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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Facility Southside Water Reclamation Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Bernalillo County, New Mexico Coordinates 35.0177854°, -106.6291304° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0177854,"lon":-106.6291304,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fort Carson has built a successful and Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

3

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

4

Argonne partners with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as larger events, such as the MWRD beginning to disinfect its discharge. Click to enlarge. Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as larger events, such as the MWRD beginning to disinfect its discharge. Click to enlarge. Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as larger events, such as the MWRD beginning to disinfect its discharge. Click to enlarge. Boats pass under the LaSalle St. Bridge in downtown Chicago. Scientists at Argonne are partnering with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to catalogue the microbe population of the Chicago River. Click to enlarge.

5

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Reclamation of Cleaning Water Using Ultrafiltration and Double Pass Reverse Osmosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the production of electrodeposition primers, water is used as the primary cleaning agent. The dirty water that is generated contains residual contaminants from the primer production equipment, which requires that the water be disposed of as a hazardous waste. These contaminants are typically pigments and solvents. Because of the commitment to minimize process generated wastes, an integrated ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) system was installed to reclaim the cleaning water at the PPG Industries, Inc. (PPG) Cleveland, Ohio plant. The recovered water is then reused for cleaning in the primer manufacturing process. The integrated ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis system operates to reclaim 80 to 85% of the cleaning water. The system effectively removes 100% of the pigments and resins and 98% of the solvents and heavy metals. The quality of the final reclaimed water at the end of the process actually meets local sanitary water system discharge limits.

Neuman, T.; Long, G.; Tinter, M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Reclamation Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reclamation Act (Nebraska) Reclamation Act (Nebraska) Reclamation Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources This section establishes Reclamation Districts to conserve, develop, and stabilize supplies of water for domestic, irrigation, power, manufacturing and other beneficial uses. Reclamation Districts are established by

8

Research Addressing Power Plant Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Power Plant Water Management to Minimize Water Use while Providing Reliable Electricity Generation Water and Energy 2 Water and Energy are inextricably linked. Because...

9

Water Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to see the operation than have us explain it. Basically, most treatment plants remove the solid material and use living organisms and chlorine to clean up the water. Steve Sample...

10

Safety problems of water-development works designed for land reclamation  

SciTech Connect

A safety declaration is a fundamental document assuring the safety of water-development works, their correspondence to safety criteria, the design, and active technical regulations and rules.

Shchedrin, V. N. [Russian Academy of Agriculture Sciences (Russian Federation); Kosichenko, Yu. M. [FGNU RocNIIPM, Novocherkassk (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

NETL Water and Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

12

Land Reclamation and the Resource Extraction Reclamation Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Protection's Mining Program is responsible for enacting and implementing regulations pertaining to land reclamation. The program primarily focuses on the reclamation...

13

Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas Gas Technology Institute (GTI) will develop a membrane separation technology to recover water...

15

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants GIS Catalog Graphic Arthur Langhus Layne, LLC will create an internet-based, geographic information system (GIS) catalog of non-traditional sources of cooling water for coal-fired power plants. The project will develop data to identify the availability of oil and gas produced water, abandoned coal mine water, industrial waste water, and low-quality ground water. By pairing non-traditional water sources to power plant water needs, the research will allow power plants that are affected by water shortages to continue to operate at full-capacity without adversely affecting local communities or the environment. The nationwide catalog will identify the location, water withdrawal, and

16

Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Reclamation Division of the Public Service Commission is tasked with administering the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation. Specific regulations can be found in article 69-05.2 of...

17

9th Annual North American Waste to Energy Conference WATER RECLAMATION PRACTICES AT THE PINELLAS COUNTY (FL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 million gallons per day (MGD) of makeup water for the cooling tower and up to 200 thousand gallons per day in the cooling towers. Reclaimed water for boiler makeup will require membrane treatment followed by ion exchange cooling is achieved by a circulating water system through a five (5) cell mechanical draft cooling tower

Columbia University

18

Demonstrating Market Approach to Reclamation of Mined Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

202-293-7516 jmahoney@epri.com Environmental and Water Resources Demonstrating market approach to reclamation of mineD lanDs Background Many years of coal mining in the...

19

WATER REQUIREMENTS FOR A RADIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the water requirements is presented for a hypothetical plant to process all the fuel from a 15,000Mwe nuclear economy. For each processing plant, specific requirements must be based on a detailed water survey which includes water quality, process requirements, and in-plant conservation plans. These considerations are discussed and the quantitative requirements are listed. (J.R.D.)

Harrington, F.E.

1962-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Power Demand Options in Regions of Water Stress and Future Carbon Management Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a regional modeling assessment of non-traditional water sources for use in thermoelectric power plants. The assessment includes the development of a model to characterize water quantity and quality from several sources of non-traditional water, initially focused within the Southeastern United States. The project includes four primary tasks: (1) identify water sources, needs, and treatment options; (2) assess and model non-traditional water quantity and quality; (3) identify and characterize water treatment options including an assessment of cost; and (4) develop a framework of metrics, processes, and modeling aspects that can be applied to other regions of the United States.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon Sequestration at a Regional-Scale Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the...

22

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including: assessment of the availability and proximity of impaired waters at twelve power plant locations spanning the major geographic regions of the continental 48 states;...

23

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Cooling Towers GE Global Research will develop treatment technologies to enable power plant use of non-traditional waters. Using effective treatment methods to make...

24

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was to identify cost saving alternatives to the current coal- fired power plant cooling process using non-traditional water sources such as coal mine discharges....

25

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Extraction From Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas-Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion...

26

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would otherwise be evaporated from the stack. This water would then be available for power plant operations such as cooling tower or flue gas desulfurization make-up water. An...

27

Water protection in coke-plant design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reclamations Mead Substation  

SciTech Connect

This 35 million dollar facility will be a vital part of the Pacific Northwest-Southwest Intertie. It will be one of the four terminals in the project, involving ehv direct current transmission of power. After site preparation, construction began July 25 on the Bureau of Reclamations Mead Substation. This is a key dc, ac terminal of the Pacific Northwest-Southwest Intertie. The entire Mead Substation, fully equipped with both ac and dc facilities, is scheduled for completion by September 1971.

Bennet, N.B.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Water Conservation with Urban Landscape Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water shortages are a common problem in much of the southwest. Increasing urbanization and increasing population places greater demands on dwindling water supplies. Over half of the water used in urban areas of the southwest is used in the irrigation of landscapes. To help cope with increased urban water demands and low water supplies, research was conducted from March 1981 to July 1983 at The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Dallas to gain information relative to consumptive water use by native and non-native landscape plants. Twenty weighing lysimeters were constructed and installed and plants established in the lysimeters and adjacent areas. The lysimeters were made from 0.6 X 0.9 m undisturbed cores of Austin silty clay soil. Plants used in the lysimeter study were buffalograss, St. Augustine grass, cenizo, boxwood and Texas barberry. All plants are native to Texas except boxwood and St. Augustine grass. Four lysimeters were planted to each plant type. This allowed two moisture levels and two replications of each plant type. There was no difference in water use by St. Augustine grass and buffalo grass during the year of establishment. Daily water use ranged from 0.49 to 0.08 cm per day but was generally 50% class A pan evaporation. St. Augustine grass used 0.03 cm/day more water than buffalo grass during 1982. -Irrigation treatments used in 1982 did not influence water use by either grass type but buffalo grass retained higher quality under dry treatment (irrigated at 0.40 bar moisture tension) than St. Augustine grass. Water use from May to July 1983 was highest (of all treatments) by St. Augustine grass when irrigated at 0.25 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth and lowest (of all treatments) by buffalograss when irrigated at 0.75 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth. Application of 50% class A pan evaporation each week appears to be an acceptable guideline for irrigation of either turfgrass but research should be conducted over a longer time period to obtain more specific guidelines for each grass species. Water use by shrubs in lysimeters was variable and not influenced by plant type during the period of establishment (Fall 1981). During 1982 water use was influenced more by plant size than by specie or water level. Cenizo had much faster growth rate than the other shrubs in the study. Water use by container grown plants indicated that cenizo had higher water use efficiency than boxwood or Indian Hawthorn. Water use was determined for several native shrubs and of the ones compared, Texas barberry appeared to have the most promise for use in water conserving landscapes.

Hip, B. W.; Giordano, C.; Simpson, B.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Drexel University is conducting research with the overall objective of developing technologies to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. The goal of this research is to develop a scale-prevention technology based on a novel filtration method and an integrated system of physical water treatment in an effort to reduce the amount of water needed for cooling tower blowdown. This objective is being pursued under two coordinated, National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research and development projects. In both projects, pulsed electrical fields are employed to promote the precipitation and removal of mineral deposits from power plant cooling water, thereby allowing the water to be recirculated for longer periods of time before fresh makeup water has to be introduced into the cooling water system.

31

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Water Management Power Plant Water Management A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Impaired Water as Cooling Water in Coal-Based Power Plants – Nalco Company Example of Pipe Scaling The overall objective of this project, conducted by Nalco Company in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory, is to develop advanced-scale control technologies to enable coal-based power plants to use impaired water in recirculating cooling systems. The use of impaired water is currently challenged technically and economically due to additional physical and chemical treatment requirements to address scaling, corrosion, and biofouling. Nalco's research focuses on methods to economically manage scaling issues (see Figure 1). The overall approach uses synergistic

32

Land Reclamation Act (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reclamation Act (Missouri) Land Reclamation Act (Missouri) Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government MunicipalPublic...

33

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants Using Energy Stored in Main Condenser Cooling Water - University of Florida This project replaces the cooling tower in a fossil fired power plant with an innovative diffusion driven desalination (DDD) plant that will render the power plant a net producer of fresh water. The energy required to drive the desalination process comes from the main condenser cooling water, which would otherwise be discharged. Saline water is used to condense the low pressure steam exiting the turbine. The hot, saline water exiting the condenser is sprayed into the top of a diffusion tower. The diffusion tower is filled with high surface area packing material such as that used in air stripping towers to enhance the water/air surface area. Air is blown through the bottom of the tower and becomes humidified. The humidified air goes to a direct-contact condenser where the fresh water is condensed. This process has an advantage over conventional desalination technology in that it may be driven by waste heat with very low thermodynamic availability. Also, cold air is a byproduct of this process which can be used to cool buildings.

34

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a study on the use of nanofiltration (NF) treatment options to enable use of non-traditional water sources as an alternative to freshwater make-up for thermoelectric power plants. The project includes a technical and economic evaluation of NF for two types of water that contain moderate to high levels of total dissolved solids (TDS): (1) cooling tower recirculating water and (2) produced waters from oil & gas extraction operations. Reverse osmosis (RO) is the most mature and commonly considered option for high TDS water treatment. However, RO is generally considered to be too expensive to make treatment of produced waters for power plant use a feasible application. Therefore, SNL is investigating the use of NF, which could be a more cost effective treatment option than RO. Similar to RO, NF is a membrane-based process. Although NF is not as effective as RO for the removal of TDS (typical salt rejection is ~85 percent, compared to >95 percent for RO), its performance should be sufficient for typical power plant applications. In addition to its lower capital cost, an NF system should have lower operating costs because it requires less pressure to achieve an equivalent flux of product water.

35

Missouri Water Treatment Plant Upgraded | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment Plant Upgraded Missouri Water Treatment Plant Upgraded July 13, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis The high service pumps at the St. Peters Water Treatment Plant are almost 30...

36

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems In this project, SPX Cooling Systems, formerly Marley Cooling Technologies, Inc., evaluates the performance of its patented Air2Air(tm) condensing technology in cooling tower applications at coal-fired electric power plants. Researchers quantify Air2Air(tm) water conservation capabilities with results segmented by season and time of day. They determine the pressure drop and energy use during operation. Additionally, SPX Cooling Systems develops a collection method for the recovered water, analyzes water quality, and identifies potential on-site processes capable of utilizing the recovered water.

37

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Carnegie Mellon University, in a joint effort with the University of Pittsburgh, is conducting a study of the use of treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup for coal fired power plants. This project builds upon a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy entitled, "Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants," which showed that treated municipal wastewater is the most common and widespread source in the United States. Data analysis revealed that 81 percent of power plants proposed for construction by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) would have sufficient cooling water supply from one to two publicly owned treatment works (POTW) within a 10-mile radius, while 97 percent of the proposed power plants would be able to meet their cooling water needs with one to two POTWs within 25 miles of these plants. Thus, municipal wastewater will be the impaired water source most likely to be locally available in sufficient and reliable quantities for power plants. Results of initial studies indicate that it is feasible to use secondary treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup. The biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, and phosphorus in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, although current research is demonstrating that these problems can be controlled through aggressive chemical management. It is currently unclear whether tertiary treatment of municipal waste water prior to its re-use can be a cost-effective option to aggressive chemical management of the bulk cooling water volume.

38

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use Photo of a Temperate Wetland. Photo of a Temperate Wetland Applied Ecological Services, Inc. (AES) will study the use of restored wetlands to help alleviate the increasing stress on surface and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling requirements. The project will develop water conservation and cooling strategies using restored wetlands. Furthermore, the project aims to demonstrate the benefits of reduced water usage with added economic and ecological values at thermoelectric power plant sites, including: enhancing carbon sequestration in the corresponding wetlands; improving net heat rates from existing power generation units; avoiding limitations when low-surface

39

The Water Circuit of the Plants - Do Plants have Hearts ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a correspondence between the circulation of blood in all higher animals and the circulation of sap in all higher plants - up to heights h of 140 m - through the xylem and phloem vessels. Plants suck in water from the soil, osmotically through the roothair zone, and subsequently lift it osmotically again, and by capillary suction (via their buds, leaves, and fruits) into their crowns. In between happens a reverse osmosis - the endodermis jump - realized by two layers of subcellular mechanical pumps in the endodermis walls which are powered by ATP, or in addition by two analogous layers of such pumps in the exodermis. The thus established root pressure helps forcing the absorbed ground water upward, through the whole plant, and often out again, in the form of guttation, or exudation.

Wolfgang Kundt; Eva Gruber

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

40

Oceanographic Considerations for Desalination Plants in Southern California Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of product drinking water produced by this plant will begallon of product water produced, the proposed desalinationof the time if product water is produced by the desalination

Jenkins, Scott A; Wasyl, Joseph

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ArcMine: A GIS extension to support mine reclamation planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new GIS extension, named ArcMine, developed to support reclamation planning in abandoned mining areas. ArcMine provides four tools to (a) assess mine subsidence hazards, (b) estimate the erosion of mine wastes, (c) analyze flow ... Keywords: GIS, Mine reclamation, Mine wastes, Mine water, Reforestation, Subsidence

Sung-Min Kim; Yosoon Choi; Jangwon Suh; Sungchan Oh; Hyeong-Dong Park; Suk-Ho Yoon; Wa-Ra Go

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Lehigh University will conduct pilot-scale testing of a condensing heat exchanger to recover water from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Testing will include using a slipstream of flue gas from a natural gas-fired boiler with sulfur trioxide injection and slipstreams of flue gas from two coal-fired boilers. The project continues the development of condensing heat exchanger technology for coal-fired boilers initially started under the U.S. Department of Energy's Project DE-FC26-06NT42727 (Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas). In particular, Lehigh researchers will: (1) expand the database on water

44

Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium  

SciTech Connect

The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

None Available

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

45

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. The project team demonstrates the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Most water consumption in coal-fired power plants occurs due to evaporative water losses. For example, a 500-megawatt (MW) power plant will loose approximately 5,000 - 6,000 gallons per minute (gpm) to evaporation and 500 gpm in the wet FGD system. Installation of regenerative reheat on FGD systems is expected to reduce water consumption to one half of water consumption using conventional FGD technology. Electrostatic Precipitator Researchers are conducting pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assessing the resulting impact on air pollution control (APC) systems. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc. as the prime contractor, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern Company, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). The team is conducting an analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs. The tests are intended to determine the impact of operation at cooler flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate removal (see Figure 1), SO3 removal, and Hg removal. Additionally, tests are conducted to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger.

46

Solar Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania Solar Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania October 8, 2010 - 10:39am Addthis Aqua Pennsylvania, Inc. installed a 1 MW solar farm at its Ingram’s Mill Water Treatment Plant in East Bradford, Pa. The solar project is saving the water company $77,000 a year. | File photo Aqua Pennsylvania, Inc. installed a 1 MW solar farm at its Ingram's Mill Water Treatment Plant in East Bradford, Pa. The solar project is saving the water company $77,000 a year. | File photo Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE It takes a lot of energy to run a water treatment plant round-the-clock. And pumping 35 million gallons of water a day to hundreds of thousands businesses and residents can get expensive.

47

Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water Resource Management Issues April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1364 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

48

Bureau of Reclamation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reclamation Reclamation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Bureau of Reclamation Name Bureau of Reclamation Short Name BOR Address 1849 C Street Place Washington, DC References Reclamation Offices - Addresses and Contacts Name Bureau of Reclamation Address 1849 C Street NW Place Washington, DC Zip 20240-0001 Coordinates 38.8936749°, -77.0425236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8936749,"lon":-77.0425236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts) This is the approved revision of...

50

Reclamation Practices and Procedures for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Carbon Sequestration Coordinator, Jim Burger, Virginia Tech Pamla Wood Clark Dorman Pennie DuBarry I. How can current reclamation practices be modified to enhance carbon...

51

Reclamation Practices and Procedures for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Carbon Sequestration Coordinator: Jim Burger Facilitators: Pamela Wood Clark Dorman Pennie DuBarry How can current reclamation practices be modified to enhance carbon storage...

52

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification...

53

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Changes related to "Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas)" Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act...

55

Pages that link to "Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas)" Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act...

56

Pages that link to "Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)" ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)" Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota) Jump to:...

57

Changes related to "Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)" ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)" Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota) Jump to:...

58

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease...

59

Virginia Coal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation implements the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act and establishes a statewide regulatory program for reclamation following coal surface mining activities. The...

60

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - New York State Education Department Coal-fired power plants within North America need an effective, economical, and non-polluting technique for managing infestations of zebra mussels within their facilities, particularly in cooling water intake systems. Unfortunately, due to a lack of options, many facilities have relied on the use of broad-spectrum, chemical biocides for control of these freshwater, macro-fouling mussels. Biocide treatments, such as continuous chlorination for three weeks, are widely regarded as environmentally unacceptable. Chlorine, for example, can combine with organic compounds in water resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes, dioxins, and other potentially carcinogenic substances. Because of this, there is growing concern within the power generation industry that such broad-spectrum biocides will be banned by individual states and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This would result in a crisis situation for the electric utility industry. Even if such an outright ban does not occur, the reduction in the use of such biocides is generally viewed by coal-fired and other power generating industries as environmentally prudent and desirable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Use of Reclaimed Water for Power Plant Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTENTS Chapter 1 - Introduction .......................................................................................................... 1 Power Plants Need Water .................................................................................................. 1 Meeting Water Demands in a Water-Constrained Environment ....................................... 3 Purpose and Structure of the Report .................................................................................. 3 Chapter 2 - Database of Reclaimed Water Use for Cooling ................................................... 5 Data Collection .................................................................................................................. 5 The Database...................................................................................................................... 7

62

Interim reclamation report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploration shaft site  

SciTech Connect

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Extensive studies of the geotechnical aspects of the site were undertaken, including preparations for drilling a large diameter Exploratory Shaft. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the Exploratory Shaft Facility, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 43 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth May 29, 2013 - 12:07pm Addthis A sample image from the AWSIS system. A sample image from the AWSIS system. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy Sobering news from experts: Rising populations, regional droughts, and decreasing groundwater levels are draining the nation's fresh water supply. And it's not just that we're using that water for our personal consumption; even the electricity we rely on to power our society requires a lot of water. In fact, major energy producers - like coal-fired power plants, which produce about 40 percent of our electricity - require about 150 billion gallons of fresh water per day to produce the electricity we

64

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth May 29, 2013 - 12:07pm Addthis A sample image from the AWSIS system. A sample image from the AWSIS system. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy Sobering news from experts: Rising populations, regional droughts, and decreasing groundwater levels are draining the nation's fresh water supply. And it's not just that we're using that water for our personal consumption; even the electricity we rely on to power our society requires a lot of water. In fact, major energy producers - like coal-fired power plants, which produce about 40 percent of our electricity - require about 150 billion gallons of fresh water per day to produce the electricity we

65

Electrical Atomization of Water Dripping from Plant Leaves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical atomization of water dripping from plant leaves has been studied. It is observed that when a high positive d.c. voltage of 8?10 kV is applied to a plant then the water dripping from its leaves tips comes off the tips as a smoke of very ...

A. K. Kamra; D. V. Ahire

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

RECOVERY OF DEGRADED HEAVY WATER AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented on purification and reconcentration of heavy water at the Savannah River Plant. Process and equipment descriptions, typical operating costs, procedures for control of health hazards, standard analytical methods, and specifications for receipt of degraded heavy water for recovery at the Savannah River Plant are included. (auth)

Scotten, W.C.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

RECLAMATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t a N o r t h N o r t h D a k o t a D a k o t a Boise Austin Topeka Pierre Helena Phoenix Lincoln Olympia Santa Fe Cheyenne Sacramento Des Moines Carson City Salt Lake City AE Comm...

68

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 1: Feasibility Study (1004931), published in 2004; Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization (1012207) published in 2007; and Boiler Water Deposition ...

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities - EPRI The objective of this project is evaluation and development of the use of produced water...

70

Performance of memory reclamation for lockless synchronization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achieving high performance for concurrent applications on modern multiprocessors remains challenging. Many programmers avoid locking to improve performance, while others replace locks with non-blocking synchronization to protect against deadlock, priority inversion, and convoying. In both cases, dynamic data structures that avoid locking require a memory reclamation scheme that reclaims elements once they are no longer in use. The performance of existing memory reclamation schemes has not been thoroughly evaluated. We conduct the first fair and comprehensive comparison of three recent schemesquiescent-state-based reclamation, epoch-based reclamation, and hazard-pointer-based reclamationusing a flexible microbenchmark. Our results show that there is no globally optimal scheme. When evaluating lockless synchronization, programmers and algorithm designers should thus carefully consider the data structure, the workload, and the execution environment, each of which can dramatically affect the memory reclamation performance. We discuss the consequences of our results for programmers and algorithm designers. Finally, we describe the use of one scheme, quiescentstate-based reclamation, in the context of an OS kernelan execution environment which is well suited to this scheme.

Thomas E. Hart; Paul E. McKenney; Angela Demke Brown; Jonathan Walpole

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants. It notes the major factors which affect this practice. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers.

MacDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification Technology Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Project Manager: James R. Longanbach Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Norma J. Kuehn Ronald L. Schoff Vladimir Vaysman Jay S. White Power Plant Water Usage and Loss Study i August 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...................................................................................................................... I LIST OF TABLES.............................................................................................................................III

73

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Lehigh University This project determines the feasibility of using low grade power plant waste heat to dry lignite and sub-bituminous coals before they are burned in...

74

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Water Hammer Handbook for Nuclear Plant Engineers and Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water hammer events continue to be responsible for costly equipment damage and plant outages. This Water Hammer Handbook is designed to help utility engineers prevent, mitigate, and accommodate water hammer events. The handbook provides assessment techniques, design approaches, and operating procedures. Also included are a root cause summary and an extensive overview of BWR and PWR water hammer experience on a system-by-system basis.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

Use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater demands are steadily increasing throughout the United States. As its population increases, more water is needed for domestic use (drinking, cooking, cleaning, etc.) and to supply power and food. In arid parts of the country, existing freshwater supplies are not able to meet the increasing demands for water. New water users are often forced to look to alternative sources of water to meet their needs. Over the past few years, utilities in many locations, including parts of the country not traditionally water-poor (e.g., Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina) have needed to reevaluate the availability of water to meet their cooling needs. This trend will only become more extreme with time. Other trends are likely to increase pressure on freshwater supplies, too. For example, as populations increase, they will require more food. This in turn will likely increase demands for water by the agricultural sector. Another example is the recent increased interest in producing biofuels. Additional water will be required to grow more crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels and to process the raw materials into biofuels. This report provides information about an opportunity to reuse an abundant water source -- treated municipal wastewater, also known as 'reclaimed water' -- for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Innovations for Existing Plants research program (Feeley 2005). This program initiated an energy-water research effort in 2003 that includes the availability and use of 'nontraditional sources' of water for use at power plants. This report represents a unique reference for information on the use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling. In particular, the database of reclaimed water user facilities described in Chapter 2 is the first comprehensive national effort to identify and catalog those plants that are using reclaimed water for cooling.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

77

Use of Alternate Water Sources for Power Plant Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report lays out a framework developed to evaluate the potential use of non-traditional water supplies for cooling new or existing power plants. The report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Water use of tall and dwarf crop plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

height in a spring wheat. Crop Science 34(No. 6); \\ i i *O F T A L L AND D W A R F CROP PLANTS By J . Giles Wainesbetween water application, crop yields, and management

Waines, J. Giles; Ehdaie, Bahman

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Microelectronics Plant Water Efficiency Improvements at Sandia...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia National Laboratories has developed extensive water efficiency improvements at its Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications (MESA) complex in Albuquerque, New...

80

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

The results of an investigation of sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants and the major factors which affect this practice are presented. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers. Due to limited supplies of high-quality water, municipal waste water is increasingly viewed as an alternative source of supply for a variety of water uses, including electric power plant evaporative cooling. In California, enough municipal effluent is discharged to the ocean to conceivably supply the total projected cooling water needs of new power plants for the next 20 years or more. A number of existing applications of such waste water for power plant cooling, including several California cases, demonstrate the technical feasibility of its use for this purpose. However, a combination of economic, environmental, and geographic factors reduce the likelihood of widespread use of this alternative for meeting anticipated large increases in power plant water requirements in the state. The most important factors are: the long distances involved; the public health concerns; added costs and environmental effects; and unreliability of supply quality.

McDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tanker ballast water treating plant meets tough specs  

SciTech Connect

Sumed, a joint company of Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Dubai, and Kuwait, contracted for a system that would reduce the oil content of discharged ballast water from as much as 2000 ppm to 6 ppm. The oil-water separation plant was installed at Sidi Kerir on the Egyptian coast along the Mediterranean. The plant has five double rows, with each row containing seven concrete tank units (70 units total). Each unit has four plate packs to clean 8000 cu m/hr. The proving trial began on May 3, 1978, and lasted for 32 days. During the period, 14 tankers discharged their ballast water into the plant and the plant removed all but an average of 1.46 ppm of oil, with the highest oil content being 4.0 ppm. (1 diagram, 1 drawing, 1 graph, 3 photos, 4 references, 1 table)

De Kok, a.F.; Marson, H.W.

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

82

USE of mine pool water for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water and energy production issues intersect in numerous ways. Water is produced along with oil and gas, water runs off of or accumulates in coal mines, and water is needed to operate steam electric power plants and hydropower generating facilities. However, water and energy are often not in the proper balance. For example, even if water is available in sufficient quantities, it may not have the physical and chemical characteristics suitable for energy or other uses. This report provides preliminary information about an opportunity to reuse an overabundant water source--ground water accumulated in underground coal mines--for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which has implemented a water/energy research program (Feeley and Ramezan 2003). Among the topics studied under that program is the availability and use of ''non-traditional sources'' of water for use at power plants. This report supports NETL's water/energy research program.

Veil, J. A.; Kupar, J. M .; Puder, M. G.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the following Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports: 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004; 1012207, Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization, published in 2007; 1014128, Boiler Water Deposition Model fo...

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

84

Use of Degraded Water Sources as Cooling Water in Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In electricity production, nearly all thermal power plants reject heat either to a large body of water (once-through cooling) or to the atmosphere via wet cooling towers the predominant form of cooling in California. These towers, however, use considerable quantities of water. Competing state demands for freshwater have forced California thermal power plants to consider alternative cooling water supplies, though the availability of such supplies and data on their use and impact is limited. In fac...

2003-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

Water Pinch Technology for Process Water Reduction: Success Story at Solutia's Krummrich Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A site-wide water conservation and wastewater minimization study complementing the previous energy study was undertaken by a consulting engineering company specializing in pinch analysis for Solutia's W. G. Krummrich plant in Sauget, Illinois. The 1995 fresh water intake and wastewater effluent for the site were approximately 2400 gpm and 2000 gpm, respectively. The effluent from the plant was treated off-site by two publicly owned treatment works (POTWs). The total annual cost to Solutia for city water ...

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

Water vulnerabilities for existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Water consumption by all users in the United States over the 2005-2030 time period is projected to increase by about 7% (from about 108 billion gallons per day [bgd] to about 115 bgd) (Elcock 2010). By contrast, water consumption by coal-fired power plants over this period is projected to increase by about 21% (from about 2.4 to about 2.9 bgd) (NETL 2009b). The high projected demand for water by power plants, which is expected to increase even further as carbon-capture equipment is installed, combined with decreasing freshwater supplies in many areas, suggests that certain coal-fired plants may be particularly vulnerable to potential water demand-supply conflicts. If not addressed, these conflicts could limit power generation and lead to power disruptions or increased consumer costs. The identification of existing coal-fired plants that are vulnerable to water demand and supply concerns, along with an analysis of information about their cooling systems and related characteristics, provides information to help focus future research and development (R&D) efforts to help ensure that coal-fired generation demands are met in a cost-effective manner that supports sustainable water use. This study identified coal-fired power plants that are considered vulnerable to water demand and supply issues by using a geographical information system (GIS) that facilitated the analysis of plant-specific data for more than 500 plants in the NETL's Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) (NETL 2007a) simultaneously with 18 indicators of water demand and supply. Two types of demand indicators were evaluated. The first type consisted of geographical areas where specific conditions can generate demand vulnerabilities. These conditions include high projected future water consumption by thermoelectric power plants, high projected future water consumption by all users, high rates of water withdrawal per square mile (mi{sup 2}), high projected population increases, and areas projected to be in a water crisis or conflict by 2025. The second type of demand indicator was plant specific. These indicators were developed for each plant and include annual water consumption and withdrawal rates and intensities, net annual power generation, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. The supply indictors, which are also area based, include areas with low precipitation, high temperatures, low streamflow, and drought. The indicator data, which were in various formats (e.g., maps, tables, raw numbers) were converted to a GIS format and stored, along with the individual plant data from the CPPDB, in a single GIS database. The GIS database allowed the indicator data and plant data to be analyzed and visualized in any combination. To determine the extent to which a plant would be considered 'vulnerable' to a given demand or supply concern (i.e., that the plant's operations could be affected by water shortages represented by a potential demand or supply indicator), criteria were developed to categorize vulnerability according to one of three types: major, moderate, or not vulnerable. Plants with at least two major demand indicator values and/or at least four moderate demand indicator values were considered vulnerable to demand concerns. By using this approach, 144 plants were identified as being subject to demand concerns only. Plants with at least one major supply indicator value and/or at least two moderate supply indicator values were considered vulnerable to supply concerns. By using this approach, 64 plants were identified as being subject to supply concerns only. In addition, 139 plants were identified as subject to both demand and supply concerns. Therefore, a total of 347 plants were considere

Elcock, D.; Kuiper, J.; Environmental Science Division

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology SPX Cooling Technologies is developing physical enhancements for air cooled condensers (ACC) to improve fan airflow in windy conditions. By removing cross-wind effects on ACC fans, the SPX wind guides will increase ACC performance, thereby increasing the overall efficiency of the power plant. This project will add wind guides to an existing ACC cooling process at a selected coal-fired power plant in order to quantify the efficiency improvement. SPX Cooling Technologies will also employ computational fluid dynamic modeling to examine and conduct a pilot-scale test to resolve application and optimization issues and determine the effectiveness of the wind guide technology.

88

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fate of As, Se, Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater - Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Fate of As, Se, Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater - Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) TVA, in cooperation with EPRI and the American Electric Power (AEP), is installing a demonstration passive treatment system at the Paradise Fossil Plant near Drakesboro, Kentucky, to treat ammonia in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) effluent stream. The passive system is used to convert ammonia in the wastewater to nitrate in an aerobic component, followed by denitrification in anaerobic wetlands. In addition to NH 4, the wastewater stream also contains other hazardous pollutants captured from flue gas emissions, including arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg). Biogeochemical reactions could affect the retention and speciation of As, Se, and Hg in the wastewater as it moves through the treatment system. A more thorough understanding of these transformations is needed. For this project, an extraction trench component is being used for removal of As, Se, and Hg. This extraction trench is integrated into the passive system components described above, which is installed and operated by TVA with support from EPRI.

89

Performance of a hotel chilled water plant with cool storage  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive monitoring suite was installed at a large convention hotel located in San Francisco, CA. The instrumentation was used for a research project to evaluate the effectiveness of electricity price based controls that automate response to real time pricing and to characterize the operation and performance of the hotel's chilled water plant that included a newly installed ice cool storage system. The hotel operates under real-time electricity rates. To date, over four years of data have been collected. Data included electricity use for all chillers, secondary coolant, chilled water, condenser pumps, and the cooling tower fans. Thermal flow data were also collected for the storage system, ice chiller, direct cooling chillers, and chilled water load loops. This paper (1) describes the chilled water plant, (2) defines the performance measurement objectives for the project, (3) discusses operational experience with the plant, focusing on the cool storage system, (4) analyzes chilled water plant and cool storage system operation by examining the charge/discharge heat flow data, and (5) evaluates how well the plant as a whole and the cool storage system specifically met cooling loads of the facility, and how this affected their use.

Gillespie, K.L.; Blanc, S.L.; Parker, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

[Plant growth with limited water]. Performance report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When water is in short supply, soybean stem growth is inhibited by a physical limitation followed in a few hours by metabolic changes that reduce the extensibility of the cell walls. The extensibility then becomes the main limitation. With time, there is a modest recovery in extensibility along with an accumulation of a 28kD protein in the walls of the growth-affected cells. A 3lkD protein that was 80% similar in amino acid sequence also was present but did not accumulate in the walls of the stem cells. In the stem, growth was inhibited and the mRNA for the 28kD protein increased in response to water deprivation but the mRNA for the 3 1 kD protein did not. The roots continued to grow and the mRNA for the 28kD protein did not accumulate but the mRNA for the 3lkD protein did. Thus, there was a tissuespecific response of gene expression that correlated with the contrasting growth response to low water potential in the same seedlings. Further work using immunogold labeling, fluorescence labeling, and western blotting gave evidence that the 28kD protein is located in the cell wall as well as several compartments in the cytoplasm. Preliminary experiments indicate that the 28kD protein is a phosphatase.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/Fly Ash  

to fossil fuel burning power plants to control mineral precipitation in cooling water. Flue gas, which is 10% CO2, could be diverted into a plants cooling water

92

Water Pinch Success Story at Solutia's Krummrich Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A site-wide water conservation and wastewater minimization study complementing the previous energy study was undertaken by a consulting engineering company specializing in Pinch Analysis for Solutias W.G. Krummrich plant in Sauget, Illinois. The 1995 fresh water intake and wastewater effluent for the site were approximately 2400 gpm and 2000 gpm, respectively. The effluent from the plant was treated off-site by two publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs). The total annual cost to Solutia for city water intake and effluent treatment was about $8.5 million/yr. The major objective of the Water Pinch study was to identify practical, technically feasible projects to reduce city water intake and wastewater effluent at the plant, so as to reduce annual operating costs. Twenty-three specific projects were identified from the water Pinch study that would reduce the city water intake by 520 gpm (21%) and wastewater effluent by 580 gpm (29%). Two of these projects involved the recovery of product that was being lost in the wastewater effluent. Annual cost savings to Solutia (post 2001) were estimated to be over $1.6 million/yr from wastewater conservation projects, and $2.5 million/yr from renegotiation of the tariff structure, for a total savings of 48%.

Kumana, J. D.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the commercial steam and power generation industry, deposits on heat transfer surfaces of the steam-water cycle equipment in fossil plant units have been a challenge. Deposits form at nearly all locations within the steam-water cycle, particularly in boiler tubes where failures can have substantial negative impacts on unit availability and reliability. Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-wat...

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Verifying concurrent memory reclamation algorithms with grace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Memory management is one of the most complex aspects of modern concurrent algorithms, and various techniques proposed for it--such as hazard pointers, read-copy-update and epoch-based reclamation--have proved very challenging for formal reasoning. In ...

Alexey Gotsman; Noam Rinetzky; Hongseok Yang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

City Water and Light Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Light Plant and Light Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name City Water and Light Plant Place Arkansas Utility Id 9879 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Large Industrial General Service- Large(Primary Metering) Industrial General Service- Small Electric Rate Commercial General service (Residential Electric Rate) Residential

96

Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act authorizes the state to develop, adopt, issue and amend rules and regulations pertaining to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. These regulations are consistent with, but no more restrictive that the federal regulations set forth in the Surface Mining and Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) Surface Mining and Reclamation Division (SMRD) is the authority under this act. Regulation No. 20 from the

97

Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

INNOVATIVE FRESH WATER PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system, which is powered by the waste heat from low pressure condensing steam in power plants. The desalination is driven by water vapor saturating dry air flowing through a diffusion tower. Liquid water is condensed out of the air/vapor mixture in a direct contact condenser. A thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production efficiency of 4.5% based on a feed water inlet temperature of only 50 C. An example is discussed in which the DDD process utilizes waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant to produce 1.51 million gallons of fresh water per day. The main focus of the initial development of the desalination process has been on the diffusion tower. A detailed mathematical model for the diffusion tower has been described, and its numerical implementation has been used to characterize its performance and provide guidance for design. The analysis has been used to design a laboratory scale diffusion tower, which has been thoroughly instrumented to allow detailed measurements of heat and mass transfer coefficient, as well as fresh water production efficiency. The experimental facility has been described in detail.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Mohamed Darwish; Diego Acevedo; Jessica Knight

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Process Optimization and Integration Strategies for Material Reclamation and Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities are characterized by the significant usage of natural resources and the massive discharge of waste materials. An effective strategy towards the sustainability of industrial processes is the conservation of natural resources through waste reclamation and recycles. Because of the numerous number of design alternatives, systematic procedures must be developed for the effective synthesis and screening of reclamation and recycle options. The objective of this work is to develop systematic and generally applicable procedures for the synthesis, design, and optimization of resource conservation networks. Focus is given to two important applications: material utilities (with water as an example) and spent products (with lube oil as an example). Traditionally, most of the previous research efforts in the area of designing direct-recycle water networks have considered the chemical composition as the basis for process constraints. However, there are many design problems that are not component-based; instead, they are property-based (e.g., pH, density, viscosity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), basic oxygen demand (BOD), toxicity). Additionally, thermal constraints (e.g., stream temperature) may be required to identify acceptable recycles. In this work, a novel approach is introduced to design material-utility (e.g., water) recycle networks that allows the simultaneous consideration of mass, thermal, and property constraints. Furthermore, the devised approach accounts for the heat of mixing and for the interdependence of properties. An optimization formulation is developed to embed all potential configurations of interest and to model the mass, thermal, and property characteristics of the targeted streams and units. Solution strategies are developed to identify stream allocation and targets for minimum fresh usage and waste discharge. A case study on water management is solved to illustrate the concept of the proposed approach and its computational aspects. Next, a systematic approach is developed for the selection of solvents, solvent blends, and system design in in extraction-based reclamation processes of spent lube oil Property-integration tools are employed for the systematic screening of solvents and solvent blends. The proposed approach identifies the main physical properties that influence solvent(s) performance in extracting additives and contaminants from used lubricating oils (i.e. solubility parameter (delta), viscosity (v), and vapor pressure (p)). The results of the theoretical approach are validated through comparison with experimental data for single solvents and for solvent blends. Next, an optimization formulation is developed and solved to identify system design and extraction solvent(s) by including techno-economic criteria. Two case studies are solved for identification of feasible blends and for the cost optimization of the system.

Kheireddine, Houssein

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

INNOVATIVE FRESH WATER PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An innovative Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) process was recently described where evaporation of mineralized water is driven by diffusion within a packed bed. The energy source to drive the process is derived from low pressure condensing steam within the main condenser of a steam power generating plant. Since waste heat is used to drive the process, the main cost of fresh water production is attributed to the energy cost of pumping air and water through the packed bed. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A combined thermodynamic and dynamic analysis demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3'' Hg. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the diffusion tower and direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. An experimental DDD facility has been fabricated, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. The analyses agree quite well with the current data and the information available in the literature. Direct contact condensers with and without packing have been investigated. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is significantly enhanced when packing is added to the direct contact condensers.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

NETL Publications: Conference Proceedings-Existing Plants Water Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Existing Plants Water Projects Meeting NETL Existing Plants Water Projects Meeting October 27-28, 2008 Table of Contents Disclaimer Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

102

Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fuel Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project concerns a diffusion driven desalination (DDD) process where warm water is evaporated into a low humidity air stream, and the vapor is condensed out to produce distilled water. Although the process has a low fresh water to feed water conversion efficiency, it has been demonstrated that this process can potentially produce low cost distilled water when driven by low grade waste heat. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A dynamic analysis of heat and mass transfer demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3 Hg. The optimum operating condition for the DDD process with a high temperature of 50 C and sink temperature of 25 C has an air mass flux of 1.5 kg/m{sup 2}-s, air to feed water mass flow ratio of 1 in the diffusion tower, and a fresh water to air mass flow ratio of 2 in the condenser. Operating at these conditions yields a fresh water production efficiency (m{sub fW}/m{sub L}) of 0.031 and electric energy consumption rate of 0.0023 kW-hr/kg{sub fW}. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. The analyses agree quite well with the current data. Recently, it has been recognized that the fresh water production efficiency can be significantly enhanced with air heating. This type of configuration is well suited for power plants utilizing air-cooled condensers. The experimental DDD facility has been modified with an air heating section, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is enhanced when air is heated prior to entering the diffusion tower. Further analytical analysis is required to predict the thermal and mass transport with the air heating configuration.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight; Venugopal Jogi

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Study on the Mode of Power Plant Circulating Water Waste Heat Regenerative Thermal System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant Circulating Water (PPCW) waste heat recycling is an important way of increasing a power plants primary energy ratio. According to the PPCW waste heat regenerative thermal system, the authors propose two modes of heat pump heat regenerative ... Keywords: heat pump, power plant circulating water (PPCW), waste heat recycling, energy saving

Bi Qingsheng; Ma Yanliang; Yang Zhifu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources The Indiana Department of Natural Resources implements and enforces the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, as well as a statewide program to protect society and the environment from the adverse effects of mining operations, and regulates coal mining operations to

105

Changes related to "Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts)" Coal Mining Regulatory and...

106

Pages that link to "Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts)" Coal Mining Regulatory and...

107

Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) This is the approved revision of this page, as well...

108

Reverse osmosis desalination and reclamation : control of colloidal and biofouling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this thesis work was on the fundamentals of colloidal and biofouling in reverse osmosis (RO) desalination and reclamation. A novel sodium chloride (more)

Chong, Tzyy Haur.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate and High Temperature Waste Reclamation  

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have developed a highly efficient technology for the reclamation of waste heat in mechanical heat engines widely used in ...

110

Denver Watts to Water | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Denver Watts to Water Denver Watts to Water Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Earn the ENERGY STAR and other recognition Benchmark energy use ENERGY STAR in action Communicate and educate ENERGY STAR communications toolkit Bring Your Green to Work with ENERGY STAR

111

Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Report contains results from utility scale analysis and site visits, as well as facility scale screening and site visits.

Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Van Geet, O.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

Gensheimer, Robert James, III

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Oceanographic Considerations for Desalination Plants in Southern California Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerations for Desalination Plants in SouthernConsiderations for Desalination Plants in Southernfor the Huntington Beach Desalination Project, submitted to

Jenkins, Scott A; Wasyl, Joseph

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Railroad Commission of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas regulates all surface mining activities for the extraction of coal. The Commission acts with the authority of the Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act, which establishes that the state of Texas has exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations in the state, in accordance with the

115

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

116

Life of Plant Activity Estimates for a Nominal 1000 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning nuclear power plant and disposal site managers must understand the radioactive source term of a nuclear power plant to effectively manage disposition of these materials. This study estimates the radioactive source term from nominal 1000 MWe pressurized water and boiling water reactors to support decisions related to radioactive waste storage, processing, and disposal through decommissioning.BackgroundThis study examines the radionuclide ...

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

Identifying Critical Thresholds for Acute Response of Plants and Ecosystems to Water Stress (TARP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The experimental system was able to produce statistically significant differences in soil water status after only for a minimum of 40 days to be effective at producing soil water deficits sufficient to reduce plant water use successfully produced significantly lower soil water contents and water potentials under all treatment trees

119

Coupling of carbon, water, and nutrient interactions in woody plant soil systems. Program and presentation summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of 63 abstracts of presentations made at the International Symposium of Whole-Plant Physiology - coupling of carbon, water, and nutrient interactions in woody plant soil systems held in Knoxville, Tennessee on October 6-11, 1985.

Not Available

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of a demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from reject water of municipal wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reject water, the liquid fraction produced after dewatering of anaerobically digested activated sludge on a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP), contains from 750 to 1500 (more)

Guo, Chenghong.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Regional Studies Program. Extraction of North Dakota lignite: environmental and reclamation issues  

SciTech Connect

This study, sponsored by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, addresses the environmental implications of extraction of coal in North Dakota. These implications are supported by details of the geologic and historical background of the area of focus, the lignite resources in the Fort Union coalfield portion. The particular concentration is on the four-county area of Mercer, Dunn, McLean, and Oliver where substantial coal reserves exist and a potential gasification plant site has been identified. The purposes of this extensive study are to identify the land use and environmental problems and issues associated with extraction; to provide a base of information for assessing the impacts of various levels of extraction; to examine the economics and feasibility of reclamation; and to identify research that needs to be undertaken to evaluate and to improve reclamation practices. The study also includes a description of the physical and chemical soil characteristics and hydrological and climatic factors entailed in extraction, revegetation, and reclamation procedures.

LaFevers, J.R.; Johnson, D.O.; Dvorak, A.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Manual for training reclamation inspectors in the fundamentals of hydrology  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is intended to be a desk reference to help nonhydrologists achieve a basic understanding of hydrology as it relates to surface mining and reclamation. Surface coal mining and reclamation inspectors and other staff will find it useful in implementing regulatory programs. The handbook is not meant to be a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The handbook can be used in the training of surface-mining and reclamation inspectors, both Federal and State, and as a basic reference for inspectors in carrying out their assigned duties. The handbook describes clues and indicators of potential problems, suggests ways to prevent or mitigate them, and discusses various observation and sampling techniques.

Curtis, W.R.; Dyer, K.L.; Williams, G.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Regional Cost Estimates for Reclamation Practices on Arid and Semiarid Lands  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army uses the Integrated Training Area Management program for managing training land. One of the major objectives of the Integrated Training Area Management program has been to develop a method for estimating training land carrying capacity in a sustainable manner. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology measures training load in terms of Maneuver Impact Miles. One Maneuver Impact Mile is the equivalent impact of an M1A2 tank traveling one mile while participating in an armor battalion field training exercise. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology is also designed to predict land maintenance costs in terms of dollars per Maneuver Impact Mile. The overall cost factor is calculated using the historical cost of land maintenance practices and the effectiveness of controlling erosion. Because land maintenance costs and effectiveness are influenced by the characteristics of the land, Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity cost factors must be developed for each ecological region of the country. Costs for land maintenance activities are presented here for the semiarid and arid regions of the United States. Five ecoregions are recognized, and average values for reclamation activities are presented. Because there are many variables that can influence costs, ranges for reclamation activities are also presented. Costs are broken down into six major categories: seedbed preparation, fertilization, seeding, planting, mulching, and supplemental erosion control. Costs for most land reclamation practices and materials varied widely within and between ecological provinces. Although regional cost patterns were evident for some practices, the patterns were not consistent between practices. For the purpose of estimating land reclamation costs for the Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology, it may be desirable to use the ''Combined Average'' of all provinces found in the last row of each table to estimate costs for arid lands in general.

W. K. Ostler

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Thermal reclamation of used blast grit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four reclaimer feasibility tests were conducted with used blast grit from the Long Beach Naval Shipyard. The results of these tests revealed that the organic material component of the used grit was fully oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. Some of the metallic oxides of copper, zinc, titanium, and lead from the used grit were largely elutriated into a cyclonic collector. The calcined (reclaimable) fraction from this test work amounted to approximately 95% of the used grit charged. The major oxide and organic component analyses conducted revealed no significant general chemical difference between the virgin and reclaimed grit. Based on these results, a commercial plant can be designed to provide a reusable grit yield in excess of 80% within the general size specifications. 2 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Sandstrom, W.A.; Patel, J.G.

1988-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Railroad Commission of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas is the regulatory authority for uranium surface mining. Law authorizes the Commission to assure that reclamation of mining sites is possible, to protect land owners and the environment through regulation and permitting, and to ensure that mining is operated within the rules and regulations to prevent unreasonable degradation of

127

Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Facility Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Adams County, Colorado Coordinates 39.8398269°, -104.1930918° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8398269,"lon":-104.1930918,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

128

"1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Reclamation",7079 "2. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "3. Martin","Gas","Florida Power & Light Co",3695 "4. W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power...

129

Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota) This is the approved revision of this page, as well...

130

Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info Start Date 1995 State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources These regulations describe standards relevant to reclamation that must be followed both during and after the completion of mining in a given area. An

131

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advanced Power Plant Modeling with Applications to an Advanced Boiling Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wave fronts. However, in most power plant transient performance models, there are few heat exchangersAdvanced Power Plant Modeling with Applications to an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor and a Heat Introduction This paper presents two advanced modeling methods, and two applications, for power plant

Mitchell, John E.

133

Optimization under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazar; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila Diwekar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optimization Under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Energy and water are both essential to sustainable development and economic productivity. Ample supplies of water are essential to energy production, and water management is dependent on ample supplies of energy for water treatment and transportation. The critical nexus between energy and water has been recognized in a variety of recent studies, but the policy and regulatory machinery that this nexus depends on is not keeping up with the growing challenges. Population growth and societal demand for improved quality of life will require more clean water for drinking and sanitation, more water for

136

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface E&WR - Water-Energy Interface Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation: A Modeling Framework The purpose of this study, conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center at West Virginia University, is to develop and demonstrate a framework for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects, and environmental benefits of using mine water for thermo-electric power generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering, and environmental factors to be considered and evaluated in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. Development and demonstration of the framework involves the following activities: A field investigation and case study conducted for the proposed Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. This 300 megawatt power plant has been proposed to burn coal refuse from the Champion coal refuse pile, which is the largest coal waste pile in Western Pennsylvania. The field study, based on previous mine pool research conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC), identifies mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2,000 to 3,000 gpm power plant water requirement.

137

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Catalytic. System design final report. Volume 2. Preliminary pilot plant design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preliminary design of a solar water desalination pilot plant is presented. Pilot plant drawings and process descriptions are provided. Use of solar and wind energy are discussed. Testing, performance and cost of the pilot plant are studied. (BCS)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

New coal plant technologies will demand more water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population shifts, growing electricity demand, and greater competition for water resources have heightened interest in the link between energy and water. The US Energy Information Administration projects a 22% increase in US installed generating capacity by 2030. Of the 259 GE of new capacity expected to have come on-line by then, more than 192 GW will be thermoelectric and thus require some water for cooling. Our challenge will become balancing people's needs for power and for water. 1 ref., 7 figs.

Peltier, R.; Shuster, E.; McNemar, A.; Stiegel, G.J.; Murphy, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Mound Laboratory's Reclamation and Recycling Program  

SciTech Connect

In keeping with Mound Laboratory's tradition for innovation and forward-looking action, several studies were recently conducted to seek out alternatives to incineration and landfill of all nonradioactive solid waste. Efforts were directed towards reclamation, reuse, and recycling of solid wastes. These efforts resulted in a reclamation and recycling program which is being implemented in three separate phases: 1. Phase I provides for reclamation and recycling of IBM cards, printouts, and white paper. 2. Phase II is designed for reclamation, recycling, or off-site disposal of all wastes generated in buildings and areas where radioactive or explosive wastes are not contained. 3. Phase III provides for reclamation, recycling, or off-site disposal of the remaining wastes not included in Phases I and II. Implementatin would follow successful operation of Phases I and II and would only be implemented after a complete analysis of monitoring and segregation techniques have been established to assure against any possibility of off-site contamination.

Garbe, Yvonne M.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

143

Aalborg Universitet Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aalborg Universitet Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil &, B. (2013). Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas, 2013 #12;Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production

Yang, Zhenyu

144

Development of an artificial neural network-based software for prediction of power plant canal water discharge temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant cooling water systems that interact with nearby effluents are complex non-linear, large-time-delay systems. A neural network-based software tool was developed for prediction of the canal water discharge temperature at a coal-fired power plant ... Keywords: Canal water thermal discharge, Neural networks, Power plants

Carlos E. Romero; Jiefeng Shan

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Precipitation Variability and Surface-Mine Reclamation in the Green, Powder and San Juan River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal and state legislation requires the reclamation of surface-mined lands. Reclamation usually involves landscape shaping and revegetation. In arid and semiarid regions, climate exerts considerable influence on revegetation facility. This ...

Terrence J. Toy

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act imposes permitting and operating restrictions on strip and underground mining activities for coal and uranium, and authorizes the Department of Environmental Quality to administer a

147

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

148

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOENETL R&D Efforts November 1, 2009 DOENETL-311040609 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an...

149

Recent Articles on Water-Related Impacts on Power Plant Siting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States in 1995, USGS Circular 1200, 1998 Recent Articles on Water-Related Impacts on Power Plant Siting and Operation May 2006 Issue of Power Magazine California's Efforts to End...

150

Dynamic Response of Terrestrial Hydrological Cycles and Plant Water Stress to Climate Change in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration CO2 and climate change are expected to have a major effect on terrestrial ecosystem hydrological cycles and plant water stress in the coming decades. The present study investigates the potential responses of ...

Fulu Tao; Zhao Zhang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Institutional impediments to using alternative water sources in thermoelectric power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Obtaining adequate water supplies for cooling and other operations at a reasonable cost is a key factor in siting new and maintaining existing thermoelectric power plant operations. One way to reduce freshwater consumption is to use alternative water sources such as reclaimed (or recycled) water, mine pool water, and other nontraditional sources. The use of these alternative sources can pose institutional challenges that can cause schedule delays, increase costs, or even require plants to abandon their plans to use alternative sources. This report identifies and describes a variety of institutional challenges experienced by power plant owners and operators across the country, and for many of these challenges it identifies potential mitigating approaches. The information comes from publically available sources and from conversations with power plant owners/operators familiar with using alternative sources. Institutional challenges identified in this investigation include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Institutional actions and decisions that are beyond the control of the power plant. Such actions can include changes in local administrative policies that can affect the use of reclaimed water, inaccurate growth projections regarding the amount of water that will be available when needed, and agency workloads and other priorities that can cause delays in the permitting and approval processes. (2) Developing, cultivating, and maintaining institutional relationships with the purveyor(s) of the alternative water source, typically a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and with the local political organizations that can influence decisions regarding the use of the alternative source. Often a plan to use reclaimed water will work only if local politics and power plant goals converge. Even then, lengthy negotiations are often needed for the plans to come to fruition. (3) Regulatory requirements for planning and developing associated infrastructure such as pipelines, storage facilities, and back-up supplies that can require numerous approvals, permits, and public participation, all of which can create delays and increased costs. (4) Permitting requirements that may be difficult to meet, such as load-based discharge limits for wastewater or air emissions limitations for particulate matter (which will be in the mist of cooling towers that use reclaimed water high in dissolved solids). (5) Finding discharge options for cooling tower blowdown of reclaimed water that are acceptable to permitting authorities. Constituents in this wastewater can limit options for discharge. For example, discharge to rivers requires National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits whose limits may be difficult to meet, and underground injection can be limited because many potential injection sites have already been claimed for disposal of produced waters from oil and gas wells or waters associated with gas shale extraction. (6) Potential liabilities associated with using alternative sources. A power plant can be liable for damages associated with leaks from reclaimed water conveyance systems or storage areas, or with mine water that has been contaminated by unscrupulous drillers that is subsequently discharged by the power plant. (7) Community concerns that include, but are not limited to, increased saltwater drift on farmers fields; the possibility that the reclaimed water will contaminate local drinking water aquifers; determining the 'best' use of WWTP effluent; and potential health concerns associated with emissions from the cooling towers that use recycled water. (8) Interveners that raise public concerns about the potential for emissions of emergi

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes Best Technology Available for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plants steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

Gary Vine

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

COST STUDY OF A 100-Mw(e) DIRECT-CYCLE BOILING WATER REACTOR PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A technical and economic evaluation is presented of a direct-cycle light- water boiling reactor designed for natural circulation and internal steam-water separation. The reference lOO-Mw(e) reactor power plant design evolved from the study should have the best chance (compared to similar plants) of approaching the 8 to 9 mill/kwh total power-cost level. (W.D.M.)

Bullinger, C.F.; Harrer, J.M.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Formation and Fate of Trihalomethanes in Power Plant Cooling Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trihalomethanes (THMs) are semi-volatile compounds that form in water when chlorine or bromine reacts with dissolved organic carbon. This report investigates the formation and fate of THM compounds in power plant cooling water systems, THM health risks, a generalized mechanism of THM formation, and the applicability of existing THM research to power plant cooling. The report presents results of a two-site sampling and analytical program designed to identify THM formation potential in cooling towers using...

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

155

DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF MULTI-PASS PRESSURIZED WATER NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS BY ANALOG COMPUTER TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

A kinetic model of the primary loop of a multi-pass pressurized water reactor power plant is developed to evaluate, by analog computer techniques, the transient response characteristics under conditions of steam generator load and reactor control rod perturbations. Using the 2-pass 28 Mw(t) SM-2 reactor as a typical plant, transient behavior patterns are illustrated and examined for a variety of load inputs, variations in plant constants, and analog model simplifications. (auth)

Brondel, J.O.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Foundry Sand Reclamation: CMP Report No. 90-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current environmental regulations have created a situation where the disposal of waste foundry sand has become difficult and expensive. One solution to this problem is the use of a sand reclamation system which "cleans" the sand to a sufficient degree to allow re-use of the sand in the foundry sand system. A large number of sand binder systems are in use for various reasons of cost and performance characteristics. There are also three main methods of sand reclamation and combinations of these. A basic un...

1991-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

PRODUCTION OF HEAVY WATER SAVANNAH RIVER AND DANA PLANTS. Technical Manual  

SciTech Connect

A summary is presented of the basic technical iniormation that pertains to processes that are used at the Dana and Savannah River Plants for the production of heavy water. The manual is intended primarily for plant operating and technical personnel and was prepared to supplement and provide technical support for detailed operating procedures. Introductory sections contain some background information on the history, uses, available processes, and analytical procedures for heavy water. They also include a general comparison of the design and laserformance of the two plants and an analysis of their differences. The technology of the heavy water separation processes used, namely hydrogen sulfide exchange, distillation of water, and electrolysis is discussed in detail. The manufacture and storage of hydrogen sulfide gas and the process water treatment facilities are also discussed. (auth)

Bebbington, W.P.; Thayer, V.R. eds.; Proctor, J.F. comp.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Storm water pollution prevention plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final storm water regulation on November 16, 1990. The storm water regulation is included in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) regulations. An NPDES permit was issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and was effective on July 1, 1995. The permit requires that a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) be developed by December 28, 1995, and be fully implemented by July 1, 1996; this plan has been developed to fulfill that requirement. The outfalls and monitoring points described in this plan contain storm water discharges associated with industrial activities as defined in the NPDES regulations. For storm water discharges associated with industrial activity, including storm water discharges associated with construction activity, that are not specifically monitored or limited in this permit, Y-12 Plant personnel will meet conditions of the General Storm Water Rule 1200-4-10. This document presents the programs and physical controls that are in place to achieve the following objectives: ensure compliance with Section 1200-4-10-.04(5) of the TDEC Water Quality Control Regulations and Part 4 of the Y-12 Plant NPDES Permit (TN0002968); provide operating personnel with guidance relevant to storm water pollution prevention and control requirements for their facility and/or project; and prevent or reduce pollutant discharge to the environment, in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Tennessee Water Quality Control Act.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Davenport Water Pollution Control Plant Biomass Facility | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

160

Foliar water uptake: a common water acquisition strategy for plants of the redwood forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LB (1995) Foliar uptake of water by wet leaves of Sloaneaand the resultant ?lm of water they deposit on foliage slownot greatly increase soil water availability and may provide

Limm, Emily Burns; Simonin, Kevin A.; Bothman, Aron G.; Dawson, Todd E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Jackpile-Paguate Uranium Mine Reclamation Project, Laguna Indian Reservation, Cibola County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Approval of a reclamation plan is proposed for the Jackpile-Paguate uranium mine, located on three leases of Laguna Indian tribal lands in Cibola County, 40 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. The mine was operated by Anaconda Minerals Company from 1953 through early 1982. Of the total 7868 leased acres, 2656 acres were disturbed by mining. The disturbed areas include 3 open pits, 32 waste dumps, 23 protore (subgrade ore) stockpiles, 4 topsoil stockpiles, and 66 acres of buildings and roads. Three alternative plans are under consideration, involving different filling treatments of the open pits. Under Anaconda's proposal, the open pits would be backfilled to at least three feet above projected ground water recovery levels. The DOI plan would involve backfilling the pits with protore, excess material from waste dump resloping, and soil cover the elevations 40 to 70 feet higher than Anaconda's minimum. The pits then would remain as closed basins, or open channels would be constructed to convey runoff from the pit areas to the Rio Paguate. The Laguna proposal would consist of backfilling the pits seven feet above the DOI proposal. For all alternatives, highwall stability techniques would involve removal of loose material and buttressing with waste and overburden. Waste dump slopes would be reduced to between 2:1 and 3:1, and slopes could be terraced. Jackpile Sandstone exposed by resloping would be covered with four feet of overburden and one foot of topsoil. Mine site facilities would either be removed or cleaned up and left intact. All disturbed areas would be covered with topsoil and seeded. Reclamation would be considered complete when revegetated sites reached either 70% or 90% of that found on comparable reference sites. Post-reclamation monitoring periods would be 3, 5, or 10 years, depending on the alternative chosen. Cost estimates range from $54.2 million to $57.4 million.

Not Available

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

WATERMAN: Technical and Economic Guidelines for Evaluating Power Plant Water Management Options: Volumes 1 and 2: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WATERMAN code is the first software specifically designed to assist utility engineers and chemists in developing and revising complex integrated power plant water balances. As such, this IBM PC code enables quick and accurate assessments of water uses throughout the plant, identifies recycle/reuse options, and evaluates the impacts of such options on plant makeup water needs, process water chemistry, and wastewater treatment requirements.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Radiological monitoring plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant: Surface Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant conducts a surface water monitoring program in response to DOE Orders and state of Tennessee requirements under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). The anticipated codification of DOE Order 5400.5 for radiation protection of the public and the environment (10 CFR Part 834) will require an environmental radiation protection plan (ERPP). The NPDES permit issued by the state of Tennessee requires a radiological monitoring plan (RMP) for Y-12 Plant surface waters. In a May 4, 1995 memo, the state of Tennessee, Division of Water Pollution Control, stated their desired needs and goals regarding the content of RMPs, associated documentation, and data resulting from the RMPs required under the NPDES permitting system (L. Bunting, General Discussion, Radiological Monitoring Plans, Tennessee Division of Water Pollution Control, May 4,1995). Appendix A provides an overview of how the Y-12 Plant will begin to address these needs and goals. It provides a more complete, documented basis for the current Y-12 Plant surface water monitoring program and is intended to supplement documentation provided in the Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), NPDES reports, Groundwater Quality Assessment Reports, and studies conducted under the Y-12 Plant Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The purpose of this update to the Y-12 Plant RMP is to satisfy the requirements of the current NPDES permit, DOE Order 5400.5, and 10 CFR Part 834, as current proposed, by defining the radiological monitoring plan for surface water for the Y-12 Plant. This plan includes initial storm water monitoring and data analysis. Related activities such as sanitary sewer and sediment monitoring are also summarized. The plan discusses monitoring goals necessary to determine background concentrations of radionuclides, to quantify releases, determine trends, satisfy regulatory requirements, support consequence assessments, and meet requirements that releases be ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA).

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of modeling the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in EPRI report 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004. This report presents findings of follow-up activities directed toward the ultimate goal of developing an aggregate model that is applicable to the important deposition phenomena in fossil drum-type boilers.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Uses of power plant discharge water in greenhouse production  

SciTech Connect

A TVA research study on the use of waste heat in thermal effluents from power plant, fossil-fired or nuclear, for environmental control in greehhouses is described in terms of the engineering objectives, horticultural obj ectives, design, operation, and performance testing of the greenhouse facility, and preliminary results with an empty greenhouse and one used to grow cucumbers. The engineering system has performed as designed to date, although modifications to permit futare performance evaluations are planned. The horticultural production has been satisfactory to date and other crops, varieties, and rooting media will be tested to increase production. (LCL)

Bond, B.J.; Furlong, W.K.; King, L.D.; Madewell, C.E.; Martin, J.B.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Save water to save energy | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Save water to save energy Save water to save energy Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Purchase energy-saving products Put computers to sleep Get help from an expert Take a comprehensive approach Install renewable energy systems

169

Microelectronics Plant Water Efficiency Improvements at Sandia National Laboratories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandia National Laboratories has developed extensive Sandia National Laboratories has developed extensive water efficiency improvements at its Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications (MESA) complex in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Since 1949, Sandia has developed science-based technologies that support national security: nuclear weapons, energy and infrastruc- ture assurance, nonproliferation, defense systems and assessments, and homeland security. The laboratory sits on 8,699 acres of land and employs more than 10,000 employees and contractors. Altogether, it owns 871 buildings encompassing more than 5.8 million square feet. The MESA complex houses research in microelectronics, including designing and prototyping microsystem-based components. The complex consumes about 28% of the total water used at Sandia. The processes used to create

170

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-water cycles. Deposition in drum boilers has been identified as the area of broadest concern to the industry; therefore, an improved understanding of deposition in drum boilers is expected to represent the greatest source of benefits and value to end users. The overall objective of the modeling described here is to develop a comprehensive, integrated model for deposition process...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of Reclamation dams ORISE has served as lead exercise planner for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation's Critical Infrastructure Exercise Program since its inception in 2003. Six of the dams operated by BOR are designated as National Critical Infrastructure facilities: Flaming Gorge, Folsom, Glen Canyon, Grand Coulee, Hoover and Shasta. The program helps BOR answer an important question-are these massive dams secure in the event of a terrorist attack? Exercise programs for each of these critical facilities typically extend over a 12-month period during which ORISE facilitates a series of exercise events that test emergency response plans. ORISE guides the dam's staff,

174

Applicability of Nanotechnology to Fossil Plant Water-Steam Cycles: Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The control of water purity, even to part per billion (ppb) levels, is vital to the energy efficiency and economic performance of fossil power stations. Failure to control levels of potentially aggressive impurities in the water-steam cycle can cause corrosion and even catastrophic failures. There is also a need to find and explore filtration technologies for power plants to improve reduction in metal oxides transport to vulnerable components. This report presents the findings of an investigation of the ...

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reclamation of plutonium from pyrochemical processing residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have jointly developed a process to recover plutonium from molten salt extraction residues. These NaCl, KCL, and MgCl/sub 2/ residues, which are generated in the pyrochemical extraction of /sup 241/Am from aged plutonium metal, contain up to 25 wt % dissolved plutonium and up to 2 wt % americium. The overall objective was to develop a process to convert these residues to a pure plutonium metal product and discardable waste. To meet this objective a combination of pyrochemical and aqueous unit operations was used. The first step was to scrub the salt residue with a molten metal (aluminum and magnesium) to form a heterogeneous ''scrub alloy'' containing nominally 25 wt % plutonium. This unit operation, performed at RFP, effectively separated the actinides from the bulk of the chloride salts. After packaging in aluminum cans, the ''scrub alloy'' was then dissolved in a nitric acid - hydrofluoric acid - mercuric nitrate solution at SRP. Residual chloride was separated from the dissolver solution by precipitation with Hg/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ followed by centrifuging. Plutonium was then separated from the aluminum, americium and magnesium using the Purex solvent extraction system. The /sup 241/Am was diverted to the waste tank farm, but could be recovered if desired.

Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.; Holcomb, H.P.; Chostner, D.F.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Water Use Efficiency in Plant Growth and Ambient Carbon Dioxide Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report examines the validity and explores the practical implications of the proposition that CO2 enrichment of the leaf environment enhances plant growth and, simultaneously decreases plant water use. A theoretical analysis of the water and carbon dioxide balance of plant leaves was made in the form of a computer program based upon known physiological facts. It predicts significant increases in water use efficiency by plants as CO is enriched, the size of the increase depending upon the external conditions. Experimental tests were conducted in an environmental simulator with stands of soybean, pepper and southern pea plants. The predictions of the model were substantially verified, with CO2 concentrations ranging from normal to six-fold normal. Although CO2 is obviously an ideal antitranspirant, the efficacy of its release in open stands is doubtful in view of plausible economic factors. Butt in enclosures this would be a different matter, and for such situations the present report gives a scientific basis for engineering and system analysis.

van Bavel, C. H. M.

1972-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

In-line continuous monitoring system improve water plant EOR performance  

SciTech Connect

To optimize water plant performance and reduce maintenance expense, Unocal has installed a continuous produced-water monitoring system at its Dome water plant, which serves an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project east of Bakersfield, Calif. These EOR leases are producing approximately 12,000 b/d of oil by injection of 40,000 equivalent b/d of steam. More than 75% of the water required for steaming is obtained by recycling produced water through separation and filtration stages to remove the residual oil and solids. The recycled water is then softened prior to being returned to the steam generators. Under normal operating conditions, produced water received at the main collection tank ranges from 50-200 ppm oil, and is reduced to 5 ppm or less downstream of the dissolved air flotation unit. The plant has been in operation for over 8 years and during that time has experienced the usual number of upsets in the oil-water separation system. These upsets have resulted in additional maintenance expenses to clean fouled garnet and anthracite in the multimedia filters, replace cartridge filter elements, and clean (sometimes replace) softener resin. Direct costs associated with these failures were estimated to be in excess of $30,000/year. Unocal had tried monitoring systems, with poor results due to low reliability or insufficient accuracy before it found a satisfactory system. It was an MPS-3000 in-line continuous monitor, manufactured by the Micro Pure Division of Rexnord Automation. Unlike previously tested monitors, this unit operates on a detection principle of reflected ultrasonic energy, a low maintenance design which would theoretically be unaffected by components other than oil and solids in the produced water.

Morin, R.J.; Gaucher, D.E.

1986-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the basis of the oceanic food web the surface, corals and other deepwater OIL AND HUMAN USE Wellhead CORALS · Coral surveys · Tissue collections · Transect surveys to detect submerged oil · Oil plume modeling · Sediment sampling AQUATIC VEGETATION

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydrogen Water Chemistry Effects on BWR Radiation Buildup: Volume 1: Laboratory Results and Plant Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diverse laboratory experiments and a review of the most recent dose rate data from operating plants identify some of the key factors responsible for the increase in shutdown radiation fields at a number of BWRs following implementation of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). These insights suggest strategies to minimize radiation field increases under HWC and to avoid possible problems during chemical decontamination.

1994-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Martin Marietta Corporation. Pilot plant final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the technical effort of Martin Marietta Corporation, in association with Black and Veatch International as a subcontractor for the trade studies performed to design a Solar Desalination Pilot Plant is documented. The final system configuration utilizes existing technology to convert seawater to potable water. This technology includes the collection of solar energy, storage of this energy in a fluid heat transfer medium, generation of steam and electricity from this stored energy, utilization of low pressure turbine exhaust steam as a source of energy to distill salt water, and also generation of potable water through the use of a reverse osmosis unit.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Characteristics of water chemistry in heavy water recovery system of nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The moisture inside the coolant and moderator system areas of Candu-type nuclear power plant is recycled to prevent the deuterium of value from being lost and the tritium of harm from being spread to the natural environment. The deuterium is separated ... Keywords: anion, breakthrough time, cation, deuterium recovery, ion exchange, resin ratio

In Hyoung Rhee; Hyun Kyoung Ahn; Hyun Jun Jeong

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Condensate Polishing Guidelines for Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor Plants - 2004 Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful condensate polishing allows more reliable operation of nuclear units by maintaining control of ionic and particulate impurity transport to the pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators and the boiling water reactor (BWR) and recirculation system. This report presents revisions of EPRI's 1997 nuclear industry consensus guidelines for the design and operation of deep bed and filter demineralizer condensate polishers. These guidelines are consistent with the 2000 revisions of EPRI's "BWR W...

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Influence of Soil Cap Depth and Vegetation on Reclamation of Phosphogypsum Stacks in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study quantified environmental parameters to develop reclamation strategies for phosphogypsum stacks. Research was conducted on phosphogypsum stack experimental plots established in 2006 (6 soil (more)

Turner, Elizabeth Lenore

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Optimality and Conductivity for Water Flow: From Landscapes, to Unsaturated Soils, to Plant Leaves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimality principles have been widely used in many areas. Based on an optimality principle that any flow field will tend toward a minimum in the energy dissipation rate, this work shows that there exists a unified form of conductivity relationship for three different flow systems: landscapes, unsaturated soils and plant leaves. The conductivity, the ratio of water flux to energy gradient, is a power function of water flux although the power value is system dependent. This relationship indicates that to minimize energy dissipation rate for a whole system, water flow has a small resistance (or a large conductivity) at a location of large water flux. Empirical evidence supports validity of the relationship for landscape and unsaturated soils (under gravity dominated conditions). Numerical simulation results also show that the relationship can capture the key features of hydraulic structure for a plant leaf, although more studies are needed to further confirm its validity. Especially, it is of interest that according to this relationship, hydraulic conductivity for gravity-dominated unsaturated flow, unlike that defined in the classic theories, depends on not only capillary pressure (or saturation), but also the water flux. Use of the optimality principle allows for determining useful results that are applicable to a broad range of areas involving highly non-linear processes and may not be possible to obtain from classic theories describing water flow processes.

Liu, H.H.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy penalty analysis of possible cooling water intake structurerequirements on existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that cooling water intake structures must reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. Many existing power plants in the United States utilize once-through cooling systems to condense steam. Once-through systems withdraw large volumes (often hundreds of millions of gallons per day) of water from surface water bodies. As the water is withdrawn, fish and other aquatic organisms can be trapped against the screens or other parts of the intake structure (impingement) or if small enough, can pass through the intake structure and be transported through the cooling system to the condenser (entrainment). Both of these processes can injure or kill the organisms. EPA adopted 316(b) regulations for new facilities (Phase I) on December 18, 2001. Under the final rule, most new facilities could be expected to install recirculating cooling systems, primarily wet cooling towers. The EPA Administrator signed proposed 316(b) regulations for existing facilities (Phase II) on February 28, 2002. The lead option in this proposal would allow most existing facilities to achieve compliance without requiring them to convert once-through cooling systems to recirculating systems. However, one of the alternate options being proposed would require recirculating cooling in selected plants. EPA is considering various options to determine best technology available. Among the options under consideration are wet-cooling towers and dry-cooling towers. Both types of towers are considered to be part of recirculating cooling systems, in which the cooling water is continuously recycled from the condenser, where it absorbs heat by cooling and condensing steam, to the tower, where it rejects heat to the atmosphere before returning to the condenser. Some water is lost to evaporation (wet tower only) and other water is removed from the recirculating system as a blow down stream to control the building up of suspended and dissolved solids. Makeup water is withdrawn, usually from surface water bodies, to replace the lost water. The volume of makeup water is many times smaller than the volume needed to operate a once-through system. Although neither the final new facility rule nor the proposed existing facility rule require dry cooling towers as the national best technology available, the environmental community and several States have supported the use of dry-cooling technology as the appropriate technology for addressing adverse environmental impacts. It is possible that the requirements included in the new facility rule and the ongoing push for dry cooling systems by some stakeholders may have a role in shaping the rule for existing facilities. The temperature of the cooling water entering the condenser affects the performance of the turbine--the cooler the temperature, the better the performance. This is because the cooling water temperature affects the level of vacuum at the discharge of the steam turbine. As cooling water temperatures decrease, a higher vacuum can be produced and additional energy can be extracted. On an annual average, once-through cooling water has a lower temperature than recirculated water from a cooling tower. By switching a once-through cooling system to a cooling tower, less energy can be generated by the power plant from the same amount of fuel. This reduction in energy output is known as the energy penalty. If a switch away from once-through cooling is broadly implemented through a final 316(b) rule or other regulatory initiatives, the energy penalty could result in adverse effects on energy supplies. Therefore, in accordance with the recommendations of the Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group (better known as the May 2001 National Energy Policy), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), has studied the energy penalty resulting from converting plants with once-through cooling to wet towers or indirect-dry towers. Five l

Veil, J. A.; Littleton, D. J.; Gross, R. W.; Smith, D. N.; Parsons, E.L., Jr.; Shelton, W. W.; Feeley, T. J.; McGurl, G. V.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Reclamation and reuse of freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

SciTech Connect

ADS is using a commercially available solvent reclamation system to recycle 95-97 percent of the Freon used in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses. ADS has further developed the commercially available solvent reclamation system to accommodate radioactive contaminated Freon. This report establishes the following: validity of the method; success of recycling; and effect of radionuclides in recycling radioactive contaminated Freon. The standard analysis method for determining total petroleum hydrocarbons (commonly known as oil and grease determination) involves solvent extraction of the hydrocarbons using Freon followed by quantitation using infrared detection. This has been the method of choice because it is simple, rugged, inexpensive, and applicable to both solid and liquid samples and to radioactive samples. Due to its deleterious effect on the ozone layer, the use of Freon and other chloro-fluorocarbons (CFCs) has been greatly restricted. Freon has become very expensive (800$/liter) and will soon be unavailable entirely. Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon extraction method. These methods include solid-phase extraction, solvent extraction, and supercritical fluid extraction all of which use gravimetric determination or infrared analysis of the extracted hydrocarbons. These methods are not as precise or as sensitive as the Freon extraction method, and a larger amount of sample is therefore required due to the decreased sensitivity. The solid phase extraction method cannot accommodate solid samples. Supercritical fluid extraction requires expensive instrumentation. ADS opted to keep the existing Freon method and recycle the solvent. An inexpensive solvent reclamation system was procured to reclaim the spent Freon. This reclaimer removes hydrocarbons from the Freon solvent by passage through an activated carbon bed.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Peterson, S.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Plant cover and water balance in gravel admixtures at an arid waste-burial site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isolation of radioactive waste buried in unsaturated zones will require long-term control of recharge and erosion. Soil covers control recharge at and sites by storing rainwater close enough to the surface to be removed by evapotranspiration. Surface layers of rock or gravel control erosion at sites with sparse vegetation, but can also alter plant habitat and cause recharge through interred waste. As an alternative, gravel mixed into the uppermost soil law may control erosion ever the king-term better than surface gravel layers. Gravel admixtures may also not influence plant establishment or sod water balance in waste-site covers. The interactive effects of gravel admixture concentration, vegetation, and precipitation on soil water content and plant cover were measured at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Results support use of a combination of vegetation and gravel admixtures for erosion control. Vegetation seasonally depleted root zone water storage to about 6.5 volume % regardless of precipitation amount or the presence of gravel admixture amendments. In contrast, yearly increases in soil water storage as deep as 225 cm in plots without vegetation may be a leading indicator of recharge. The composition and abundance of vegetation changed over time and with precipitation amount, but was not influenced by gravel amendments. Seeded wheatgrasses [Agropyron sibericum Wilde and Agropyron dasystachyum (Hook.) Scribn.] established only when irrigated with twice average precipitation, but persisted after the irrigation ceased. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) and Russian thistle (Salsola kali L.) colonized areas receiving both irrigation and ambient precipitation. Stands with wheatgrasses extracted water more rapidly and depleted soil water to lower levels than cheatgrass-dominated stands. Increases in gravel cover and near-surface gravel concentrations after 5 yr were evidence of the formation of a protective gravel veneer. 44 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Waugh, W.J. [Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, CO (United States); Thiede, M.E.; Bates, D.J. [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOE/NETL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Non-Traditional Water Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOE/NETL R&D Efforts November 1, 2009 DOE/NETL-311/040609 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

194

Patterns of fish assemblage structure and dynamics in waters of the Savannah River Plant. Comprehensive Cooling Water Study final report  

SciTech Connect

Research conducted as part of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) has elucidated many factors that are important to fish population and community dynamics in a variety of habitats on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Information gained from these studies is useful in predicting fish responses to SRP operations. The overall objective of the CCWS was (1) to determine the environmental effects of SRP cooling water withdrawals and discharges and (2) to determine the significance of the cooling water impacts on the environment. The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine the effects of thermal plumes on anadromous and resident fishes, including overwintering effects, in the SRP swamp and associated tributary streams; (2) assess fish spawning and locate nursery grounds on the SRP; (3) examine the level of use of the SRP by spawning fish from the Savannah River, this objective was shared with the Savannah River Laboratory, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company; and (4) determine impacts of cooling-water discharges on fish population and community attributes. Five studies were designed to address the above topics. The specific objectives and a summary of the findings of each study are presented.

Aho, J.M.; Anderson, C.S.; Floyd, K.B.; Negus, M.T.; Meador, M.R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Storm water runoff for the Y-12 Plant and selected parking lots  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of storm water runoff from the Y-12 Plant and selected employee vehicle parking lots to various industry data is provided in this document. This work is an outgrowth of and part of the continuing Non-Point Source Pollution Elimination Project that was initiated in the late 1980s. This project seeks to identify area pollution sources and remediate these areas through the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process as managed by the Environmental Restoration Organization staff. This work is also driven by the Clean Water Act Section 402(p) which, in part, deals with establishing a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for storm water discharges. Storm water data from events occurring in 1988 through 1991 were analyzed in two reports: Feasibility Study for the Best Management Practices to Control Area Source Pollution Derived from Parking Lots at the DOE Y-12 Plant, September 1992, and Feasibility Study of Best Management Practices for Non-Point Source Pollution Control at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, February 1993. These data consisted of analysis of outfalls discharging to upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) within the confines of the Y-12 Plant (see Appendixes D and E). These reports identified the major characteristics of concern as copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nitrate (as nitrogen), zinc, biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), fecal coliform, and aluminum. Specific sources of these contaminants were not identifiable because flows upstream of outfalls were not sampled. In general, many of these contaminants were a concern in many outfalls. Therefore, separate sampling exercises were executed to assist in identifying (or eliminating) specific suspected sources as areas of concern.

Collins, E.T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluation of plant seedling water stress using dynamic fluorescence index with blue LED-based fluorescence imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic fluorescence image index system capable of non-destructive assessment of water stress in cabbage seedlings was developed. The quenching curves of chlorophyll fluorescence characteristic to the plant's water stress status under reduced excitation ... Keywords: Chlorophyll fluorescence, Fluorescence image, Fluorescence index, Water stress

Shih-Chieh Hsiao; Suming Chen; I-Chang Yang; Chia-Tseng Chen; Chao-Yin Tsai; Yung-Kun Chuang; Feng-Jehng Wang; Yu-Liang Chen; Tzong-Shyan Lin; Y. Martin Lo

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Accounting strategy of tritium inventory in the heavy water detritiation pilot plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a methodology for determination of tritium inventory in a tritium removal facility. The method proposed is based on the developing of computing models for accountancy of the mobile tritium inventory in the separation processes, of the stored tritium and of the trapped tritium inventory in the structure of the process system components. The configuration of the detritiation process is a combination of isotope catalytic exchange between water and hydrogen (LPCE) and the cryogenic distillation of hydrogen isotopes (CD). The computing model for tritium inventory in the LPCE process and the CD process will be developed basing on mass transfer coefficients in catalytic isotope exchange reactions and in dual-phase system (liquid-vapour) of hydrogen isotopes distillation process. Accounting of tritium inventory stored in metallic hydride will be based on in-bed calorimetry. Estimation of the trapped tritium inventory can be made by subtraction of the mobile and stored tritium inventories from the global tritium inventory of the plant area. Determinations of the global tritium inventory of the plant area will be made on a regular basis by measuring any tritium quantity entering or leaving the plant area. This methodology is intended to be applied to the Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea (Romania) and to the Cernavoda Tritium Removal Facility (which will be built in the next 5-7 years). (authors)

Bidica, N.; Stefanescu, I. [Inst. of Cryogenics and Isotopes Technologies, Uzinei Str. No. 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Cristescu, I. [TLK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.; Lazar, A.; Vasut, F.; Pearsica, C.; Stefan, I. [Inst. of Cryogenics and Isotopes Technologies, Uzinei Str. No. 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Prisecaru, I.; Sindilar, G. [Univ. Politehnica of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Coal-Combustion and Biomass-Pyrolysis Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov Heino Beckert Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 MS C04 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov 04/2008 Carbon Sequestration Enhancing carbon SEquEStration and rEclamation of dEgradEd landS with coal-combuStion and biomaSS-PyrolySiS ProductS Background Terrestrial sequestration of carbon can occur by three mechanisms, all of which first require "capture" or fixation of atmospheric carbon by photosynthesis into plant tissues. If captured by herbaceous plants, much of the carbon is quickly

200

Water Use in Parabolic Trough Power Plants: Summary Results from WorleyParsons' Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) contracted with WorleyParsons Group, Inc. to examine the effect of switching from evaporative cooling to alternative cooling systems on a nominal 100-MW parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) plant. WorleyParsons analyzed 13 different cases spanning three different geographic locations (Daggett, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Alamosa, Colorado) to assess the performance, cost, and water use impacts of switching from wet to dry or hybrid cooling systems. NREL developed matching cases in its Solar Advisor Model (SAM) for each scenario to allow for hourly modeling and provide a comparison to the WorleyParsons results.Our findings indicate that switching from 100% wet to 100% dry cooling will result in levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) increases of approximately 3% to 8% for parabolic trough plants throughout most of the southwestern United States. In cooler, high-altitude areas like Colorado's San Luis Valley, WorleyParsons estimated the increase at only 2.5%, while SAM predicted a 4.4% difference. In all cases, the transition to dry cooling will reduce water consumption by over 90%. Utility time-of-delivery (TOD) schedules had similar impacts for wet- and dry-cooled plants, suggesting that TOD schedules have a relatively minor effect on the dry-cooling penalty.

Turchi, C. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C. F.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Membrane Filtration and Ozonation of Poultry Chiller Overflow Water: Study of Membrane Treatment To Reduce Water Use and Ozonation for Sanitation at a Poultry Processing Plant in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poultry processing plants use large volume of water and the cost of obtaining and disposal of water is increasing rapidly. HACCP quality control procedures introduced recently have increased the water and compounded the situation. Chlorine is widely used in sanitation of poultry operations. Chlorine generates several byproducts that are proven to be harmful from food safety and environmental points of view. The search for alternatives to chlorine in poultry operations, particularly in the chiller, is of ...

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants  

SciTech Connect

Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

Not Available

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report.

Edward Levy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

Austin, B.A.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

205

Assessment of Ice Plugging of the Cooling Water Intake at American Electric Power's Conesville Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Electrical Power (AEP) Conesville power plant is shutting down the last unit that uses a once-through cooling system. Currently, warm water from the existing cooling system is routed to the intake area to control ice buildup. After the last unit is shut down, there will be no control of the ice buildup in the trash racks, making complete blockage of the intake facility a possibility. A sediment-control structure was built in 2000 to prevent sediment buildup at the intake facility. The sedime...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.

Edward Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Wei Zhang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Water effects of the use of western coal for electrical production  

SciTech Connect

Water may be a constraint on the expanded development of coal resources in the semi-arid western United States. Water allocation in the West has been determined by the appropriative rights doctrine which allows perpetual use of water sources by those who first claim it for beneficial purposes. This has had the effect of placing a dominative interest in water allocation in one economic sector: agriculture. New water sources are available to coal producers but political and economic problems must be overcome. Water is required by every phase of coal development. Mines use water for dust control and land reclamation. Coal slurry pipelines would use water as a transport medium. Steam electric power plants use water for cooling, cleaning, and in the boiler. Coal gasification plants would use water for cooling, cleaning, and as a material input. In addition to these direct uses of water by coal development, the people who build and operate the development demand water for domestic and recreational purposes. The quantity of water required for a given element of a coal development is site specific and dependent on many factors. The available literature cites a range of estimates of the amount of water required for each type of development. The width of this range seems related to the stage of development of the particular technology. Estimates of water requirements for various schemes to provide an average electrical load of 9 GWe to a load center 1000 miles from western mines are shown in Table 5.

Rogers, E.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter ($15 to $60 per 1000 gallons), with treatment costs accounting for 13 ?? 23% of the overall cost. Results from this project suggest that produced water is a potential large source of cooling water, but treatment and transportation costs for this water are large.

Chad Knutson; Seyed Dastgheib; Yaning Yang; Ali Ashraf; Cole Duckworth; Priscilla Sinata; Ivan Sugiyono; Mark Shannon; Charles Werth

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pierina noceti Pierina noceti Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5428 pierina.noceti@netl.doe.gov steven I. apfelbaum Principal Investigator Applied Ecological Services, Inc. 17921 Smith Road P.O. Box 256 Brodhead, WI 53520 608-897-8641 steve@appliedeco.com Wetland Water Cooling PartnershiP: the Use of restored Wetlands to enhanCe thermoeleCtriC PoWer Plant Cooling and mitigate the demand on sUrfaCe Water Use Background Thermoelectric power plants require a significant volume of water to operate, accounting for 39 percent of freshwater (136 billion gallons per day) withdrawn in the United States in 2000, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study. This significant use of water ranks second only to the agricultural sector

210

Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants All Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. This relates to the volume of circulating water, hot water temperature on the tower, cold water discharge, and wet bulb temperature (consisting of ambient temperature and relative humidity). After the tower is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, engineers look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on-stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: 1. The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for. 2. Slippage due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation. 3. The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome. 4. New plant expansion needs additional water volume and possibly colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance- Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants all Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. This relates to the volume of circulatlng water, hot water temperature on the tower, cold water temperature discharge, and wet bulb temperature (consisting of ambient temperature and relative humidity). After the tower is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, engineers look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on-stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: 1. The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for. 2. "Slippage" due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation. 3. The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome (1). 4. New plant expansion needs additional water volume and possibly colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

Dreher, G.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Development of a thermal reclamation system for spent blasting abrasive  

SciTech Connect

Abrasive blasting is the most economical method for paint removal from large surface areas such as the hulls and tanks of oceangoing vessels. Tens of thousands of tons of spent abrasive are generated annually by blasting operations in private and US Navy shipyards. Some of this material is classified as hazardous waste, and nearly all of it is currently being either stockpiled or disposed in landfills. The rapid decline in available landfill space and corresponding rise in landfill tipping fees pose a severe problem for shipyard operators throughout the US. This paper discusses the results of a research and development program initiated by the Institute of Gas Technology and supported by the US Navy to develop and test a fluidized-bed thermal reclamation system for spent abrasive waste minimization. Bench- and pilot-scale reclaimer tests and reclaimed abrasive performance tests are described along with the current status of a program to build and test a 5-ton/hour prototype reclaimer at a US Navy shipyard.

Bryan, B.B.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rehmat, A.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

NONE

1993-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Exxon Research and Engineering. System design final report, Volume 2. Appendices baseline plant design details seawater feed (System A)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The details of the design of a conceptual baseline solar desalination plant are provided. Yanbu, Saudi Arabia is the site for the plant. Details are defined for several of the plant subsystems including: energy storage, energy delivery, reverse osmosis/multiple effect distillation, water storage, waste disposal, backup power generation, controls and instrumentation, data acquisition, and facilities and enclosures subsystems. The plant equipment is listed and process flow diagrams are included. Cost estimates and economic analyses of the plant are documented. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A-54: Used Foundry Sand Reclamation in New Vibratory Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... as Shielding Materials for Electromagnetic Interference and Radiation Shielding ... for Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators during Cold-Working Process.

217

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Preliminary performance estimates and value analyses for binary geothermal power plants using ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids in binary geothermal power generation systems is investigated. The available thermodynamic data is discussed and the methods of extrapolating this data to give the quantities needed to perform analyses of the system is given. Results indicated that for a system without a recuperator and with a working fluid which is 50 percent by mass of each constituent, the geofluid effectiveness (watt-hr/lbm geofluid) is 84 percent of that for the 50MW Heber Plant. The cost of generating electric power for this system was estimated to be 9 percent greater than for the Heber Plant. However, if a recuperator is incorporated in the system (using the turbine exhaust to preheat and partially boil the working fluid) the geofluid effectiveness becomes 102 percent of that for the Heber Plant, and the cost of electricity is 5-1/4 percent lower (relative to the Heber Plant) because of less expensive equipment resulting from lower pressure, better heat transfer, and less working fluid to handle for the ammonia-water plant. These results do not necessarily represent the optimum system. Because of uncertainty in thermodynamic properties, it was felt that detailed optimization was not practical at this point. It was concluded that use of nonazeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons as working fluids should be studied before expending further effort in the investigation of the ammonia-water mixtures.

Bliem, C.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Forecasting models for operating and maintenance cost of the pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted in cooperation with the Department of Industrial Engineering of King Abdulaziz University. The main objective of this study is to meet some of the goals of the Solar Energy Water Desalination Plant (SEWDP) plan in the area of economic evaluation. The first part of this project focused on describing the existing trend in the operation and maintenance (OandM) cost for the SOLERAS Solar Energy Water Desalination Plant in Yanbu. The second part used the information obtained on existing trends to find suitable forecasting models. These models, which are found here, are sensitive to changes in costs trends. Nevertheless, the study presented here has established the foundation for (OandM) costs estimating in the plant. The methodologies used in this study should continue as more data on operation and maintenance costs become available, because, in the long run, the trend in costs will help determine where cost effectiveness might be improved. 7 refs., 24 figs., 15 tabs.

Al-Idrisi, M.; Hamad, G.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cooling Requirements and Water Use Impacts of Advanced Coal-fired Power Plants with CO2 Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to the large cost impact that comes with including CO2 capture in coal power plants, the consumption of water also increases. The increase in water consumption could represent a significant barrier to the implementation of CO2 capture. Although it is assumed that technology improvements might reduce the cost and power consumption of future CO2 capture systems, it might not be feasible to implement CO2 capture if additional water is not available at a site. In addition, because many regions of...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) Interconnect Between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and Replacement of Rio Grande Diversion Pumping Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for the capital renovation project proposed by the Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (a.k.a. San Benito) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. Both nominal and real, expected economic and financial costs of water and energy savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for both components of the proposed project (i.e., a lined interconnect between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and replacement of the Rio Grande diversion pumping plant). Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Expected cost of water savings and cost of energy savings for both components are aggregated into a composite set of cost measures for the total proposed project. Aggregate cost of water savings is estimated to be $41.26 per ac-ft and energy savings are measured at an aggregate value of $0.0001586 per BTU (i.e., $0.541 per kwh). In addition, expected values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamations three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $157.07 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001777 per BTU ($0.606 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.80.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with a Powder River Basin coal to measure the effects of fluidization velocity and drying temperature on rate of drying in a batch drying process. Comparisons to computational results using the batch bed drying model show good agreement. Comparisons to drying results with North Dakota lignite at the same process conditions confirm the lignite dries slightly more rapidly than the PRB. Experiments were also carried out to determine the effects of inlet air humidity on drying rate. The specific humidity ranged from a value typical for air at temperatures near freezing to a value for 30 C air at 90 percent relative humidity. The experimental results show drying rate is strongly affected by inlet air humidity, with the rate decreasing with more humid inlet air. The temperature of the drying process also plays a strong role, with the negative impacts of high inlet moisture being less of a factor in a higher temperature drying process. Concepts for coal drying systems integrated into a power plant were developed. These make use of hot circulating cooling water from the condenser, steam extraction from the turbine cycle and thermal energy extracted from hot flue gas, in various combinations. Analyses are under way to calculate the effects of drying system design and process conditions on unit performance, emissions, and cooling tower makeup water.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Efficient Water Use & Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Use Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility: Using reverse osmosis to superpurify water reduces bacterial growth and mineral build up, allowing the system to circulate water up to four times in the High-Performance Computing Center. LANSCE cooling towers circulate water for evaporative cooling. LANL is testing methods for decreased water and chemical use at this location. Gabriel C. Herrera of LANL checks gauges on piping inside the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility (SERF). Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility: In an effort to reduce water consumption, the SERF was constructed to treat and process sanitary effluent water used for cooling the supercomputing facilities. Sandia Canyon: Water from the SERF is used to keep the wetlands healthy to transform hexavalent into trivalent chromium.

225

Simulation of Evapotranspiration and Its Response to Plant Water and CO2 Transfer Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evapotranspiration (ET) is controlled by atmospheric demand, plant and soil hydraulic constraints, and the plant physiological activities that determine canopy resistance. This paper introduces a new ET scheme developed for the Ecological ...

Shusen Wang

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Stochastic Optimization Approach to Water Management in Cooling-Constrained Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constraints and weather conditions on generation capacity. In a pulverized coal power plant study we have source of freshwater withdrawals in the United States [10]. In base-load power plants (i.e., coal of evaporation. A 500 MW coal-fired power plant that employs once-through cooling can use more than 10 million

227

? U. S. Bureau of ReclamationPreface Preface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In California, water is precious, competition for water is fierce, and conservation is critical. The value that Californians place on water is reflected in a constitutional provision ensuring its reasonable and beneficial use. Article X, section 2 of the California Constitution prohibits the waste and unreasonable use of this precious resource. All water within the state is the property of the state, but the right to use water may be acquired under California law. To manage competition for scarce water supplies, California has an appropriative water right system that provides for the orderly development of the state's water resources while safeguarding against waste and unreasonable use. Despite constitutional provisions prohibiting waste and a system of water rights to manage allocations, water conservation has always been important. California has a long history of laws, policies and practices that promote water conservation. Conservation and efficiency of water usage are recognized least-cost strategies to help ensure a vital economy, a healthy environment, and a high standard of living. As our understanding, knowledge and technology improve, we have learned that our use of water for given purposes can also improve. Statutes and policies have been instituted that

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

Lata

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

230

DESIGN FEATURES AND OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE NEW BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY RADIATION LAUNDRY AND RECLAMATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Facilities and procedures for the decontamination, reclamation, or disposal of radioactively contaminated tools, equipment, and clothing are described. For safety and economy these operations are grouped in a facility with specially designed ventilation and controls under the supervision of a health physicist. (auth)

Pearsall, S.f Gemmell, L.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Influence of the Mushroom Compost Application on the Microorganism Quantity of Reclamated Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mushroom compost which was produced from farm can be used to improving the quality of the reclamated soil. On the one hand, the question about environmental pollution made by the mushroom compost is solved, and on the other hand, it can improve the ... Keywords: mushroom material, micro-organisms, soil quality

Liu Xueran; Li Xinju; Li Bing

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 1, Sand reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mobile thermal foundry sand reclamation unit was designed and constructed. This unit consisted of thermal and mechanical sand reclamation equipment installed on the bed of a 50 foot low-boy trailer. It was transported to a number of Midwest foundries for on-site demonstration of the sand reclamation process. This allowed participating foundries to have their own refuse sand (10-100 tons) processed and then reused in production for evaluation. The purpose for building the unit was to demonstrate to foundries through ``hands on`` experience that refuse sands can be reclaimed and successfully reused particularly in regard to product quality. Most of the participating foundries indicated a high level of satisfaction with the reclaimed sand. Laboratory testing of samples of the used sand, before and after processing by the demonstration unit, verified the usability of the reclaimed sand. One of the foundries participating was a brass foundry, the sand from this foundry contained lead and is classified as a hazardous material. After reclamation the sand was no longer hazardous and could also be reused in the foundry.

Vondra, L.F.; Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-year (1994-98) project on using blends of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) and biosolids in agriculture, horticulture, and land reclamation was undertaken to assess agronomic value, environmental safety, and potential economic use of these materials.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Program on Technology Innovation - Use of Natural Peat to Remediate Contaminated Water at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the use of natural peat to remediate contaminated groundwater, including its potential use in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. Readers will find descriptions of peat's properties and the mechanisms by which it removes contaminants from water, results of laboratory and field studies using natural peat to remove specific environmental contaminants, and recommendations for modifications that can enhance peat's removal efficiency.

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

Impacts of operation of CVP regulating reservoirs on water temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets and transmits electric power throughout 15 western states. Western's Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region (Sierra Nevada Region) markets approximately 1,480 megawatts (MW) of firm power (and 100 MW of seasonal peaking capacity) from the Central Valley Project (CVP) and other sources and markets available nonfirm power from the Washoe Project. Western's mission is to sell and deliver electricity generated from CVP powerplants. The hydroelectric facilities of the CVP are operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation). Reclamation manages and releases water in accordance with the various acts authorizing specific projects and with enabling legislation. Western's capacity and energy sales must be in conformance with the laws that govern its sale of electrical power. Further, Western's hydropower operations at each facility must comply with minimum and maximum flows and other constraints set by Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, or other agencies, acting in accord with law or policy.

Vail, L.W.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

SciTech Connect

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

WATER QUALITY CONTROL POLICY ON THE USE OF COASTAL AND ESTUARINE WATERS FOR POWER PLANT COOLING Draft Final Substitute Environmental Document State Water Resources Control Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Water Board also contributed to this documents preparation. The authors also wish to acknowledge previous contributions to this project by Ms. Sheila Vassey (State Water Board), Mr. Adam Laputz (currently

California Environmental; Protection Agency; Ms. Kim Ward; Mr. Michael Gjerde; Mr. Frank Roddy Of The

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy and water development appropriations for 2000. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session, March 25, 1999  

SciTech Connect

These hearings focus on what is happening in the Corps of Engineers and in the Bureau of Reclamation in regard to water supply and management issues in Florida, California, and Colorado. Details of the FY 2000 budget request for the Bureau of Reclamation are addressed. An estimated $2.2 billion will be provided in permanent appropriations.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Digital computer code for simulating the dynamics of full-size dual-purpose desalting plants using a pressurized water reactor as a heat source  

SciTech Connect

A digital simulator was developed for use in calculating the dynamic response of full-size dual-purpose desalting plants. This simulator consists of a multistage flash (MSF) evaporator, a pressurized water reactor (PWR) as the heat source, a drumtype steam generator, and a turbine plant utilizing a back- pressure turbine. A bypass steam system was modeled to achieve flexible operation of the electric power and water portions of the combined plant. The proposed use of this simulator is to investigate various coupling and control schemes and to help determine possible problem areas in full back-pressure turbine dual-purpose desalting plant designs. (auth)

Delene, J.G.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Water desalination plants performance using fuzzy multi-criteria decision making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Countries which do not have adequate supply of freshwater sources like Kuwait resort to using desalination plants to meet their demand. Kuwait had used Multi-flash desalination (MSF) plants sine the 50's of the last century to satisfy its ever increasing ... Keywords: decision maker, freshwater, multi-effect desalination, multi-stage flash, preference, reverse osmosis

Mohammed A. Hajeeh

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF THE COOLING WATER INTAKE STRUCTURE, TANGUISSON POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report for the Environmental Effects of Cooling Water Intake Structures project (contract number/or chemicals) and as impingement (where the cooling water intake traps larger organisms against the intake and impingement of aquatic organisms in cooling water intakes.) For rules such as those outlined above

Schupp, Peter

245

A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

Jasbir Gill

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

Jasbir Gill

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

248

pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/ Fly ...  

The discovery represents a cost-effective way to utilize materials indigenous to fossil fuel burning power platns to control mineral precipitation is cooling water.

249

Design and cost of near-term OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plants for the production of desalinated water and electric power. [Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There currently is an increasing need for both potable water and power for many islands in the Pacific and Caribbean. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology fills these needs and is a viable option because of the unlimited supply of ocean thermal energy for the production of both desalinated water and electricity. The OTEC plant design must be flexible to meet the product-mix demands that can be very different from site to site. This paper describes different OTEC plants that can supply various mixes of desalinated water and vapor -- the extremes being either all water and no power or no water and all power. The economics for these plants are also presented. The same flow rates and pipe sizes for both the warm and cold seawater streams are used for different plant designs. The OTEC plant designs are characterized as near-term because no major technical issues need to be resolved or demonstrated. The plant concepts are based on DOE-sponsored experiments dealing with power systems, advanced heat exchanger designs, corrosion and fouling of heat exchange surfaces, and flash evaporation and moisture removal from the vapor using multiple spouts. In addition, the mature multistage flash evaporator technology is incorporated into the plant designs were appropriate. For the supply and discharge warm and cold uncertainties do exist because the required pipe sizes are larger than the maximum currently deployed -- 40-inch high-density polyethylene pipe at Keahole Point in Hawaii. 30 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.; Genens, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Internet Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at America's Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, rising populations and regional droughts have caused coal-fired power plants to temporarily curtail or cease production due to a lack of available water for cooling. In addition, concerns about the availability of adequate supplies of cooling water have resulted in cancellation of plans to build much-needed new power plants. These issues, coupled with concern over the possible impacts of global climate change, have caused industry and community planners to seek alternate sources of water to supplement or replace existing supplies. The Department of Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is researching ways to reduce the water demands of coal-fired power plants. As part of the NETL Program, ALL Consulting developed an internet-based Catalog of potential alternative sources of cooling water. The Catalog identifies alternative sources of water, such as mine discharge water, oil and gas produced water, saline aquifers, and publicly owned treatment works (POTWs), which could be used to supplement or replace existing surface water sources. This report provides an overview of the Catalog, and examines the benefits and challenges of using these alternative water sources for cooling water.

J. Daniel Arthur

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+{trademark} Design Certification Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW{sub t} (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

THE ASSESSMENT OF SELECTED WASTES AND PLANTS USABILITY FOR RECLAMATION OF COPPER INDUSTRY DUMPING SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ment was thoroughly mixed with wastes and then nitrogen 0.5sediment mixed with various kind of wastes according to the

SPIAK, ZOFIA; GEDIGA, KRZYSZTOF

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

THE ASSESSMENT OF SELECTED WASTES AND PLANTS USABILITY FOR RECLAMATION OF COPPER INDUSTRY DUMPING SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the following pattern: A) phosphogypsum 50g + mine sand 50g+ quarry overlay 50g B) phosphogypsum 100g + mine sand 100g+ quarry overlay 100g C) phosphogypsum 50g + mine sand 50g +

SPIAK, ZOFIA; GEDIGA, KRZYSZTOF

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

THE ASSESSMENT OF SELECTED WASTES AND PLANTS USABILITY FOR RECLAMATION OF COPPER INDUSTRY DUMPING SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

near Boles?awiec, in the region of Lower Silesia, Poland.and bio fibre (Geo-Trade Poland) Each object was carried inregion of Lower Silesia, Poland. The experiments comprise

SPIAK, ZOFIA; GEDIGA, KRZYSZTOF

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Plan for support of large-plant (post-CRBR) needs in large-leak sodium-water reaction area  

SciTech Connect

Work in the large leak test and analysis area of steam generator development has been carried out at GE-ARSD under 189a SG037 since 1973. The currently planned master schedule for the SG037 program is shown. Principal activities are the large leak testing program being carried out at the Large Leak Test Rig and the analysis methods development. The plan for supporting the large plant (post-CRBR) needs in the large leak sodium-water reaction area is outlined. Most of the needs will be answered in the current SG037 large leak program. (DLC)

Whipple, J.C.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

Jose Reyes

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

257

Interim report VII, production test IP-549-A half-plant low alum feed water treatment at F Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A half-plant low alum water treatment test began at F Reactor on January 16, 1963. The test, which had been prompted by the analysis of ledge corrosion attack on fuel elements, will demonstrate whether or not high alum feed is responsible for increasing the frequency of ledge and groove corrosion attack on fuel element surfaces. The effect will be evaluated by comparing visual examination results obtained from the normal production fuel irradiated in process water treated with two different alum feed rates. Six 20-column fuel discharges, ten columns from each side of the reactor, have been taken during the test as follows: (1) One discharge prior to the start of the test. (2) One discharge such that the test side was exposed to coolant treated with both high and low alum feed. (3) Four discharges under test conditions. This report discusses the results obtained from the fifth discharge under test conditions.

Geier, R.G.

1964-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Willamette River Water Treatment Plant - Wilsonville, Oregon [EDRA / Places Awards, 20004 -- Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per-day drinking-water EDRA/Places Awards 2004 In this issuewe present the EDRA/ Places awards for 2004.These awards, in design, planning and research, highlight

Sensenig, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Recent Articles on Water-Related Impacts on Power Plant Siting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Andrea McNemar National Energy Technology Laboratory A Water Constrained Future - How Power Producers Can Minimize the Impact in the West May 1 - 2, 2007 San Diego, CA Estimating...

263

Assessment of sludge management options in a waste water treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Spanish water agengy, Cadagua, for advice on life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental impacts of Cadagua operated wastewater treatment ...

Lim, Jong hyun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Design and Operation Checklists for Zero Discharge Power Plant Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design and operation checklists prepared by participants in the Zero Discharge Symposium identify key issues for the successful operation of a zero discharge power plant.The checklists highlight the importance of communication between utilities and architect/engineering companies, as well as within the utility industry itself.

1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

265

100 kW CC-OTEC Plant and Deep Ocean water Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examine multiple usage of DSW Yokogawa Electric Produce & set up electricity & control system Plant the electric grid for the first time in 15 years in the world. #12;IOES (Institute of Ocean Energy, Saga Univ.) Experiments and Demonstration by IOES (Institute of Ocean Energy, Saga University) 30 kW Electricity

266

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water. Aerotherm final report, 77-235. [Can washing in Campbell Soup plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Solar Industrial Process Hot Water Program are to design, test, and evaluate the application of solar energy to the generation and supply of industrial process hot water, and to provide an assessment of the economic and resource benefits to be gained. Other objectives are to stimulate and give impetus to the use of solar energy for supplying significant amounts of industrial process heat requirements. The plant selected for the design of a solar industrial process hot water system was the Campbell Soup facility in Sacramento, California. The total hot water demand for this plant varies between 500 and 800 gpm during regular production shifts, and hits a peak of over 1,000 gpm for approximately one hour during the cleanup shift. Most of the hot water is heated in the boiler room by a combination of waste heat recovery and low pressure (5 psi) steam-water heat exchangers. The hot water emerges from the boiler room at a temperature between 160/sup 0/F and 180/sup 0/F and is transported to the various process areas. Booster heaters in the process areas then use low pressure (5 psi) or medium pressure (20 psi) steam to raise the temperature of the water to the level required for each process. Hot water is used in several processes at the Campbell Soup plant, but the can washing process was selected to demonstrate the feasibility of a solar hot water system. A detailed design and economic analysis of the system is given. (WHK)

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Measurements of metabolically active inorganic phosphate in plants growing in natural and agronomic settings and under water stress. [Stromal Phosphate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At high rates of photosynthesis, the conflicting requirements of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis for phosphate and starch and sucrose synthesis for low phosphate, may limit the overall rate of photosynthesis. This is called feedback limitation of photosynthesis. A nonaqueous fractionation technique was used to measure stromal phosphate levels without contamination from vacuolar phosphate. Under normal conditions the stromal phosphate level was found to be 7mM. Under feedback limited photosynthesis, this value dropped to <1mM. In a related study, the effect of water stress on photosynthesis was examined. Water stress was shown to cause a decrease in total leaf photosynthesis, due not to a total loss of photosynthetic ability, but rather due to photosynthesis only occurring in patches of the leaf. Water stress was shown to cause a reduction in starch and sucrose synthesis. Since this decline can be reversed by increasing the CO{sub 2} level around the plant, this is proposed to be due to closing of stomata due to the water stress. (MHB)

Sharkey, T.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

Dreher, G.B.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Population dynamics of iron-oxidizing communities in pilot plants for the treatment of acid mine waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The iron-oxidizing microbial community in two pilot plants for the treatment of acid mine water was monitored to investigate the influence of different process parameters such as pH, iron concentration, and retention time on the stability of the system to evaluate the applicability of this treatment technology on an industrial scale. The dynamics of the microbial populations were followed using T-RFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) over a period of several months. For a more precise quantification, two TaqMan assays specific for the two prominent groups were developed and the relative abundance of these taxa in the iron-oxidizing community was verified by real-time PCR. The investigations revealed that the iron-oxidizing community was clearly dominated by two groups of Betaproteobacteria affiliated with the poorly known and not yet recognized species 'Ferrovum myxofaciens' and with strains related to Gallionella ferruginea, respectively. These taxa dominated the microbial community during the whole investigation period and accelerated the oxidation of ferrous iron despite the changing characteristics of mine waters flowing into the plants. Thus, it is assumed that the treatment technology can also be applied to other mine sites and that these organisms play a crucial role in such treatment systems. 32 refs., 4 figs. 1 tab.

Elke Heinzel; Eberhard Janneck; Franz Glombitza; Michael Schlmann; Jana Seifert [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg (Germany). Interdisciplinary Ecological Center

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Reclamation and reuse of Freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), we have successfully demonstrated the use of a solvent recycling system to reclaim spent Freon solvent in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) analyses of radioactive samples. A wide variety of sample types including ground water, organics, laboratory waste, process control, sludge, soils, and others are received by our lab for total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. This paper demonstrates the successful use of a commercially available carbon bed recycle system which we modified to enable the recovery of 95-98 percent of the radioactive contaminated Freon. This system has been used successfully in our lab for the past three years.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Young, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

DataTrends: Water Use Tracking | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DataTrends: Water Use Tracking DataTrends: Water Use Tracking Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

272

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Advanced light water reactor plants system 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80{sup +}{trademark} during the U.S. government`s 1994 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems. Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units and the System 80+ design form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The Nuclear Island portion of the System 80+ standard design has also been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their bid specification for an ALWR. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was docketed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1991 and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report (DSER) was issued in October 1992.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Summary of Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) Water Management Installations at U.S. Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an inventory of zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management systems currently operating at U.S. power generating stations. A total of 146 ZLD operations were identified and described. The report discusses the numerous treatment methods used at these ZLD facilities along with their merits and detractions of each method.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

276

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Compost Amendment to Reduce Nutrient Runoff. Prepared for the City of Redmond. College of Forestry. Water Quality and Quantity Effects of Amending Soils with Compost Surface runoff decreased by five to 10 times after amending the soil with compost (4 in of compost tilled 8 in into the soil), compared

277

Influence of Cooling Circulating Water Flow on Back Pressure Variation of Thermal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, condenser pressure can be considered as back pressure of the steam turbine, which has great influence on the unit power. Based on the back pressure calculation model, influence on back pressure variation by adjusting circulating ... Keywords: Cold-end system, back pressure, cooling water flow, unit power

Nian Zhonghua, Liu Jizhen, Liu Guangjian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the twelfth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report and results are shown for a drying system utilizing a combination of waste heat from the condenser and thermal energy extracted from boiler flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Ursla Levy; John Sale; Nenad Sarunac

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Compatibility of the ultraviolet light-ozone system for laundry waste water treatment in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

As an alternative treatment system for laundry waste water in nuclear power plants, a system was chosen in which such organic compounds as surfactant would be oxidized by ultraviolet (UV) light and ozone. The system compatibility, UV light source, and dissolved ozone concentration were examined through experiments. First, ozone gas was absorbed in the waste water. After the dissolved ozone concentration equilibrated at the desired value, the waste water was irradiated by a mercury lamp. Then, the time dependence of the concentrations of the organic compounds, the dissolved ozone, and the hydrogen peroxide were measured to estimate the treatment rate of the system. The mercury lamp with a 10{sup 5}-Pa vapor pressure achieved large UV radiation and a treatment rate increase, leading to a compatible system without secondary waste generation. The effect of the dissolved ozone concentration on the treatment rate was saturated when concentration was >3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mol/10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3} at the time UV radiation was started. Numerical results indicated the saturation was due to hydrogen peroxide generation, which prevents hydroxyl radical generation.

Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Izumida, Tatsuo [Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reply to: Comment on 'Neutron imaging reveals internal plant water dynamics'  

SciTech Connect

Our recent publication (Warren et al. 2013) described how pulses of deuterium oxide (D2O) or H2O combined with neutron radiography can be used to indicate root water uptake and hydraulic redistribution in maize. This technique depends on the large inherent differences in neutron cross-section between D and H atoms resulting in strong image contrast. However, as illustrated by Carminati and Zarebanadkouki (2013) there can be a change in total water content without a change in contrast simply by a change in the relative proportions of D2O and H2O. While we agree with their premise and detailed calculations (Zarebanadkouki at al. 2012, 2013), further evidence suggests that mixing of D2O and H2O did not confound evidence of hydraulic redistribution in our study.

Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-lin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Perfect, Edmund [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document, Volume 2, Revision 8: ALWR Evolutionary Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's ALWR Program has been an industry-wide effort to establish the technical foundation for design of the advanced light water reactor (ALWR). This program included participation and sponsorship of several international utility companies and close cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The cornerstone of the ALWR Program is a set of utility design requirements, which are contained in the ALWR Utility Requirements Document. The purpose of this document is to present a clear, complete statement...

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document, Volume 3, Revision 8: ALWR Passive Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's ALWR Program has been an industry-wide effort to establish the technical foundation for design of the advanced light water reactor (ALWR). This program included participation and sponsorship of several international utility companies and close cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The cornerstone of the ALWR Program is a set of utility design requirements, which are contained in the ALWR Utility Requirements Document. The purpose of this document is to present a clear, complete statement...

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

BWR (boiling-water reactor) radiation control: In-plant demonstration at Vermont Yankee: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of the RP1934 program, which was established by EPRI in 1981 to demonstrate the adequacy of BRAC program (RP819) principles for BWR radiation control at Vermont Yankee, are presented. Evaluations were performed of the effectiveness of optimization of purification system performance, control of feedwater dissolved oxygen concentrations, minimization of corrosion product and ionic transport, and improved startup, shutdown, and layup practices. The impact on shutdown radiation levels of these corrective actions was assessed based on extensive primary system radiation survey and component gamma scan data. Implementation of the BRAC recommendations was found to be insufficient to reduce the rate of activity buildup on out-of-core surfaces at Vermont Yankee, and additional corrective actions were found necessary. Specifically, replacement of cobalt-bearing materials in the control rod drive pins and rollers and feedwater regulating valves was pursued as was installation of electropolished 316 stainless steel during a recirculation piping replacement program. Aggressive programs to further reduce copper concentrations in the reactor water by improving condensate demineralizer efficiency and to minimize organic ingress to the power cycle by reducing organic concentrations in recycled radwaste also were undertaken. Evaluations of the impact on activity buildup of several pretreatment processes including prefilming in moist air, preexposure to high temperature water containing zinc, and electropolishing also were performed in a test loop installed in the reactor water cleanup system. A significant beneficial impact of electropolishing was shown to be present for periods up to 6000 hours.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

NETL: Water - Energy Interface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Water - Energy Interface Innovations for Existing Plants Water - Energy Interface Previous Next...

285

Guide to implementing reclamation processes at Department of Defense municipal solid waste and construction debris landfills. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis serves as a guide for implementing landfill reclamation techniques on municipal solid waste or construction debris landfills owned, operated, or used by the DoD. The research describes historical and current methods for disposing of solid waste including open dumping, sanitary landfilling, and the development of state-of-the-art sanitary landfill cell technology. The thesis also identifies the factors which have led to the need for new methods of managing municipal solid waste. The vast majority of the study is devoted to identifying actions which should be taken before, during, and after implementation of a landfill reclamation project. These actions include the development of health, safety, and contingency planning documents, the establishment of systems for characterizing and monitoring site conditions, and the identification of other procedures and processes necessary for performing successful operations. Finally, this study contains a model for analyzing under which conditions reclamation is economically feasible. The model examines economic feasibility in four separate conditions and shows that reclamation is economically feasible in a wide variety of markets. However, the model also shows that feasibility is directly associated with a continuance of normal landfilling operations. Landfill, Landfill reclamation, Landfill mining, Municipal solid waste, Recycling, Construction debris.

Tures, G.L.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Department of Energy/Office of Fossil Energys Innovations for Existing Plants Energy-Water R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Technology Laboratory's Power Energy Technology Laboratory's Power Plant-Water R&D Program Thomas J. Feeley, III 1 , Sara Pletcher 1 , Barbara Carney 1 , and Andrea T. McNemar 2 1 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Science Applications International Corporation, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 ABSTRACT Thermoelectric power plants utilize significant quantities of water for generating electrical energy. For example, a 500 MW power plant that employs once-through cooling uses over 12 million gallons per hour of water for cooling and other process requirements. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) estimates that thermoelectric generation accounts for approximately

287

Summary and bibliography of safety-related events at boiling-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1980  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a bibliography that contains 100-word abstracts of event reports submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at boiling-water-reactor nuclear power plants in 1980. The 1547 abstracts included on microfiche in this bibliography describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies that were experienced at the facilities. These abstracts are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Full-size keyword and permuted-title indexes to facilitate location of individual abstracts are provided following the text. Tables that summarize the information contained in the bibliography are also provided. The information in the tables includes a listing of the equipment items involved in the reported events and the associated number of reports for each item. Similar information is given for the various kinds of instrumentation and systems, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction).

McCormack, K.E.; Gallaher, R.B.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

289

Design of cold water pipe for sea thermal power plants. Progress report, 1 May 1975--30 May 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the preliminary analysis of design conditions for a 40-ft. diameter, 4000 ft. long, cold water supply pipe for a 100 MW sea thermal power plant. The pipe is assumed to be freely suspended from a floating platform. The design is based on a circular row of tubes with spacers between to form the pipe wall. Internal pressure conditions are calculated for maximum assumed flow rates in the pipe. External pressure distribution is calculated for maximum assumed ocean current velocity. Drag and moment distributions are calculated for the pipe loaded with an assumed current velocity profile and buoyancy distribution. Collapse stability calculations are made for the pipe and for the individual tubes. Tube and spacer interaction stresses are calculated for the combined pressure, bending moment, and tensile loads imposed on the pipe. Preliminary analysis is performed on a flexible pipe support system capable of isolating the pipe from the platform during any sea state likely to be encountered by a sea thermal power plant. It is concluded that the basic design is feasible and justifies more precise analysis.

Anderson, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Decontamination of industrial cyanide-containing water in a solar CPC pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work was to improve the quality of wastewater effluent coming from an Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power station to meet with future environmental legislation. This study examined a homogeneous photocatalytic oxidation process using concentrated solar UV energy (UV/Fe(II)/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in a Solar Compound Parabolic Collector (CPC) pilot plant. The efficiency of the process was evaluated by analysis of the oxidation of cyanides and Total Organic Carbon (TOC). A factorial experimental design allowed the determination of the influences of operating variables (initial concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, oxalic acid and Fe(II) and pH) on the degradation kinetics. Temperature and UV-A solar power were also included in the Neural Network fittings. The pH was maintained at a value >9.5 during cyanide oxidation to avoid the formation of gaseous HCN and later lowered to enhance mineralization. Under the optimum conditions ([H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] = 2000 ppm, [Fe(II)] = 8 ppm, pH = 3.3 after cyanide oxidation, and [(COOH){sub 2}] = 60 ppm), it was possible to degrade 100% of the cyanides and up to 92% of Total Organic Carbon. (author)

Duran, A.; Monteagudo, J.M.; San Martin, I.; Aguirre, M. [Grupo IMAES, Department of Chemical Engineering, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela 3, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended to serve as guidance, or to supplement EPA or other agency environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-1 Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended, it is an outline of practices which may or have been used for uranium site restoration. Mining reclamation for uranium mining sites. The existence of bonding requirements and/or financial guarantees in the cases where

292

Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

communities along a water availability gradient M. Fernandawith decreasing water availability. Overall, variation inrelated to water and light availability and CAM appeared to

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with lignite and Powder River Basin coals to determine the effects of inlet air moisture level on the equilibrium relationship between coal moisture and exit air relative humidity and temperature. The results show that, for lignite, there is a slight dependence of equilibrium moisture on inlet humidity level. However, the equilibrium relationship for PRB coal appears to be independent of inlet air humidity level. The specific equilibrium model used for computing lignite coal dryer performance has a significant effect on the prediction accuracy for exit air relative humidity; but its effects on predicted coal product moisture, exit air temperature and specific humidity are minimal. Analyses were performed to determine the effect of lignite product moisture on unit performance for a high temperature drying system. With this process design, energy for drying is obtained from the hot flue gas entering the air preheater and the hot circulating cooling water leaving the steam condenser. Comparisons were made to the same boiler operating with lignite which had been dried off-site.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Maintenance Guide for Horizontal Split-Casing Closed Cooling Water Pumps in Combined-Cyc le Combustion-Turbine Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies the failure modes and general maintenance requirements for horizontal split-casing closed cooling water pumps used in utility combined-cycle combustion-turbine power plants. Information in this report was provided and reviewed by member utilities. Manufacturers information and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) database information was used as a basis for the ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton ( 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

Reclamation of abandoned surface coal mined land using flue gas desulfurization products  

SciTech Connect

Details are given of a field-scale research project where the Fleming site, in Ohio, of highly degraded and acid-forming abandoned surface coal-mined land, was reclaimed using a dry flue gas desulfurization product from an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion burner at a General Motors plant Pontiac, MI, which burned eastern Ohio coal and used dolomitic limestone for desulfurization. Plots were seeded with a mixture of grasses, wheat and clover, in 1994 and soil and water samples were analysed in 1995 and in 2009. It was found that FGD-treated plots promoted good regenerative growth, similar to that in plots using more concentrated re-soil material. The FGD treatment also greatly improved overall water quality. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Chen, L.; Kost, D.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, OH (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Program on Technology Innovation: Technology Research Opportunities for Efficient Water Treatment and Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides background information on the use of freshwater in the United States and the basic technologies employed to treat and utilize water. The connections between water use and energy consumption are also highlighted. Opportunities are discussed for improving water use efficiency through on-site water reuse, water reclamation, and water use reductions. Lastly, recommendations are provided for future action to advance specific technologies and market opportunities.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Case Studies of Potential Facility-Scale and Utility-Scale Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Projects across Reclamation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Tasks included assessing the suitability for wind and solar on both a utility and facility scale.

Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Jimenez, A.; Melius, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; VanGeet, O.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants: ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005343  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seyed Dastgheib seyed Dastgheib Principal Investigator Illinois State Geological Survey 615 E. Peabody Drive Champaign, Illinois 61820-6235 217-265-6274 dastgheib@isgs.uius.edu Reuse of PRoduced WateR fRom co 2 enhanced oil RecoveRy, coal-Bed methane, and mine Pool WateR By coal-Based PoWeR Plants: PRomis /PRoject no. : de-nt0005343 Background Coal-fired power plants are the second largest users of freshwater in the United States. In Illinois, the thermoelectric power sector accounts for approximately 84 percent of the estimated 14 billion gallons per day of freshwater withdrawals and one-third of the state's 1 billion gallons per day of freshwater consumption. Illinois electric power generation capacity is projected to expand 30 percent by 2030, increasing water consumption by

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Use of Irrigation to Extend the Seeding Window for Final Reclamation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to investigate the feasibility of various techniques for reclaiming lands disturbed during site characterization at Yucca Mountain. As part of this program, two studies were conducted in 1997 to assess the effects of combinations of seeding date (date that seeds are planted) and supplemental irrigation on densities of native plant species at Yucca Mountain. Study objectives were to (1) determine whether the traditional seeding window (October-December) could be extended through combinations of seeding date and irrigation date, (2) determine which combination of seeding date and irrigation was most successful, and (3) assess the effects of irrigation versus natural precipitation on seedling establishment. In the first study, a multi-species seed mix of 16 native species was sown into plots on four dates (12/96, 2/97, 3/97, and 4/97). Irrigation treatments were control (no irrigation) or addition of 80 mm of supplemental water applied over a one month period. Plant densities were sampled in August and again in October, 1997. In the second study, Larrea tridentata and Lycium andersonii, two species that are common at Yucca Mountain, but difficult to establish from seed, were sown together into plots in January and August, 1997. Half the plots were irrigated with approximately 250 mm of water between August 18 and September 11, while the remaining plots received no irrigation (control). Plant densities were sampled in October, 1997. The August census for the multi-species mix study showed irrigated plots that were sown in February, March and April had higher plant densities and more species than plots that were not irrigated. Irrigation had no effect on plant densities on plots that were seeded in December. Plots were used again in October following 18 mm of precipitation in September. Densities of three species, Ambrosia dumosa, Hymenoclea salsola, and L. tridentata, (warm-season species) were lower on irrigated plots sown in December, February, and March, and showed no response to irrigation on plots sown in April. Therefore, early spring irrigation did not facilitate establishment of warm-season species. These results suggest that these species are dependent upon precipitation while temperatures are warm in late summer or fall. However, control plots that were seeded in December had acceptable densities of these species. A more practical approach might be to avoid irrigation costs by seeding in December and waiting for fall precipitation. The remaining species (cool-season species) showed an opposite response to supplemental water with greater densities on irrigated plots sown in February, March, and April, and no response to irrigation on plots sown in December. While these results show that irrigation can extend the seeding window for cool-season species should it be necessary, it was also apparent that if seeds are sown by late December, irrigation is not necessary to achieve acceptable plant densities.

TRW Environmental Safety

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Part II: Potential Usefullness of Antitranspirants for Increasing Water Use Efficiency in Plants: Applied Investigations with Antitranspirants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fruit (Figure 34). Water intake was not curtailed bya 50% retardation in water intake to the fruit, the actualsystems the greatest water intake was by fruit not treated

Davenport, David C; Martin, Paul E; Hagan, Robert M; Fisher, Mary Ann

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Frozen plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frozen plants Frozen plants Name: janicehu Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do some plants freeze and others do not? Replies: The main reason some plants freeze and others do not is that some plants do not have much water in them. Pine tree leaves have little water and are therefore difficult to freeze. Another reason is that some plants make chemicals to put into their fluids that reduce the freezing temperature. Salts and oils are some. The polyunsaturated fats found in many plants freeze at a lower temperature than the saturated fats found in many animals. Therefore plant fats are liquid (oils) at room temperature, and animal fats are solid. Plants could not use so many saturated fats as warm blooded animals do or they would freeze up solid at higher temperatures. I know little of plants but many animals can make ethylene glycol to keep themselves from freezing. Ethylene glycol is the active ingredient in car anti-freeze

304

Condensers for Combined-Cycle Plants: Air-Cooled and Water-Cooled Condensers Design Best Practices and Procurement Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined-Cycle (NGCC) power plants are expected to play an increasing role in the mix of new power generation. Additional guidance is needed for utilities, contracted engineering firms, and suppliers to better specify, design, supply, and operate these next-generation plants. This document focuses on the steam condensers, both wet and air-cooled, which are anticipated to serve these plants. It provides guidance, best practices, and lessons learned in regard to these condensers and offers insi...

2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

305

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Assessment of landfill reclamation and the effects of age on the combustion of recovered municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarized the Lancaster county Solid Waste Management Authorities`s (LCSWMA)landfill reclamation activities, ongoing since 1991. All aspects have been analyzed from the manpower and equipment requirements at the landfill to the operational impacts felt at the LCSWMA Resource Recovery Facility (RRF) where the material is delivered for processing. Characteristics of the reclaimed refuse and soil recovered from trommeling operations are discussed as are results of air monitoring performed at the landfill excavation site and the RRF. The report also discusses the energy value of the reclaimed material and compares this value with those obtained for significantly older reclaimed waste streams. The effects of waste age on the air emissions and ash residue quality at the RRF are also provided. The report concludes by summarizing the project benefits and provides recommendations for other landfill reclamation operations and areas requiring further research.

Forster, G.A. [Lancaster Environmental Foundation, PA (United States)] [Lancaster Environmental Foundation, PA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 3. Waste-water treatment-plant emissions. Experimental phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 3 describes the measurements and experimental data obtained to assess emissions from various points within a POTW. Included are a discussion of sampling methods development, emissions studies of activated carbon bed odor control units located at various points of a large municipal wastewater treatment plant and its collection system, upwind/downwind sampling from an activated sludge aeration basins at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant, and preliminary studies of haloform formation as a result of chlorination of wastewater.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Guensler, R.; Kim, J.O.; Chou, T.L.; Uyeminami, D.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Revised financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western whileothers resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $23 million.

Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Surface mining and reclamation effects on flood response of watersheds in the central Appalachian Plateau region - article no. W04407  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface mining of coal and subsequent reclamation represent the dominant land use change in the central Appalachian Plateau (CAP) region of the United States. Hydrologic impacts of surface mining have been studied at the plot scale, but effects at broader scales have not been explored adequately. Broad-scale classification of reclaimed sites is difficult because standing vegetation makes them nearly indistinguishable from alternate land uses. We used a land cover data set that accurately maps surface mines for a 187-km{sup 2} watershed within the CAP. These land cover data, as well as plot-level data from within the watershed, are used with HSPF (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) to estimate changes in flood response as a function of increased mining. Results show that the rate at which flood magnitude increases due to increased mining is linear, with greater rates observed for less frequent return intervals. These findings indicate that mine reclamation leaves the landscape in a condition more similar to urban areas rather than does simple deforestation, and call into question the effectiveness of reclamation in terms of returning mined areas to the hydrological state that existed before mining.

Ferrari, J.R.; Lookingbill, T.R.; McCormick, B.; Townsend, P.A.; Eshleman, K.N. [University of Maryland, Frostburg, MD (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Onondaga County Department of Water Environment Protection: Process Optimization Saves Energy at Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Onondaga County, New York, is saving nearly 3 million kWh and 270 million Btu annually at a wastewater treatment plant after replacing inefficient motors and upgrading pumps.

Not Available

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.  

SciTech Connect

Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. A report released in January 2011 examined the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. This report continues the analysis and examines the financial implications of the experimental flows conducted at the GCD from 2006 to 2010. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center)

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

A TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CURRENT WATER POLICY BOUNDARY AT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988, groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99) was identified in samples collected from residential water wells withdrawing groundwater from the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) north of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) facility. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided temporary drinking water supplies to approximately 100 potentially affected residents by initially supplying bottled water, water tanks, and water-treatment systems, and then by extending municipal water lines, all at no cost, to those persons whose wells could be affected by contaminated groundwater. The Water Policy boundary was established in 1993. In the Policy, DOE agreed to pay the reasonable monthly cost of water for homes and businesses and, in exchange, many of the land owners signed license agreements committing to cease using the groundwater via rural water wells. In 2012, DOE requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), managing contractor of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), provide an independent assessment of the quality and quantity of the existing groundwater monitoring data and determine if there is sufficient information to support a modification to the boundary of the current Water Policy. As a result of the assessment, ORAU concludes that sufficient groundwater monitoring data exists to determine that a shrinkage and/or shift of the plume(s) responsible for the initial development of this policy has occurred. Specifically, there is compelling evidence that the TCE plume is undergoing shrinkage due to natural attenuation and associated degradation. The plume shrinkage (and migration) has also been augmented in local areas where large volumes of groundwater were recovered by pump-and treat remedial systems along the eastern and western boundaries of the Northwest Plume, and in other areas where pump-and-treat systems have been deployed by DOE to remove source contaminants. The available evidence supports adjusting the western and northwestern Water Policy boundary. Based on the historical and modeled hydrogeological data reflecting past flow and plume attenuation, along with associated plume migration toward the northeast, the establishment of a new boundary along the westernmost margin of the earliest indication of the TCE plume is proposed and justified on hydrogeological grounds. Approximately 30% of the original area would remain within the adjusted Water Policy area west and northwest of the PGDP facility. This modification would release about 70% of the area, although individual properties would overlap the new boundary.

None

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

315

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 1. Project summaries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Phase II research project on emission of potentially toxic organic compounds (PTOCs) from wastewater treatment plants were fivefold: (1) assessment of the importance of gaseous emissions from municipal wastewater collection systems; (2) resolution of the discrepancy between the measured and estimated emissions (Phase I), from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant (JWPCP) operated by the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (CSDLAC); (3) determination of airborne concentrations of PTOCS immediately downwind of an activated sludge aeration process at the City of Los Angeles' Hyperion Treatment Plant (HTP); (4) a modeling assessment of the effects of transient loading on emissions during preliminary and primary treatment at a typical municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP); (5) a preliminary investigation of effects of chlorination practices on haloform production. Volume 1, for which the abstract was prepared, contains a summary of results from each project; Volume 2 contains the discussion regarding the modeling of collection system emissions; Volume 3 addresses methods development and field sampling efforts at the JWPCP and HTP, data on emissions from a mechanically ventilated sewer and results of some preliminary haloform formation studies in wastewaters; and Volume 4 discusses aspects of the emissions modeling problem.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Schroeder, E.D.; Corsi, R.L.; Guensler, R.; Meyerhofer, J.A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

Not Available

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Development of Simulation Model for D2O Supply System in Heavy Water Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this research is improvement of performance in control system for heavy water supply system of nuclear fuel change machine. Before started design of control system, the model of target system is needed because it is hard to test and ... Keywords: simulation, nuclear, heavy-water, D2O, MATLAB

Sung-Won Choi; Seong-Geun Kwak; Ji-Hyoung Ryu; Kil-To Chong; Chang-Goo Lee

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Plant succession on disturbed sites in four plant associations in the Northern Mojave Desert  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is characterizing Yucca Mountain Nevada, as a potential site for long-term underground storage of high-level nuclear waste. DOE is committed to reclaim all lands disturbed by the project, and return them to a stable ecological state, with a composition and productivity similar to predisturbance conditions. A study was implemented to assess plant species which naturally invade disturbed sites in the Yucca Mountain Project Area. In 1991 and 1992 study plots were established on disturbed sites. Sites were characterized by disturbance type (i.e., road, drill pad, etc.), disturbance severity, vegetation association, time since abandonment, and topographic placement. Density of all perennial plant species was measured on disturbed and undisturbed plots. The species with the highest density in disturbed sites was Chrysothamnus teretifolia. This species was not a major contributor in undisturbed sites. In the undisturbed sites Ambrosia dumosa had the highest density of perennial plant species but was also high in density in the disturbance sites. Total species density was higher in undisturbed sites compared to disturbed sites. Plant species density analysis compared disturbed and undisturbed vegetation associations. Results will be used to design reclamation field trails and to finalize the Yucca Mountain Project Reclamation Implementation Plan.

Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.; Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Decision Document for the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant, Pesticide Rinse Area, Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, Illicit PCB Dump Site, and the Battery Acid Pit Fort Lewis, Washington  

SciTech Connect

PNNL conducted independent site evaluations for four sites at Fort Lewis, Washington, to determine their suitability for closure on behalf of the installation. These sites were recommended for "No Further Action" by previous invesitgators and included the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Waste Water Treatment Plant (IWTP), the Pesticide Rinse Area, the Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, and the Illicit PCB Dump Site.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Liikala, Terry L.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Taira, Randal Y.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

320

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

past 15 years, nine solar thermal power plants, with a totala) colocating thermal power plants that use seawater forWater used in thermal electric power plants is extracted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities at U.S. nuclear power plants. U.S. Dep. EnergyAlthough coal and nuclear power plants tend to supply baseis difficult to develop nuclear power plants in water-scarce

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Energy and water-development appropriations for 1983. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session. Part 3  

SciTech Connect

Secretary of the Interior James Watt's testimony in support of water-development projects opened part three of the hearing record. Also seeking funds to develop both needed water supplies and hydropower were representatives of the Bureau of Reclamation, the Corps of Engineers, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Appalachian Regional Commission. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes constructing desalination plants, recycling water,include water recycling, desalination, underground aquifers,

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Management of the aging of critical safety-related concrete structures in light-water reactor plants  

SciTech Connect

The Structural Aging Program has the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant safety-related structures for continued service. The program consists of a management task and three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued-service determinations. Objectives, accomplishments, and planned activities under each of these tasks are presented. Major program accomplishments include development of a materials property data base for structural materials as well as an aging assessment methodology for concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, a review and assessment of inservice inspection techniques for concrete materials and structures has been complete, and work on development of a methodology which can be used for performing current as well as reliability-based future condition assessment of concrete structures is well under way. 43 refs., 3 tabs.

Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Arndt, E.G. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Drum Screen Filtration of Cooling Water in Fossil-Fired and Nuclear Power Plants: The Electricite de France (EDF) Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents a summary of the lessons learned from operating the drum screen filtration systems used for the last three decades in lectricit de Frances (EDFs) nuclear and fossil-fired power plants, both in terms of the technological aspects of filtration and with regard to the prevention of clogging risks and the prevention of damage to the living organisms impinged on the drum screens and entrained into the cooling ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

"1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" Washington" "1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 "2. Chief Joseph","Hydroelectric","USCE-North Pacific Division",2456 "3. Transalta Centralia Generation","Coal","TransAlta Centralia Gen LLC",1596 "4. Rocky Reach","Hydroelectric","PUD No 1 of Chelan County",1254 "5. Columbia Generating Station","Nuclear","Energy Northwest",1097 "6. Wanapum","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",1059 "7. Boundary","Hydroelectric","Seattle City of",1040 "8. Priest Rapids","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",932

327

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell, Wellpinit, Washington, February 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Maintenance Program and Maintenance Program Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the DOE Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell Wellpinit, Washington February 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 01-06 Document Number S00204 DOE/Grand Junction Office Sherwood LTSP February 2001 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction............................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.2 Legal and Regulatory Requirements ........................................................................

328

Energy and water development appropriations for 1985. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 3 of the hearing record covers the testimony of Interior Secretary William Clark and witnesses from the Bureau of Reclamation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Appalachian Regional Commission. Clark cited the accomplishments of the Bureau of Reclamation during his first three months in office and described the reorganization of the Department's 10 bureaus. His testimony on water policy covers cost sharing for flood control, irrigation, and other water projects. Questions directed to Clark and the other witnesses also dealt with resource development, program management, and the status and level of appropriations for specific projects of concern to committee members.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.

Bharathan, D.; Nix, G.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

330

Monitored natural attenuation of manufactured gas plant tar mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water: a 14-year field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site 24 was the subject of a 14-year (5110-day) study of a ground water plume created by the disposal of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar into a shallow sandy aquifer approximately 25 years prior to the study. The ground water plume in 1988 extended from a well-defined source area to a distance of approximately 400 m down gradient. A system of monitoring wells was installed along six transects that ran perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the plume centerline. The MGP tar source was removed from the site in 1991 and a 14-year ground water monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study commenced. The program measured the dissolved mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) periodically over time, which decreased significantly over the 14-year period. Naphthalene decreased to less than 99% of the original dissolved mass, with mass degradation rates of 0.30 per year (half-life 2.3 years). Bulk attenuation rate constants for plume centerline concentrations over time ranged from 0.33 {+-} 0.09 per year (half-life 2.3 {+-} 0.8 years) for toluene and 0.45 {+-} 0.06 per year (half-life 1.6 {+-} 0.2 years) for naphthalene. The hydrogeologic setting at Site 24, having a sandy aquifer, shallow water table, clay confining layer, and aerobic conditions, was ideal for demonstrating MNA. However, these results demonstrate that MNA is a viable remedial strategy for ground water at sites impacted by MAHs and PAHs after the original source is removed, stabilized, or contained.

Neuhauser, E.F.; Ripp, J.A.; Azzolina, N.A.; Madsen, E.L.; Mauro, D.M.; Taylor, T. [Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC, Green Bay, WI (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. ) AWWA. 2006. Water Conservation ProgramsA PlanningWater Conservation..staff (Caffal, 1995). Water Conservation Beyond optimizing

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Environmental behavior of transuranic nuclides leaked from water cooled nuclear power plants. Final report, August 1, 1977-December 31, 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Release data are reported for three coastal water-cooled nuclear reactors: Millstone Point No. 1 and No. 2 (for the period January 1977 through April 1978), and Maine Yankee (for the period 20 June 1977 through 25 March 1978); release samples were analyzed for /sup 55/Fe, /sup 60/Co, /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 242/Cm, and /sup 244/Cm, but not all nuclides on every sample. Radioiron is a major component of the releases measured; the transuranium nuclides are less significant components than was expected, but levels have occasionally reached microcuries per month. Pulses of this size are adequate for tracer studies. Environmental samples (water, sediments, and biota) have been analyzed from about the two reactor sites noted, and that of the Pilgrim No. 1 reactor. No water samples remote from reactor outflows have unequivocally shown reactor contamination. No sediment samples from near Millstone Point or Pilgrim 1 have shown reactor contamination; this has been clearly evident in several sediment collections from near Maine Yankee. Biota so far measured from near Millstone Point show reactor contamination only when taken from the effluent canal. From the Maine Yankee and Plymouth areas, however, biota samples frequently prove to show slight, but definite, reactor contamination.

Bowen, V.T.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta Drake Process Unit (DPU) was developed and deployed for operation in the Powder River Basin. First year operatio

James Bauder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation at the Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges, reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals. This report provides an economic analysis of the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

Elders, W.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

Starr, R.C.; Green, T.S.; Hull, L.C.

2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

337

Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal and natural gas fired power plants for the locations ornatural gas) because there are a lot of plants that use combined heat and power (

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal and natural gas fired power plants for the locations ornatural gas) because there are a lot of plants that use combined heat and power (

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY An ENERGY STAR Resource Guidedrinking water supply industry to reduce energy consumptionenergy is used in the public drinking water supply industry.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MORA: an Energy-Aware Slack Reclamation Scheme for Scheduling Sporadic Real-Time Tasks upon Multiprocessor Platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we address the global and preemptive energy-aware scheduling problem of sporadic constrained-deadline tasks on DVFS-identical multiprocessor platforms. We propose an online slack reclamation scheme which profits from the discrepancy between the worst- and actual-case execution time of the tasks by slowing down the speed of the processors in order to save energy. Our algorithm called MORA takes into account the application-specific consumption profile of the tasks. We demonstrate that MORA does not jeopardize the system schedulability and we show by performing simulations that it can save up to 32% of energy (in average) compared to execution without using any energy-aware algorithm.

Nelis, Vincent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Innovative Water Reuse and Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is being performed in this program area to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water...

343

Environmental control procedures at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

New environmental control activities in the past year at SRP have included improved control and reporting procedures for chemical spills, reclamation of high-value scrap from wastes, new disposal methods for solid wastes not suitable for the sanitary landfill, improved oil containment, and reduction of sediment discharges to on-plant streams. Interdepartmental committees provide the primary routes for planning and coordinating environmental protection throughout SRP. An improved site-use coordination procedure, developed and implemented by ERDA-SR, has provided more effective control and communication pertaining to activities of the several organizations actively using the 300-square-mile SRP site. (auth)

Sheldon, E.B.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Part 3  

SciTech Connect

This document of part 3 of the hearings for the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994. This document contains the testimony of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Bureau of Reclamation, the Secretary of the Interior, Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Delaware River Basin Commission, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Tennessee Valley Authority, and Appalachian Regional Commission.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, On Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committed on appropriations, House of Representatives. The topics include the Bureau of Reclamation, testimony of the Secretary of the Interior, Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The discussion is related to the funding of activities in these areas.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Energy and water appropriations, fiscal year 1999. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are hearings on H.R. 2203/S. 1004 an act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1998. Witnesses before the committee were from the US DOE for atomic energy defense activities, Office of Energy Research; US DOD, civil; US Corps of Engineers, civil; and US DOI, Bureau of Reclamation.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy and water development appropriations, fiscal year 1998. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, US Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

These are hearings on H.R. 2203/S. 1004 an act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1998. Witnesses before the committee were from the US DOE for atomic energy defense activities, the Bonneville Power Administration, environmental restoration and waste management; the US DOI, bureau of reclamation; US DOD, civil; and Corps of Engineers, civil.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Water treatment on wheels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design options and combinations of fixed and mobile demineralization equipment give power plant operators the flexibility to continually optimize their water treatment system to meet rapidly changing needs. The article classifies water treatment service contracts for demineralized water into four categories and presents associated design, economic and operational advantages to power plant designers, constructors, owners and operators. 1 tab.

Taylor, R.T.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Land Application of Coal Combustion By-Products: Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land application of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) can prove beneficial for a number of reasons. The data presented in this survey provide a basis for optimizing the rates and timing of CCBP applications, selecting proper target soils and crops, and minimizing adverse effects on soil properties, plant responses, and groundwater quality.

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments, Panoche Water District, South Dos Palos, California  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LFR Levine-Fricke (LFR), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Panoche Water District, have completed a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium- (Se-) enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. The project was initiated in October 1998 by LBNL. LFR assumed the role of primary subcontractor on the project in July 2001. Substantial portions of this report, describing work performed prior to November 2000, were previously prepared by LBNL personnel. The data set, findings, and recommendations are herein updated with information collected since November 2000. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems that may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to groundwater; reduced productivity of farm crops; and Se uptake by wild and crop plants. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through February 2002, and results of these investigations.

Zawislanski, Peter; Benson, Sally; TerBerg, Robert; Borglin, Sharon

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases conducted in water year 2011 resulted only in financial costs; the total cost of all experimental releases was about $622,000.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration)

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Recent Developments and Operating Experience with British Incinerator Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the plants have water spray attemperation. Problems have arisen from spray controls, in keeping nozzles clean

Columbia University

353

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear plants use steam turbines, and cooling water asmajority is used for steam-driven turbines, which generatedelectricity using steam engines, gas turbines, or Stirling

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Pollution adn Plant Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution adn Plant Growth Pollution adn Plant Growth Name: Virdina Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the effcts off water polltuion on plant growth? Are there any good websites where I can find current or on going research being done by other scientist? Replies: Dear Virdina, Possibly helpful: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/poll/e_poll.htm http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/wq/info/wq987.htm Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach This is a very complicated question, there are so many different types of water pollution and different species of plants react very differently. Good places to start are the U.S. environmental protection agency, the office of water is at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/ and there is a link to a kid's page from there: http://www.epa.gov/OST/KidsStuff/ You might also try state EPA's, Illinois is at:

355

Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants ProMIS/Project No.:DE-NT0005647  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology to reduce Fresh-WAter evAporAtIve coolIng loss At coAl-BAsed thermoelectrIc poWer plAnts promIs/project no. :de-nt0005647 Background The production of electricity requires a reliable, abundant, and predictable source of freshwater - a resource that is limited in many parts of the United States and throughout the world. The process of thermoelectric generation from fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas is water intensive. According to the 2000 U.S. Geological Survey, thermoelectric-power withdrawals accounted for 48 percent of total water use, 39 percent of total freshwater withdrawals (136 billion gallons per day) for all categories, and 52 percent of fresh surface water withdrawals. As a growing economy drives the need for more electricity, demands on freshwater

356

San Luis Unit technical record of design and construction. Volume 5. Construction Dos Amigos Pumping Plant, Pleasant Valley Pumping Plant. Central Valley Project, West San Joaquin Division, San Luis Unit, California. A water resources technical publication. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The technical record of design and construction of the San Luis unit is divided into seven volumes. This volume, number V, deals with the construction of two specific features of the San Luis unit, Dos Amigos Pumping Plant and Pleasant Valley Pumping Plant.

1974-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Water for energy. Missouri River reservoirs: Pick--Sloan Missouri Basin Program. Draft environmental statement  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Reclamation proposes to make available for energy related industrial purposes up to 1.0 million acre-feet of water annually from main-stem Missouri River reservoirs. The anticipated areas of water use include eastern Montana, western North Dakota, parts of western and central South Dakota, and northeastern Wyoming. Water service contracts would be issued for 40 years or less, with water delivery terminating no later than the year 2035. A summary of the environmental impact and adverse environmental effects postulated is presented.

McPhail, R.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Developing the Resource Potential of a Shallow Water Table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

apply compara Also, soil water intake rates tend deliveryabove the water table at which plant intake and upward

Grimes, D. W; Henderson, D. W

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists the treatment methods and the percentage of utilitieslists the characteristics of the water sources used by utilities

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Preliminary data summary for the used-oil reclamation and re-refining industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The summaries contain data about industrial facilities in various industries discharging pollutants in their wastewaters and considers whether the EPA should pursue regulations to control such discharges. The summaries were prepared in order to allow EPA to respond to the mandate of Section 304(m) of the Clean Water Act. Summaries for categories already subject to rulemaking were developed for comparison purposes. The report is part of the process by which EPA is considering what management standards may be appropriate for the recycling of used oil, in response to the requirements mandated by these Acts. The study has attempted to characterize and profile the Oil Reclaimer/Re-Refining Industry. The goals of this preliminary effort were to: conduct a literature review, perform an industry profile, site visit re-refiners, screen sample re-refiners, and develop a Preliminary Data Summary.

Troy, K.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Processes in the characterization, remediation, and reclamation used to decommission a tailings pile containing unknown substances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility that is government owned and contractor operated. The Waste Isolation Division of Westinghouse Electric Corporation operates the WIPP for the DOE, Carlsbad Area Office (CAO). The mission of the CAo at WIPP is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the WIPP for safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. This mission seeks to establish an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. By incorporating the CAO mission, the WIPP is providing a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of TRU wastes generated by the defense activities of the U.S. Government. This report describes the characterization and proposed alternatives for remediation of a 7.5 acre saltpile containing a variety of rock and sediment debris, mine construction debris and possible hydrocarbon products in various containers. The pile was generated during mining activities and was not compacted during placement. A geophysical and soil gas survey was performed as a precursor to intrusive drilling and sampling programs.

Jones, S.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water: preliminary design and performance report. Volume I. Technical report. Aerotherm report TR-76-219. [For can washing at Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and performance of a solar hot water system for can washing at the Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento, California, are presented. The collector field is located on the roof of the finished products warehouse of the Campbell Soup Sacramento plant. Water is supplied from a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) supply line which is located directly below an existing roof access hatch. A supply pipe will be brought up through that hatch. The water flow will then be split into two manifold lines which supply the dual rows of flat plate collectors. The preheated water from the flat plates is then passed into six sets of parallel connected concentrators. Each set consist of eight 1.83 x 3.05 m (6 x 10 foot) modules connected in series. The water from these units is gathered in a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) insulated pipe which transports it to the storage tank. This pipe will be attached to an existing pipe run until it reaches the can washing building. From there the pipe will follow the can washing building around to the storage tank. The storage tank is a 75,200 1 (20,000 gal) steel tank which is coated internally with a USDA approved phenolic liner. The outside of the tank is insulated. A 2.2 kw (3 hp) motor is used to pump the stored water for the tank into the can washing line. Detail drawings and descriptions of the collector field, installation, piping, controls, data acquisition equipment, and roof structure are included. Furthermore, a program schedule with equipment and manpower costs for successfully completing Phase II of this contract is included. Also included is an organization chart of the Phase II program personnel. (WHK)

None

1976-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

Depth and temporal variations in water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in well USGS-59 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In-situ measurements of the specific conductance and temperature of ground water in the Snake River Plain aquifer were collected in observation well USGS-59 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These parameters were monitored at various depths in the aquifer from October 1994 to August 1995. The specific conductance of ground water in well USGS-59, as measured in the borehole, ranged from about 450 to 900 {micro}S/cm at standard temperature (25 C). The pumping cycle of the production wells at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant causes changes in borehole circulation patterns, and as a result the specific conductance of ground water at some depths in the well varies by up to 50% over a period of about 14 hours. However, these variations were not observed at all depths, or during each pumping cycle. The temperature of ground water in the well was typically between 12.8 and 13.8 C. The results of this study indicate that temporal variations in specific conductance of the ground water at this location are caused by an external stress on the aquifer--pumping of a production well approximately 4,000 feet away. These variations are believed to result from vertical stratification of water quality in the aquifer and a subsequent change in intrawell flow related to pumping. When sampling techniques that do not induce a stress on the aquifer (i.e., thief sampling) are used, knowledge of external stresses on the system at the time of sampling may aid in the interpretation of geochemical data.

Frederick, D.B. [Idaho INEL Oversight Program, Boise, ID (United States); Johnson, G.S. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill, 1996. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, June 20, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The report addresses H.R. 1905 a bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996. The bill supplies funds for water resources development programs and related activities of the Dept. of Army, Civil Functions - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program, the Department of Interior`s Bureau of Reclamation, and for certain Department of Energy`s energy research activities. The report includes comments on various programs.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy usage in existing markets and cheese-making plants The compiled informationenergy policy options (such as strategies, incentives, and programs) can be established based upon new energy information, dairy markets,

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy usage in existing markets and cheese-making plants The compiled informationenergy policy options (such as strategies, incentives, and programs) can be established based upon new energy information, dairy markets,

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level 4.4.3.1 National Energy Consumption per Raw-milkor final energy consumption on national or plant levels, andConsumption, or Energy Use Intensity (EUI) Greenhouse Gas Gigawatt Hours Lawrence Berkeley National

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level 4.4.3.1 National Energy Consumption per Raw-milkor final energy consumption on national or plant levels, andConsumption, or Energy Use Intensity (EUI) Greenhouse Gas Gigawatt Hours Lawrence Berkeley National

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Low Molecular Weight Organic Contaminants in Advanced Treatment: Occurrence, Treatment and Implications to Desalination and Water Reuse Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plant cooling water, intakes for desalination systemsimmediately after the intake water storage tank. Prior toconcentrations in pilot plant intake water potentially due

Agus, Eva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

prairie restoration plant ident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Identification Plant Identification Once your restoration is started and plants begin to germinate, the next issue you are faced with is the identification of what is growing. From my experience, the seeds you planted should start germinating after about a week to ten days. Of course, this is dependent on the weather conditions and the amount of moisture in the soil. If you are watering regularly, you will get growth much more quickly than if you are just waiting for nature to take its course. Identifying prairie plants as they germinate is very difficult. If you are an experienced botanist or an expert on prairie plants, your identification will still be a little more than an educated guess. In other words identifying prairie species from non-native species will take some time.

372

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for WaterIndustry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Finding Money for Your Energy Efficiency Projects. (A Primer

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rural businesses, for instance for energy audits. In FY2010,Business_Programs/ind ustriallighting_bestpracticessheet.pdf. Water & Wastewater Treatment Energy Use Self-Audit

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Service Water Piping Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the years 1988 and 1989, EPRI organized the Service Water Working Group (SWWG) to identify and help resolve the many issues surrounding service water (SW) systems in nuclear power plants. One issue identified by the SWWG was corrosion in service water piping systems. Interest in this issue resulted in the development of several technical reports: Guidelines for the Repair/Replacement Welding of Nuclear Service Water Systems, TR-100386; Guide for the Examination of Service Water System Piping, TR-10206...

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Guidelines for Makeup Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of boiler and heat recovery steam generator HRSG cycle makeup water is central to ensuring the necessary purity of boiler or HRSG water, feedwater, and steam. It plays an important role in ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil and combined cycle plants. This report presents up-to-date guidelines based on proven approaches for producing makeup water from various raw water supplies. Major losses of availability in fossil fuel plants are attributable to water and steam contam...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Exergetic, thermal, and externalities analyses of a cogeneration plant  

SciTech Connect

A thermodynamic study of an 88.4 MW cogeneration plant located in the United States is presented in this paper. The feedstock for this actual plant is culm, the waste left from anthracite coal mining. Before combustion in circulating fluidized bed boilers, the usable carbon within the culm is separated from the indigenous rock. The rock and ash waste from the combustion process fill adjacent land previously scared by strip mining. Trees and grass are planted in these areas as part of a land reclamation program. Analyses based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics using actual operating data are first presented to acquaint the reader with the plant's components and operation. Using emission and other relevant environmental data from the plant, all externalities study is outlined that estimates the plant's effect on the local population. The results show that the plant's cycle performs with a coefficient of utilization of 29% and all approximate exergetic efficiency of 34.5%. In order to increase these values, recommended improvements to the plant are noted. In addition, the externality costs associated with the estimated SO{sub 2} and NOx discharge from the culm fed plant are lower (85-95%) than those associated with a similarly sized coal fed plant. The plant's cycle efficiencies are lower than those associated with more modern technologies; such as all integrated gas turbine combined cycle. However, given the abundant, inexpensive supply of feedstock located adjacent to the plant and the environmental benefit of removing culm banks, the plant's existing operation is unique from an economical and environmental viewpoint.

Bailey, M.B.; Curtiss, P.; Blanton, P.H.; McBrayer, T.B. [Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program was undertaken to enhance the manufacturability, constructability, and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation and Plume Abatement Cooling Tower, giving a validated cost basis and capability. Air2Air{TM} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10% - 25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate). This program improved the efficiency and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation Cooling Tower capability, and led to the first commercial sale of the product, as described.

Ken Mortensen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current Delta water Plant and Intake Location System Size (future water quality conditions at different Delta intakesusing the intake with the better water quality between Old

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Water pollution  

SciTech Connect

Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 9A. Subcontract information. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; water supply and civil engineering subcontracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume 9A considers subcontract work done at the site involving hydrogeological studies with respect to water supply and geotechnical work with respect to the building foundations necessary based on boreholes drilled and the lithology of the area. (LTN)

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

PHYSICAL PLANT OPERATING POLICY AND PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, streams, and lakes. f. Water Reuse Sump: A sump at Plant 1 that collects rain water, cooling tower spray, acid station wash water and other sources and returns them to the cooling towers for reuse. g. Water, or grounds. PP/OP 08.13 #12;Page 2 2. Potential Sources of Storm Water Contamination a. West Cooling Tower

Rock, Chris

384

Awareness of sustainable development: why did the Saemangeum Tideland Reclamation Project lead to the first national controversy over sustainable development in South Korea?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a list of aspects or characteristics of sustainable development awareness in a society was made from a literature review of the history of sustainable development, theories and practices on sustainable development, and sustainable development in anthropology. An historical review of tideland reclamation in Korea and key informant interviews about the Saemangeum Tideland Reclamation Project were conducted. It was an effort to show that the Saemangeum Project became the first national controversy over sustainable development in South Korea by applying the list of aspects or characteristics of sustainable development awareness. This study was carried out in an attempt to seek a way of studying sustainable development from an anthropological point of view. The results of this study indicated that the majority of aspects or characteristics of sustainable development awareness had emerged in the early and middle 1990s when the Saemangeum Project became a national controversy over the environment versus development. Broadening the research area of sustainable development by focusing on a human behavior, awareness, is the main contribution of this study to the anthropological study of development. The thesis concludes with the possibility of a comparative study between countries where mud-flats are a significant natural resource to deepen understanding sustainable development.

Choi, In Huck

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status Plant Operational Status Page Content Operational Status Shift 1 - Day The Pantex Plant is open for normal operations. All personnel are to report for duty according to...

387

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature of w a t e r Produced water = 360F (182OC) I nt o l i f t i n g t h e produced water a g a i n s t g r a ve i n j e c t e d o r produced water moves. Moreover, even i

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

H. R. 5373: An Act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, August 3, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This Act may be cited as the [open quotes]Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1993[close quotes]. The purpose of this Act is to make appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, and for other purposes. Title I presents provisions for the Department of Defense--Civil Department of the Army; Title II for the Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation; Title III for the Department of Energy; and Title V for General Provisions.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, August 4, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report addresses H.R. 4506 a bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995. The bill supplies funds for water resources development programs and related activities of the Dept. of Army, Civil Functions - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program, the Department of Interior`s Bureau of Reclamation, and for certain Department of Energy`s energy research activities. The report includes comments on various programs.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

DOE-NETL Electric Utility-Water R&D Program EPRI Water Advisory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Utility-Water R&D Program EPRI Water Advisory Council September 25, 2002 Milwaukee, WI Thomas J. Feeley, III, Product Manager Innovations for Existing Plants TJFEPRI...

391

Use of electrodialysis for concentrating simulated (Model) drainage collector waters  

SciTech Connect

The volume of mineralized drainage collector waters (DCW) increased as the result of development of soil reclamation. For example, this volume is 0.3 km/sup 3//yr in the Ashkhabad province alone, and the total for the Turkmen SSR is 5 km/sup 3//hr. The degree of mineralization of DCW varies from 2 to 33 g/liter. About 50% of the mineralization of DCW is made up of hardness salts. Desalination of mineralized DCW and their return the water-supply system would decrease consumption of fresh water and diminish salination of existing water sources. The purpose of this work was to examine the possibility of obtaining highly concentrated brines during desalination of simulated DCW without preliminary softening with the use of MK-100M cation-exchange membrane obtained by chemical modification of homogeneous MK-100 cation-exchange membrane with the ethylenediamine.

Grebenyuk, V.D.; Veisov, B.K.; Chebotareva, R.D.; Braude, K.P.; Nefedova, G.Z.

1986-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

Life Cycle Management Planning at V.C. Summer Nuclear Plant: Main Condenser, Radiation Monitoring System, and Nuclear Safety-Related HVAC Chilled Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes very important to keep the plant economically viable throughout its remaining licensed operating term (either a 40-year or 60-year term). This report provides the industry with lessons learned from applying the EPRI LCM planning process to three SSCs at V.C. Summer Generating Station.

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

393

The effects of variable operation on RO plant performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimizations of reverse osmosis (RO) plants typically consider steady state operation of the plant. RO plants are subject to transient factors that may make it beneficial to produce more water at one time than at another. ...

Williams, Christopher Michael, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

7th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium G1 Plants of Colorado; Current Conservation Status and Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Greenland, and Mongolia. Plants in mountains of British Columbia is closest. Brian K.: On the subject,000 plants. Many plants along CO River near the water. Jill H.: Transcontinental pipeline went through

395

Microsoft Word - RBL-RUL_Gas-Plant  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Page 1 Project Rulison Monitoring Results For Separated Water at a Natural Gas Plant, Parachute, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction,...

396

NETL: Innovations for Existing Plants Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to develop a new dynamic simulator for supercritical pulverized coal and natural gas combined cycle power plants. 05.31.2013 News Finding Alternative Water Sources for...

397

Model of the Feed Water System Including a Generic Model of the Deaerator for a Full Scope Combined Cycle Power Plant Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the modelling of the Feed water System and an original generic model for closed vessels containing a fluid in two phases at equilibrium conditions with an incondensable gas. The model was used for the deaerator of a Combined Cycle ... Keywords: deaerator, pressurised vessels model, feedwater simulation

Edgardo J. Roldan-Villasana; Ana K. Vazquez

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alluvial Aquifer, that has resulted from oil and gas operations in the area, particularly in south, discharge from poultry and hog plants, and leaky landfills, among others. Saline water intrusion and near

Soerens, Thomas

399

Storm Water Detention Pond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allow water to meander through them. * Amend soil on the banks of the drainages with a compost-based soil builder. * Plant or stake the channel with with appropriate vegetation...

400

Water Impacts of the Electricity Sector (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the water impacts of the electricity sector. Nationally, the electricity sector is a major end-user of water. Water issues affect power plants throughout the nation.

Macknick, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial hot water. Volume 1. Final design report. [For American Linen Supply laundry in El Centro, California  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a solar system for integration into the process hot water and steam services for the laundry facility, American Linen Sypply, located in El Centro, California is presented. A tracking parabolic collector array and thermal storage tanks will be used. Process analysis, instrumentation for control and data analysis, construction, maintenance and safety, energy reduction analysis, and economic analysis are described. A waste heat reclamation system is included in the design. (WHK)

1977-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 1. Investigation and evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in piping of boiling water reactor plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IGSCC in BWR piping is occurring owing to a combination of material, environment, and stress factors, each of which can affect both the initiation of a stress-corrosion crack and the rate of its subsequent propagation. In evaluating long-term solutions to the problem, one needs to consider the effects of each of the proposed remedial actions. Mitigating actions to control IGSCC in BWR piping must be designed to alleviate one or more of the three synergistic factors: sensitized material, the convention BWR environment, and high tensile stresses. Because mitigating actions addressing each of these factors may not be fully effective under all anticipated operating conditions, mitigating actions should address two and preferably all three of the causative factors; e.g., material plus some control of water chemistry, or stress reversal plus controlled water chemistry.

Not Available

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The environmental behavior of transuranic nuclides released from water cooled nuclear power plants. Final report, 1 August 1977-31 December 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Release data are reported for three coastal water-cooled nuclear reactors: Millstone Point No. 1 and No. 2 (for the period January 1977 through April 1978), and Maine Yankee (for the period 20 June 1977 through 25 March 1978); release samples were analyzed for (55)Fe, (60)Co, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239), (240)Pu, (241)Am, (242)Cm and (244)Cm, but not all nuclides on every sample. Radioiron is a major component of the releases measured; the transuranium nuclides are less significant components than was expected, but levels have occasionally reached microcuries per month. Pulses of this size are adequate for tracer studies. Environmental samples (water, sediments, and biota) have been analyzed from about the two reactor sites noted, and that of the Pilgrim No. 1 reactor. No water samples remote from reactor outflows have unequivocally shown reactor contamination. No sediment samples from near Millstone Point or Pilgrim 1 have shown reactor contamination; this has been clearly evident in several sediment collections from near Main Yankee.

Bowen, V.T.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

405

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

Decision Support for IntegratedDecision Support for Integrated WaterWater--Energy PlanningEnergy Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis · Simulated at the power plant level with 4841 individual plants modeled · Plants distinguishedProject Impetus · Energy-Water Roadmap findings: ­ Reduce fresh water consumption in electric power generation Surface Water Ground Water Population Growth Industry Fuels Wind Hydro Solar Thermoelectric #12;System

Keller, Arturo A.

407

Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MW) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MW) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

Douglas G. Hall

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Maintaining plant safety margins  

SciTech Connect

The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.

Bergeron, P.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Plant Sciences for a Sustainable Future An Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Plant Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an understanding of the biological processes that govern plant carbon sequestration, vegetation dynamics, and exchanges of carbon, water, and energy between the biosphere and atmosphere. Achieving a multilayered

410

Phytoremediation of Trace Elements by Wetland Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some plants naturally absorb and hyperaccumulate trace elements in their tissues. In a process known as phytoremediation, scientists are harnessing this ability to remove toxic heavy metals and trace elements from contaminated soils and waters. This screening program quantified the capacity of various wetland plant species for removing trace elements from polluted water.

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

411

Guidelines for New High Reliability Fossil Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. New plants should have the optimum cycle chemistry features designed in, and the guidelines provided in this report will assist owners and operators of new plants in specifying these features during the design phase.

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Relationship between Water and Energy: Optimizing Water and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to conserve water, drought-proof operating plants and control costs, the critical relationship of water and energy is clearly exposed. Five years of effort has transpired into countless studies, more than 100 projects and a clear understanding that the highest value opportunities for water conservation usually exist where there is the strongest interaction of water and energy. Steam management systems, process cooling, high quality water production and waste water treatment represent high probability areas for water conservation and value capture. These are not the only areas to reduce water management infrastructure and environmental footprint but they represent areas with the high potential for efforts to return bottom line value.

Finley, T.; Fennessey, K.; Light, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Carnivorous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carnivorous Plants Carnivorous Plants Nature Bulletin No. 597-A March 27, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CARNIVOROUS PLANTS Plants, generally, are eaten by insects or furnish other food for them. But there are a few families of strange plants that, instead, "eat" insects and other small animals. About 500 species are distributed over the world, from the arctic to the tropics. Most of them have peculiar leaves that not only attract insects but are equipped to trap and kill their victims. Even more remarkable is the fact that some have glands which secrete a digestive juice that softens and decomposes the animal until it is absorbed by the plant in much the same way as your stomach digests food.

415

Computeer-based decision support tools for evaluation of actions affecting flow and water quality in the San Joaquin Basin  

SciTech Connect

This document is a preliminary effort to draw together some of the important simulation models that are available to Reclamation or that have been developed by Reclamation since 1987. This document has also attempted to lay out a framework by which these models might be used both for the purposes for which they were originally intended and to support the analysis of other issues that relate to the hydrology and to salt and water quality management within the San Joaquin Valley. To be successful as components of a larger Decision Support System the models should to be linked together using custom designed interfaces that permit data sharing between models and that are easy to use. Several initiatives are currently underway within Reclamation to develop GIS - based and graphics - based decision support systems to improve the general level of understanding of the models currently in use, to standardize the methodology used in making planning and operations studies and to permit improved data analysis, interpretation and display. The decision support systems should allow greater participation in the planning process, allow the analysis of innovative actions that are currently difficult to study with present models and should lead to better integrated and more comprehensive plans and policy decisions in future years.

Quinn, N.W.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Thermal spray applications for power plant components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plants usually are located near water and many are in salt water environments. Corrosion occurring in these environments is a problem often solved with thermal spray coatings. The use of thermal spray aluminum and zinc in three power plants for various components is reviewed. Special emphasis is on the cooling tower at the Seabrook, New Hampshire plant. A guide to selection of the coating and process also is given.

Sampson, E.R.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The public concern for continued delivery of these ecosystem services is increasing; with private landowners of the plateau region affecting the delivery of these services. A geographic information systems spatial analysis was conducted for Bandera and Kerr counties, with two components being: (1) biophysical and (2) landowner interest. Together these resulted in an overarching map depicting the optimal locations to allocate government assistance to landowners for managing their property to support three ecosystem services: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration.In April 2003, a mail survey of selected landowners was conducted to determine their opinions regarding ecosystem services and cost-share programs (Olenick et al. 2005). In July 2004, a supplemental survey of respondents to the first survey was conducted to follow-up on a few questions answered incorrectly and to focus on landowner opinions regarding cost-share assistance programs and land management activities. Overall, it appeared that five year performance contracts were the most chosen contract type for respondents of all property sizes, earning mid/high annual incomes, and for all length of ownership time periods. Based on our findings, the publicly-funded assistance programs that should be allocated to the optimal ecosystem service locations are five and ten year performance contracts based on property size, length of ownership, and income level categories. The spatial and statistical analysis results were successful, in that optimal locations and types of cost share programs were identified for each ecosystem service in order to prioritize the allocation of limited public resources. The patches of ecosystem target areas within the final target area map can be used as land management demonstration sites to reveal to surrounding landowners the benefits of participating in publicly funded cost-share assistance programs. However, the study has been limited by the generality of the GIS statewide wildlife data.

Davis, Amber Marie

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Geothermal/Water Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Use Water Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Water Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Water Use General Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers in northern California is the world's largest producer of geothermal power. The dry-steam field has successfully produced power since the early 1960s when Pacific Gas & Electric installed the first 11-megawatt plant. The dry steam plant consumes water by emitting water vapor into the atmosphere. Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways: The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second is using water for cooling (for some plants only).

419

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generators. The plant's water intake structure, which isoff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory, andat the aquarium's water system intake located in a deep

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1985. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, US Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part I of the hearing record covers three days of testimony on energy and water development appropriations involving the Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. William Gianelli, Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) reviewed the $2.49 billion budget and pending legislation that relates to it, as well as to a variety of issues including project productivity, ocean disposal of dredged materials, regulatory reform, private financing of public recreation, and the role of federal engineers. Secretary of the Interior William Clark reviewed the functions of the Bureau of Reclamation, and Commissioner Robert Broadbent discussed the $1.08 billion budget in more detail. Tennessee Valley Authority Chairman Charles Dean gave an overview of projects and budget requirements amounting to $117.5 million.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reclamation plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) Lining Main Canal Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the Main Canal with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamations three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -13.65.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) Lining Main Canal Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the Main Canal with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamations three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction cos