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Sample records for water resources act

  1. Archaeological Resources Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Protection Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Archaeological Resources Protection ActLegal...

  2. Archaeological Resources Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Protection Act) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Archaeological Resources Protection ActLegal...

  3. Energy and Water Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Letter 2004-02 - FY 2004 Le2islation Provisions (dated March 1.2004) Energy and Water Act AL-2004-02 provides guidance regarding the implementation of Section 30 I. 304....

  4. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Section 401 Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    document outlines the Agency of Natural Resources coordination process with respect to Clean Water Act Section 401 water quality certification decisions. Author Vermont...

  5. Energy technology scenarios for use in water resources assessments under Section 13a of the Federal Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    This document presents two estimates of future growth of emerging energy technology in the years 1985, 1990, and 2000 to be used as a basis for conducting Water Resources Council assessments as required by the Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act of 1974. The two scenarios are called the high world oil price (HWOP) and low world oil price (LWOP) cases. A national-level summary of the ASA tabulations is shown in Appendix A; the scenarios are presented at the ASA level of detail in Appendix B. The two scenarios were generally derived from assumptions of the Second National Energy Plant (NEP II), including estimates of high and low world oil price cases, growth rate of GNP, and related economic parameters. The overall national energy growth inherent in these assumptions was expressed as a detailed projection of various energy fuel cycles through use of the Fossil-2 model and regionalized through use of the Strategic Environmental Assessment System (SEAS). These scenarios are for the use of regional analysts in examining the availability of water for and the potential impacts of future growth of emerging energy technology in selected river basins of the Nation, as required by Section 13(a).

  6. Extending the authorization of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 through the end of Fiscal Year 1993: report to accompany H. R. 5010. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, August 8, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the bill is to extend the authorization of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984. The bill extends the authorization of appropriations for assistance to the water resources research institutes through the end of 1993, clarifies the non-Federal matching requirements for institutes, and initiates a new $5 million program directed at regional and interstate water problems. The Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, to whom the bill was referred, reports favorably on the bill with an amendment and recommends its passage.

  7. S. 1635: A Bill to extend the authorization of appropriations for the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 through the end of fiscal year 1994. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, September 18, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 1635 is a bill to extend the authorization of appropriations for the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 through the end of fiscal year 1994.

  8. Safe Drinking Water Act and Regulations (EPA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Safe Drinking Water Act is the main federal law that ensures the quality of Americans' drinking water.

  9. Safe Drinking Water Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drinking Water Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Safe Drinking Water ActLegal Abstract The Safe Drinking Water...

  10. Clean Water Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Clean Water ActLegal Abstract The Clean Water Act (CWA) establishes the basic structure for...

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility assessment guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rastatter, C.; Fagan, D.; Foss, D.

    1986-10-01

    Facilities that manage hazardous wastes are required to obtain permits under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. This guidance document informs RCRA permit writers and enforcement officials of procedures to be used in conducting RCRA Facility Assessments. The RCRA corrective-action program was established to investigate and require clean up of releases of hazardous wastes or constituents to the environment at facilities subject to RCRA permits. Releases to ground water, surface water, air, soil, and subsurface strata may be addressed.

  12. Oregon Water Resources Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Water Resources Department Name: Oregon Water Resources Department Address: 725 Summer Street NE, Suite A Place:...

  13. Clean Water Act and Regulations (EPA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Water Act (CWA; 33 U.S.C. §1251 et seq.) establishes the basic structure for regulating discharges of pollutants into the waters of the United States and regulating quality standards for surface waters.

  14. LANL in Compliance with Clean Water Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disputes citizens' lawsuit February 7, 2008 LANL in Compliance with Clean Water Act LOS ALAMOS, NM, Feb. 7, 2008-Los Alamos National Laboratory officials today expressed surprise to a lawsuit alleging noncompliance with the federal Clean Water Act filed today by citizens groups against Los Alamos National Security LLC and the U.S. Department of Energy. "The Laboratory is in compliance with its storm water permit under the federal Clean Water Act," said Dick Watkins, associate director

  15. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations Presentations: Keynote 1: Energy-Positive Water ...

  16. Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources PDF icon Primer FINAL.PDF More Documents & Publications Water ...

  17. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations Presentations: Keynote 1: Energy-Positive Water...

  18. Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources.PDF (4.19 MB) More Documents & Publications Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources Water Use in the ...

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    programs and sites on issues related to implementation and compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous and solid waste management regulations. ...

  20. New Mexico HB 201 (2012) An Act Relating to Geothermal Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- BillBill: New Mexico HB 201 (2012) An Act Relating to Geothermal Resources; Providing for ground water to...

  1. Oregon Water Resources Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name: Oregon Water Resources Commission Abbreviation: OWRC Address: 725 Summer Street NE, Suite A Place: Salem, Oregon Zip:...

  2. Water Resources Council FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES For...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Resources Council FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES For Implementing E.O. 11988 43 FR 6030 February 10, 1978 (Second Reprinting) i- ' 1': : 8410-01 WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL...

  3. California Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources Control Board Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control Board Place: Sacramento, California Coordinates:...

  4. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentations Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations ...ositiveWorkshopReuse.pdf (2.28 MB) NearyWaterResourceWorkshoppresentaion2015.pdf ...

  5. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  6. Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

  7. California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    401 Water Quality Certification Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water...

  8. Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Substitute Water Supply Plans Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply...

  9. National Environmental Policy Act Process WATER Los Alamos National...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Policy Act Process WATER Los Alamos National Laboratory WATER The campaigns LA-UR-15-27484 * The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process begins with a ...

  10. California State Water Resources Control Board Storm Water Homepage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Water Resources Control Board Storm Water Homepage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State Water Resources Control Board...

  11. WSDE Water Resources website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: WSDE Water Resources websiteLegal Abstract The Washington...

  12. Resource Recovery Opportunities at America's Water Resource Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at America's Water Resource Recovery Facilities Todd Williams, Deputy Leader for Wastewater Infrastructure Practice, CH2M HILL williamsbiomass2014.pdf (1.26 MB) More ...

  13. Idaho Department of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Idaho Department of Water Resources Name: Idaho Department of Water Resources Address: 322 East Front Street, PO Box 83720 Place:...

  14. Colorado Division of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Division of Water Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colorado Division of Water Resources Name: Colorado Division of Water Resources Address: 1313 Sherman St., Suite 818...

  15. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report View the workshop presentations. Workshop Report: Water Resource ...

  16. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects Citation Details ...

  17. Title 40 CFR 230 Definitions - Clean Water Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RegulationRegulation: Title 40 CFR 230 Definitions - Clean Water ActLegal Abstract Sets forth regulatory definitions under the Clean Water Act including the definition of waters of...

  18. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  19. Water Power Information Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Power Information Resources Water Power Information Resources How Hydropower Works How Hydropower Works See a detailed view of the inside of a hydropower energy generation system. Read more Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database on OpenEI Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database on OpenEI The DOE Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy. Read more The following resources about water power technologies

  20. Water resource opportunity assessment: Fort Dix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Hostick, D.J.; Elliott, D.B.; Fitzpatrick, Q.K.; Dahowski, R.T.; Dison, D.R

    1996-12-01

    This report provides the results of the water resource opportunity assessments performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Fort Dix facility located in Fort Dix, New Jersey.

  1. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Related Documents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Documents Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Related Documents ... Workshop Report Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report ...

  2. Water resources and the urban environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loucks, E.D.

    1998-07-01

    140 abstracts from the conference cover topics such as urban stormwater management; geographic information systems, hydrologic and hydraulic computer modeling; groundwater analysis and management; drinking water supply and quality; and international water resources issues.

  3. Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act Published Publisher...

  4. Idaho Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Idaho Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification...

  5. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Certification: A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Guide...

  6. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Certification A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Guide...

  7. DOE Publications and Data Resources Related to Water-Energy ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Publications and Data Resources Related to Water-Energy DOE Publications and Data Resources Related to Water-Energy Department of Energy Publications Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges ...

  8. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS

  9. Xiaojin County Xinghua Water Resource and Hydropower Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xinghua Water Resource and Hydropower Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xiaojin County Xinghua Water Resource and Hydropower Development Co., Ltd. Place: Aba...

  10. Nevada Division of Water Resources Forms Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    library Web Site: Nevada Division of Water Resources Forms Webpage Abstract Provides access to State of Nevada Division of Water Resources forms. Author State of Nevada Division...

  11. Oregon Water Resource Department Forms Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Water Resource Department Forms Webpage Abstract Provides access to water resource...

  12. Wetlands, Floodplains, and Other Water Resources Guidance and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wetlands, Floodplains, and Other Water Resources Guidance and Requirements Wetlands, Floodplains, and Other Water Resources Guidance and Requirements Guidance Revised Guidelines ...

  13. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (71.99 KB) More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power

  14. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before...

  15. Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Executive...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report Executive Summary Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Executive Summary Executive summary workshop report for the for the Energy-Positive Water Resource ...

  16. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Christopher M. ...

  17. Kangding Hualong Water Resources Electric Power Investment Co...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hualong Water Resources Electric Power Investment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kangding Hualong Water Resources & Electric Power Investment Co., Ltd. Place: Ganzi...

  18. Gansu Linhai Water Resource and Hydropower Investment Co Ltd...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resource and Hydropower Investment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gansu Linhai Water Resource and Hydropower Investment Co., Ltd. Place: Lanzhou, Gansu Province,...

  19. Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Workshop report for the Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop hosted by the National Science Foundation, ...

  20. EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and text of Section 319 of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1329). Author United States Environmental Protection Agency Published United States Environmental Protection Agency,...

  1. The Environmental Protection Agency: Clean Water Act Section...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Environmental Protection Agency: Clean Water Act Section 319 Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: The Environmental Protection...

  2. WAC - 173-225 Federal Water Pollution Control Act - Establishment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    225 Federal Water Pollution Control Act - Establishment of Implementation Procedures of Application for Certification Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  3. Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Webpage Author United State Environmental Protection...

  4. Colorado Water Quality Control Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Colorado Water Quality Control ActLegal Abstract Statute setting forth laws for water quality control...

  5. NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Characterization Building on its success in wind resource characterization and assessment, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has extended its capabilities to the field of water power. NREL's team of scientists, engineers and computer experts has broad experience in physical oceanography, meteorology, modeling, data analysis, and Geographic Information Systems. Many years of experience in wind assessment have enabled NREL to develop the skills and methodologies to evaluate

  6. The clean water act -- (Federal Water Pollution Control Act), what it means to utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talt, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    Departing from previous policy, in August 1993 the USEPA`s Water Office recommended that the agency regulate a proposed electric power plant`s cooling pond as a water of the US. At issue was a proposal by Florida Power corp. to build a new electric power plant in Polk County, Florida. A 2,600 acre cooling pond to collect heated and discharged water was included in the proposal. Region 4 USEPA staff asked USEPA Headquarters in Washington, DC to decide whether the pond was exempt from the CWA or a water of the US. The pond could be a habitat for migratory birds according to a memo prepared by Region 4 staff. The USEPA Water Office used the presence of migratory birds to claim a nexus to interstate commerce and therefore concluded that the pond should be regulated under the CWA. Electric power industry proponents have argued that an overly expansive definition of waters of the US may result in any new power plant being required to construct cooling towers. Cooling towers are said to be a more expensive and wasteful method to cool heated water. Region 4 ultimately recanted its earlier position after considerable discussions with various other Environmental Protection Agency offices and, no doubt industry pressure. Florida Power Corp. was not required to obtain an NPDES permit for the cooling pond. The lesson of Florida Power Corp. is that the regulatory environment for utilities can be uncertain under the Clean Water Act even in the face of a relatively straightforward exemption from regulation.

  7. Dealing with the Clean Water Act pending reauthorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, S.

    1994-09-01

    This report addresses probable changes in the Clean Water Act that may affect federal facilities such as those under the DOE. These changes will be included in a reauthorization of the act. The author draws upon the 1992 National Water Quality Inventory Report to Congress as a source to identify changes in the focus of the reauthorized act on non-point source issues, watershed management, new enforcement mechanisms and an assortment of smaller issues that will have indirect effects on federal facilities.

  8. UC 73-22 Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: UC 73-22 Utah Geothermal Resource...

  9. UC 73-22 - Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: UC 73-22 - Utah Geothermal Resource...

  10. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  11. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  12. Vermont Natural Resources Board: Act 250 Permit and License Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GuidanceGuideHandbook Abstract Overview of Act 250 permitting Vermont's land use law and development law (not energy related). Author Vermont Department of Environmental...

  13. USFWS Endangered Species Act and Section 7 Regulations and Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The purpose of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend.

  14. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Water Heating Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar ... More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar ...

  15. Recovery Act:Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill deep resource wells Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska El Paso County Geothermal Project: Innovative Research Technologies ...

  16. Clean Water Act Section 319 Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Clean Water Act Section 319 Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an overview of the nonpoint...

  17. Clean Water Act Section 303(d) Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Clean Water Act Section 303(d) Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an overview of Section...

  18. National Environmental Policy Act Process WATER Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Policy Act Process WATER Los Alamos National Laboratory WATER The campaigns LA-UR-15-27484 * The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process begins with a proposed federal action. If the agency is unsure if there will be a significant environmental effect, the determination is made to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA). * An EA is a concise public document for which a federal agency is responsible. It provides an evaluation/analysis that can be used to determine if an

  19. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar Water Heating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transcript | Department of Energy Solar Water Heating Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar Water Heating Transcript Video recording transcript of a Webinar on Nov. 16, 2010 about residential solar water heating applications solar_water_heating_webinar.pdf (152.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water Heaters Sustainable

  20. Nevada Division of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Division of Water Resources Name: Nevada Division of Water Resources Address: 901 S. Stewart St., Suite 2002 Place: Carson city, Nevada Zip: 89701 Phone Number: 775-684-2800...

  1. ORS 536 - Water Resources Administration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    36 - Water Resources Administration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ORS 536 - Water Resources AdministrationLegal...

  2. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ID-11263 January 2006 Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United ... The term "available" as used to refer to water energy resource sites or a category of ...

  3. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testimony28SEPA2928Legg29.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before The Subcommittee on Water and...

  4. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural...

  5. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House ... More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy ...

  6. Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ...

  7. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power By: Jon Worthington, Administrator, SWPA Subject: DOE Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request 3-15-11_Final_Testimony_(Worthington)_(SWPA).pdf (48.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on

  8. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee | Department of Energy Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator SEPA 4-16-13_Kenneth_Legg FT HNR (47.42 KB) More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee

  9. RCW 43.143 - Ocean Resources Management Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Management ActLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1997 Legal Citation RCW 43.143 (1997) DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  10. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  11. STATE OF MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES MISSOURI CLEAN WATER COMMISSION

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    STATE OF MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES MISSOURI CLEAN WATER COMMISSION MISSOURI STATE OPERATING PERMIT In compliance with the Missouri Clean Water Law, (Chapter 644 R.S. Mo. as amended, hereinafter, the Law), and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Public Law 92-500, 92 nd Congress) as amended, Permit No.: MO-0004863 Owner: United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Address: P.O. Box 410202, Kansas City, MO 64141-0202 Continuing Authority: United States Department of Energy

  12. Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M

    2009-07-08

    to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

  13. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Solar Hot Water. solar_thermal_presentation.pdf (1.45 MB) More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat

  14. Current Practices of the Department of Water Resources in Supervision...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Current Practices of the Department of Water Resources in Supervision of...

  15. California State Water Resources Control Board | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. California State Water Resources Control Board is an organization based in Sacramento, California. References "SWRCB...

  16. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: ...

  17. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power, Committee on Natural Resources, U.S. House of Representatives By: Stephen J. Wright, Administrator Bonneville Power ...

  18. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    K. Drummond, Administrator, Bonneville Power Administration Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee 4-16-13WilliamDrummond FT HNR More...

  19. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power, Committee on Natural Resources, U.S. House of Representatives By: Mr. Stephen J. Wright, Administrator BPA Subject: DOE Fiscal...

  20. California Department of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Twitter: @CADWR Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCalifornia-Department-of-Water-Resources Outage Hotline: (916) 845-8911 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data...

  1. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility...

  2. Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management Webpage Citation State of...

  3. Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability May Wu Ph.D. ... 15, 2012 Biofuel Is a Key Component in Water-Energy Nexus 1 2 Potential Cellulosic ...

  4. Technologies for water resources management: an integrated approach to manage global and regional water resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, W. C., LLNL

    1998-03-23

    Recent droughts in California have highlighted and refocused attention on the problem of providing reliable sources of water to sustain the State`s future economic development. Specific elements of concern include not only the stability and availability of future water supplies in the State, but also how current surface and groundwater storage and distribution systems may be more effectively managed and upgraded, how treated wastewater may be more widely recycled, and how legislative and regulatory processes may be used or modified to address conflicts between advocates of urban growth, industrial, agricultural, and environmental concerns. California is not alone with respect to these issues. They are clearly relevant throughout the West, and are becoming more so in other parts of the US. They have become increasingly important in developing and highly populated nations such as China, India, and Mexico. They are critically important in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, especially as they relate to regional stability and security issues. Indeed, in almost all cases, there are underlying themes of `reliability` and `sustainability` that pertain to the assurance of current and future water supplies, as well as a broader set of `stability` and `security` issues that relate to these assurances--or lack thereof--to the political and economic future of various countries and regions. In this latter sense, and with respect to regions such as China, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia, water resource issues may take on a very serious strategic nature, one that is most illustrative and central to the emerging notion of `environmental security.` In this report, we have identified a suite of technical tools that, when developed and integrated together, may prove effective in providing regional governments the ability to manage their water resources. Our goal is to formulate a framework for an Integrated Systems Analysis (ISA): As a strategic planning tool for managing

  5. Protection of the Groundwater Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection of the Groundwater Resource Protection of the Groundwater Resource Monitoring wells act as sentinels between suspected LANL contamination and the water supply. August 1,...

  6. Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water &

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Utilities and their Partners | Department of Energy Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners The water and energy sectors have traditionally been studied independently, regulated by separate oversight agencies, and delivered to customers by separate utilities. Yet it is undeniable that there are

  7. NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources are represented by a color range from blue to red depending on the intensity of the waves. NREL's Marine and Hydrokinetic Atlas displaying the wave power density for ...

  8. Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication, Environmental Protection Agency Number ID4890008952

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzemer, Michael J.; Hart, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication for the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Partial Permit, PER-116. This Permit Reapplication is required by the PER-116 Permit Conditions I.G. and I.H., and must be submitted to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with IDAPA 58.01.05.012 [40 CFR §§ 270.10 and 270.13 through 270.29].

  9. File:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf Size of this preview: 463 ...

  10. Alaska AS 46.15, Alaska Water Use Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    link for Alaska AS 46.15, Alaska Water Use Act Citation Alaska AS 46.15, Alaska Water Use Act (2007). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAlaskaAS46.15,Alaska...

  11. Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Denver Basin Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage Abstract This is the...

  12. State Water Resources Control Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: State Water Resource Control Board1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  13. 18 CFR Conservation of Power and Water Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conservation of Power and Water Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 18 CFR Conservation of Power and...

  14. Title 10 Chapter 37 Wetlands Protection and Water Resources Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    37 Wetlands Protection and Water Resources Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 10 Chapter 37...

  15. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Related Documents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Related Documents Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Related Documents WTE-Workshop-Report-Executive-Summary-DRAFT.pdf (51.84 KB) WERF.ENER1C12-Executive-Summary.pdf (877.19 KB) FCTO-BETO-2015-Workshop-Summary-Outline.pdf (332 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen, Hydrocarbons, and Bioproduct Precursors from Wastewaters Workshop Report Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Waste

  16. Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy

  17. Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GTO

    2015-06-01

    Water consumption in geothermal energy development occurs at several stages along the life cycle of the plant, during construction of the wells, piping, and plant; during hydroshearing and testing of the reservoir (for EGS); and during operation of the plant. These stages are highlighted in the illustration above. For more information about actual water use during these stages, please see the back of this sheet..

  18. Resource Recovery Opportunities at America’s Water Resource Recovery Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Resource Recovery Opportunities at America’s Water Resource Recovery Facilities Todd Williams, Deputy Leader for Wastewater Infrastructure Practice, CH2M HILL

  19. Oversight Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power, and Oceans | Department of Energy Oversight Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans Oversight Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans 03-22-16_WAPA_Gabriel_Final_Testimony (580.62 KB) 03-22-16_BPA_Andrews_Final_Testimony (113.14 KB) 03-22-16_SEPA_Legg_Final_Statement (30.92 KB) 03-22-16_SWPA_Carpenter_Final_Statement (43.84 KB) More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources

  20. Review of Water Resources and Desalination Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLER, JAMES E.

    2003-03-01

    Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods to desalinate brackish water and sea water can help reverse this destabilizing trend. Desalination has now been practiced on a large scale for more than 50 years. During this time continual improvements have been made, and the major technologies are now remarkably efficient, reliable, and inexpensive. For many years, thermal technologies were the only viable option, and multi-stage flash (MSF) was established as the baseline technology. Multi-effect evaporation (MEE) is now the state-of-the-art thermal technology, but has not been widely implemented. With the growth of membrane science, reverse osmosis (RO) overtook MSF as the leading desalination technology, and should be considered the baseline technology. Presently, RO of seawater can be accomplished with an energy expenditure in the range of 11-60 kJ/kg at a cost of $2 to $4 per 1000 gallons. The theoretical minimum energy expenditure is 3-7 kJ/kg. Since RO is a fairly mature technology, further improvements are likely to be incremental in nature, unless design improvements allow major savings in capital costs. Therefore, the best hope to dramatically decrease desalination costs is to develop ''out of the box'' technologies. These ''out of the box'' approaches must offer a significant advantage over RO (or MEE, if waste heat is available) if they are to be viable. When making these comparisons, it is crucial that the specifics of the calculation are understood so that the comparison is made on a fair and equivalent basis.

  1. New Report Outlines Potential of Future Water Resource Recovery Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new report from a workshop held jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) outlines a range of research and actions needed to transform today’s water treatment plants into water resource recovery facilities.

  2. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heaters | Department of Energy Water Heaters Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water Heaters 20110222_webinar_transcript.pdf (117.27 KB) More Documents & Publications Overcoming Persistent Barriers to Energy Efficiency in Multifamily Housing through Partnerships overcoming_persistent_barriers_energy_efficiency_multifamily_housing.doc Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics

  3. Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, J.P.

    1990-08-01

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

  4. H. R. 3052: This Act may be cited as the Coal Field Water Protection and Replacement Act, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the protection of water resources during coal mining operations. Sections of the bill describe probable hydrologic consequences; surface and ground water monitoring plan; performance bonds; protection of water resources for permit approval; effect of underground coal mining operations; inspection and monitoring; penalty for failure of representative of Secretary or state regulatory authority to carry out certain duties; release of performance bond; water rights and replacement; regulations; and state programs.

  5. Clean option: Berkeley Pit water treatment and resource recovery strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development, established the Resource Recovery Project (RRP) in 1992 as a five-year effort to evaluate and demonstrate multiple technologies for recovering water, metals, and other industrial resources from contaminated surface and groundwater. Natural water resources located throughout the DOE complex and the and western states have been rendered unusable because of contamination from heavy metals. The Berkeley Pit, a large, inactive, open pit copper mine located in Butte, Montana, along with its associated groundwater system, has been selected by the RRP for use as a feedstock for a test bed facility located there. The test bed facility provides the infrastructure needed to evaluate promising technologies at the pilot plant scale. Data obtained from testing these technologies was used to assess their applicability for similar mine drainage water applications throughout the western states and at DOE. The objective of the Clean Option project is to develop strategies that provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to resource recovery using the Berkeley Pit water as a feedstock. The strategies not only consider the immediate problem of resource recovery from the contaminated water, but also manage the subsequent treatment of all resulting process streams. The strategies also employ the philosophy of waste minimization to optimize reduction of the waste volume requiring disposal, and the recovery and reuse of processing materials.

  6. Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 312 of the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2010 amends Section 136 of the Energy Independence and Security Act to include ultra-efficient vehicles within the definition of advanced technology vehicles.

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure sumamry for the Uranium Treatment Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This closure summary has been prepared for the Uranium Treatment Unit (UTU) located at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The actions required to achieve closure of the UTU area are outlined in the Closure Plan, submitted to and approved by the Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation staff, respectively. The UTU was used to store and treat waste materials that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This closure summary details all steps that were performed to close the UTU in accordance with the approved plan.

  8. Resource Recovery OpportunitiesatAmericas Water Resource Recovery Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2013 by CH2M HILL, Inc. CH2MHILL® Resource Recovery Opportunities at America's Water Resource Recovery Facilities By Todd Williams, PE, BCEE Wastewater Global Service Team Deputy Leader Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Washington, DC July 30, 2014 CH2MHILL Today  Operations on all continents  Approximately 28,000 employees  100 percent owned by our employees  Broadly diversified across multiple business sectors  US$7 billion in revenue We are an industry leader in

  9. Safe Drinking Water Act: Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-15

    This report presents information on the Safe Drinking Water Act. Sections are presented on: Legislative history and statute; implementing regulations; and updates.

  10. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  11. Water Resource Assessment of Geothermal Resources and Water Use in Geopressured Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Troppe, W. A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical report from Argonne National Laboratory presents an assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation and an analysis of fresh water use in low-temperature geopressured geothermal power generation systems.

  12. Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Report Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Executive summary workshop report for the for the Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop hosted by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Department of Energy on April 28–29, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia.

  13. Modeling the Gila-San Francisco Basin using system dynamics in support of the 2004 Arizona Water Settlement Act.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Peplinski, William J.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2012-04-01

    Water resource management requires collaborative solutions that cross institutional and political boundaries. This work describes the development and use of a computer-based tool for assessing the impact of additional water allocation from the Gila River and the San Francisco River prescribed in the 2004 Arizona Water Settlements Act. Between 2005 and 2010, Sandia National Laboratories engaged concerned citizens, local water stakeholders, and key federal and state agencies to collaboratively create the Gila-San Francisco Decision Support Tool. Based on principles of system dynamics, the tool is founded on a hydrologic balance of surface water, groundwater, and their associated coupling between water resources and demands. The tool is fitted with a user interface to facilitate sensitivity studies of various water supply and demand scenarios. The model also projects the consumptive use of water in the region as well as the potential CUFA (Consumptive Use and Forbearance Agreement which stipulates when and where Arizona Water Settlements Act diversions can be made) diversion over a 26-year horizon. Scenarios are selected to enhance our understanding of the potential human impacts on the rivers ecological health in New Mexico; in particular, different case studies thematic to water conservation, water rights, and minimum flow are tested using the model. The impact on potential CUFA diversions, agricultural consumptive use, and surface water availability are assessed relative to the changes imposed in the scenarios. While it has been difficult to gage the acceptance level from the stakeholders, the technical information that the model provides are valuable for facilitating dialogues in the context of the new settlement.

  14. Systems Dynamic ToolBox for Water Resource Planning

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-01

    The Fully Integrated System Dynamics Tookbox for Water Resources Planning (Toolbox) is a library of generic modules intended to assist in water management planning and decision making in watersheds around the world. The modules - built in a commercially available modeling environment called Powersim Studio Expert, represent the different sub-systems ina watershed, including population, agriculture, economics, climate, reservoirs, stream flows, and fish populations, and provides generic building blocks with which complex models of complex modelsmore » of complex watersheds can be assembled. The resulting models provide a tool for observing how research management decision made in one sector of a basin can affect other sectors. Improved water resource management contributes to improved public health, economic development, ecological sustainability, and overall security and stability.« less

  15. HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONVERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

    2007-01-15

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Integrated system dynamics toolbox for water resources planning.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Marissa Devan; Passell, Howard David; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Peplinski, William J.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Coursey, Don; Hanson, Jason; Grimsrud, Kristine; Thacher, Jennifer; Broadbent, Craig; Brookshire, David; Chemak, Janie; Cockerill, Kristan; Aragon, Carlos , Socorro, NM); Hallett, Heather , Socorro, NM); Vivoni, Enrique , Socorro, NM); Roach, Jesse

    2006-12-01

    Public mediated resource planning is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Unfortunately, supporting tools are lacking that interactively engage the public in the decision-making process and integrate over the myriad values that influence water policy. In the pages of this report we document the first steps toward developing a specialized decision framework to meet this need; specifically, a modular and generic resource-planning ''toolbox''. The technical challenge lies in the integration of the disparate systems of hydrology, ecology, climate, demographics, economics, policy and law, each of which influence the supply and demand for water. Specifically, these systems, their associated processes, and most importantly the constitutive relations that link them must be identified, abstracted, and quantified. For this reason, the toolbox forms a collection of process modules and constitutive relations that the analyst can ''swap'' in and out to model the physical and social systems unique to their problem. This toolbox with all of its modules is developed within the common computational platform of system dynamics linked to a Geographical Information System (GIS). Development of this resource-planning toolbox represents an important foundational element of the proposed interagency center for Computer Aided Dispute Resolution (CADRe). The Center's mission is to manage water conflict through the application of computer-aided collaborative decision-making methods. The Center will promote the use of decision-support technologies within collaborative stakeholder processes to help stakeholders find common ground and create mutually beneficial water management solutions. The Center will also serve to develop new methods and technologies to help federal, state and local water managers find innovative and balanced solutions to the nation's most vexing water problems. The toolbox is an important step toward achieving the technology development goals of this center.

  17. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1991 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 131 gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and water levels at 431 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio.

  18. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  19. Enforcing the law: The case of the Clean Water Acts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, S.; Waterman, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    The contents of this report include the following: (1) The Water Quality Problem; (2) The Institutional Setting; (3) Pragamatic Enforcement; (4) Bureaucrats and Attitudes, Amelia Rouse and Robert Wright; (5) Bureaucratic Discretion and Hierarchical Political Control, Susan Hunter, Richard W. Waterman, and Robert Wright; (6) Enforcement at the State Level; (7) Explaining Variations in NPDES Enforcement; (8) Water Outcomes; and (9) Conclusions and Recommendations.

  20. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1995. Water data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1996-05-01

    Water resources data for the 1995 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 65 gaging stations; stage only for 40 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 23 gage stations) and 76 wells; and water levels for 217 observation wells. Also included are data for 113 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  1. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1994. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1995-03-01

    Water resources data for the 1994 water year for Louisiana consists of records for stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 45 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 51 surface-water stations (including 24 gage stations) and 84 wells; and water levels for 209 observations wells. Also included are data for 115 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  2. State Water Resources Control Board Order No. 2009-009-DWQ |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Resources Control Board Order No. 2009-009-DWQ Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: State Water Resources Control...

  3. An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

    2011-04-30

    This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

  4. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: Water Resources Bills, S. 499 and S. 519 By: Derrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration

  5. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Sites quality assurance project plan: Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) describes the measures that shall be taken to ensure that the environmental data collected during characterization and closure activities of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are meaningful, valid, defensible, and can be used to achieve project objectives. These activities are conducted by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Nevada Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The Nevada ER Project consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The RCRA Industrial Sites subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada ER Project. Currently, this QAPjP is limited to the seven RCRA Industrial Sites identified within this document that are to be closed under an interim status and pertains to all field-investigation, analytical-laboratory, and data-review activities in support of these closures. The information presented here supplements the RCRA Industrial Sites Project Management Plan and is to be used in conjunction with the site-specific subproject sampling and analysis plans.

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  8. Implementation of the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 201 0.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter 20 1 0-0 1 provides implementing instruction and guidance relating to the following General Provisions of the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 20 10

  9. Procedural guidance for reviewing exposure information under RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) section 3019. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grogan, T.; Kayser, R.

    1986-09-26

    This guidance manual describes the procedures for permit writers in evaluating exposure information submitted under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Section 3019. The integration of the review with existing RCRA permitting activities is also discussed. The document outlines procedures to follow in referring sites to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) for health evaluations.

  10. Permit applicants' guidance manual for exposure information requirements under RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) Section 3019. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-03

    The purpose of this document is to provide owners and operators of hazardous-waste landfills and surface impoundments that are subject to permitting under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) with guidance for submitting information on the potential for public exposure to hazardous wastes, as required by Section 3019 of RCRA.

  11. Using FRAMES to Manage Environmental and Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Millard, W. David; Gelston, Gariann M.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Pelton, Mitch A.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Lee, Cheegwan; Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Alex J.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Castleton, Karl J.

    2007-05-16

    The Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems FRAMES) is decision-support middleware that provides users the ability to design software solutions for complex problems. It is a software platform that provides seamless and transparent communication between modeling components by using a multi-thematic approach to provide a flexible and holistic understanding of how environmental factors potentially affect humans and the environment. It incorporates disparate components (e.g., models, databases, and other frameworks) that integrate across scientific disciplines, allowing for tailored solutions to specific activities. This paper discusses one example application of FRAMES, where several commercialoff-the-shelf (COTS) software products are seamlessly linked into a planning and decision-support tool that helps manage water-based emergency situations and sustainable response. Multiple COTS models, including three surface water models, and a number of databases are linked through FRAMES to assess the impact of three asymmetric and simultaneous events, two of which impact water resources. The asymmetric events include 1) an unconventional radioactive release into a large potable water body, 2) a conventional contaminant (oil) release into navigable waters, and 3) an instantaneous atmospheric radioactive release.

  12. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Presentations Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations McCormick_4-28-2015.pdf (4.37 MB) Luthy_NSF-EPA-DOE_Luthy_workshop_4-28_v2.pdf (1.76 MB) Giles_Washington_DC_April_2015_WW.pdf (1.66 MB) Kartik_Chandran_DOE_EPA_NSF_Workshop_Presentation_Slides.pdf (1.68 MB) Kohl_2014-04-28_Kohl_NSF_slides_for_Tom_Speth.pdf (1.01 MB) Fillmore_WERF_NSF_panel.4.29.2015.pdf (1.14 MB) Shuman_NSF_Conference_2015.pdf (584.7 KB)

  13. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliabilty before Subcommittees of the House Committee on Natural Resources, November 5, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliabilty, U.S. Department of Energy before the Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources and...

  14. Solid waste landfills under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This document provides guidance for meeting: (1) Guidelines for the Land Disposal of Solid Waste (40 CFR 241); (2) Criteria for Classification of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities and Practices (40 CFR 257); and (3) Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills (MSWLFs) (40 CFR Part 258). Revisions to 40 CFR 257 and a new Part 258 were published in the Federal Register (56 FR 50978, 10/9/91). The Guidelines for the Land Disposal of Solid Waste set requirements and recommended procedures to ensure that the design, construction, and operation of land disposal sites is done in a manner that will protect human health and the environment. These regulations are applicable to MSWLFs and non-MSWLFs (e.g., landfills used only for the disposal of demolition debris, commercial waste, and/or industrial waste). These guidelines are not applicable to the, land disposal of hazardous, agricultural, and/or mining wastes. These criteria are to be used under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in determining which solid waste disposal facilities pose a reasonable possibility of adversely affecting human health or the environment. Facilities failing to satisfy these criteria will be considered to be open dumps which are prohibited under Section 4005 of RCRA. The Criteria for MSWLFs are applicable only to MSWLFs, including those MSWLFs in which sewage sludge is co-disposed with household waste. Based on specific criteria, certain MSWLFs are exempt from some, or all, of the regulations of 40 CFR 258. MSWLFs that fail to satisfy the criteria specified in 40 CFR 258 are also considered open dumps for the purposes of Section 4005 of RCRA. Through the use of a series of interrelated flow diagrams, this guidance document directs the reader to each design, operation, maintenance, and closure activity that must be performed for MSWLFs and non-MSWLFs.

  15. Protection of the Groundwater Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection of the Groundwater Resource Protection of the Groundwater Resource Monitoring wells act as sentinels between suspected LANL contamination and the water supply. August 1, 2013 Where to place a sentinel well Where

  16. Proceedings of the Radionuclide Contamination in Water Resources Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, J H; Duisebayev, B; Janecky, D R; Knapp, R; Rosenburg, N D; Smith, D K; Tompson, A F B; Tyupkina, O; Veselov, V V

    2001-07-26

    A workshop entitled ''Radionuclide Contamination in Water Resources'' was held in Almaty, Kazakhstan from Tuesday 29 May through Friday 1 June. This workshop was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and three organizations from the Republic of Kazakhstan: the Institute of Nonproliferation, the Institute of Hydrogeology and Hydrophysics, and KazAtomProm. Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy, three national laboratories, and 13 different organizations from the Republic of Kazakhstan attended the workshop. A complete list of attendees, the workshop program, and information on the background and motivation for this workshop are provided in this report. The objective of the workshop was to identify critical problems, discover what is known about the problems related to radionuclide contamination of groundwater resources, form collaborative teams, and produce a small number proposals that both address further characterization and assess risk via contaminant fate and transport modeling. We plan to present these proposals to U.S. government agencies and international sponsors for funding.

  17. Water energy resources of the United States with emphasis on low head/low power resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas G.; Cherry, Shane J.; Reeves, Kelly S.; Lee, Randy D.; Carroll, Gregory R.; Sommers, Garold L.; Verdin, Kristine L.

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for each of the 20 hydrologic regions are presented in Appendix A, and similar presentations for each of the 50 states are made in Appendix B.

  18. Developing a cost effective environmental solution for produced water and creating a ''new'' water resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doran, Glenn; Leong, Lawrence Y.C.

    2000-05-01

    The project goal is to convert a currently usable by-product of oil production, produced water, into a valuable drinking water resource. The project was located at the Placate Oil Field in Santa Clarita, California, approximately 25 miles north of Los Angeles. The project included a literature review of treatment technologies; preliminary bench-scale studies to refine a planning level cost estimate; and a 10-100 gpm pilot study to develop the conceptual design and cost estimate for a 44,000 bpd treatment facility. A reverse osmosis system was constructed, pilot tested, and the data used to develop a conceptual design and operation of four operational scenarios, two industrial waters levels and two irrigation/potable water.

  19. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: H.R. 4349, "Hoover Power Allocation Act of 2009" By: Timothy Meeks, Administrator Western Area Power Administration

  20. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Kenneth Legg, Administrator, Southeastern Area Power Administration Subject: Subject: FY 2013 Spending and Missions of the Power Marketing Administrations 3-20-12_Legg_SEPA_FT_1.pdf (41.28 KB) More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources Committee

  1. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance for Geothermal Resource Evaluation Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Thomas R. Wood; Joel Renner

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to report on the evaluation of geothermal resource potential on and around three different United States (U. S.) Air Force Bases (AFBs): Nellis AFB and Air Force Range (AFR) in the State of Nevada (see maps 1 and 5), Holloman AFB in the State of New Mexico (see map 2), and Mountain Home AFB in the State of Idaho (see map 3). All three sites are located in semi-arid parts of the western U. S. The U. S. Air Force, through its Air Combat Command (ACC) located at Langley AFB in the State of Virginia, asked the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) for technical assistance to conduct technical and feasibility evaluations for the potential to identify viable geothermal resources on or around three different AFBs. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is supporting FEMP in providing technical assistance to a number of different Federal Agencies. For this report, the three different AFBs are considered one project because they all deal with potential geothermal resource evaluations. The three AFBs will be evaluated primarily for their opportunity to develop a geothermal resource of high enough quality grade (i.e., temperature, productivity, depth, etc.) to consider the possibility for generation of electricity through a power plant. Secondarily, if the resource for the three AFBs is found to be not sufficient enough for electricity generation, then they will be described in enough detail to allow the base energy managers to evaluate if the resource is suitable for direct heating or cooling. Site visits and meetings by INL personnel with the staff at each AFB were held in late FY-2009 and FY-2010. This report provides a technical evaluation of the opportunities and challenges for developing geothermal resources on and around the AFBs. An extensive amount of literature and geographic information was evaluated as a part of this assessment. Resource potential maps were developed for each of the AFBs.

  2. Getting into hot water: the law of geothermal resources in Colorado...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Getting into hot water: the law of geothermal resources in Colorado Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Periodical: Getting into hot water: the law...

  3. DOE Publications and Data Resources Related to Water-Energy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Publications and Data Resources Related to Water-Energy DOE Publications and Data Resources Related to Water-Energy Department of Energy Publications Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities 2014 This report describes connections between the Nation's energy and water systems. It presents opportunities to address systems efficiency and resilience through technology, data, modeling, and analysis. Federal Building Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance 2014 The Department of Energy has

  4. Water Resources Data Nevada Water Year 2002 Water-Data Report...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D. Joyner, and Roslyn Ryan Water-Data Report NV-02-1 Prepared in cooperation with the ... may be considered as partial records, but they are presented separately in this report. ...

  5. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization report - area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The Area 6 North and South Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEPs) are historic disposal units located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the site under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 265.

  6. Acid mine drainage: Common law, SMCRA, and the Clean Water Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrich, C.

    1995-12-31

    Acid mine drainage is a major problem related to coal mining which, if unabated, can severely damage the aquatic environment. Damage resulting from acid mine drainage was first addressed by common law and riparian principles. As societal laws changed, common law principles alone could not effectively control this problem. Preventing and controlling pollution including acid mine drainage are important goals of the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act (SMCRA) and the Clean Water Act (CWA). This article examines how common law, SMCRA, and the CWA address the acid mine drainage issue independently, and how improvements in the control of acid mine drainage can be achieved.

  7. Recovery Act:Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado Using Remoter Sensing and On-Site Exploration, Testing and Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act:Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado Using Remoter Sensing and On-Site Exploration, Testing and Analysis presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  8. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Director for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources U.S. Senate, April 22, 2009.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Director for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, April 22, 2009 regarding S....

  9. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the DPF under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265 (1996c). The DPF is prioritized in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) but is governed by the permit. The DPF was characterized through sampling events in 1994, 1996, and 1997. The results of these sampling events are contained in the Final Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Report, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision I (DOE/NV, 1997). This Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for the Area 6 DPF has been prepared for the DOE/NV`s Environmental Restoration Project. The CMS has been developed to support the preparation of a Closure Plan for the DPF. Because of the complexities of the contamination and regulatory issues associated with the DPF, DOE/NV determined a CMS would be beneficial to the evaluation and selection of a closure alternative.

  10. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404). Environmental guidance program reference book: Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  11. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy James McDonald Administrator, Southwestern Area Power Administration Subject: Subject: FY 2013 Spending and Missions of the Power Marketing Administrations 3-20-12_McDonald_SWPA_FT_0.pdf (50.68 KB) More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural

  12. Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Availability | Department of Energy Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource Use and Availability Dr. May Wu, ANL, 8/15/12 webinar presentation on the environmental impacts attributable to wastewater from biofuels production. wu_webinar.pdf (4.26 MB) More Documents & Publications Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Analysis and

  13. DOE Publications and Data Resources Related to Water-Energy ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This report describes connections between the Nation's energy and water systems. It presents opportunities to address systems efficiency and resilience through technology, data, ...

  14. New Report Outlines Potential of Future Water Resource Recovery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Such a shift offers the potential to reduce the financial burdens on municipalities, decrease stress on energy systems, cut air and water pollution, improve system resiliency to ...

  15. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy solar_thermal_transcript.pdf (148.79 KB) More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics

  16. Colorado Division of Water Resources Policy 2010-4 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy 2010-4 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Colorado Division of Water Resources Policy 2010-4Legal Published NA...

  17. Superseded- Floodplain Management Guidelines for Implementing EO 11988 (Water Resources Council, 1978)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Resources Council adopted these guidelines in 1978 following the signing of Executive Order 11988.  The guidelines provide an introduction to key terms and concepts in floodplain...

  18. 2 C.C.R. 402 - Division of Water Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 2 C.C.R. 402 - Division of Water ResourcesLegal Abstract Under this article of the Colorado...

  19. South Asia Water Resources Workshop: An effort to promote water quality data sharing in South Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAJEN,GAURAV; BIRINGER,KENT L.; BETSILL,J. DAVID

    2000-04-01

    To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group comprised of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the US convened at the Soaltee Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, September 12 to 14, 1999. The workshop was sponsored in part by the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The CMC promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in regions throughout the world as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. In the long term, the workshop organizers and participants are interested in the significance of regional information sharing as a means to build confidence and reduce conflict. The intermediate interests of the group focus on activities that might eventually foster regional management of some aspects of water resources utilization. The immediate purpose of the workshop was to begin the implementation phase of a project to collect and share water quality information at a number of river and coastal estuary locations throughout the region. The workshop participants achieved four objectives: (1) gaining a better understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of existing regional organizations promoting environmental cooperation in South Asia; (3) identifying sites within the region at which data is to be collected; and (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process.

  20. Water resources protection strategy: Revision 1, Attachment 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-10

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) must provide a demonstration of compliance with the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards for inactive mill sites pursuant to 40 CFR Part 192. This plan outlines the proposed strategy to demonstrate compliance with the ground water standards at the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This demonstration consists of (1) the ground water protection standard, (2) a performance assessment, (3) a closure performance demonstration, and (4) a performance monitoring and corrective action program.

  1. Managing Nicaraguan Water Resources Definition and Relative Importance of Information Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engi, D.; Guillen, S.M.; Vammen, K.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the results of the Vital the Nicaraguan Water Resources Management Initiative, Issues process as implemented for a collaborative effort between the Nicaraguan Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources and Sandia National Laboratories. This initiative is being developed to assist in the development of an efficient and sustainable water resources management system for Nicamgua. The Vital Issues process was used to provide information for developing a project that will develop and implement an advanced information system for managing Nicaragua's water resources. Three Vital Issues panel meetings were convened to 1) develop a mission statement and evaluation criteria for identifying and ranking the issues vital to water resources management in Nicaragua 2) define and rank the vital issues; and 3) identify a preliminary list of information needed to address the vital issues. The selection of panelists from the four basic institutional perspectives- government, industiy, academe, and citizens' groups (through nongovernmental organizations (NGOs))-ensured a high level of stakeholder representation on the panels. The already existing need for a water resource management information system has been magnified in the aftemnath of Hurricane Mitch. This information system would be beneficial for an early warning system in emergencies, and the modeling and simulation capabilities of the system would allow for advanced planning. Additionally, the outreach program will provide education to help Nicaraguan improve their water hygiene practices.

  2. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailing site Maybell, Colorado. Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental regulations to correct and prevent ground water contamination resulting from former uranium processing activities at inactive uranium processing sites (40 CFR Part 192 (1993)) (52 FR 36000 (1978)). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has decided that each assessment will include information on hydrogeologic site characterization. The water resources protection strategy that describes the proposed action compliance with the EPA ground water protection standards is presented in Attachment 4, Water Resources Protection Strategy. Site characterization activities discussed in this section include the following: (1) Definition of the hydrogeologic characteristics of the environment, including hydrostratigraphy, aquifer parameters, areas of aquifer recharge and discharge, potentiometric surfaces, and ground water velocities. (2) Definition of background ground water quality and comparison with proposed EPA ground water protection standards. (3) Evaluation of the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant source and/or residual radioactive materials. (4) Definition of existing ground water contamination by comparison with the EPA ground water protection standards. (5) Description of the geochemical processes that affect the migration of the source contaminants at the processing site. (6) Description of water resource use, including availability, current and future use and value, and alternate water supplies.

  3. Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case studies and additional resources on implementing renewable energy in Federal new construction and major renovations are available.

  4. GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

    2012-09-30

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and

  5. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10). Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  6. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Resources Policies, Manuals & References Map Transportation Publications ⇒ Navigate Section Resources Policies, Manuals & References Map Transportation Publications Getting Help or Information askUS - Operations Unified Services Portal IT Help Desk (or call x4357) Facilities Work Request Center Telephone Services Travel Site Info Laboratory Map Construction Updates Laboratory Shuttle Buses Cafeteria Menu News and Events Today at Berkeley Lab News Center Press Releases Feature

  7. VIRTUAL HYDROPOWER PROSPECTING: A FOUNDATION FOR WATER ENERGY RESOURCE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Lee; Sera White; Julie Brizzee; Shane Cherry; Douglas Hall

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the gross power potential of the natural stream water energy resources of the United States was performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models (DEMs) and geographic information system (GIS) tools. Water energy resource sites (stream segments) assessed in the basic resource assessment were further evaluated to identify which can be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of each site was refined to determine its developable hydropower potential using a set of development criteria corresponding to a damless low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) project. The methodologies for performing the basic resource assessment and subsequent feasibility assessment are described and the summary results for the nation are presented.

  8. Economic and environmental impacts of proposed changes to Clean Water Act thermal discharge requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper examines the economic and environmental impact to the power industry of limiting thermal mixing zones to 1000 feet and eliminating the Clean Water Act {section}316(a) variance. Power companies were asked what they would do if these two conditions were imposed. Most affected plants would retrofit cooling towers and some would retrofit diffusers. Assuming that all affected plants would proportionally follow the same options as the surveyed plants, the estimated capital cost of retrofitting cooling towers or diffusers at all affected plants exceeds $20 billion. Since both cooling towers and diffusers exert an energy penalty on a plant`s output, the power companies must generate additional power. The estimated cost of the additional power exceeds $10 billion over 20 years. Generation of the extra power would emit over 8 million tons per year of additional carbon dioxide. Operation of the new cooling towers would cause more than 1.5 million gallons per minute of additional evaporation.

  9. Consequences of proposed changes to Clean Water Act thermal discharge requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.; Moses, D.O.

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes three studies that examined the economic and environmental impact on the power industry of (1) limiting thermal mixing zones to 1,000 feet, and (2) eliminating the Clean Water Act (CWA) {section}316(1) variance. Both of these proposed changes were included in S. 1081, a 1991 Senate bill to reauthorize the CWA. The bill would not have provided for grandfathering plants already using the variance or mixing zones larger than 1000 feet. Each of the two changes to the existing thermal discharge requirements were independently evaluated. Power companies were asked what they would do if these two changes were imposed. Most plants affected by the proposed changes would retrofit cooling towers and some would retrofit diffusers. Assuming that all affected plants would proportionally follow the same options as the surveyed plants, the estimated capital cost of retrofitting cooling towers or diffusers at all affected plants ranges from $21.4 to 24.4 billion. Both cooling towers and diffusers exert a 1%-5.8% energy penalty on a plant`s output. Consequently, the power companies must generate additional power if they install those technologies. The estimated cost of the additional power ranges from $10 to 18.4 billion over 20 years. Generation of the extra power would emit over 8 million tons per year of additional carbon dioxide. Operation of the new cooling towers would cause more than 1.5 million gallons per minute of additional evaporation. Neither the restricted mixing zone size nor the elimination of the {section}316(1) variance was adopted into law. More recent proposed changes to the Clean Water Act have not included either of these provisions, but in the future, other Congresses might attempt to reintroduce these types of changes.

  10. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy Before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, March 3, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE, before the Senate Committe on Energy and Natural Resources on the department's...

  11. Multi-resolution integrated modeling for basin-scale water resources management and policy analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Hoshin V. (Hoshin Vijai),; Brookshire, David S.; Springer, E. P.; Wagener, Thorsten

    2004-01-01

    Approximately one-third of the land surface of the Earth is considered to be arid or semi-arid with an annual average of less than 12-14 inches of rainfall. The availability of water in such regions is of course, particularly sensitive to climate variability while the demand for water is experiencing explosive population growth. The competition for available water is exerting considerable pressure on the water resources management. Policy and decision makers in the southwestern U.S. increasingly have to cope with over-stressed rivers and aquifers as population and water demands grow. Other factors such as endangered species and Native American water rights further complicate the management problems. Further, as groundwater tables are drawn down due to pumping in excess of natural recharge, considerable (potentially irreversible) environmental impacts begin to be felt as, for example, rivers run dry for significant portions of the year, riparian habitats disappear (with consequent effects on the bio-diversity of the region), aquifers compact resulting in large scale subsidence, and water quality begins to suffer. The current drought (1999-2002) in the southwestern U.S. is raising new concerns about how to sustain the combination of agricultural, urban and in-stream uses of water that underlie the socio-economic and ecological structure in the region. The water stressed nature of arid and semi-arid environments means that competing water uses of various kinds vie for access to a highly limited resource. If basin-scale water sustainability is to be achieved, managers must somehow achieve a balance between supply and demand throughout the basin, not just for the surface water or stream. The need to move water around a basin such as the Rio Grande or Colorado River to achieve this balance has created the stimulus for water transfers and water markets, and for accurate hydrologic information to sustain such institutions [Matthews et al. 2002; Brookshire et al 2003

  12. Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act and Energy Department programs were designed to stimulate the economy while creating new power sources, conserving resources and aligning the nation to once again lead the global energy economy.

  13. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Main Report and Appendix A evaluate water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low...

  14. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  15. Water resources development in Santa Clara Valley, California: insights into the human-hydrologic relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jesse L.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    2000-06-01

    Groundwater irrigation is critical to food production and, in turn, to humankind's relationship with its environment. The development of groundwater in Santa Clara Valley, California during the early twentieth century is instructive because (1) responses to unsustainable resource use were largely successful; (2) the proposals for the physical management of the water, although not entirely novel, incorporated new approaches which reveal an evolving relationship between humans and the hydrologic cycle; and (3) the valley serves as a natural laboratory where natural (groundwater basin, surface watershed) and human (county, water district) boundaries generally coincide. Here, I investigate how water resources development and management in Santa Clara Valley was influenced by, and reflective of, a broad understanding of water as a natural resource, including scientific and technological innovations, new management approaches, and changing perceptions of the hydrologic cycle. Market demands and technological advances engendered reliance on groundwater. This, coupled with a series of dry years and laissez faire government policies, led to overdraft. Faith in centralized management and objective engineering offered a solution to concerns over resource depletion, and a group dominated by orchardists soon organized, fought for a water conservation district, and funded an investigation to halt the decline of well levels. Engineer Fred Tibbetts authored an elaborate water salvage and recharge plan that optimized the local water resources by integrating multiple components of the hydrologic cycle. Informed by government investigations, groundwater development in Southern California, and local water law cases, it recognized the limited surface storage possibilities, the spatial and temporal variability, the relatively closed local hydrology, the interconnection of surface and subsurface waters, and the value of the groundwater basin for its storage, transportation, and treatment

  16. A Coupled Modeling System to Simulate Water Resources in the Rio Grande Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossert, J.E.; Breshears, D.D.; Campbell, K.; Costigan, K.R.; Greene, R.K.; Keating, E.H.; Kleifgen, L.M.; Langley, D.L.; Martens, S.N.; Sanderson, J.G.; Springer, E.P.; Stalker, J.R.; Tartakovsky, D.M.; Winter, C.L.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1999-01-11

    Limited availability of fresh water in arid and semi-arid regions of the world requires prudent management strategies from accurate, science-based assessments. These assessments demand a thorough understanding of the hydrologic cycle over long time periods within the individual water-sheds that comprise large river basins. Measurement and simulation of the hydrologic cycle is a tremendous challenge, involving a coupling between global to regional-scale atmospheric precipitation processes with regional to local-scale land surface and subsurface water transport. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a detailed modeling system of the hydrologic cycle and applying this tool at high resolution to assess the water balance within the upper Rio Grande river basin. The Rio Grande is a prime example of a river system in a semiarid environment, with a high demand from agricultural, industrial, recreational, and municipal interests for its water supply. Within this river basin, groundwater supplies often augment surface water. With increasing growth projected throughout the river basin, however, these multiple water users have the potential to significantly deplete groundwater resources, thereby increasing the dependence on surface water resources.

  17. Water resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Corps of Engineers built and operates six dams and lakes on the upper Missouri River in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska for the purposes of flood control, hydropower, irrigation, and navigation. The Corps did not evaluate streambank erosion problems when the dams were planned because it was not required to study, before construction, such problems that the project might create. Corps studies show that bank erosion between Garrison Dam and Lake Oahe is less now than before the dam was built but since construction of the dam there now is a continuous net loss of lands. Among other streambank erosion problems, this report notes that the river banks will continue to erode, but at lesser rate than in the past, between Garrison Dam and Lake Oahe. The Corps has authority to provide erosion protection structures but these have to be economically justified and environmentally acceptable.

  18. Ion exchange resins: Water purification. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of ion exchange resins for purification or treatment of water or wastewater. The citations cover both treatment and pretreatment of municipal and industrial wastewater, often for the purpose of reusing the treated water in an industrial process. Desalination and remediation of groundwater and other water supplies is also examined. Some instances of recovery of rare elements, such as radioactive species, from process water are included. (Contains a minimum of 98 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Ion exchange resins: Water purification. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of ion exchange resins for purification or treatment of water or wastewater. The citations cover both treatment and pretreatment of municipal and industrial wastewater, often for the purpose of reusing the treated water in an industrial process. Desalination and remediation of groundwater and other water supplies is also examined. Some instances of recovery of rare elements, such as radioactive species, from process water are included. (Contains a minimum of 100 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources: Appendix C - Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Surveys Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated.

  1. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1996. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1997-05-01

    The report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 41 gaging stations and 5 lakes; water quality for 38 surface-water stations (including 22 gage stations) and 100 wells; and water levels for 235 observation wells. Also included are data for 117 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations.

  2. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the

  3. Effects of climate change on Pacific Northwest water-related resources: Summary of preliminary findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Sands, R.D.; Vail, L.W.; Chatters, J.C.; Neitzel, D.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Case Study is a multi-agency analysis of atmospheric/climatic change impacts on the Pacific Northwest (which includes Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and portions of the Columbia River Basin in Western Montana). The purpose of the case study, which began in fiscal year 1991, was to develop and test analytical tools, as well as to develop an assessment of the effects of climate change on climate-sensitive natural resources of the Pacific Northwest and economic sectors dependent on them. The overall study, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency, was a broad-based, reconnaissance-level study to identify potential climate impacts on agriculture, coastal resources, forest resources, and irrigation in the Pacific Northwest. DOE participated in the reconnaissance study, with responsibility for hydroelectric and water supply issues. While this report briefly discusses a broader array of water issues, attention is mainly focused on three aspects of the water study: (1) the effects of the region`s higher temperatures on the demand for electric power (which in turn puts additional demand on hydroelectric resources of the region); (2) the effects of higher temperatures and changes, both in precipitation amounts and seasonality, on river flows and hydroelectric supply; and (3) the effect of higher temperatures and changed precipitation amounts and seasonality on salmonid resources -- particularly the rearing conditions in tributaries of the Columbia River Basin. Because the meaning of regional climate forecasts is still quite uncertain, most of the preliminary findings are based on sensitivity analyses and historical analog climate scenarios.

  4. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of

  5. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat

  6. Cure for the nation`s water pollution problem: Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCune, J.F.

    1998-08-31

    This paper discusses federal and state implementation of the water quality-based strategy. It focuses on the development and implementation of water quality standards-based limitations (namely, total maximum daily loads or TMDLs) under section 303(d). It addresses the impact of such limitations on entities and activities that generate water pollution.

  7. Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  8. Promoting plumbing fixture and fitting replacement: Recommendations and review for state and local water resource authorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunham, C.; Lutz, J.D.; Pickle, S.J.

    1995-06-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has prepared this report to facilitate compliance with the requirements of Section 123 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT). Section 123 requires the Department of Energy to issue recommendations for establishing state and local incentive programs to encourage acceleration of voluntary consumer replacement of existing water closets, urinals, showerheads and faucets with water-saving products meeting EPACT standards. The authors recommend that state and local authorities working together and also with utilities: (A) investigate the cost-effectiveness of voluntary replacement of plumbing fixtures and fittings as an effective component of a water efficiency incentive program; (B) allow utilities to distribute the costs of water saving products by billing at pre-installation rates until devices have been paid for; (C) encourage decreased water usage by establishing rate structures such as increasing block rates or seasonal pricing; (D) add additional incentive to rebate programs by making the rebates untaxable income. (E) require municipalities or utilities to exhaust every reasonable method of water conservation before applying for permits to construct water supply or water treatment systems; (F) require high-efficiency toilets, urinals, showerheads, and faucets in new construction and changing plumbing codes to incorporate different pipe sizing needs; and (G) and mandate installation of meters to correctly measure water consumption. Following the introduction, a general overview of these recommendations is presented. Each recommendation is discussed briefly. After determining the cost-effectiveness of a plumbing replacement program (or plumbing replacement aspect of a larger program) states can encourage replacement of toilets, urinals, showerheads, and faucets in a number of ways. This report lists both legislative and economic measures that can be implemented on the state level that impact local programs.

  9. Recovery Act: Water Heater ZigBee Open Standard Wireless Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, William P.; Buescher, Tom

    2014-04-30

    The objective of Emerson's Water Heater ZigBee Open Standard Wireless Controller is to support the DOE's AARA priority for Clean, Secure Energy by designing a water heater control that levels out residential and small business peak electricity demand through thermal energy storage in the water heater tank.

  10. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; Johnson, D.; Monier, Erwan; Strzepek, J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richness in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.

  11. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; et al

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richnessmore » in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.« less

  12. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01

    The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

  13. Water Energy Resource Data from Idaho National Laboratory's Virtual Hydropower Prospector

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hydropower Program is to conduct research and development (R&D) that will improve the technical, societal, and environmental benefits of hydropower and provide cost-competitive technologies that enable the development of new and incremental hydropower capacity, adding diversity to the nation's energy supply. The Virtual Hydropower Prospector is a GIS application to locate and evaluate natural stream water energy resources. In the interactive data map the U.S. is divided into 20 hydrologic regions. The Prospector tool applies an analytical process to determine the gross power potential of these regions and helps users to site potential hydropower projects.

  14. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackman, Thomas; Minor, Timothy; Pohll, Gregory

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  15. Applying Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act to Federal Projects Which Involve the Discharge of Dredged or Fill Materials into Waters of the U.S., Including Wetlands (CEQ, 1980)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Council on Environmental Quality memorandum establishes procedures for coordinating agency views and formulating Administration policy prior to requesting Congressional action on projects that may be subject to Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act (Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended).

  16. Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc.

  18. Data collection for cooperative water resources modeling in the Lower Rio Grande Basin, Fort Quitman to the Gulf of Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passell, Howard David; Pallachula, Kiran; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Villalobos, Joshua; Piccinni, Giovanni; Brainard, James Robert; Gerik, Thomas; Morrison, Wendy; Serrat-Capdevila, Aleix; Valdes, Juan; Sheng, Zhuping; Lovato, Rene; Guitron, Alberto; Ennis, Martha Lee; Aparicio, Javier; Newman, Gretchen Carr; Michelsen, Ari M.

    2004-10-01

    Water resource scarcity around the world is driving the need for the development of simulation models that can assist in water resources management. Transboundary water resources are receiving special attention because of the potential for conflict over scarce shared water resources. The Rio Grande/Rio Bravo along the U.S./Mexican border is an example of a scarce, transboundary water resource over which conflict has already begun. The data collection and modeling effort described in this report aims at developing methods for international collaboration, data collection, data integration and modeling for simulating geographically large and diverse international watersheds, with a special focus on the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo. This report describes the basin, and the data collected. This data collection effort was spatially aggregated across five reaches consisting of Fort Quitman to Presidio, the Rio Conchos, Presidio to Amistad Dam, Amistad Dam to Falcon Dam, and Falcon Dam to the Gulf of Mexico. This report represents a nine-month effort made in FY04, during which time the model was not completed.

  19. Understanding barotrauma in fish passing hydro structures: a global strategy for sustainable development of water resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Boys, Craig A.; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Silva, Luiz G.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mallen-Cooper, Martin; Phonekhampeng, Oudom; Thorncraft, Garry; Singhanouvong, Douangkham

    2014-03-24

    Freshwater fishes are one of the most imperiled groups of vertebrates and species declines have been linked to a number of anthropogenic influences. This is alarming as the diversity and stability of populations are at risk. In addition, freshwater fish serve as important protein sources, particularly in developing countries. One of the focal activities thought to influence freshwater fish population declines is water resource development, which is anticipated to increase over the next several decades. For fish encountering hydro structures, such as passing through hydroturbines, there may be a rapid decrease in pressure which can lead to injuries commonly referred to as barotraumas. The authors summarize the research to date that has examined the effects of rapid pressure changes on fish and outline the most important factors to consider (i.e., swim bladder morphology, depth of acclimation, migration pattern and life stage) when examining the susceptibility of barotraumas for fish of interest.

  20. Case History of a Clean Water Act Compliance Agreement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    A major Clean Water Act (CWA) Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement was signed on March 25, 1991 by the US Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Field Office (DOE, RFFO) and the Water Enforcement Division of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VIII. The agreement revised the Rocky Flats Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and arose from pemittee-requested changes in effluent monitoring points and permit violations, most notably the February 22, 1989 Chromic Acid Incident. The Rocky Flats Plant, now called the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) near Golden Colorado was operated at that time by Rockwell International Corporation, who later plead guilty to six misdemeanor and felony counts of the CWA (the aforementioned NPDES permit violations) and paid a $4 million fine on March 26, 1992. The Compliance Agreement, hereafter referred to as the NPDES FFCA, called for three separate remedial action plans and contained a schedule for their submittal to the EPA. The compliance plans focussed on: (1) Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) performance upgrades, (2) source control and surface water protection, and (3) characterization of the impacts from past sludge disposal practices. Projects that implemented the compliance plans were initiated soon after submittal to the EPA and are forecast to complete in 1997 at a total cost of over $35 million. This paper presents a case history of NPDES FFCA compliance projects and highlights the successes, failures, and lessons learned.

  1. Northern Cheyenne Reservation Coal Bed Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis of Produced Water Disposal Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaochang Wo; David A. Lopez; Jason Whiteman Sr.; Bruce A. Reynolds

    2004-07-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is currently one of the most active gas plays in the United States. Monthly production in 2002 reached about 26 BCF in the Wyoming portion of the basin. Coalbed methane reserves for the Wyoming portion of the basin are approximately 25 trillion cubic feet (TCF). Although coal beds in the Powder River Basin extend well into Montana, including the area of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, the only CBM development in Montana is the CX Field, operated by the Fidelity Exploration, near the Wyoming border. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located on the northwest flank of the PRB in Montana with a total land of 445,000 acres. The Reservation consists of five districts, Lame Deer, Busby, Ashland, Birney, and Muddy Cluster and has a population of 4,470 according to the 2000 Census. The CBM resource represents a significant potential asset to the Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Methane gas in coal beds is trapped by hydrodynamic pressure. Because the production of CBM involves the dewatering of coalbed to allow the release of methane gas from the coal matrix, the relatively large volume of the co-produced water and its potential environmental impacts are the primary concerns for the Tribe. Presented in this report is a study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) in partnership with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe to assess the Tribe’s CBM resources and evaluate applicable water handling options. The project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Native American Initiative of the National Petroleum Technology Office, under contract DEAC07- 99ID13727. Matching funds were granted by the MBMG in supporting the work of geologic study and mapping conducted at MBMG.

  2. The role of integrated resource planning, environmental externalities, and anticipation of future regulation in compliance planning under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernow, S.; Biewald, B.; Wulfsberg, K.

    1993-07-01

    Utilities are developing sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emission compliance plans to meet limitations of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). Compliance plans will have long-term effects on resource selection, fuel choice, and system dispatch. Use of integrated resource planning (IRP) is necessary to ensure compliance plans are consistent with the overall societal goals. In particular, environmental externalities must be integrated with the compliance planning process. The focus of the CAAA is on air pollution reduction, specifically acid gases and toxics, and attainment of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for criteria pollutants. Title IV specifically focuses on sulfur dioxide with a national allowance trading system, while further regulation of toxics and nitrogen oxides is slated for additional study. Yet, compliance planning based narrowly upon today`s environmental regulations could fail to meet the broad goals of IRP if a larger array of environmental externalities is excluded from the analysis. Compliance planning must consider a broad range of environmental effects from energy production and use to (1) protect society`s long-term stake in environmental quality, and (2) ensure that today`s plans are rich enough to accommodate potential changes in regulation and national environmental goals. The explicit recognition of environmental effects, such as those associated with CO{sub 2} release, will result in prudent compliance plans that take advantage of current opportunities for pollution avoidance and have long-term viability in the face of regulatory change. By including such considerations, the mix of resources acquired and operated (supply and demand, existing and new, conventional and renewable, fuel type and fuel quality, pollution control, and dispatch protocols) will be robust and truly least-cost.

  3. Water treatment facilities (excluding wastewater facilities). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, costs, and operation of water treatment facilities. Facilities covered include those that provide drinking water, domestic water, and water for industrial use. Types of water treatment covered include reverse osmosis, chlorination, filtration, and ozonization. Waste water treatment facilities are excluded from this bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. A Holistic Look at Minimizing Adverse Environmental Impact Under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Veil, John A.; Puder, Markus G.; Littleton, Debra J.; Johnson, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that “the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact.” As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops new regulations to implement Section 316(b), much of the debate has centered on adverse impingement and entrainment impacts of cooling-water intake structures. Depending on the specific location and intake layout, once-through cooling systems withdrawing many millions of gallons of water per day can, to a varying degree, harm fish and other aquatic organisms in the water bodies from which the coolingmore » water is withdrawn. Therefore, opponents of once-through cooling systems have encouraged the EPA to require wet or dry cooling tower systems as the best technology available (BTA), without considering site-specific conditions. However, within the context of the broader scope of the CWA mandate, this focus seems too narrow. Therefore, this article examines the phrase “minimizing adverse environmental impact” in a holistic light. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the terms “environmental” and “minimizing.” Congress chose “environmental” in lieu of other more narrowly focused terms like “impingement and entrainment,” “water quality,” or “aquatic life.” In this light, BTA for cooling-water intake structures must minimize the entire suite of environmental impacts, as opposed to just those associated with impingement and entrainment. Wet and dry cooling tower systems work well to minimize entrainment and impingement, but they introduce other equally important impacts because they impose an energy penalty on the power output of the generating unit. The energy penalty results from a reduction in plant operating efficiency and an increase in internal power consumption. As a consequence of the energy penalty, power companies must generate additional

  5. Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

    2012-02-15

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on “CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources” in Berkeley, June 1–2, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPA’s mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}–brine might occur.

  6. Integration of Water Resource Models with Fayetteville Shale Decision Support and Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cothren, Jackson; Thoma, Greg; DiLuzio, Mauro; Limp, Fred

    2013-06-30

    ) methodology to assess the shifting and alteration of the flow regime within the river and streams of the study area. 2) Evaluate the effect of measurable land use changes related to gas development (well-pad placement, access road completion, etc.) on surface water flow in the region (Task/Section 3.7). Results showed that since the upsurge in shale-gas related activities in the Fayetteville Shale Play (between 2006 and 2010), shale-gas related infrastructure in the region have increase by 78%. This change in land-cover in comparison with other land-cover classes such as forest, urban, pasture, agricultural and water indicates the highest rate of change in any land-cover category for the study period. A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) flow model of the Little Red River watershed simulated from 2000 to 2009 showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. A forecast scenario based on the assumption that 2010 land-cover does not see any significant change over the forecast period (2010 to 2020) also showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. Further analyses showed that this change in the stream-flow regime for the forecast period is attributable to the increase in land-cover as introduced by the shale-gas infrastructure. 3) Upgrade the Fayetteville Shale Information System to include information on watershed status. (Tasks/Sections 2.1 and 2.2). This development occurred early in the project period, and technological improvements in web-map API’s have made it possible to further improve the map. The current sites (http://lingo.cast.uark.edu) is available but is currently being upgraded to a more modern interface and robust mapping engine using funds outside this project. 4) Incorporate the methodologies developed in Tasks/Sections 3.5 and 3.7 into a Spatial Decision Support System for use by regulatory agencies and producers in the play. The resulting system is available at http://fayshale.cast.uark.edu and is under review the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission.

  7. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Corrie E.; Harto, Christopher B.; Schroeder, Jenna N.; Martino, Louis E.; Horner, Robert M.

    2013-11-05

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2

  8. GIS-based Geospatial Infrastructure of Water Resource Assessment for Supporting Oil Shale Development in Piceance Basin of Northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew D; Mattson, Earl D; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle E.

    2015-04-01

    Oil shale deposits of the Green River Formation (GRF) in Northwestern Colorado, Southwestern Wyoming, and Northeastern Utah may become one of the first oil shale deposits to be developed in the U.S. because of their richness, accessibility, and extensive prior characterization. Oil shale is an organic-rich fine-grained sedimentary rock that contains significant amounts of kerogen from which liquid hydrocarbons can be produced. Water is needed to retort or extract oil shale at an approximate rate of three volumes of water for every volume of oil produced. Concerns have been raised over the demand and availability of water to produce oil shale, particularly in semiarid regions where water consumption must be limited and optimized to meet demands from other sectors. The economic benefit of oil shale development in this region may have tradeoffs within the local and regional environment. Due to these potential environmental impacts of oil shale development, water usage issues need to be further studied. A basin-wide baseline for oil shale and water resource data is the foundation of the study. This paper focuses on the design and construction of a centralized geospatial infrastructure for managing a large amount of oil shale and water resource related baseline data, and for setting up the frameworks for analytical and numerical models including but not limited to three-dimensional (3D) geologic, energy resource development systems, and surface water models. Such a centralized geospatial infrastructure made it possible to directly generate model inputs from the same database and to indirectly couple the different models through inputs/outputs. Thus ensures consistency of analyses conducted by researchers from different institutions, and help decision makers to balance water budget based on the spatial distribution of the oil shale and water resources, and the spatial variations of geologic, topographic, and hydrogeological Characterization of the basin. This endeavor

  9. Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketelle R.H.

    2008-09-25

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan

  10. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W.; Chawla, M.K.; Swor, C.T.

    2014-01-15

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  11. Reconnaissance of ground-water quality in the Papio-Missouri river natural resources district, Eastern Nebraska, July through September 1992. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verstraeten, I.M.; Ellis, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe the water quality of the principal aquifers in the study area. Wells representative of the geology and land use in the study area were selected for water-quality sampling. Variations in constituent concentration among aquifers are discussed. The report describes the spatial distributions of dissolved nitrite plus-nitrate as nitrogen and triazine and other acetanilide herbicides and evaluates the effects of cropland application of nitrogen and herbicides on the ground-water quality within the study area. The report also summarizes the concentrations of dissolved major and trace constituents including radionuclide activity and concentration.

  12. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  13. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2013-08-31

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  14. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  15. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 281 Solar Hot Water Application Assessment for U.S. Army IMCOM-Southeast Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Chvala, William D.

    2010-09-30

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires installations (EISA) to install solar systems of sufficient capacity to provide 30% of service hot water in new construction and renovations where cost-effective. However, installations are struggling with how to implement solar hot water, and while several installations are installing solar hot water on a limited basis, paybacks remain long. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to address this issue to help determine how best to implement solar hot water projects. This documents discusses the results of that project.

  16. FOIA, The Privacy Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOIA, the Privacy Act Your Rights under the FOIA, the Privacy Act, and other Privacy Laws The Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act Division/Office is responsible for administering policies, programs, and procedures to ensure DOE compliance with the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and the Privacy Act (PA), 5 U.S.C. 552 and 5 U.S.C. 552a, respectively. The resources on these pages are provided to aid in finding answers to your questions about programs of the Department of Energy and to

  17. Recovery Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recovery Act - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  18. Evaluation of the US Geological Survey ground-water data-collection program in Hawaii, 1992. Water-resources investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, S.S.

    1997-12-31

    This report describes an evaluation of the 1992 USGS ground-water data-collection program in Hawaii. The occurrence of ground water in the Hawaiian islands is briefly described. Objectives for the data-collection program are identified followed by a description of well networks needed to prepare maps of water levels and chloride concentrations. For the islands of Oahu, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, and Hawaii, the wells in the 1992 ground-water data-collection program are described followed by maps showing the distribution and magnitude of pumpage, and the distribution of proposed pumped wells. Wells in the 1992 USGS ground-water data-collection program that provide useful data for mapping water levels and chloride concentrations are identified followed by locations where additional wells are needed for water-level and chloride-concentration data. In addition, a procedure to store and review data is described.

  19. Using a watershed-based approach to manage and protect water resources in the Bear Canyon Watershed, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, F.J.

    1995-12-31

    Depending upon how people use land in a watershed, whether it be farming, livestock grazing, timber harvesting, mining, urbanization, or even recreation, all have significant impacts on the water moving through that watershed. This paper will focus on the urban watershed and how stormwater runoff from urbanization affects erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. It also will explore the potential of a watershed as the basis for managing and protecting water resources. Watershed-based management offers a clear look at how land-use changes affect not only water quality but also erosion and sedimentation; in addition, this approach develops preventive strategies to restore those affected water and land resources. The preventive strategies the author uses for this watershed can be applied to other New Mexico urban watersheds. This paper is divided into three parts. The first part shows how past and present land-use activities affect erosion, sedimentation, and water quality in the Bear Canyon arroyo system. The second part provides solutions to the problems of soil erosion and stormwater pollution in the urban areas through government intervention. The third part discusses how Best Management Practices (BMPs) can be used to limit or reduce stormwater pollution in residential and industrial areas.

  20. Title 16 U.S.C. 1278(a) Restrictions on Water Resources Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under the Federal Power Act on or directly affecting any river which is designated as a component of the national wild and scenic rivers system under the Wild and Scenic Rivers...

  1. Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-04-03

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type

  2. Spinning Reserve from Pump Load: A Technical Findings Report to the California Department of Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, BJ

    2005-05-06

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at the request of the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, is investigating opportunities for electrical load to provide the ancillary service of spinning reserve to the electric grid. The load would provide this service by stopping for a short time when there is a contingency on the grid such as a transmission line or generator outage. There is a possibility that a significant portion of the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO's) spinning reserve requirement could be supplied from the California Department of Water Resources (CDWR) pumping load. Spinning reserve has never been supplied from load before, and rule changes would be needed to allow it. In this report, we are presenting technical findings on the possibility of supplying spinning reserve from pumping system load. In parallel, we are pursuing the needed rule changes with the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), and the CAISO. NERC and FERC have agreed that they have no prohibition against supplying spinning reserve from load. The WECC Minimum Operability Reliability Criteria working group has agreed that the concept should be considered, and they are presently discussing the needed tariff and rule changes. Presently, spinning reserve is provided by generation that is actually spinning but is operating at low power levels and can be ramped up quickly to provide reserve power. In a sense, this is an inefficient and environmentally unfriendly way of providing reserves because it requires the generator to operate at a low power level that may be inefficient and may discharge more pollutants per kW than operating at rated power. It would be better if this generation capacity were in a position to bid into the energy market. Providing an additional supply of spinning reserve would tend to reduce prices for both

  3. Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate Electricity Using Geothermal Water Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Demonstrate technical and financial feasibility of the use of an existing low-temperature geothermal resource for combined heat and power; and Maintain and enhance existing geothermal district heating operation.

  4. Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources: Appendix A - Assessment Results by Hydrologic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for each of the 20 hydrologic regions are presented in Appendix A

  5. Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources: Appendix B - Assessment Results by State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Surveys Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for for each of the 50 states are made in Appendix B.

  6. Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources: Appendix B - Assessment Results by State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for for each of the 50 states are made in Appendix B.

  7. The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 28th and 29th, a joint workshop organized by Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis (EPSA) and University of California - Irvine’s (UCI) Water UC Irvine was held at the UCI campus. The workshop participants, which included university researchers, utility providers, state and federal agencies, and non-profit organizations, distilled lessons from Western U.S. states and developed recommendations to enable water & electrical utilities, regulators, and other stakeholders to enhance effectiveness and efficiency in both water and electricity use.

  8. Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA) Data Resources FITARA Resources Available for Download: DOE IT Policy Archive: ZIP IT Leadership Directory: HTML | ...

  9. ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Arizona has substantial natural resources, including coal, solar, and hydroelectric resources. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment ...

  10. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Main Report and Appendix A: Evaluates water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects.