologic sustainability metric, developed to quantify the stormwater impacts of urbanization. The Hydrologic Footprint Residence captures temporal and spatial hydrologic characteristics of a flood wave passing through a stream segment and is used to assess stormwater management scenarios, including Best Management Practices and Low Impact Development.

Giacomoni, Marcio

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Water Outlet Control Mechanism for Fuel Cell System Operation ...  

Self-Regulating Water Separation System for Fuel Cells Innovators at NASAs Johnson Space ... Solar Thermal; Startup ... The system uses the flow energy of the fuel ...

278

HILARY SOLOMON, WATER QUALITY SPECIALIST POULTNEY METTOWEE NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION DISTRICT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Champlain Sea Grant. The views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of any of those organizations. This is publication number LCSG-?12-?11. 2 Abstract: The Poultney Mettowee Natural Resources Conservation District (PMNRCD) is located in southern Vermont and is comprised of lands in the Poultney and Mettowee watersheds, which drain to the narrow South Lake of Lake Champlain. The District, with assistance from the Rutland Regional Planning Commission (RRPC) and the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), has conducted Phase 1 Stream Geomorphic Assessments (mapping and digital resources with a quick field verification) on the entire main stem and many of the tributaries of the Poultney and Mettowee Rivers. Additionally, Phase 2, or field-?level assessments, have been conducted on the main stem and select tributaries within these watersheds. The goal of these assessments is to understand and promote long-?term stream stability, which in the Poultney and Mettowee watersheds, will lead to decreased phosphorus transportation to Lake Champlain. Each geomorphic assessment posits a number of predictions about stream stability and probable future adjustments and makes recommendations for compatible stream corridor projects and infrastructure management. This study will review projects that used geomorphic data in their design and evaluate their ability to withstand the floodwaters of Tropical Storm Irene.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Modeling water resource systems using a service-oriented computing paradigm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Service-oriented computing is a software engineering paradigm that views complex software systems as an interconnected collection of distributed computational components. Each component has a defined web service interface that allows it to be loosely-coupled ... Keywords: Integrated modeling, Systems analysis, Water management, Web services

Jonathan L. Goodall; Bella F. Robinson; Anthony M. Castronova

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Coordinated Control of a Central Air Conditioning System Based on Variable Chilled Water Temperature and Variable Chilled Water Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, regulation of water flow by means of pump frequency conversion is one of the major methods for power-saving in central air conditioning systems. In this article, optimization regulation for central air conditioning system on the basis of coordinative optimization control for variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow to obtain better power savings is put forward. According to typical meteorological year data, hourly air conditioning load of whole year for every typical room has been calculated with the transmission function method. In order to guarantee each typical room, the highest cooling load rate is used as an input parameter for optimization calculation. Based on the surface cooler check model, the smallest energy consumption of chiller and chiller water pump was taken as the objective function of the optimization model. The performance characteristics of a chiller, water pump, regulation valve and pipeline are taken into account, and the optimization chilled water temperature and chilled water flow were carried out. The case study for a commercial building in Guangzhou showed that the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is lower by 17% only with employment of variable water flow regulation by pump frequency conversion. In the case of optimization control with coordinative control of variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow, the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is reduced by 22% in presence of remarkable power saving effects. Increasing the chilled water temperature will reduce the dehumidified capability of the air cooler, and the indoor relative humidity will increase. The simulation showed that the adjustment optimized process meets the comfort of each typical room. The lower the cooling load rate is, the more obvious the effect of power-saving is. The highest power-saving rate appears in December, which is 36.7%. Meanwhile, the least rate appears in July, which is only 14.5%.

Liu, J.; Mai, Y.; Liu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Design and Application of the Water Temperature Control System for Large Aquaculture Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the traditional cooling methods such as ice cooling and natural convection cooling can not meet the special requirements of ornamental fish breeding, the way based on mechanical refrigeration, heat exchange system, water supply system and automatic ... Keywords: aquaculture pond for ornamental fish, water temperature automatic control, mechanical refrigeration, plate exchanger, water supply system

Chen Shuai; Zhong Ke; Cai Yingling

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Appendix B of Attachment 3: Groundwater hydrology report, Attachment 4: Water resources protection strategy, Final  

SciTech Connect

Attachment 3 Groundwater Hydrology Report describes the hydrogeology, water quality, and water resources at the processing site and Dry Flats disposal site. The Hydrological Services calculations contained in Appendix A of Attachment 3, are presented in a separate report. Attachment 4 Water Resources Protection Strategy describes how the remedial action will be in compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater standards.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: U.S. EPR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the AREVA US EPR design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary and Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. It is anticipated that the timely identification of any inconsistencies will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them before the first US EPR plant begins operation.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: APR1400  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP) APR1400 design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary (Volume 1) and Secondary (Volume 2) Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. The timely identification of any inconsistencies and technical gaps will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

285

Engineering quality control of solar-powered intelligent water-saving irrigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development tendency of the agricultural irrigation technology is Automatic water-saving irrigation, powered by solar energy and achieved control purposes by moisture content monitoring techniques and the variable irrigation technology. In this paper, ... Keywords: intelligent, quality control, solar power, water-saving irrigation

Liu Xiaochu; Wu Hualong; Ling Jingpeng; Tao Jianhua; Yao Li

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Davenport Water Pollution Control Plant Biomass Facility | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

287

Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

288

An Educational Resource Based on Water and Health as a Teaching Aid in French Primary Schools Part I: Identification of Needs and Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: It is a commonplace that water is essential for life, but to what extent is the general public, and children in particular, aware of how water affects health? The aim of this review was to consider the relationship between water and health under three main headings: the importance of hydration for children, dietary intake of water, and water as an essential factor in hygiene contributing to good health. The literature was reviewed to provide a rationale for the implementation of teaching about water and health in French primary schools under three main areas: (i) the importance of hydration for school children and water promotion in primary schools; (ii) the problem of overweight/obesity and the need to adopt healthy drinking habits as defined in French nutritional policy; (iii) the survey of the quality of drinking water in France and its relationship with good hygiene practices. There are currently few educational resources in France on water and health that teachers can use in the classroom. This review gives reasons why a Water and Health learning resource is a useful tool and shows how it can be developed within the constraints imposed by the school syllabus and in accordance with French nutritional and environmental policy. Educ. Sci. 2013, 3 301

Chantal Savanovitch; Marie-pierre Sauvant-rochat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ET{sub o}), rainfall deficit (rainfall - ET{sub o}) and relative crop yield reduction for a generic crop under climate change conditions for three locations in Puerto Rico: Adjuntas, Mayaguez, and Lajas. Reference evapotranspiration is estimated by the Penman-Monteith method. Rainfall and temperature data were statistically downscaled and evaluated using the DOE/NCAR PCM global circulation model projections for the B1 (low), A2 (mid-high) and A1fi (high) emission scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emission Scenarios. Relative crop yield reductions were estimated from a function dependent water stress factor, which is a function of soil moisture content. Average soil moisture content for the three locations was determined by means of a simple water balance approach. Results from the analysis indicate that the rainy season will become wetter and the dry season will become drier. The 20-year mean 1990-2010 September rainfall excess (i.e., rainfall - ET{sub o} > 0) increased for all scenarios and locations from 149.8 to 356.4 mm for 2080-2100. Similarly, the 20-year average February rainfall deficit (i.e., rainfall - ET{sub o} < 0) decreased from a -26.1 mm for 1990-2010 to -72.1 mm for the year 2080-2100. The results suggest that additional water could be saved during the wet months to offset increased irrigation requirements during the dry months. Relative crop yield reduction did not change significantly under the B1 projected emissions scenario, but increased by approximately 20% during the summer months under the A1fi emissions scenario. Components of the annual water balance for the three climate change scenarios are rainfall, evapotranspiration (adjusted for soil moisture), surface runoff, aquifer recharge and change in soil moisture storage. Under the A1fi scenario, for all locations, annual evapotranspiration decreased owing to lower soil moisture, surface runoff decreased, and aquifer recharge increased. Aquifer recharge increased at all three locations because the majority of recharge occurs during the wet season and the wet season became wetter. This is good news from a groundwater production standpoint. Increasing aquifer recharge also suggests that groundwater levels may increase and this may help to minimize saltwater intrusion near the coasts as sea levels increase, provided that groundwater use is not over-subscribed.

Harmsen, E.W.; Miller, N.L.; Schlegel, N.J.; Gonzalez, J.E.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Utilization of geopressured resources in the oxidation of organic waste in supercritical water. Phase I, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured resources are geothermal reservoirs containing dissolved methane in hot brine at pressures well in excess of their in situ hydrostatic pressure. In the US, geopressured resources are primarily located in the Gulf (of Mexico) Coast. The wells in this area are characterized by typical bottomhole temperatures of 120-180 C (250-360 F) (Negus-de Wys, 1991a) and bottomhole pressures of 675-1275 bar (9,800-18,500 psia) (Negus-de Wys, 1991b). Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the destruction of hazardous organic waste in which oxidation is carried out in a water medium above the critical point of pure water (374 C/705 F, 221 bar/3208 psia) (Tester et al., 1992). Geopressured resources are particularly suitable as an input stream to a SCWO waste treatment process due to the near critical conditions of their hot brine. By using a Rankine-type power cycle, electric power can be generated by capturing the available thermal and hydraulic energy from the geothermal resource and the chemical energy of the dissolved methane released by the oxidation process. In addition to oxidizing the methane to convert the chemical energy to thermal energy, auxiliary fuel in the form of an organic waste can be co-oxidized to increase the energy output to commercially sustainable levels. Coupling the treatment of geopressured brine with an organic waste in a SCWO process synergistically improves power production while providing a means for treating hazardous waste. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of using geopressured resources to simultaneously detoxify hazardous waste and generate electric power. Our ultimate aim is to develop conceptual process designs for above-ground and fully or modified in situ approaches to co-processing organic waste with geopressured brine in supercritical water. As a preparatory step for investigating in situ approaches, a realistic above-ground conceptual design was developed in this study. In that concept, the waste, brine and oxidant (air or oxygen) are introduced into the SCWO reactor at the system pressure of 234 bar (3400 psia). The heat of oxidation raises the temperature of the system to about 600 C (1100 F). Due to the low solubility of inorganic salts in supercritical water (about 200 ppm or less) (Armellini and Tester, 1990, 1991a, 1991b), solid salt forms and falls to the lower section of the reactor, where it is cooled and quenched with water, creating a concentrated (organic-free) brine that would be mixed with brackish water and reinjected back to the geopressured well. Power is generated by the expansion of the products of the SCWO process through a series of multi-stage turboexpanden. A processing capacity of 100,000 gallons per day (gpd) was initially taken as the design basis, following some investigations carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Propp et al., 1990). The process was modeled using the ASPEN PLUS{trademark} process flowsheet simulator and material and energy balances were determined. Both the cases of using air and oxygen as oxidant were investigated. Toluene was chosen as the model compound to represent the organic waste. Turbine design calculations based on the volumetric flowrates obtained for a 100,000 gpd capacity resulted in unrealistically high rotor rotational speeds and small wheel pitch diameters to achieve optimum efficiencies. Higher SCWO effluent flowrates would lower rotor rotational speeds and increase wheel pitch diameters to more practical levels. Thus, a 42-fold larger design capacity of 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) was adopted as the basis for an above-ground base case. The results for the material and energy balances for a processing capacity of 100,000 bpd using air and oxygen as oxidant scale up linearly from the results for the 100,000 gpd case. The best case flowsheet corresponding to a 100,000 bpi case using oxygen as oxidant is given in Figure 1. Our conceptual design study suggests that simultaneous detoxification of hazardous waste and production of power is possible by co-pr

Diaz, Alexander F.; Herzog, Howard J.; Tester, Jefferson W.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Radionuclide behavior in water saturated porous media: Diffusion and infiltration coupling of thermodynamically and kinetically controlled radionuclide water - mineral interactions  

SciTech Connect

A model is developed describing one dimensional radionuclide transport in porous media coupled with locally reversible radionuclide water-mineral exchange reactions and radioactive decay. Problems are considered in which radionuclide transport by diffusion and infiltration processes occur in cases where radionuclide water-solid interaction are kinetically and thermodynamically controlled. The limits of Sr-90 and Cs-137 migration are calculated over a wide range of the problem variables (infiltration velocity, distribution coefficients, and rate constants of water-mineral radionuclide exchange reactions).

Spasennykh, M.Yu. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Apps, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

REFLECTOR CONTROL OF A BOILING-WATER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A line connecting the reactor with a spent steam condenser contains a valve set to open when the pressure in the reactor exceeds a predetermined value and an orifice on the upstream side of the valve. Another line connects the reflector with this line between the orifice and the valve. An excess steam pressure causes the valve to open and the flow of steam through the line draws water out of the reflector. Provision is also made for adding water to the reflector when the steam pressure drops. (AEC)

Treshow, M.

1962-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

293

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hotel Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Optimal Control of Distributed EnergyHotel Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Optimal Control of Distributed EnergyHotel Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Optimal Control of Distributed Energy

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ET{sub o}), rainfall deficit (rainfall - ET{sub o}) and relative crop yield reduction for a generic crop under climate change conditions for three locations in Puerto Rico: Adjuntas, Mayaguez, and Lajas. Reference evapotranspiration is estimated by the Penman-Monteith method. Rainfall and temperature data were statistically downscaled and evaluated using the DOE/NCAR PCM global circulation model projections for the B1 (low), A2 (mid-high) and A1fi (high) emission scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emission Scenarios. Relative crop yield reductions were estimated from a function dependent water stress factor, which is a function of soil moisture content. Average soil moisture content for the three locations was determined by means of a simple water balance approach. Results from the analysis indicate that the rainy season will become wetter and the dry season will become drier. The 20-year mean 1990-2010 September rainfall excess (i.e., rainfall - ET{sub o} > 0) increased for all scenarios and locations from 149.8 to 356.4 mm for 2080-2100. Similarly, the 20-year average February rainfall deficit (i.e., rainfall - ET{sub o} crop yield reduction did not change significantly under the B1 projected emissions scenario, but increased by approximately 20% during the summer months under the A1fi emissions scenario. Components of the annual water balance for the three climate change scenarios are rainfall, evapotranspiration (adjusted for soil moisture), surface runoff, aquifer recharge and change in soil moisture storage. Under the A1fi scenario, for all locations, annual evapotranspiration decreased owing to lower soil moisture, surface runoff decreased, and aquifer recharge increased. Aquifer recharge increased at all three locations because the majority of recharge occurs during the wet season and the wet season became wetter. This is good news from a groundwater production standpoint. Increasing aquifer recharge also suggests that groundwater levels may increase and this may help to minimize saltwater intrusion near the coasts as sea levels increase, provided that groundwater use is not over-subscribed.

Harmsen, E.W.; Miller, N.L.; Schlegel, N.J.; Gonzalez, J.E.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Control of nitrogen-16 in BWR (boiling water reactor) main steam lines under hydrogen water chemistry conditions: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary aim of this work was to attempt to identify methods to limit or control the N-16 main steam increases which occur as a result of plant operation under hydrogen water chemistry. The hydrogen water chemistry test data for 8 plants, N-13 chemistry measurements performed at three plants and N-16 main steam concentration measurements made at five plants were analyzed and correlations established. As a result of this study, potential chemical and physical control methods were identified. The test data compilations for the eight plants are included in this report. 6 figs.

Ruiz, C.P.; Lin, C.C.; Wong, T.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Design of Automation Control System for Water Chillers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy crisis led to the recognition that the energy conservation is important. The aim of performance test rig of a water chiller which is introduced in this paper is just for the energy saving. In order to get the better efficiency, a monitoring system ...

Yuhong Sun; Yuying Sun; Junmei Li; Xiaowei Yin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Political Ecology of the Citarum River Basin: Exploring "Integrated Water Resources Management" in West Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ultimately produced higher water prices because rates wereon Environment and Water ( which produced Dublin Principles

Cavelle, Jenna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

GRR/Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit GRR/Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit 14OREWaterPollutionControlFacilityPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR Division 45 Regulations Pertaining to NPDES and WPCF Permits Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14OREWaterPollutionControlFacilityPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) issues Water

299

Feasibility and Importance of an Automatic Controller for Solar Hot Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Being a developing country, Bangladesh has a very poor condition in terms of generating electricity. Alongside, natural resources like fuel and coal are in limited amount and will not be able to sustain forever. As a result, sustainable energy is starting ... Keywords: automatic, solar, heater, controller, microcontroller, relay, LCD, valve

M. R. Hasan; A. Rahman; A. Azad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

High-impact papers presented in the subject category of water resources in the essential science indicators database of the institute for scientific information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Essential Science Indicators (ESI) database is widely used to evaluate institutions and researchers. The objective of this study was to analyze trends and characteristics of papers in the subject category of water resources in the ESI database of ... Keywords: ESI, Indicators, Number of countries cited, Number of institutes cited, Number of subject areas cited

Kun-Yang Chuang; Ming-Huang Wang; Yuh-Shan Ho

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Missouri River Basin state and Federal water and related land resource program: fiscal years 1979-1985. Volume 10. South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This report, Volume 10 in a series of 11, documents state and Federal water and related land resources planning, development, and management activities for the state of South Dakota. The other reports cover information on Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, and Montana. Many planning and study activities are discussed.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Tighten water-chemistry control after boiler layup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for internal deposition and corrosion can affect boiler reliability by reducing thermal efficiency, tube integrity, and the time between chemical cleanings. While chemical control specifications for normal operation have been developed by consensus of manufacturers and industry, their impact on shutdowns, layups, and startups is not always appreciated. The discussion of chemical-control options applies to boiler systems operating in the medium- and high-pressure ranges. Identification and correction of root causes underlying the chemistry problems encountered and application of the principles involved should result in shorter startup times, improved control over phosphate hideout, and reduced need for chemical cleaning. Each of these has a significant cost impact; together, they are the true measure of a successful chemistry-control program.

Brestel, L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Pressurized Water Reactor AgInCd Control Rod Lifetime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swelling of the lower end tip of AgInCd (AIC) absorber rods is one of the lifetime limiting phenomena for PWR control rods. Understanding the relationship between swelling and accumulated fluence is crucial to predicting the service life of these components. This report presents the initial results and analyses from a control rod absorber research program led by the EPRI Fuel Reliability Program, in close collaboration with Westinghouse Electric Company and AREVA NP. The goals of the program are to chara...

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

304

Distributed Energy Resources and Control: A power system point of view  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intelligent control systems that can manage both the electrical and financial operation of the grid and new. In a distributed controller, data may be processed and e.g. reduced locally, supervised or remote that are solved locally, using local data. Then, information is shared between local distributed control centers

305

A spatially-distributed cost-effectiveness analysis framework for controlling water pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the aim of comparing various agro-environmental measures to control pesticide pollution in surface waters, we propose a methodological framework for spatially-distributed cost-effectiveness analysis. We use the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) ... Keywords: Bio-economic modelling, Cost-effectiveness analysis, Integrated modelling, Pesticides, SWAT

Jean-Marie Lescot; Paul Bordenave; Kevin Petit; Odile Leccia

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Aalborg Universitet Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aalborg Universitet Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil &, B. (2013). Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas, 2013 #12;Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production

Yang, Zhenyu

307

Brief paper: Fuzzy control of the activated sludge wastewater treatment process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activated sludge process is a commonly used method for treating sewage and waste waters. It is characterised by a lack of relevant instrumentation, control goals that are not always clearly stated, the use of qualitative information in decision making ... Keywords: Computer control, control system synthesis, controllers, fuzzy control, process control, water pollution, water resources

R. M. Tong; M. B. Beck; A. Latten

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Water pollution: EPA controls over ballast water at Trans-Alaska Pipeline Marine Terminal  

SciTech Connect

The Alyeska Pipeline Service Company at Valdez, Alaska, operates a water treatment plant at the terminal to treat ballast water, oily sea water that is carried in tankers to provide stability, before it is discharged into the bay. The Environmental Protection Agency is nearly 4 years late in issuing a new permit to Alyeska which regulates the types and amounts of pollution that can be discharged. Alyeska has been operating under an extension of its old permit whose conditions may be less stringent than the new permit will require. Prior to 1984, EPA monitored Alyeska's permit and identified instances of noncompliance with permit conditions, but its enforcement actions were limited to discussions and correspondence with Alyeska. In contrast, since 1984, EPA has begun taking enforcement actions as well as investigating allegations of other environmental problems. EPA should have acted sooner and until the new permit is issued, questions about the protection of marine life and water quality in Valdez Bay will remain unanswered.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing. Work plan  

SciTech Connect

The work plan for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's research on assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing is outlined. There are two tandem tasks in the program, a literature and information review and evaluation and an experimental effort. The experimental work will address environmental control technologies for retort and product water, contamination of ground water by abandoned in situ retorts, raw and spent shale leachates, fugitive emissions from background oil shale retorting, and aquifer bridging during or after shale oil extraction.

Wewerka, E.M.; Wagner, P.; Wanek, P.L.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Research on water level optimal control of boiler drum based on dual heuristic dynamic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler drum system is an important component of a thermal power plant or industrial production, and the water level is a critical parameter of boiler drum control system. Because of non-linear, strong coupling and large disturbance, it is difficult to ... Keywords: BP neural network, boiler drum level, dual heuristic dynamic programming, optimal control

Qingbao Huang; Shaojian Song; Xiaofeng Lin; Kui Peng

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*...............................................3:40 pm Watershed Planning in Arkansas by Floyd Watson*, Kevin Bennoch*, Sandi Formica*, Jennifer of Arkansas, Fayetteville A Community Approach to Handling and Utilizing Dairy Manure by Sandi Formica*, Mc

Soerens, Thomas

312

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and O&M. Tarrifs: Area-wise, crop-wise. () January 13, 2010 10 / 14 #12;Crop growth and moisture Soil

Sohoni, Milind

313

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maharashtra MWRRA Tarrif Document () February 16, 2010 1 / 16 #12;Vol I: The Chapters 1 Preface: Terms: The structure of the tarrif document and current tariffs. 7 Chap. 7: The computation of O & M norms. 8 Chap. 8:Urban China: Fixed fraction of capital costs absorbed into tarrif. Beijing at Rs. 24 /cu.m. including about Rs

Sohoni, Milind

314

Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MW) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MW) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

Douglas G. Hall

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

GRR/Section 19-NV-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-NV-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues GRR/Section 19-NV-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-NV-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues 19NVAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Regulations & Policies Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) NRS, Chapter 445A - water controls NRS, Chapter 533 - adjudication of vested water rights and appropriation of public waters NRS, Chapter 534 - outlines underground water and well NRS, Chapter 534A - geothermal resources Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) NAC, Chapter 445A - water controls Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

316

Computer resources Computer resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

Yang, Zong-Liang

317

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We take the perspective of a microgrid that has installed distribution energy resources (DER) in the form of distributed generation with combined heat and power applications. Given uncertain electricity and fuel prices, the microgrid minimizes its expected annual energy bill for various capacity sizes. In almost all cases, there is an economic and environmental advantage to using DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected annualized energy bill is reduced by 9percent while CO2 emissions decline by 25percent. Furthermore, the microgrid's risk is diminished as DER may be deployed depending on prevailing market conditions and local demand. In order to test a policy measure that would place a weight on CO2 emissions, we use a multi-criteria objective function that minimizes a weighted average of expected costs and emissions. We find that greater emphasis on CO2 emissions has a beneficial environmental impact only if DR is available and enough reserve generation capacity exists. Finally, greater uncertainty results in higher expected costs and risk exposure, the effects of which may be mitigated by selecting a larger capacity.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Refueling Simulation Strategy of a CANDU Reactor Based on Optimum Zone Controller Water Levels  

SciTech Connect

An optimum refueling simulation method was developed for application to a Canada deuterium uranium 713-MW(electric) (CANDU-6) reactor. The objective of the optimization was to maintain the operating range of the zone controller unit (ZCU) water level so that the reference zone power distribution is reproduced following the refueling operation. The zone controller level on the refueling operation was estimated by the generalized perturbation method, which provides sensitivities of the zone power to an individual refueling operation and the zone controller level. By constructing a system equation of the zone power, the zone controller level was obtained, which was used to find the most suitable combination of the refueling channels. The 250-full-power-day refueling simulations showed that the channel and bundle powers are well controlled below the license limits when the ZCU water level remains in the typical operating range.

Choi, Hangbok; Kim, Do Heon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Solar Desalination of Brackish Water Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was found that the solar water heater could increase the brackish water temperature to above 170 F during://wrri.nmsu.edu Solar Desalination of Brackish Water Using Membrane Distillation Process Shuguang Deng, NMSU from brackish water by using solar energy assisted membrane distillation processes. Problem

Johnson, Eric E.

320

Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Geothermal Systems in the Northwestern Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Geothermal Systems in the Northwestern Great Basin Abstract In the western Great Basin, the Walker Lane is a system of right-lateral strike-slip faults accommodating ~15-25% of relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Relatively high rates of recent (<10 Ma) west-northwest extension absorb northwestward declining dextral motion in the Walker Lane, diffusing that motion into the Basin-Range. Abundant geothermal fields cluster in several northeasttrending belts in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Control system for electric water heater with heat pump external heat source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A control system for an electric water heater operatively associated with an external heat source, such as a heat pump. The water heater includes a water storage tank provided with an electric tank heating unit having a tank thermostat which closes in response to water temperature in the tank, allowing a flow of current through the tank heating unit so as to turn it on to heat the water, and which opens when the tank thermostat has been satisfied, interrupting the current flow so as to turn the tank heating unit off. The control system as responsive to the initial current surge through the tank heating unit when the tank thermostat closes to interrupt the current flow to the tank heating unit so as to maintain the heating unit off and to turn on the external heat source and maintain it on until the tank thermostat opens. The initial current surge cleans the contacts of the tank thermostat by burning off any insulating oxide residues which may have formed on them. The control system includes means responsive to abnormal conditions which would prevent the external heat source from heating water effectively for turning off the external heat source and turning on the tank heating unit and maintaining the external heat source off and the tank heating unit on until the tank thermostat is satisfied.

Shaffer Jr., J. E.; Picarello, J. F.

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

322

Resource Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation: Volume 21, Water Conservation Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This Water Conservation Plan covers facilities within the ORR including the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), the Industrial Park, the Scarboro Facility, Rust Engineering, and the Clark Center Recreation Area. The water balance for the ORR is summarized and plans for optimizing water usage and protecting water quality are included. Temporary measures to curtail water usage in the event of a drought are also summarized.

Kasten, J.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater  

SciTech Connect

The following document is the final report for DE-FC26-05NT42327: Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater. This work was carried out under a cooperative agreement from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with additional funding from Keltech, Inc. The objective of the project was to improve the temperature control performance of an electric tankless water heater (TWH). The reason for doing this is to minimize or eliminate one of the barriers to wider adoption of the TWH. TWH use less energy than typical (storage) water heaters because of the elimination of standby losses, so wider adoption will lead to reduced energy consumption. The project was carried out by Building Solutions, Inc. (BSI), a small business based in Omaha, Nebraska. BSI partnered with Keltech, Inc., a manufacturer of electric tankless water heaters based in Delton, Michigan. Additional work was carried out by the University of Nebraska and Mike Coward. A background study revealed several advantages and disadvantages to TWH. Besides using less energy than storage heaters, TWH provide an endless supply of hot water, have a longer life, use less floor space, can be used at point-of-use, and are suitable as boosters to enable alternative water heating technologies, such as solar or heat-pump water heaters. Their disadvantages are their higher cost, large instantaneous power requirement, and poor temperature control. A test method was developed to quantify performance under a representative range of disturbances to flow rate and inlet temperature. A device capable of conducting this test was designed and built. Some heaters currently on the market were tested, and were found to perform quite poorly. A new controller was designed using model predictive control (MPC). This control method required an accurate dynamic model to be created and required significant tuning to the controller before good control was achieved. The MPC design was then implemented on a prototype heater that was being developed simultaneously with the controller development. (The prototype's geometry and components are based on a currently marketed heater, but several improvements have been made.) The MPC's temperature control performance was a vast improvement over the existing controller. With a benchmark for superior control performance established, five additional control methods were tested. One problem with MPC control is that it was found to be extremely difficult to implement in a TWH, so that it is unlikely to be widely adopted by manufacturers. Therefore the five additional control methods were selected based on their simplicity; each could be implemented by a typical manufacturer. It was found that one of these methods performed as well as MPC, or even better under many circumstances. This method uses a Feedback-Compensated Feed-Forward algorithm that was developed for this project. Due to its simplicity and excellent performance this method was selected as the controller of choice. A final higher-capacity prototype heater that uses Feedback-Compensated Feed-Forward control was constructed. This prototype has many improvements over the currently marketed heaters: (1) excellent control; (2) a modular design that allows for different capacity heaters to be built easily; (3) built-in fault detection and diagnosis; (4) a secondary remote user-interface; and (5) a TRIAC switching algorithm that will minimize 'flicker factor'. The design and engineering of this prototype unit will allow it to be built without an increase in cost, compared with the currently marketed heater. A design rendering of the new product is shown below. It will be launched with a new marketing campaign by Keltech in early 2009.

David Yuill

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of water's unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature TH{\\approx}232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization - including the size and structure of critical nuclei - has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase upon moving into the supercooled region according to a power law that would diverge at Ts{\\approx}225 K,(1,2) so there may be a link between water's thermodynamic anomalies and the crystallization rate of ice. But probing this link is challenging because fast crystallization prevents experimental studies of the liquid below TH. And while atomistic studies have captured water crystallization(3), the computational costs involved have so far prevented an assessment of the rates and mechanism involved. Here we report coarse-grained molecular simulations with the mW water model(4) in the supercooled regime around TH, which reveal that a sharp increase in the fraction of four-coordinated molecules in supercooled liquid water explains its anomalous thermodynamics and also controls the rate and mechanism of ice formation. The simulations reveal that the crystallization rate of water reaches a maximum around 225 K, below which ice nuclei form faster than liquid water can equilibrate. This implies a lower limit of metastability of liquid water just below TH and well above its glass transition temperature Tg{\\approx}136 K. By providing a relationship between the structural transformation in liquid water, its anomalous thermodynamics and its crystallization rate, this work provides a microscopic foundation to the experimental finding that the thermodynamics of water determines the rates of homogeneous nucleation of ice.(5)

Emily B. Moore; Valeria Molinero

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Environmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climatically important trace gas fluxes on regional and global scales, yet the magnitude of the transfer-generated turbulence in a shallow tidal sea, Nature, 400, 251­254. Raymond, P. A., and J. J. Cole (2001), Gas exchangeEnvironmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems

Ho, David

326

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources...

327

Application Study of the Pump Water Flow Station for Building Energy Consumption Monitoring and Control Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new building energy monitoring and pump speed control method. The pump speed is controlled to maintain the system resistance at an optimized value to approach the best pump efficiency and save pump power. The system resistance can be obtained by the pump head and the water flow rate calculated by the pump water-flow station (PWS), which was recently developed. The PWS measures the water flow rate using the pump head, pump speed, and pump performance curve. This method has been experimentally proved in real HVAC systems. A case study was demonstrated in this paper for application of this new method in a Continuous Commissioning (CC) practice. The case study shows that the PWS can control the pump speed to maintain the optimized system operating point. It can also measure the water flow rate and monitor energy consumption continuously with low installation and almost no maintenance cost. The results show that the new technology can save pump power and increase pump efficiency significantly.

Liu, G.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Enhancement Strategies for Mitigating Potential Operational Impacts of Cooling Water Intake Structures: Approaches for Enhancing Env ironmental Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes environmental enhancement or restoration approaches that may be applicable for mitigating impingement and entrainment impacts associated with cooling water intake structures (CWISs).

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Coal-water slurry spray characteristics of an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been complete to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from a electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions 50% (by mass) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}, the break-up time was 0. 30 ms. An empirical correlation for both spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as the time and locations of the measurement. The time-averaged cone angle for the base case conditions was 13.6{degree}. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.

Caton, J.A.; Payne, S.E.; Terracina, D.P.; Kihm, K.D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Impacts of Varying Penetration of Distributed Resources with & without Volt/Var Control: Case Study of Varying Load Types  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a follow-up to an earlier one on impacts of distributed energy resources (DR) on distribution feeders. As DR penetration level on the feeder increases, there can be impacts to distribution system/feeder capacity, line losses, and voltage regulation. These can vary as the penetration level reaches the capacity of the distribution feeder/system or loading. The question is how high of a DR level can be accommodated without any major changes to system operation, system design and protection. Our objective for this work was to address the question of how the DR impacts vary in regards to both DR voltage regulation capability and load mix. A dynamic analysis was used to focus on the impacts of DR with and without volt/var control with different load composition on the distribution feeder. The study considered an example 10MVA distribution feeder in which two inverter-based DRs were used to provide voltage regulation. The results due to DR without voltage regulation capability are compared with DR capable of providing local (at its bus) voltage regulation. The analysis was repeated for four different feeder load compositions consisting of (1) constant power, (2) constant impedance, (3) constant current and (4) ZIP (equal combination of previous three).

Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Term project for Landscape Architecture 222, Prof. G. Mathias Kondolf, University of California, Berkeley, Spring 2009. Hard copy available at the Water Resources Center Archives, UC Berkeley.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water pollution, water conservation, habitat value, microwater pollution, water conservation, habitat value, microwater quality awareness, water conservation awareness, and

Diamond, Hayley; Gaffney, Andrea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of pressurized water reactor steam-generator water-level control, designed for use within physically distributed testing environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A hardware-in-the-loop model was developed to represent digital sensing and control of steam generator water-level. The model was created with an intention to serve as (more)

Brink, Michael Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Tools & Resources: Resource Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that reduce air emissions. Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) A tool that provides data on the environmental characteristics of almost all electric...

334

Publications & Resources, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or approved by Brookhaven National Laboratory or the Human Resources Division. Manuals Scientific Staff Manual Supervisors Personnel Manual SBMS Subject Areas Compensation...

335

Assembly fixture for cross-shaped control rods of boiling water nuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assembly fixture is disclosed for cross-shaped control rods of boiling-water nuclear reactors with an upper core grid mesh for holding a core cell formed of four fuel assemblies having a gap therebetween and means disposed beneath the reactor core for driving the control rods in the gap, including a frame having corners formed therein, the frame being substantially the size of a core cell and being disposable on the core grid, templates diagonally oppositely disposed on the frame and extending into the core cell for lateral guidance of the control rods, stops for the control rods disposed on the templates, and a carrying handle having a first portion thereof being pivotable at one of the corners of the frame and a second portion thereof being locked to an opposite corner of the frame in a disassembled condition and swung out of the locked condition in an assembled condition.

Lippert, H.J.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMPOSITE CONTROL RODS FOR WATER-COOLED POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The phrase "composite control rod" is used to describe a hafnium-tipped titanium-boron control component with a titanium cladding. Blades for such cortrol rods were successfully prepared in cooperation with the Battelle Memorial Institute by a picture-frame rolling technique. The rolling packs, which are machined from type 304 stainless steel, contain slntered titanium boron and wrought hafnium core materials in a commercially pure titanium envelope. Such packs are evacuated, sealod off, and rolled at 16O0 F with a total reduction of 3/1 using 20% reduction per roll setting. Postfabrication treatments include mechanical removal of the stainless steel envelope, flat annealing, machining, and stress relief annealing. Data on the mechanical properties, corrosion performance, thermal cycling resistance, and irradiation damage resistance of composite control rod components are presented. This information strongly indicates that composite control rods will perform satisfactorily in water-coolod reactors. (aut)h

Ray, W.E.

1957-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Development of a Procedure for the Predictive Control Strategy of a Chilled Water Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage systems store the thermal energy produced by the chiller plant in periods of off-peak electrical demand or when cheaper electricity is available. The stored thermal energy is then withdrawn from the reservoir to satisfy cooling load during peak demand periods. This paper discusses the development of a simplified predictive control strategy for a 7000 ton-hour chilled water storage system serving a hospital. Control strategies are developed for both on-peak and off-peak months to minimize demand charges. By optimizing the operation of the building air handling units (AHUs), chilled water pumps, chiller plant and the thermal storage system, the storage tank is better charged while chiller run time is reduced. Both on-peak and off-peak electrical demands are expected to be reduced significantly.

Wei, G.; Sakuri, Y.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management system to Balance Intermittent Resources in the Bonneville Power Administration and California ISO Control Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The entire project addresses the issue of mitigating additional intermittency and fast ramps that occur at higher penetration of intermittent resources, including wind genera-tion, in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the California Independent Sys-tem Operator (California ISO) control areas. The proposed Wide Area Energy Storage and Management System (WAEMS) will address the additional regulation requirement through the energy exchange between the participating control areas and through the use of energy storage and other generation resources. For the BPA and California ISO control centers, the new regulation service will look no different comparing with the traditional regulation resources. The proposed project will benefit the regulation service in these service areas, regardless of the actual degree of penetration of the intermittent resources in the regions. The project develops principles, algorithms, market integration rules, functional de-sign and technical specifications for the WAEMS system. The project is sponsored by BPA and supported in kind by California ISO, Beacon Power Corporation, and the Cali-fornia Energy Commission (CEC).

Makarov, Yuri V.; Yang, Bo; DeSteese, John G.; Lu, Shuai; Miller, Carl H.; Nyeng, Preben; Ma, Jian; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

File:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Quality Control Act.pdf Water Quality Control Act.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 413 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 69 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 14:23, 14 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 14:23, 14 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 69 pages (413 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs)

342

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. The fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. This volume of the report contains the appendices: (A) abbreviations and definitions, glossary; (B) 4.5 MWe utility demonstrator power plant study information; (C) rejected heat utilization; (D) availability; (E) conceptual design specifications; (F) details of the economic analysis; (G) detailed description of the selected configuration; and (H) fuel cell power plant penetration analysis. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. The displacement of oil and coal resulting from the Bergen County Utilities Authority application was determined. A demonstration program based on the selected configuration was prepared to describe the scope of work, organization, schedules, and costs from preliminary design through actual tests and operation. The potential market for nationwide application of the concept was projected, along with the equivalent oil displacement resulting from estimated commercial application.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

BWR (boiling-water reactor) radiation control: In-plant demonstration at Vermont Yankee: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of the RP1934 program, which was established by EPRI in 1981 to demonstrate the adequacy of BRAC program (RP819) principles for BWR radiation control at Vermont Yankee, are presented. Evaluations were performed of the effectiveness of optimization of purification system performance, control of feedwater dissolved oxygen concentrations, minimization of corrosion product and ionic transport, and improved startup, shutdown, and layup practices. The impact on shutdown radiation levels of these corrective actions was assessed based on extensive primary system radiation survey and component gamma scan data. Implementation of the BRAC recommendations was found to be insufficient to reduce the rate of activity buildup on out-of-core surfaces at Vermont Yankee, and additional corrective actions were found necessary. Specifically, replacement of cobalt-bearing materials in the control rod drive pins and rollers and feedwater regulating valves was pursued as was installation of electropolished 316 stainless steel during a recirculation piping replacement program. Aggressive programs to further reduce copper concentrations in the reactor water by improving condensate demineralizer efficiency and to minimize organic ingress to the power cycle by reducing organic concentrations in recycled radwaste also were undertaken. Evaluations of the impact on activity buildup of several pretreatment processes including prefilming in moist air, preexposure to high temperature water containing zinc, and electropolishing also were performed in a test loop installed in the reactor water cleanup system. A significant beneficial impact of electropolishing was shown to be present for periods up to 6000 hours.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Agent-based models of socio-hydrological systems for exploring the institutional dynamics of water resources conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Basins-At-Risk theory formulates relations between institutional capacity in a basin and the level of water conflict in that basin, suggesting that higher levels of institutional capacity will lead to reduced levels ...

Kock, Beaudry E. (Beaudry Evan)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Use of a Coupled Land Surface General Circulation Model to Examine the Impacts of Doubled Stomatal Resistance on the Water Resources of the American Southwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tiny openings on the surfaces of leaves, stomata, control the flux of CO2, water vapor, and other gases between the atmosphere and the earths vegetated surface. An increase in atmospheric CO2 could have an effect on stomatal openings, causing ...

Marian Martin; Robert E. Dickinson; Zong-Liang Yang

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

WILLIAMS, J.C.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Water Chemistry Control System for Recovery of Damaged and Degraded Spent Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the government of Serbia have led the project cosponsored by the U.S, Russia, European Commission, and others to repackage and repatriate approximately 8000 spent fuel elements from the RA reactor fuel storage basins at the VIN?A Institute of Nuclear Sciences to Russia for reprocessing. The repackaging and transportation activities were implemented by a Russian consortium which includes the Sosny Company, Tekhsnabeksport (TENEX) and Mayak Production Association. High activity of the water of the fuel storage basin posed serious risk and challenges to the fuel removal from storage containers and repackaging for transportation. The risk centered on personnel exposure, even above the basin water, due to the high water activity levels caused by Cs-137 leached from fuel elements with failed cladding. A team of engineers from the U.S. DOE-NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Vinca Institute, and the IAEA performed the design, development, and deployment of a compact underwater water chemistry control system (WCCS) to remove the Cs-137 from the basin water and enable personnel safety above the basin water for repackaging operations. Key elements of the WCCS system included filters, multiple columns containing an inorganic sorbent, submersible pumps and flow meters. All system components were designed to be remotely serviceable and replaceable. The system was assembled and successfully deployed at the Vinca basin to support the fuel removal and repackaging activities. Following the successful operations, the Cs-137 is now safely contained and consolidated on the zeolite sorbent used in the columns of the WCCS, and the fuel has been removed from the basins. This paper reviews the functional requirements, design, and deployment of the WCCS.

Sindelar, R.; Fisher, D.; Thomas, J.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

349

LEGAL ISSUES FOR MARKET FINANCING OF CALIFORNIA WATER In part, this study investigates market methods for generating revenues for water resource system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The energy crisis of the 1970's triggered the downfall of natural gas regulation. Regulators and industry from the natural gas and electric industries where de-coupling has taken place, and the last section UTILITIES Similar to the natural gas and electricity industries, California's water supply system can

Lund, Jay R.

350

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

Ketelle R.H.

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

351

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Enhancement Strategies for Mitigating Potential Operational Impacts of Cooling Water Intake Structures: Approaches for Enhancing Env ironmental Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes environmental enhancement or restoration approaches that may be applicable for mitigating impingement and entrainment impacts associated with cooling water intake structures (CWISs). These approaches are described with respect to their underlying objectives, implementation and operational requirements, costs, current use by government and the private sector, and advantages and limitations for potentially mitigating CWIS operational impacts.

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ocean Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

resource-assessment projects for advanced water power. Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy Related Terms Pamela Sydelko is the Deputy Associate Laboratory Director...

354

Resource Optimization Initiative (ROI) - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 3, 2008 ... The Resource Optimization Initiative (ROI), a not-for-profit entity, has been ... to begin with, would be Land, Water and Energy the three major...

355

Virginia Resources Authority Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Virginia Resources Authority provides financing options to support community investment in a number of areas, including wastewater, flood prevention and dam safety, solid waste, water, land...

356

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Control of Chilled Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loop chilled water pumps, condenser water pumps, and coolingsuch as 55F, and lower condenser water temperatures such assizing ? Cooling tower and condenser optimization ? Variable

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

358

Geochemical Water and Sediment Data: Reformatted Data from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) Program  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program was initiated by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1973 with a primary goal of identifying uranium resources in the United States. The Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program (initiated in 1975) was one of nine components of NURE. Planned systematic sampling of the entire United States began in 1976 under the responsibility of four DOE national laboratories: Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The NURE program effectively ended about 1983-84 when funding disappeared. Out of a total of 625 quadrangles that cover the entire lower 48 States and Alaska, only 307 quadrangles were completely sampled, some were partially completed, and many had not been done at all. Over the years various efforts have been made to finish the original task or analyze the stored samples or complete final reports. The sample archive was transferred to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1985. The archive reportedly contained about 380,000 original sediment samples from all four laboratories, about 250,000 replicates, splits, size fractions or other samples and approximately 500,000 resin samples of waters.

Smith, Steven M. [USGS

359

Potential for crop drying with geothermal hot water resources in the western United States: alfalfa, a case study. Report 305-100-02  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results of engineering, economic, and geographic analysis of the use of low-temperature geothermal heat for the commercial drying of grains, grasses, fruits, vegetables and livestock products in the United States are reported. Alfalfa (lucerne) dehydration was chosen for detailed process and cost study. Six different geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A conveyor type that could utilize geothermal hot water for its entire heat requirement proved to be the most economical. A capital cost estimate for an all-geothermal alfalfa dehydration plant near the Heber Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Imperial Valley, California was prepared. The combined cost for heat exchangers and dryer is about $1.6 million. Output is about 11 metric tons per hour. Acreage, production and dollar value data for 22 dryable crops were compiled for the areas surrounding identified hydrothermal resources in 11 western states. The potential magnitude of fossil fuel use that could be replaced by geothermal heat for drying these crops will be estimated.

Wright, T.C.

1977-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

360

Geothermal resources of the Texas Gulf Coast: environmental concerns arising from the production and disposal of geothermal waters. Geological circular 76-7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Disposal and temporary surface storage of spent geothermal fluids and surface subsidence and faulting are the major environmental problems that could arise from geopressured geothermal water production. Geopressured geothermal fluids are moderately to highly saline and may contain significant amounts of boron. Disposal of hot saline geothermal water in subsurface saline aquifers will present the least hazard to the environment. It is not known, however, whether the disposal of as much as 54,000 m/sup 3/ of spent fluids per day into saline aquifers at the production site is technically or economically feasible. If saline aquifers adequate for fluid disposal cannot be found, geothermal fluids may have to be disposed of by open watercourses, canals, and pipelines to coastal bays on the Gulf of Mexico. Overland flow or temporary storage of geothermal fluids may cause negative environmental impacts. As the result of production of large volumes of geothermal fluid, reservoir pressure declines may cause compaction of sediments within and adjacent to the reservoir. The amount of compaction depends on pressure decline, reservoir thickness, and reservoir compressibility. The magnitude of environmental impact of subsidence and fault activation varies with current land use. Geothermal resource production facilities on the Gulf Coast of Texas could be subject to a series of natural hazards: (1) hurricane- or storm-induced flooding, (2) winds from tropical storms, (3) coastal erosion, or (4) expansive soils. None of these hazards is generated by geothermal resource production, but each has potential for damaging geothermal production and disposal facilities that could, in turn, result in leakage of hot saline geothermal fluids.

Gustavson, T.C.; Kreitler, C.W.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Bethlehem Steel announces plans to control coke oven air and water pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation and the Maryland Department of the Environment have announced an agreement under which Bethlehem will spend an estimated $92-million at its Sparrows Points, Md., plant for technologically-advanced controls to further reduce air and water pollution, mainly from the plant's coke ovens. The two major systems include one to treat by-product coke oven gas and chemicals, and another to upgrade existing pushing emission controls on two older coke oven batteries. One of the new systems will replace most of the existing equipment that cleans gas and treats chemicals created by the coking process at the plant's three coke oven batteries. Because this system has the potential to greatly reduce sulfur dioxide and other pollutants, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) in September announced that its installation qualified for funding as part of the nationwide Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Testimony Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Energy Development and Water Resources Carl Bauer, Director, National Energy Technology Laboratory

363

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. ) AWWA. 2006. Water Conservation ProgramsA PlanningWater Conservation..staff (Caffal, 1995). Water Conservation Beyond optimizing

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Inst. of Resource Ecology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Galperin, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Quality control of chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples must meet certain levels of accuracy and reliability to be useful for identifying geochemical processes in hydrothermal systems. Quality control is largely a concern for the analytical laboratory, but the geochemist or reservoir engineer using the chemical data must also be concerned with analytical quality. To test accuracy and reliability of analyses available from laboratories, splits of seven water samples were sent to four stable-isotope laboratories, and splits of five water samples were sent to four chemical laboratories. The analyses of each sample were compared among laboratories, and the differences in analyses were evaluated using criteria developed for this comparison. Isotopic compositions were considered reliable if they deviated from mean values by less than 2{per_thousand}, for hydrogen and by less than 0.15{per_thousand}, for oxygen. Concentrations of each chemical component were considered reliable if they differed from mean values by less than 10%. Chemical analyses were examined for internal consistency by calculating the error in ionic charge balance and the error between ionic charge and electrical conductivity. To be considered internally consistent, chemical analyses must have less than 5% error in charge balance and less than 10% error in conductivity balance. Three isotope laboratories gave consistent compositions of all samples. No chemical laboratory gave consistent analyses of all samples. Recommendations are made that provide the user of isotopic and chemical data with the ability to better evaluate the quality of analyses.

Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366
367

Abstract--The issue of controlled and reliable integration of distributed energy resources into microgrids and large power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into microgrids and large power grids has recently gained considerable attention. The microgrid concept, which capabilities. In order to provide uninterruptible power supply to the loads, microgrids are expected to operate. The problem of optimal management of the resources in a microgrid is being widely investigated and recent

Cañizares, Claudio A.

368

Hospitality resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

369

Healthcare resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

370

Congregation resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

371

SCADA system for monitoring water supply networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water supply represents a vital problem for people, and this imposes the need to know the information regarding consumptions, resources and production. This implies a continuous supervision of the water supply process in order to allow any problem that ... Keywords: PLCs, SCADA, analysis, control, data acquisition, data transmission, monitoring

Mircea Dobriceanu; Alexandru Bitoleanu; Mihaela Popescu; Sorin Enache; Eugen Subtirelu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Teacher Resource Center: Curricular Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Curricular Resources Curricular Resources TRC Home TRC Fact Sheet Library Curricular Resources Science Fair Resources Bibliographies sciencelines The Best of sciencelines Archives Annotated List of URLs Catalog Teacher's Lounge Full Workshop Catalog Customized Workshops Scheduled Workshops Special Opportunities Teacher Networks Science Lab Fermilab Science Materials Samplers Order Form Science Safety Issues Tech Room Fermilab Web Resources The Teacher Resource Center provides workshops and consultations on Mathematics and Science Curriculum development. Here are a list of resources for educators. See the 'Customized Workshops" link in the "Teacher's Lounge" for information about more workshops available through the TRC. Key Science Resources for Curriculum Planning Key Science Resources for Curriculum Planning

374

Best Practices for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Control of Chilled Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for cleanrooms and their adjacent spaces. Chillers 39% Cooling Towers 7% Pumps 17% MUAH + RCU Fans 9% Hot Water;chilled water pumps, secondary loop chilled water pumps, condenser water pumps, and cooling towers for water-cooled chillers. While nominal energy efficiency ratings of individual component influence

375

Results of the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment investigated the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered reactor accident. This experiment, which was carried out in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories, was performed under the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program. The DF-4 test is described herein and results from the experiment are presented. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B{sub 4}C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. Hydrogen generation was found to continue throughout the experiment, diminishing slightly following the relocation of molten oxidizing zircaloy to the lower extreme of the test bundle. A large blockage which was formed from this material continued to oxidize while steam was being fed into the the test bundle. The results of this test have provided information on the initial stages of core melt progression in BWR geometry involving the heatup and cladding oxidation stages of a severe accident and terminating at the point of melting and relocation of the metallic core components. The information is useful in modeling melt progression in BWR core geometry, and provides engineering insight into the key phenomena controlling these processes. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Tools, Methods, and Modeling for Dynamic Distribution Systems, Power Factor Guidelines: Power Control with Distributed Energy Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the onset in the past few years of tax incentives, subsidies, and renewable portfolio standards for distributed energy resources (DER), utilities are experiencing increasing numbers of interconnection requests for both large, MW-class systems as well as small, residential-scale systems. As a result, utilities need methods for integrating DER without impacting system reliability or power quality for other customers, while also maintaining flexibility for future changes and minimizing ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

Planning Water Use in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Control of Chilled Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MUAH + RCU Fans Pumps Cooling Towers Figure 1. Benchmarkedcondenser water pumps, and cooling towers for water-cooledRight sizing ? Cooling tower and condenser optimization ?

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Comparison of resource assessment methods and geologic controls--deep natural gas plays and zones, United States and Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep (greater than 4.5 km--15,000 ft) conventional natural gas resources will play an important role in the future energy needs of the United States and Russia. Deep sedimentary basins are widespread in these countries and have formed in a variety of depositional and tectonic settings. Significant volumes of undiscovered deep natural gas are in the Gulf Coast, Anadarko, Permian, and Rocky Mountain basins of the U.S., and in the Timan-Pechora, West Siberia, East Siberia, and North and South Caspian basins of the former Soviet Union. Deep natural gas resources are regularly assessed by the All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Institute (VNIGRI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of their normal research activities. Both VNIGRI and the USGS employ similar assessment methods involving play (or zone) analysis using geological data and based on an analysis of confirmed and hypothetical plays using field-size distributions, discovery-process models, and statistical estimation procedures that yield probabilistic estimates of undiscovered accumulations. Resource estimates for the deep structural and statigraphic plays of the Anadarko basin and deep Paleozoic zones in the Timan-Pechora basin are compared and contrasted using both methods. Differences in results of assessments between VNIGRI and USGS arise due to (1) the way in which plays/zones are defined, (2) different geochemical models for hydrocarbon generation as applied to hypothetical plays, (3) variations in the ways in which statistical estimation procedures are applied to plays and regions, and (4) differences in economic and technologic assumptions, reserve growth calculations, and accumulation size limits and ranges.

Dyman, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Belonin, M.D. (All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Climate Change and Water Resources in California: The Cost of Conservation versus Supply Augmentation for the East Bay Municipal Utility District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009-2040: aggressive water conservation and the enlargementrationing, recycled water, conservation, and supplementalwhile meetings its costs. Water conservation versus supply

Mourad, Bessma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report, Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Preliminary final  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental protection regulations to correct and prevent groundwater contamination resulting from processing activities at inactive uranium milling sites (40 CFR 192). The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 designated responsibility to the US Department of Energy (DOE) for assessing the inactive uranium milling sites. The DOE has determined that each assessment shall include information on site characterization, a description of the proposed action, and a summary of the water resources protection strategy that describes how the proposed action will comply with the EPA groundwater protection standards. To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes that supplemental standards be applied at the Dry Flats disposal site because of Class III (limited use) groundwater in the uppermost aquifer (the basal sandstone of the Cretaceous Burro Canyon Formation) based on low yield. The proposed remedial action will ensure protection of human health and the environment.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Automated cloud resource orchestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Realizing Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud requires a control platform for orchestrating the provisioning, configuration, management and decommissioning of a distributed set of diverse cloud resources (i.e., compute, storage, network) serving ...

Changbin Liu / Boon Thau Loo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

WATER RESOURCES .NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their part to raise money for 11 seeing-eye dog for a blind Ida· hoan, by doing house work and other Jerry Clerk, Peler Corwin, Lynde Deiley, Ro.ie Deugherty, Jerry Denney, Doris Dielterl, Ruth Eridson, Ro, Power" John Reey, Jedie Reid. Donne Rideu, Jeneol Roth, Ce.ol Roulend, Petty SecM. Bllrbare Sonde, Jerry

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

385

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Tite Filament Wound Elbows and Tees and Frictional Losses in Pipes of Polyvinylchloride, R.W. Jeppson, Utah

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

386

GRR/Section 19-CA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-CA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues GRR/Section 19-CA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues 19CAAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California State Water Resources Control Board California Division of Water Rights Regulations & Policies California Water Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19CAAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative California's water acquisition process is governed by state law and common

387

Challenges in resource monitoring for residential spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings consume approximately 73% of the total electrical energy, and 12% of the potable water resources in the United States. Even a moderate reduction in this sector results in significant monetary and resource savings. Fine-grained resource monitoring ... Keywords: energy efficient homes, resource monitoring, sustainability

Younghun Kim; Thomas Schmid; Mani B. Srivastava; Yan Wang

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

THE ARIZONA WATER-ENERGY NEXUS: ELECTRICITY FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER SERVICES .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The water-energy nexus is the dependent relationship between water and energy resources. The nexus results in complex policy and management challenges for resources that have (more)

Hoover, Joseph Hamilton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Arizona water-energy nexus| Electricity for water and wastewater services.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The water-energy nexus is the dependent relationship between water and energy resources. The nexus results in complex policy and management challenges for resources that (more)

Hoover, Joseph Hamilton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water from Green River Oil Shale, 11 Chem. Ind. 1, 485 (Effluents from In-Situ Oil Shale Processing," in ProceedingsControl Technology for Oil Shale Retort Water," August 1978.

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Auto-Calibration and Control Strategy Determination for a Variable-Speed Heat Pump Water Heater Using Optimization  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces applications of the GenOpt optimizer coupled with a vapor compression system model for auto-calibration and control strategy determination towards the development of a variable-speed ground-source heat pump water heating unit. The GenOpt optimizer can be linked with any simulation program using input and output text files. It effectively facilitates optimization runs. Using our GenOpt wrapper program, we can flexibly define objectives for optimizations, targets, and constraints. Those functionalities enable running extensive optimization cases for model calibration, configuration design and control strategy determination. In addition, we describe a methodology to improve prediction accuracy using functional calibration curves. Using the calibrated model, we investigated control strategies of the ground-source heat pump water heater, considering multiple control objectives, covering the entire operation range.

Shen, Bo [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Control of Mode and Intermediate Water Mass Properties in Drake Passage by the Amundsen Sea Low  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the physical properties of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the Drake Passage region is examined on time scales down to intraseasonal, within the 19692009 period. Both SAMW and AAIW ...

Sally E. Close; Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; Elaine L. McDonagh; Brian A. King; Martin Biuw; Lars Boehme

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Ceramic filter manufacturing in Northern Ghana : water storage and quality control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, Pure Home Water (PHW), a Ghana based non-profit organization working to provide affordable and safe drinking water to people in the Northern Region of Ghana, began the construction of a ceramic pot filter (CPF) ...

Kleiman, Shanti Lisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Mathematical modeling of chemical oil-soluble transport for water control in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High water-cut is a long-standing problem in the upstream petroleum industry. Typically one-fourth of the produced fluids from oil wells worldwide are hydrocarbons and the remaining is water. Self-selective in-situ gel formation is a new potential technology ... Keywords: Gelation, Numerical modeling, Porous media, Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate or tetramethoxysilane (TMOS), Water cut

H. Valiollahi; Z. Ziabakhsh; P. L. J. Zitha

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

On Factors Controlling AirWater Gas Exchange in a Large Tidal River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Estuarine Research Federation 2011 Abstract Air­water gas exchange is an important process in aquatic Introduction In rivers and estuaries, knowledge of air­water gas exchange is important for evaluating how floating domes. The opportunistic gas method relies on gases in the water that either occurred naturally (e

Ho, David

396

Technical Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Resource Directory helps members maintain technical excellence in their professions. Technical Resources Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemi

397

Construction in Navigable Waters (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction in Navigable Waters (South Carolina) Construction in Navigable Waters (South Carolina) Construction in Navigable Waters (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control This South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control program establishes a number of provisions regarding waters, water resources, and drainage in South Carolina. Navigable streams and rivers are declared to be common highways and "forever free". The obstruction of such waterways

398

Snow water equivalent estimation using blackbox optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 23, 2011 ... Abstract: Accurate measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE) is an ... managing water resources for hydroelectric power generation.

399

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not later than May 1, 2013 along with a final completion report at the time of the final draft submission. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS........................................................................ 9 Attachment applicant and does not charge an administrative fee and does not apply its institution's indirect cost rate

Mukhtar, Saqib

400

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not later than May 1, 2013 along with a final completion report at the time of the final draft submission. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS........................................................................ 9 Attachment not charge an administrative fee and does not apply its institution's indirect cost rate to the award." VI

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The public concern for continued delivery of these ecosystem services is increasing; with private landowners of the plateau region affecting the delivery of these services. A geographic information systems spatial analysis was conducted for Bandera and Kerr counties, with two components being: (1) biophysical and (2) landowner interest. Together these resulted in an overarching map depicting the optimal locations to allocate government assistance to landowners for managing their property to support three ecosystem services: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration.In April 2003, a mail survey of selected landowners was conducted to determine their opinions regarding ecosystem services and cost-share programs (Olenick et al. 2005). In July 2004, a supplemental survey of respondents to the first survey was conducted to follow-up on a few questions answered incorrectly and to focus on landowner opinions regarding cost-share assistance programs and land management activities. Overall, it appeared that five year performance contracts were the most chosen contract type for respondents of all property sizes, earning mid/high annual incomes, and for all length of ownership time periods. Based on our findings, the publicly-funded assistance programs that should be allocated to the optimal ecosystem service locations are five and ten year performance contracts based on property size, length of ownership, and income level categories. The spatial and statistical analysis results were successful, in that optimal locations and types of cost share programs were identified for each ecosystem service in order to prioritize the allocation of limited public resources. The patches of ecosystem target areas within the final target area map can be used as land management demonstration sites to reveal to surrounding landowners the benefits of participating in publicly funded cost-share assistance programs. However, the study has been limited by the generality of the GIS statewide wildlife data.

Davis, Amber Marie

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Commit to Efficiency Resource Kit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Resource Kit Step 1. Commit to efficiency. Open this resource kit, register your commitment at femp.energy.gov/commit, and review your Commit to Efficiency materials. Step 2. Push for efficiency. Buy and specify energy-efficient products for every purchase. Step 3. Spread the word! Tell your colleagues to commit to efficiency, and ask your suppliers for exclusively energy-efficient products. Commercial Space Heating and Cooling * Boilers p * Central Air Conditioners n * Chillers - Air-Cooled Electric p - Water-Cooled Electric p * Air Source Heat Pumps n Commercial Water Heating * Gas Water Heaters p Residential Space Heating and Cooling

403

Commit to Efficiency Resource Kit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Resource Kit Step 1. Commit to efficiency. Open this resource kit, register your commitment at femp.energy.gov/commit, and review your Commit to Efficiency materials. Step 2. Push for efficiency. Buy and specify energy-efficient products for every purchase. Step 3. Spread the word! Tell your colleagues to commit to efficiency, and ask your suppliers for exclusively energy-efficient products. Commercial Space Heating and Cooling * Boilers p * Central Air Conditioners n * Chillers - Air-Cooled Electric p - Water-Cooled Electric p * Air Source Heat Pumps n Commercial Water Heating * Gas Water Heaters p Residential Space Heating and Cooling

404

Pennsylvania Solid Waste- Resource Recovery Development Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act promotes the construction and the application of solid waste disposal/processing and resource recovery systems that preserve and enhance the quality of air, water, and land resources. The...

405

Type C: Caldera Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C: Caldera Resource C: Caldera Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type C: Caldera Resource Dictionary.png Type C: Caldera Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources. Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Caldera resources may be found in many tectonic settings but are defined by their caldera structures which control the flow of the fluids in the system.

406

Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979-1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM file for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Phase II studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

Youngs, L.G.; Bacon, C.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Higgins, C.T.; Majmundar, H.H.; Taylor, G.C.

1980-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

OPTIMIZED CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR A TYPICAL WATER LOOP HEAT PUMP SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water Loop Heat Pump (WLHP) System has been widely utilized in the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) industry for several decades. There is no (more)

Lian, Xu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Soil and Water Conservation (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Texas) (Texas) Soil and Water Conservation (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Schools Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is established to encourage and oversee soil-conserving land-use practices, and to provide for the conservation of soil and related resources and the control and prevention of soil erosion, and thereby to preserve natural resources,

409

Pathway and Resource Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway and Resource Overview Pathway and Resource Overview Delivering Renewable Hydrogen Workshop - A Focus on Near-Term Applications Mark F. Ruth November 16, 2009 Palm Springs, CA NREL/PR-6A1-47108 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Definition and Presentation Outline Hydrogen pathway analysis is analysis of the total levelized cost (including return on investment), well-to- wheels (WTW) energy use, and WTW emissions for hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. This presentation focuses on * Pathway analyses using the Macro-System Model (MSM) * Resource and pathway analysis using the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA) * Status of water-electrolysis technology

410

Safety Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Print LBNLPub-3000: Health and Safety Manual Berkeley Lab safety guide, policies and procedures. Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Staff Contact information for the...

411

Biomass Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks.

412

Dispersants for Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Side Fouling Control: Sourcebook for Online and Offline Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of PWR steam generator (SG) deposit fouling in causing heat-transfer losses, SG tube and internals corrosion, level instabilities, and reductions in plant output has been well established during the last few decades. Accordingly, utilities routinely devote substantial resources to limiting or reducing the level of such deposit fouling. Deposit removal efforts are often effective, but can be costly and can carry risks of extended outages or incomplete cleaning.Another ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

413

Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery and Other Oil Resources CO2 EOR | Other EOR & Oil Resources | Environmental | Completed Oil Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FE0013723 Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams To Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing The University of Texas at Austin DE-FE0010799 Small Molecular Associative Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Thickeners for Improved Mobility Control University of Pittsburgh DE-FE0006011 Development of Real Time Semi-autonomous Geophysical Data Acquisition and Processing System to Monitor Flood Performance White River Technologies DE-FE0005979 Nanoparticle-stabilized CO2 Foam for CO2 EOR Application New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

414

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

training and tools for efficiency programs and resource management;management program, but its duties also can include delivering training,management program for buildings. The document discusses management (goals, planning, energy accounting); teamwork (staffing, training,

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Ocean Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

resource-assessment projects for advanced water power. Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Frequently Asked Questions Pamela Sydelko is the Deputy...

416

Control, Prevention, and Abatement of Pollution of Surface Waters (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of North Dakota to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the waters in the state, and to require necessary and reasonable treatment of sewage, industrial, or other wastes....

417

Light Reflection from Water Waves: Suitable Setup for a Polarimetric Investigation under Controlled Laboratory Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reflection of sunlight from a wavy water surface, often referred to as sun glint, is a well-known phenomenon that presents challenges but also hitherto untapped opportunities in remote sensing based on satellite imagery. Despite being ...

Matteo Ottaviani; Knut Stamnes; Jeff Koskulics; Hans Eide; Steven R. Long; Wenying Su; Warren Wiscombe

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Application of Ion Concentration Polarization to Water Desalination and Active Control of Analytes in Paper.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on the development of two new applications using ion concentration polarization (ICP): an out-of-plane microfluidic approach for water desalination and a method (more)

Pei, Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Automated Quality Control Procedure for the "Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground" Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow water equivalent (SWE) has been measured daily by the United States National Weather Service since 1952, whenever snow depth is 2 in. (5 cm) or greater. These data are used to develop design snow loads for buildings, for hydrological ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin; Daniel S. Wilks; Megan McKay; Richard P. Cember

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Water Reactor Chemical Volume and Control System and Steam Generator Blowdown Resins and Filters Sourcebook: 2013 Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of ion exchange practices within the industry for the removal of soluble and insoluble contaminants and filtration practices for the removal of insoluble contaminants is important for providing insight into beneficial practices as well as conditions to avoid. This report includes information on system descriptions, system operating practices, resins, and filters used in pressurized water reactor (PWR) chemical volume and control, makeup purification, and steam generator blowdown ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This administrative regulation establishes procedures to protect the surface waters of the Commonwealth, and thus protect water resources. It states the designated uses of surface water and...

422

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change and global water resources. Global Environmentalin Managing International Water Resources (No. WPS 1303):Darcy Lecture Tour. Ground Water, 45(4), 390-391. Sadoff,

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evolution of Water Marketing in California: Formal vs. Informal Property Rights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

160. Sacramento, Calif: California Dept. of Water Resources,previous/cwpu2005/index.cfm. . California Water Plan160. Sacramento, Calif: California Dept. of Water Resources,

Bickett, Damian Blase

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system for a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with quartz windows. High speed movies, detailed data for fuel line pressures and needle lift signals were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base case conditions (50% by mass) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m'), the break-up time was 0.30 msec. An empirical correlation for both spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity was developed. For the base case conditions, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Results of this research and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry.

Payne, Stephen Ellis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Mark Gabriel, Administrator WAPA...

426

Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before House Subcommittee on...

427

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists the treatment methods and the percentage of utilitieslists the characteristics of the water sources used by utilities

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mobile Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Resources Mobile Resources Mobile Resources Have a mobile device? Find tips and information here. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email For information call the Service Desk at (505) 667-5809 or email mobilelibrary@lanl.gov The following resources are optimized for mobile devices or have mobile apps available for download. Resource Available App Mobile Website Available off Yellow Network with Pairing or Login Additional Information AACR Journals Apple Yes, the Journals are optimized for mobile viewing. Not the whole AACR site. Instructional pdf on pairing with voucher ACS Apple Android No American Institute of Physics Apple No American Mathematical Society No Yes Instructions for pairing mobile devices, tablets, laptops, etc. American Physical Society No Annual Reviews No Yes Instructions for pairing with mobile device available on website.

429

The development of a GIS methodology to assess the potential for water resource contamination due to new development in the 2012 Olympic Park site, London  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Initial Screening Tool (IST) has been developed to enable Planners to assess the potential risk to ground and surface water due to remobilisation of contaminants by new developments. The IST is a custom built GIS application that improves upon previous ... Keywords: Contaminated land, GIS, Ground water, Part IIa of the Environmental Protection Act (1990), Screening tool, Surface water

A. P. Marchant; V. J. Banks; K. R. Royse; S. P. Quigley

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Property:NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Applicant Mitigation Resource Applicant Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation Property Type Text Description Applicant proposed mitigation plan to minimize the risk of a potential negative impact to a NEPA resource with a geothermal development effort. Pages using the property "NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Noise + Construction noise would be minimized through practices which avoid or minimize actions which may typically generate greater noise levels, or generate distinctive impact noise. BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Air_Quality + Water would be applied to the ground during the construction and utilization of the drill pads, access roads, and other disturbed areas as necessary to control dust. NGP would comply with any requirements prescribed by the NDEP-BAPC. NGP also proposes to water the ground to control dust during construction.

431

GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit 06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Public Utilities Commission of Nevada Regulations & Policies NRS 445A Water Controls NAC 445A Water Controls (Regulations) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative According to NRS 445A, the Nevada Division of Water Resources is charged

432

Controlling Accumulation of Fermentation Inhibitors in Biorefinery Recycle Water Using Microbial Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Background Microbial fuel cells (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cells are electrical devices that treat water using microorganisms and convert soluble organic matter into electricity and hydrogen, respectively. Emerging cellulosic biorefineries are expected to use large amounts of water during production of ethanol. Pretreatment of cellulosic biomass results in production of fermentation inhibitors which accumulate in process water and make the water recycle process difficult. Use of MFCs to remove the inhibitory sugar and lignin degradation products from recycle water is investigated in this study. Results Use of an MFC to reduce the levels of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, vanillic acid, 4- hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxyacetophenone while simultaneously producing electricity is demonstrated here. An integrated MFC design approach was used which resulted in high power densities for the MFC, reaching up to 3700mW/m2 (356W/m3 net anode volume) and a coulombic efficiency of 69%. The exoelectrogenic microbial consortium enriched in the anode was characterized using a 16S rRNA clone library method. A unique exoelectrogenic microbial consortium dominated by -Proteobacteria (50%), along with -Proteobacteria (28%), -Proteobacteria (14%), -Proteobacteria (6%) and others was identified. The consortium demonstrated broad substrate specificity, ability to handle high inhibitor concentrations (5 to 20mM) with near complete removal, while maintaining long-term stability with respect to power production. Conclusions Use of MFCs for removing fermentation inhibitors has implications for: 1) enabling higher ethanol yields at high biomass loading in cellulosic ethanol biorefineries, 2) improved water recycle and 3) electricity production up to 25% of total biorefinery power needs.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Leak, David [Imperial College, London; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Andras, Calin [Imperial College, London

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Federal agency resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

434

Multifamily housing resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

435

Entertainment venue resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

436

Higher education resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

437

Data center resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

438

Senior care resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

439

Auto dealer resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

440

ELECTRICAL LOAD MANAGEMENT FOR THE CALIFORNIA WATER SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Water Resources. Water Conservation in California. DWRUse ENERGY CONSERVATION Water Conservation Pump Efficienciescussion of load Water Conservation some of these measures in

Krieg, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Sacramento Area Water Forum: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water resources and water conservation. The institutionalWithin this task, water conservation and conjunctive use ofPotential statewide water conservation requirements might

Connick, Sarah

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Online Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Online Resources Online Resources       General Information Discovering New Physics - Fermilab: where physicists unravel the mysteries of the universe Electromagnetic Simulation: Charged Particle Motion in E/M Field (by Fu-Kwun Hwang, National Taiwan Normal University) Fermilabyrinth - Online versions of exhibits at the Lederman Science Center Fermilab Virtual Tour - Photos of accelerators and detectors with figure captions International Particle Physics Outreach Group (from CERN) Fermilab Homepage - Links to general information, experiments and projects (Fermilab at Work), particle physics (inquiring minds), resources for students (education) and more High-Energy Physics Acronyms - (from Fermilab) Particle Physics - a list of links from the American Physical Society)

443

Water injection into a Low-Permeability Rock - 2: Control Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part 1, we have demonstrated the inevitable growth of the fluid injection hydrofractures in low-permeability rocks. Thus, a smart controller that manages fluid injection in the presence of hydrofracture extension is highly desirable. Such a controller will be an essential part of automated waterflood project surveillance and control. Here we design an optimal injection controller using methods of optimal control theory. The controller inputs are the history of the injection pressure and the cumulative injection, along with the fracture size. The output parameter is the injection pressure and the control objective is the injection rate. We demonstrate that the optimal injection pressure depends not only on the instantaneous measurements, but it is determined by the whole history of the injection and of the fracture area growth. We show the controller robustness when the inputs are delayed and noisy and when the fracture undergoes abrupt extensions. Finally, we propose a procedure that allows estimation of the hydrofracture size at no additional cost.

Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Algae control problems and practices workshop  

SciTech Connect

Western water resources are continuously facing increased demand from industry and the public. Consequently, many of these resources are required to perform multiple tasks as they cycle through the ecosystem. Many plants and animals depend upon these resources for growth. Algae are one group of plants associated with nutrient and energy cycles in many aquatic ecosystems. Although most freshwater algae are microscopic in size, they are capable of dominating and proliferating to the extent that the value of the water resource for both industrial and domestic needs is compromised. There is a great diversity of aquatic environments and systems in which algae may be found, and there are many varieties of treatment and control techniques available to reduce the impacts of excessive growth. This workshop was organized to exchange information about these control problems and practices.

Pryfogle, P.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ghio, G. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Western Resource Advocates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advocates Advocates Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Western Resource Advocates Name Western Resource Advocates Address 2260 Baseline Road Place Boulder, Colorado Zip 80302 Region Rockies Area Website http://www.westernresourceadvo Notes Non-profit environmental law and policy organization developing strategic programs in three areas: Water, Energy and Lands Coordinates 39.9998°, -105.264094° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9998,"lon":-105.264094,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

446

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic File with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications are discussed, including drinking water purification, air and water pollution control, manufacture of industrial materials, materials recovery, waste treatment, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, cigarette filters, ventilation systems, medical filtration, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains a minimum of 125 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications are discussed, including drinking water purification, air and water pollution control, manufacture of industrial materials, materials recovery, waste treatment, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, cigarette filters, ventilation systems, medical filtration, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Feature - WATER Tool Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Argonne National Laboratory recently released an open access online tool called WATER (Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources), which quantifies water footprint of fuel production stages from feedstock production to conversion process for biofuel with county, state, and regional level spatial resolution. WATER provides analysis on water consumption and its impact on water quality. It contains biofuel pathways for corn grain ethanol, soybean biodiesel, and cellulosic ethanol produced from corn stover and wheat straw. Perennial grass (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) and forest wood residue-based biofuel pathways are currently under development. The WATER tool enables users to conduct pathway comparison, scenario development, and regional specific feedstock analysis in supporting of biofuel industry development and planning. It is available at http://water.es.anl.gov/.

449

NREL: Energy Analysis: Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Assessment Resource Assessment NREL has developed maps and tools to conduct renewable energy resource assessments at the state, national and international level. Around the world, interest is growing in renewable energy as a strategy to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and increase energy security. The starting point for new renewable energy projects is a characterization of the renewable resources available across a region, a resource assessment. NREL uses geospatial data sets to identify regions that are appropriate for renewable development and those that should be excluded such as water bodies, urban areas, cropland, forests, very steep terrain, and protected areas. Once resource data are available for a region, NREL can estimate the theoretical potential, or upper limit, for renewable energy in an area.

450

Center Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources for Planning Center Activities Resources for Planning Center Activities       QuarkNet at Work - Resources Home QuarkNet is a teacher professional development effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy. Teachers work on particle physics experiments during a summer and join a cadre of scientists and teachers working to introduce some aspects of their research into their classrooms. This allows tomorrow's particle physicists to peek over the shoulder of today's experimenters. These resources are available for lead teachers and mentors at Quartnet Centers as they design activities for associate teacher workshops and follow-on activities. Important Findings from Previous Years Mentor Tips Associate Teacher Institute Toolkit

451

Resource Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online search and networking tool that connects AOCS members with their peers who share a common technical interest, geographic location, or affinity. Resource Directory Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished div

452

Energy Basics: Biomass Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Share this resource Biomass Biofuels Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Biomass Resources Biomass resources include any...

453

Establishing Regional Resource Centers  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Establishing Regional Resource Centers Establishing Regional Resource Centers July 25, 2013 Coordinator: Welcome and thank you for standing by. At this time all participants are in a listen only mode. To ask a question later during the question and answer session please press star then 1 on your touchtone phone. Today's conference is being recorded. If you have any objections you may disconnect. And I would like to turn it over to Mr. Jonathan Bartlett. Sir, you may begin. Jonathan Bartlett: Thank you very much. This is Jonathan Bartlett from the Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. Today's WPA Webinar will be on the subject of establishing regional resource centers. I will be joined by Ian Baring-Gould at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the

454

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rural businesses, for instance for energy audits. In FY2010,Business_Programs/ind ustriallighting_bestpracticessheet.pdf. Water & Wastewater Treatment Energy Use Self-Audit

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for WaterIndustry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Finding Money for Your Energy Efficiency Projects. (A Primer

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Geothermal Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Resources and Technologies Geothermal Resources and Technologies Geothermal Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:24am Addthis Photo of steam rising high in the air from a geyser. Geothermal energy leverages heated air and water from beneath the earth's surface. This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector. Overview Geothermal energy is produced from heat and hot water found within the earth. Federal agencies can harness geothermal energy for heating and cooling air and water, as well as for electricity production. Geothermal resources can be drawn through several resources. The resource can be at or near the surface or miles deep. Geothermal systems move heat

458

The application of the ISO 11064 for deep water platform control centre design: benefits and limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an ergonomic intervention in the design of the control centre of two floating production storage vessels. It also discusses the application of ISO 11064 standard used throughout this intervention. The results show that the specifications ...

Francisco Duarte; Jos Maral Jackson Filho; Francisco de Paula Antunes Lima; Nora de Castro Maia

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Tools & Resources: Resource Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Directory Resource Directory The guidance documents and reports below have been used by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners to build their programs and guide them to early successes. The tools and calculators can be used by homeowners, business owners, and program designers to help determine energy savings and other benefits associated with energy efficiency upgrades. Guidance Documents and Reports Background Program Evaluation Program Updates and Lessons Learned Program Design Marketing and Driving Demand Financing and Incentives Workforce Development Partnering with Utilities Technical Resources Tools and Calculators For Homes For Commercial Buildings Emissions and Equivalency Calculators Guidance Documents and Reports Background Recovery Through Retrofit Report

460

Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water resources control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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461

Innovation in Storm Water and Oil Spill Control Techniques for Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities must comply with a wide range of state and federal regulatory policies. One regulation of particular concern to electric utilities in the United States is the Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) Rule (40 CFR Part 112). This regulation, administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), requires some facilities that produce, store, or use oil to implement oil spill control measures. Explosive failure of secondary electrical equipment such as small transforme...

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

462

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO[sub x] concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO{sub x} concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Water Power Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

465

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Environmental effects of energy production and utilization in the U. S. Volume 3. Techniques for controlling emissions  

SciTech Connect

Technological, social, economic and political techniques for controlling emission are summarized for environmental pollutants introduced into air, water and land resources. Chemical, radiological and physical factors are discussed. (PCS)

Newkirk, H.W. (comp.)

1976-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

467

ACCESS CONTROL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TERMSDEFINITIONS FROM DOE M 470.4-7 ACCESS CONTROL. The process of permitting access or denying access to information, facilities, nuclear materials, resources, or designated...

468

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part III GIS Coverage for the Valle de Jurez Irrigation District 009 (ID-009) (Distrito de Riego 009) Chihuahua, Mxico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report fulfills the deliverables required by the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES/03-PL- 02: Modification No. 3) on behalf of the Paso del Norte Watershed Council. Tasks accomplished in this phase include (a) assessment of data availability for expansion of the URGWOM model, identification of data gaps, generation of data needed from historic data using empirical methods, compilation and verification of the water quality data for reaches between the Elephant Butte Reservoir, New Mexico and Fort Quitman, Texas; (b) development of the RiverWare physical model for the Rio Grande flow for the selected reaches between Elephant Butte Reservoir and El Paso, beginning with a conceptual model for interaction of surface water and groundwater in the Rincon and Mesilla valleys, and within the limits of available data; and (c) implementation of data transfer interface between the coordinated database and hydrologic models. This Project was conducted by researchers at Texas A&M University (TAMU) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) under the direction of Zhuping Sheng of TAMU and J. Phillip King of New Mexico State University. It was developed to enhance the coordinated database, which was originally developed by the Paso del Norte Watershed Council with support of El Paso Water Utilities to fulfill needs for better management of regional water resources and to expand the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) to cover the river reaches between Elephant Butte Dam, New Mexico and Fort Quitman, Texas. In Phases I and II of this Project (TAES/03-PL-02), hydrological data needed for flow model development were compiled and data gaps were identified and a conceptual model developed. The objectives of this phase were to develop a physical model of the Rio Grande flow between Elephant Butte Dam and American Dam by using data collected in the first development phase of the PdNWC/Corps Coordinated Water Resources Database and to enhance the data portal capabilities of the PdNWC Coordinated Database Project. This report is Part III of a three part completion report for Phase III and provides information on water sources, uses, and GIS of the canals and ditches of the Valle de Jurez Irrigation District 009 (ID 009) in the Jurez Lower Valley, Chihuahua, Mxico. The author explains that the water needs of this region have changed in recent years from being primarily for agricultural purposes to domestic and industrial uses currently. Also, the United States wanted to assess and identify new data sources on a GIS format for the Mexican side. Therefore, this project produced several maps with the location of channels and ditches along the Valle de Jurez Irrigation District. This information also will support water planning of the Valle de Jurez Irrigation District 009. The maps were produced from existing digital data regarding water resources and by adding thematic layers such as soil salinity and soil texture from analog maps. ASTER satellite imagery and official panchromatic aerial photography were used to produce the maps.

Granados, Alfredo; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

NATURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the scientific work that was performed to evaluate and assess the occurrence and economic potential of natural resources within the geologic setting of the Yucca Mountain area. The extent of the regional areas of investigation for each commodity differs and those areas are described in more detail in the major subsections of this report. Natural resource assessments have focused on an area defined as the ''conceptual controlled area'' because of the requirements contained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation, 10 CFR Part 60, to define long-term boundaries for potential radionuclide releases. New requirements (proposed 10 CFR Part 63 [Dyer 1999]) have obviated the need for defining such an area. However, for the purposes of this report, the area being discussed, in most cases, is the previously defined ''conceptual controlled area'', now renamed the ''natural resources site study area'' for this report (shown on Figure 1). Resource potential can be difficult to assess because it is dependent upon many factors, including economics (demand, supply, cost), the potential discovery of new uses for resources, or the potential discovery of synthetics to replace natural resource use. The evaluations summarized are based on present-day use and economic potential of the resources. The objective of this report is to summarize the existing reports and information for the Yucca Mountain area on: (1) Metallic mineral and mined energy resources (such as gold, silver, etc., including uranium); (2) Industrial rocks and minerals (such as sand, gravel, building stone, etc.); (3) Hydrocarbons (including oil, natural gas, tar sands, oil shales, and coal); and (4) Geothermal resources. Groundwater is present at the Yucca Mountain site at depths ranging from 500 to 750 m (about 1,600 to 2,500 ft) below the ground surface. Groundwater resources are not discussed in this report, but are planned to be included in the hydrology section of future revisions of the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c).

D.F. Fenster

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

470

SpatialTemporal Changes of Water Resources in a Typical Semiarid Basin of North China over the Past 50 Years and Assessment of Possible Natural and Socioeconomic Causes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrological processes in most semiarid regions on Earth have been changing under the impacts of climate change, human activities, or combinations of the two. This paper first presents a trend analysis of the spatiotemporal changes in water ...

Bin Yong; Liliang Ren; Yang Hong; Jonathan J. Gourley; Xi Chen; Jinwei Dong; Weiguang Wang; Yan Shen; Jill Hardy