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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Generic small modular reactor plant design.  

SciTech Connect

This report gives an overview of expected design characteristics, concepts, and procedures for small modular reactors. The purpose of this report is to provide those who are interested in reducing the cost and improving the safety of advanced nuclear power plants with a generic design that possesses enough detail in a non-sensitive manner to give merit to their conclusions. The report is focused on light water reactor technology, but does add details on what could be different in a more advanced design (see Appendix). Numerous reactor and facility concepts were used for inspiration (documented in the bibliography). The final design described here is conceptual and does not reflect any proposed concept or sub-systems, thus any details given here are only relevant within this report. This report does not include any design or engineering calculations.

Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Baum, Gregory A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

3

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

6

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydraulics software RELAP-7 (which is under development in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability LWRS Program). A novel interaction between the probabilistic part (i.e., RAVEN)...

7

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM: INTRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM: INTRODUCTION The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1...

8

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from

9

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations, which govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants, require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including

10

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Login Instructions go here. User ID: Password: Log In Forgot your password?...

11

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Contact Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Organization LWRS Program Management Richard Reister Federal Project Director Light Water Reactor Deployment Office of Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy...

12

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely

13

2-3. Generic Approaches Towards Water Quality Monitoring Based on Paleolimnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phosphorus analysis of Lake St-Charles, the principal drinking water supply for Québec City, #12;62 R environmental records for lake and river ecosystems provide a valuable generic tool for water quality management by way of water quality research on three ecosystems in Québec, Canada. Lake St-Augustin is a small lake

Vincent, Warwick F.

14

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from 40y to 80y implies a doubling of the neutron exposure for the RPV. Thus,

15

Operational control of boiling water reactor stability  

SciTech Connect

Boiling water reactor cores are susceptible to instabilities, which generate power oscillations. Specific reactor operating practices can provide a mechanism for control of the instability phenomenon. An axial separation of the core into a single-phase region and a two-phase region resolves the influence of axial flux shapes on core stability. This separation provides the means to derive a core stability control that ensures significant reactor stability margin. The control is achieved by maintaining the core average bulk coolant saturation elevation above a predetermined axial plane. The control can be reliably and efficiently implemented during reactor operations. Analysis demonstrates that variations in parameters important to stability have only secondary influences on stability margin when the control is in effect. Actual plant experience with a large commercial boiling water reactor confirms the capabilities of this stability control in an operational setting.

Mowry, C.M. [PECO Energy, Wayne, PA (United States); Nir, I. [Entergy Operations, Jackson, MS (United States); Newkirk, D.W. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Tritium issues in commercial pressurized water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Tritium has become an important radionuclide in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors because of its mobility and tendency to concentrate in plant systems as tritiated water during the recycling of reactor coolant. Small quantities of tritium are released in routine regulated effluents as liquid water and as water vapor. Tritium has become a focus of attention at commercial nuclear power plants in recent years due to inadvertent, low-level, chronic releases arising from routine maintenance operations and from component failures. Tritium has been observed in groundwater in the vicinity of stations. The nuclear industry has undertaken strong proactive corrective measures to prevent recurrence, and continues to eliminate emission sources through its singular focus on public safety and environmental stewardship. This paper will discuss: production mechanisms for tritium, transport mechanisms from the reactor through plant, systems to the environment, examples of routine effluent releases, offsite doses, basic groundwater transport and geological issues, and recent nuclear industry environmental and legal ramifications. (authors)

Jones, G. [Constellation Energy Group, R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, Ontario, NY (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors CASL is focused on three issues for nuclear...

18

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents September 30, 2011 Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement

19

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents April 30, 2013 LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan To address the challenges associated with pursuing commercial nuclear power plant operations beyond 60 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs: DOE-NE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program and EPRI's Long-Term Operations (LTO) Program. April 30, 2013 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and

20

Cross section generation strategy for high conversion light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High conversion water reactors (HCWR), such as the Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR), are being designed with axial heterogeneity of alternating fissile and blanket zones to achieve a conversion ratio of ...

Herman, Bryan R. (Bryan Robert)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary. 2 figures.

Chastagner, P.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Water Reactor Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is developing the scientific basis to extend existing nuclear power plant operating life beyond the current 60-year licensing period and ensure long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security. The program is conducted in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, industry, and international partners. Idaho National Laboratory serves as the Technical Integration Office and coordinates the research and development (R&D) projects in the following pathways: Materials Aging and Degradation Assessment, Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems

23

Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Zircaloy performance in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Zircaloy has been successfully used as the primary light water reactor (LWR) core structural material since its introduction in the early days of the US naval nuclear program. Its unique combination of low neutron absorption cross section, fabricability, mechanical strength, and corrosion resistance in water and steam near 300{degrees}C has resulted in remarkable reliability of operation of pressurized and boiling water reactor (PWR, BWR) fuel through the years. At present time, BWRs use Zircaloy-2 and PWRs use Zircaloy-4 for fuel cladding. In BWRs, both Zircaloy-2 and -4 have been successfully used for spacer grids and channels, and in PWRs Zircaloy-4 is used for spacer grids and control rod guide tubes. Performance of fuel rods has been excellent thus far. The current trend for utilities worldwide is to expect both higher fuel reliability in the future. Fuel suppliers have already achieved extended exposures in lead use assemblies, and have demonstrated excellent performance in all areas; therefore unsuspected problems are not likely to arise. However, as exposure and expectations continue to increase, Zircaloy is being taken toward the limits of its known capabilities. This paper reviews Zircaloy performance capabilities in areas related to environmentally affected microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and dimensional stability. The effects of radiation and reactor environment on each property is illustrated with data, micrographs, and analysis.

Adamson, R.B.; Cheng, B.C.; Kruger, R.M. [GE Nuclear Energy, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Screening reactor steam/water piping systems for water hammer  

SciTech Connect

A steam/water system possessing a certain combination of thermal, hydraulic and operational states, can, in certain geometries, lead to a steam bubble collapse induced water hammer. These states, operations, and geometries are identified. A procedure that can be used for identifying whether an unbuilt reactor system is prone to water hammer is proposed. For the most common water hammer, steam bubble collapse induced water hammer, six conditions must be met in order for one to occur. These are: (1) the pipe must be almost horizontal; (2) the subcooling must be greater than 20 C; (3) the L/D must be greater than 24; (4) the velocity must be low enough so that the pipe does not run full, i.e., the Froude number must be less than one; (5) there should be void nearby; (6) the pressure must be high enough so that significant damage occurs, that is the pressure should be above 10 atmospheres. Recommendations on how to avoid this kind of water hammer in both the design and the operation of the reactor system are made.

Griffith, P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the

28

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the

29

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter Rebecca Smith-Kevern  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rebecca Smith-Kevern Director, Office of Light Water Reactor Technologies. I am often asked why the Federal Government should fund a program that supports the continued operation...

30

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter Thomas M. Rosseel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating and contracting with Zion Solutions, LLC (a...

31

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter By John Gaertner  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year 2011 LWRS Program funding is very clear: "Regarding the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program, (Congress) expects a high cost share from industry." Cost sharing is...

32

Light water reactor lower head failure analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as /sup 240/Pu, /sup 244/Cm and /sup 252/Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter /sup 241/Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether permanent low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Atencio, J.D.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Development of Novel Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Novel Water- Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor Addressing Barrier L: H2 Purification-22, 2003 #12;Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor · Relevance/Objectives - Produce Enhanced H2 Product with ppm CO at High Pressure Used for Reforming - Overcome Barrier L: H2 Purification/CO Clean-up - Achieve

35

Disinfection of drinking water by using a novel electrochemical reactor employing carbon-cloth electrodes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reactor for clean and efficient water purification. Disinfection of drinking...reactor for clean and efficient water purification. | Department of Biotechnology...reactor for clean and efficient water purification. Disinfection of drinking...

T Matsunaga; S Nakasono; T Takamuku; J G Burgess; N Nakamura; K Sode

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nondestructive Evaluation for Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap Materials issues are a key concern for the existing nuclear reactor fleet as material degradation can lead to increased maintenance, increased downtown, and increased risk. Extending reactor life to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of known forms of degradation. Additionally, new mechanisms of materials degradation are also possible. The purpose of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend

37

Light Water Reactors [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Air Oxidation Kinetics for Zr-based Alloys Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Light Water Reactors Bookmark and Share To continue safe operation of current LWRs, the aging degradation of the

38

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) was selected as one of the promising candidates in Generation IV reactors for its prominent advantages; those are the high thermal efficiency, the system simplification, the R&D cost minimization and the flexibility for core design. As the demand for advanced nuclear system increases, Japanese R&D project started in 1999 aiming to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through three sub-themes of 1. Plant conceptual design, 2. Thermal-hydraulics, and 3. Material. Although the material development is critical issue of SCWR development, previous studies were limited for the screening tests on commercial alloys

39

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration and cooperation with related industry R&D programs. The LWRS Program provides technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants, utilizing the unique capabilities of the national laboratory system. Sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets

40

Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor. 6 figs.

Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Rethinking the light water reactor fuel cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The once through nuclear fuel cycle adopted by the majority of countries with operating commercial power reactors imposes a number of concerns. The radioactive waste created in the once through nuclear fuel cycle has to ...

Shwageraus, Evgeni, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Review of High Temperature Water and Steam Cooled Reactor Concepts  

SciTech Connect

This review summarizes design concepts of supercritical-pressure water cooled reactors (SCR), nuclear superheaters and steam cooled fast reactors from 1950's to the present time. It includes water moderated supercritical steam cooled reactor, SCOTT-R and SC-PWR of Westinghouse, heavy water moderated light water cooled SCR of GE, SCLWR and SCFR of the University of Tokyo, B-500SKDI of Kurchatov Institute, CANDU -X of AECL, nuclear superheaters of GE, subcritical-pressure steam cooled FBR of KFK and B and W, Supercritical-pressure steam cooled FBR of B and W, subcritical-pressure steam cooled high converter by Edlund and Schultz and subcritical-pressure water-steam cooled FBR by Alekseev. This paper is prepared based on the previous review of SCR2000 symposium, and some author's comments are added. (author)

Oka, Yoshiaki [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo, 3-1, Hongo 7-Chome, Bunkyo-ku (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Antineutrino monitoring for the Iranian heavy water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note we discuss the potential application of antineutrino monitoring to the Iranian heavy water reactor at Arak, the IR-40, as a non-proliferation measure. We demonstrate that an above ground detector positioned right outside the IR-40 reactor building could meet and in some cases significantly exceed the verification goals identified by IAEA for plutonium production or diversion from declared inventories. In addition to monitoring the reactor during operation, observing antineutrino emissions from long-lived fission products could also allow monitoring the reactor when it is shutdown. Antineutrino monitoring could also be used to distinguish different levels of fuel enrichment. Most importantly, these capabilities would not require a complete reactor operational history and could provide a means to re-establish continuity of knowledge in safeguards conclusions should this become necessary.

Christensen, Eric; Jaffke, Patrick; Shea, Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced water reactor Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water... it can be built on time and budget. Reactors currently under construction in Finland and France... are indeed well behind schedule. But there are several reactors that...

45

Evaluation of the economic simplified boiling water reactor human reliability analysis using the SHARP framework .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??General Electric plans to complete a design certification document for the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor to have the new reactor design certified by the (more)

Dawson, Phillip Eng

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Conceptual Design of a Large, Passive Pressure-Tube Light Water Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design for a large, passive, light water reactor has been developed. The proposed concept is a pressure tube reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated ...

Hejzlar, P.

48

Large passive pressure tube light water reactor with voided calandria  

SciTech Connect

A reactor concept has been developed that can survive loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) without scram and without replenishing primary coolant inventory while maintaining safe temperature limits on the fuel and pressure tube. The proposed concept is a pressure tube reactor of similar design to Canada deuterium uranium reactors but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid silicon carbide-coated graphite fuel matrix is used in place of fuel pin bundles to enable the dissipation of decay heat from the fuel in the absence of primary coolant. Second, the heavy water coolant in the pressure tubes is replaced by light water, which also serves as the moderator. Finally, the calandria tank, surrounded by a graphite reflector, contains a low-pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator, and this normally voided calandria is connected to a light water heat sink. The cover gas displaces the light water from the calandria during normal operation while during a LOCA or loss of heat sink accident, it allows passive calandria flooding. Calandria flooding also provides redundant and diverse reactor shutdown. The fuel elements can operate under post-critical-heat-flux conditions even at full power without exceeding fuel design limits. The heterogeneous arrangement of the fuel and moderator ensures a negative void coefficient under all circumstances. Although light water is used as both coolant and moderator, the reactor exhibits a high degree of neutron thermalization and a large prompt neutron lifetime, similar to D{sub 2}O-moderated cores. Moreover, the extremely large neutron migration length results in a strongly coupled core with a flat thermal flux profile and inherent stability against xenon spatial oscillations.

Hejzlar, P.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels have been investigated. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-sulfur-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor water, and in air. Analytical studies focused on the behavior of carbon steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. Crack-growth rates of composite fracture-mechanics specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B steel were determined under small-amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with {approx}300 pbb dissolved oxygen. Radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence also have been investigated. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289{degrees}C.

Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials  

SciTech Connect

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used.

Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor S. Anand * K. D. S...Mumbai 400085, India The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a new power...PHWR. INTRODUCTION The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)(1, 2), currently......

S. Anand; K. D. S. Singh; V. K. Sharma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Aging and Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Components serving in a nuclear reactor plant must withstand a very harsh environment including extended time at temperature, neutron irradiation, stress, and/or corrosive media. The many modes of degradation are complex and vary depending on location and material. However, understanding and managing materials degradation is a key for the continued safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. Extending reactor service to beyond 60 years will increase the demands on materials and components. Therefore, an early evaluation of the possible effects of extended lifetime is critical. The recent NUREG/CR-6923 gives a

53

A Parametric Study of the DUPIC Fuel Cycle to Reflect Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Management Strategy  

SciTech Connect

For both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) tandem analysis, the Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU reactor (DUPIC) fuel cycle in a CANDU 6 reactor is studied using the DRAGON/DONJON chain of codes with the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI libraries. The reference feed material is a 17 x 17 French standard 900-MW(electric) PWR fuel. The PWR spent-fuel composition is obtained from two-dimensional DRAGON assembly transport and depletion calculations. After a number of years of cooling, this defines the initial fuel nuclide field in the CANDU unit cell calculations in DRAGON, where it is further depleted with the same neutron group structure. The resulting macroscopic cross sections are condensed and tabulated to be used in a full-core model of a CANDU 6 reactor to find an optimized channel fueling rate distribution on a time-average basis. Assuming equilibrium refueling conditions and a particular refueling sequence, instantaneous full-core diffusion calculations are finally performed with the DONJON code, from which both the channel power peaking factors and local parameter effects are estimated. A generic study of the DUPIC fuel cycle is carried out using the linear reactivity model for initial enrichments ranging from 3.2 to 4.5 wt% in a PWR. Because of the uneven power histories of the spent PWR assemblies, the spent PWR fuel composition is expected to differ from one assembly to the next. Uneven mixing of the powder during DUPIC fuel fabrication may lead to uncertainties in the composition of the fuel bundle and larger peaking factors in CANDU. A mixing method for reducing composition uncertainties is discussed.

Rozon, Daniel; Shen Wei [Institut de Genie Nucleaire (Canada)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Accident Performance of Light Water Reactor Cladding Materials  

SciTech Connect

During a loss of coolant accident as experienced at Fukushima, inadequate cooling of the reactor core forces component temperatures ever higher where they must withstand aggressive chemical environments. Conventional zirconium cladding alloys will readily oxidize in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures, rapidly degrading and likely failing. A cladding breach removes the critical barrier between actinides and fission products and the coolant, greatly increasing the probability of the release of radioactivity in the event of a containment failure. These factors have driven renewed international interest in both study and improvement of the materials used in commercial light water reactors. Characterization of a candidate cladding alloy or oxidation mitigation technique requires understanding of both the oxidation kinetics and hydrogen production as a function of temperature and atmosphere conditions. Researchers in the MST division supported by the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development program are working to evaluate and quantify these parameters across a wide range of proposed cladding materials. The primary instrument employed is a simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) equipped with a specialized water vapor furnace capable of maintaining temperatures above 1200 C in a range of atmospheres and water vapor contents. The STA utilizes thermogravimetric analysis and a coupled mass spectrometer to measure in situ oxidation and hydrogen production of candidate materials. This capability is unprecedented in study of materials under consideration for reactor cladding use, and is currently being expanded to investigate proposed coating techniques as well as the effect of coating defects on corrosion resistance.

Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

55

Water chemistry of breeder reactor steam generators. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

The water quality requirements will be described for breeder reactor steam generators, as well as specifications for balance of plant protection. Water chemistry details will be discussed for the following power plant conditions: feedwater and recirculation water at above and below 5% plant power, refueling or standby, makeup water, and wet layup. Experimental data will be presented from tests which included a departure from nucleate boiling experiment, the Few Tube Test, with a seven tube evaporator and three tube superheater, and a verification of control and on-line measurement of sodium ion in the ppB range. Sampling and instrumentation requirements to insure adherence to the specified water quality will be described. Evaporator cleaning criteria and data from laboratory testing of chemical cleaning solutions with emphasis on flow, chemical composition, and temperature will be discussed.

Simpson, J.L.; Robles, M.N.; Spalaris, C.N.; Moss, S.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

57

Critical Facility for lattice physics experiments for the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor and the 500MWe pressurized heavy water reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, is embarking on a broad based program for thorium utilization in power production to achieve all-round capability in the entire thorium cycle. As a step in this direction, a low power Critical Facility is under construction at BARC. The facility will greatly contribute to the understanding and validation of the calculational models and nuclear data used in the design of thorium based Advanced Heavy Water Reactor. The facility is also designed to cater to the experimental requirements of future lattice studies related to 500MWe pressurized heavy water reactors. This paper covers the basic design features, safety aspects and the planned experimental program of the new facility.

V.K. Raina; R. Srivenkatesan; D.C. Khatri; D.K. Lahiri

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect

Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items fabrication, processing, splitting, and more by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Programs understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear powers cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR.

Luk, K.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump and pipes were modeled with realistic assumptions using the PEACE module of Thermoflex. A three-dimensional layout of the plant was also generated with the SolidEdge software. The results of the engineering design are as follows: (i) The cycle achieves a net thermal efficiency of 24.13% with 350/460 C reactor inlet/outlet temperatures, {approx}250 bar reactor pressure and 0.75 bar condenser pressure. The steam quality at the turbine outlet is 90% and the total electric consumption of the pumps is about 2500 kWe at nominal conditions. (ii) The overall size of the plant is attractively compact and can be further reduced if a printed-circuit-heat-exchanger (vs shell-and-tube) design is used for the feedwater heater, which is currently the largest component by far. Finally, an analysis of the plant performance at off-nominal conditions has revealed good robustness of the design in handling large changes of thermal power and seawater temperature.

BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fuel Performance Code Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Light Water Reactor Modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fuel performance codes are used in the design and safety analysis of light water reactors. The differences in the physical models and the numerics of (more)

Blyth, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY13 Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY13.

R. Johansen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY12 Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY12.

R. Johansen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

behavior in AP1000 reactor core Test run signals emergence of the next generation in nuclear power reactor analysis tools OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Feb. 18, 2014 - Scientists and...

68

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations 2015 back to top Smith, K., Advances in Reactor Physics and Computational Science, Physor 2014 International Conference, "The Role of Reactor Physics toward a...

69

Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY11 Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Summary report for Fiscal Year 2011 activities associated with the Constellation Pilot Project. The project is a joint effor between Constellation Nuclear Energy Group (CENG), EPRI, and the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The project utilizes two CENG reactor stations: R.E. Ginna and Nine Point Unit 1. Included in the report are activities associate with reactor internals and concrete containments.

R. Johansen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to declineeven with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administrations energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Programs plans.

Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to declineeven with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administrations energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Programs plans.

McCarthy, Kathryn A [INL; Busby, Jeremy [ORNL; Hallbert, Bruce [INL; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [INL; Smith, Curtis [INL; Barnard, Cathy [INL

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly over-design portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as safety margin. Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on engineering judgment.

Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

High-Fidelity Light Water Reactor Analysis with the Numerical Nuclear Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Mathematics and Computation, Supercomputing, Reactor Physics and Nuclear and Biological Applications

David P. Weber; Tanju Sofu; Won Sik Yang; Thomas J. Downar; Justin W. Thomas; Zhaopeng Zhong; Jin Young Cho; Kang Seog Kim; Tae Hyun Chun; Han Gyu Joo; Chang Hyo Kim

76

Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 January 29, 2013 - 12:06pm Addthis Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration RELAP-7 is a nuclear reactor system safety analysis code. Development started in October 2011, and during the past quarter the initial capabilities of RELAP-7 were demonstrated by simulating a steady-state single-phase pressurized water reactor (PWR) with two parallel loops and multiple reactor core flow channels (Fig. 1). The PWR configuration matched that of the Three Mile Island 1 LWR, which is a benchmark problem from the

77

Light-water breeder reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume III  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning prebreeder and breeder reactors based on light-water-breeder (LWBR) Type 1 modules; light-water backfit prebreeder supplying advanced breeder; light-water backfit prebreeder/seed-blanket breeder system; and light-water backfit low-gain converter using medium-enrichment uranium, supplying a light-water backfit high-gain converter.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Non-Destructive Evaluation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program - Non-Destructive Program - Non-Destructive Evaluation R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Non-Destructive Evaluation R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. A workshop was held to gather subject matter experts to develop the NDE R&D Roadmap for Cables. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters.

79

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Program Plan Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas- emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow by more than 30% from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license, for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power

80

Nonlinear dynamics and chaos in boiling water reactors  

SciTech Connect

There are currently 72 commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) in operation or under construction in the western world, 37 of them in the United States. Consequently, a great effort has been devoted to the study of BWR systems under a wide range of plant operating conditions. This paper represents a contribution to this ongoing effort; its objective is to study the basic dynamic processes in BWR systems, with special emphasis on the physical interpretation of BWR dynamics. The main thrust in this work is the development of phenomenological BWR models suited for analytical studies performed in conjunction with numerical calculations. This approach leads to a deeper understanding of BWR dynamics and facilitates the interpretation of numerical results given by currently available sophisticated BWR codes. 6 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

March-Leuba, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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81

Pressurized water reactor fuel assembly subchannel void fraction measurement  

SciTech Connect

The void fraction measurement experiment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies has been conducted since 1987 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry as a Japanese national project. Two types of test sections are used in this experiment. One is a 5 x 5 array rod bundle geometry, and the other is a single-channel geometry simulating one of the subchannels in the rod bundle. Wide gamma-ray beam scanners and narrow gamma-ray beam computed tomography scanners are used to measure the subchannel void fractions under various steady-state and transient conditions. The experimental data are expected to be used to develop a void fraction prediction model relevant to PWR fuel assemblies and also to verify or improve the subchannel analysis method. The first series of experiments was conducted in 1992, and a preliminary evaluation of the data has been performed. The preliminary results of these experiments are described.

Akiyama, Yoshiei [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Fuel and Core Engineering Dept.; Hori, Keiichi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Hyougo (Japan); Miyazaki, Keiji [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Mishima, Kaichiro [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Sugiyama, Shigekazu [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Fuel Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Corrosion optimized Zircaloy for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel elements  

SciTech Connect

A corrosion optimized Zircaloy has to be based primarily on in-boiling water reactor (in-BWR) results. Therefore, the material parameters affecting corrosion were deduced from results of experimental fuel rod irradiation with systematic variations and from a large variety of material coupons exposed in water rods up to four cycles. The major material effects is the size and distribution of precipitates. For optimizing both early and late corrosion, the size has to stay in a small range. In the case of material quenched in the final stage, the quenching rate appears to be an important parameter. As far as materials chemistry is concerned, the in-BWR results indicate that corrosion in BWRs is influenced by the alloying elements tin, chromium, and the impurity silicon. In addition to corrosion optimization, hydriding is also considered. A large variation from lot to lot under identically coolant condition has been found. The available data indicate that the chromium content is the most important material parameter for hydrogen pickup.

Garzarolli, F.; Schumann, R.; Steinberg, E. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). Power Generation Group

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Final Report on Isotope Ratio Techniques for Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods.

Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Meriwether, George H.; Reid, Bruce D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluation of Buildup of Activated Corrosion Products for Highly Compact Marine Reactor DRX without Primary Coolant Water Purification System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Buildup of Activated Corrosion Products for Highly Compact Marine Reactor DRX without Primary Coolant Water Purification System

Odano, N

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Fatigue Damage in Piping Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Fatigue Damage in Piping Light water reactor sustainability (LWRS) nondestructive evaluation (NDE) Workshops were held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during July 30th to August 2nd, 2012. This activity was conducted to help develop the content of the NDE R&D roadmap for the materials aging and degradation (MAaD) pathway of the LWRS program. The workshops focused on identifying NDE R&D needs in four areas: cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessel, and piping. A selected group of subject matter experts (SMEs) from DOE national

86

Effects of light water reactor coolant environment on the fatigue lives of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of light water reactor coolant environment on the fatigue lives of Effects of light water reactor coolant environment on the fatigue lives of reactor materials July 8, 2013 A metal component can become progressively degraded, and its structural integrity can be adversely impacted when it is subjected to repeated fluctuating loads, or fatigue loading. Fatigue loadings on nuclear reactor pressure vessel components can occur because of changes in pressure and temperature caused by transients during operation, such as reactor startup or shutdown and turbine trip events. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code recognizes fatigue as a possible cause of failure of reactor materials and provides rules for designing nuclear power plant components to avoid fatigue failures. For various materials, the ASME Code defines the

87

Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water  

SciTech Connect

This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

Michael Corradini; Mark Anderson; Yassin Hassan; Akira Tokuhiro

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

88

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media Center News Obama highlights next generation nuclear reactors in the SOTU Posted: January 27, 2011 President Obama, in his State of the Union address Tuesday, cited work...

89

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has designed and operated 52 test reactors, including EBR-1, the world's first nuclear power plant Key Contributions System safety analysis Multiscale fuel performance...

90

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the better understanding of the system uncertainties and sensitivities afforded by the virtual reactor will identify improvements in both the operation and design of the fuel...

91

Bacterial Colonization of Pellet Softening Reactors Used during Drinking Water Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reactor biomass concentrations as high as 220 mg of ATP/m3 of reactor...were removed as a reusable product. High calcium and magnesium concentrations...such as scale deposits in water boilers, a higher demand for detergents in washing...

Frederik Hammes; Nico Boon; Marius Vital; Petra Ross; Aleksandra Magic-Knezev; Marco Dignum

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

A model for waterside oxidation of zircaloy fuel cladding in pressurized water reactors  

SciTech Connect

A model is developed to simulate the oxidation of zircaloy fuel rod cladding exposed to pressurized water reactor operating conditions. The model is used to predict the oxidation rate for both ex- and in-reactor conditions in terms of the weight gain and oxide thickness. Comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data show very good agreement.

Amarshad, A.I.A. [Institute of Atomic Energy Research, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Klein, A.C. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

EIS-0288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor 288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor EIS-0288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor SUMMARY This Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS) evaluates the environmental impacts associated with producing tritium at one or more of the following five CLWRs: (1) Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (Spring City, Tennessee); (2) Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (Soddy Daisy, Tennessee); (3) Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Unit 2 (Soddy Daisy, Tennessee); (4) Bellefonte Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (Hollywood, Alabama); and (5) Bellefonte Nuclear Plant Unit 2 (Hollywood, Alabama). Specifically, this EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with fabricating tritium-producing

94

EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water 8-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Summary This Supplemental EIS updates the environmental analyses in DOE's 1999 EIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS). The CLWR EIS addressed the production of tritium in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors in Tennessee using tritium-producing burnable absorber rods. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time. Documents Available for Download September 28, 2011 EIS-0288-S1: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental

95

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, Daniel J. (Export, PA); Schrader, Kenneth J. (Penn Hills, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

98

Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Stability analysis of the boiling water reactor : methods and advanced designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Density Wave Oscillations (DWOs) are known to be possible when a coolant undergoes considerable density reduction while passing through a heated channel. In the development of boiling water reactors (BWRs), there has been ...

Hu, Rui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

INL/EXT-14-33257 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

57 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program 3D J-Integral Capability in Grizzly September 2014 DOE Office of Nuclear Energy DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An inverted pressurized water reactor design with twisted-tape swirl promoters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Inverted Fuel Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) concept was previously investigated and developed by Paolo Ferroni at MIT with the effort to improve the power density and capacity of current PWRs by modifying the core ...

Nguyen, Nghia T. (Nghia Tat)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Radiological Control of Water in Reactor Pond of MR Reactor in NRC 'Kurchatov Institute', During Dismantling Work - 13462  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of the activity and radionuclide composition of water from the MR reactor pond for ?,?,?-ray radionuclides was made. To solve this problem we use a wide range of laboratory equipment: gamma spectrometric complex, beta spectrometric complex, vacuum alpha spectrometer, and spectrometric complex with liquid scintillator. The water from MR reactor pond contains: Cs-137 (2,6*10{sup 2} Bq/g), Co-60(1,8 Bq/g), Sr-90 (1,0*10{sup 2} Bq/g), H-3 (7,0*10{sup 3} Bq/g), and components of nuclear fuel (U-232,U-234,U-235,U-236,U-238). Therefore the cleaning water from radioactivity waste occurs to be quite a complicated radiochemical task. (authors)

Stepanov, Alexey; Simirsky, Yury; Semin, Ilya; Volkovich, Anatoly; Ivanov, Oleg [National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)] [National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)  

SciTech Connect

The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

General features of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

The concept of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors is developed. Breeding is possible in the tight lattice core. The power output can be maximized in the fast converter reactor. The gross thermal efficiency of the high temperature reactor adopting Inconel as fuel cladding is expected to be 44.8%. The plant system is similar to the supercritical-fossil-fired power plant which adopts once-through type coolant circulation system. The volume and height of the containment are approximately half of the BWR. The basic safety principles follows those of LWRs. The reactor will solve the economic problems of LWR and LMFBR.

Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Cyclic Mode of Transmutation of Minor Actinides in Heavy-Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of process of transmutation of americium and curium from spent nuclear fuel in heavy-water reactor during first 10 lifetimes and at transition to equilibrium mode are calculated. During transmutation, dangerous nuclides, first of all, {sup 244}Cm and {sup 238}Pu are accumulated. They cause an increase of radiotoxicity. At first 10 cycles of a transmutation, the radiotoxicity is increased by 11 times in comparison with initial load of transmuted actinides. Heavy-water reactor with thermal power of 1000 MW can transmute americium and curium extracted from 7-8 VVER-1000 type reactors. It means that the required power of transmutation reactor makes about 4 % of thermal power of VVER-1000 type reactors. (authors)

Gerasimov, Aleksander S.; Kiselev, Gennady V.; Myrtsymova, Lidia A.; Zaritskaya, Tamara S. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, SSC RF ITEP, Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya, 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

Lund, A.L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

An integrated approach for the verification of fresh mixed oxide fuel (MOX) assemblies at light water reactor MOX recycle reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an integrated approach for the verification of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to their being loaded into the reactor. There is a coupling of the verification approach that starts at the fuel fabrication plant and stops with the transfer of the assemblies into the thermal reactor. The key measurement points are at the output of the fuel fabrication plant, the receipt at the reactor site, and the storage in the water pool as fresh fuel. The IAEA currently has the capability to measure the MOX fuel assemblies at the output of the fuel fabrication plants using a passive neutron coincidence counting systems of the passive neutron collar (PNCL) type. Also. at the MOX reactor pool, the underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) has been developed to measure the MOX assemblies in the water. The UWCC measurement requires that the fuel assembly be lifted about two meters up in the storage rack to avoid interference from the fuel that is stored in the rack. This paper presents a new method to verify the MOX fuel assemblies that are in the storage rack without the necessity of moving the fuel. The detector system is called the Underwater MOX Verification System (UMVS). The integration and relationship of the three measurements systems is described.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang - Yoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Optimized Adaptive Fuzzy Controller of the Water Level of a Pressurized Water Reactor Steam Generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Mathematics and Computation, Supercomputing, Reactor Physics and Nuclear and Biological Applications

M. Marseguerra; E. Zio; F. Cadini

110

Uncertainty analysis of LBLOCA for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of safety analysis is to demonstrate in a robust way that all safety requirements are met, i.e. sufficient margins exist between real values of important parameters and their threshold values at which damage of the barriers against release of radioactivity would occur. As stated in the IAEA Safety Requirements for Design of \\{NPPs\\} a safety analysis of the plant design shall be conducted in which methods of both deterministic and probabilistic analysis shall be applied. It is required that the computer programs, analytical methods and plant models used in the safety analysis shall be verified and validated, and adequate consideration shall be given to uncertainties. Uncertainties are present in calculations due to the computer codes, initial and boundary conditions, plant state, fuel parameters, scaling and numerical solution algorithm. All conservative approaches, still widely used, were introduced to cover uncertainties due to limited capability for modelling and understanding of physical phenomena at the early stages of safety analysis. The results obtained by this approach are quite unrealistic and the level of conservatism is not fully known. Another approach is the use of Best Estimate (BE) codes with realistic initial and boundary conditions. If this approach is selected, it should be based on statistically combined uncertainties for plant initial and boundary conditions, assumptions and code models. The current trends are going into direction of the best estimate code with some conservative assumptions of the system with realistic input data with uncertainty analysis. The BE analysis with evaluation of uncertainties offers, in addition, a way to quantify the existing plant safety margins. Its broader use in the future is therefore envisaged, even though it is not always feasible because of the difficulty of quantifying code uncertainties with sufficiently narrow range for every phenomenon and for each accident sequence. In this paper, uncertainty analysis for the Large Break LOCA (200% Inlet Header Break) of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out. The uncertainty analysis was carried out for the peak cladding temperature (PCT), based on the two different methods i.e., Wilks method and the response surface technique. Their findings have also been compared.

A. Srivastava; H.G. Lele; A.K. Ghosh; H.S. Kushwaha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Neutronic Study of Slightly Modified Water Reactors and Application to Transition Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have studied slightly modified water reactors and their applications to transition scenarios. The PWR and CANDU reactors have been considered. New fuels based on Thorium have been tested: Thorium/Plutonium and Thorium/Uranium- 233, with different fissile isotope contents. Changes in the geometry of the assemblies were also explored to modify the moderation ratio, and consequently the neutron flux spectrum. A core equivalent assembly methodology was introduced as an exploratory approach and to reduce the computation time. Several basic safety analyses were also performed. We have finally developed a new scenario code, named OSCAR (Optimized Scenario Code for Advanced Reactors), to study the efficiency of these modified reactors in transition to Gen IV reactors or in symbiotic fleet. (authors)

Chambon, Richard; Guillemin, Perrine; Nuttin, Alexis; Bidaud, A. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble 53 Av. Des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Capellan, N.; David, S.; Meplan, O.; Wilson, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire - IPN, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau 91406 Orsay (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors  

SciTech Connect

The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 2 - CANDU heavy water reactor alternative  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 2 of a four volume report, summarizes the results of these analyses for the CANDU reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

Greene, S.R.; Spellman, D.J.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - I: DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Cost  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary conceptual design of a Direct Use of spent Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel In Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel fabrication plant was studied, which annually converts spent PWR fuel of 400 tonnes heavy element (HE) into CANDU fuel. The capital and operating costs were estimated from the viewpoint of conceptual design. Assuming that the annual discount rate is 5% during the construction (5 yr) and operation period (40 yr) and contingency is 25% of the capital cost, the levelized unit cost (LUC) of DUPIC fuel fabrication was estimated to be 616 $/kg HE, which is mostly governed by annual operation and maintenance costs that correspond to 63% of LUC. Among the operation and maintenance cost components being considered, the waste disposal cost has the dominant effect on LUC ({approx}49%). From sensitivity analyses of production capacity, discount rate, and contingency, it was found that the production capacity of the plant is the major parameter that affects the LUC.

Choi, Hangbok; Ko, Won Il; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

SciTech Connect

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Boiling water reactor stability analysis with RETRAN-03  

SciTech Connect

An MOC option has been developed to eliminate the numerical diffusion associated with the time domain analysis of small perturbations. This model has been implemented as an option in RETRAN-03 and evaluated for BWR stability applications by comparing RETRAN analyses results with data from a series of stability tests from the Vermont Yankee reactor. The results indicate that the MOC option can be used to evaluate BWR stability conditions.

Bergeron, P.A.; Fujita, N.; Paulsen, M.P.; McFadden, J.H.; Agee, L.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

119

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

120

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research and Testing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 Severe Accident Test Station ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cladding research and testing. The purpose of this research is to furnish U.S. industry (EPRI, Areva, Westinghouse), and regulators (NRC) with much-needed data supporting safe and economical nuclear power generation and used fuel management. LWR fuel cladding work is tightly integrated with ORNL accident tolerant fuel development and used fuel disposition programs thereby providing a powerful capability that couples basic materials science research with the nuclear applications research and development. The ORNL LWR fuel cladding program consists of five complementary areas of research: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding material testing under design

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121

Evolution of the core physics concept for the Canadian supercritical water reactor  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the advanced reactor concepts chosen by the GEN-IV International Forum (GIF) for research and development efforts. Canada's contribution is the Canadian SCWR, a heavy water moderated, pressure tube supercritical light water cooled reactor. Recent developments in the SCWR lattice and core concepts, primarily the introduction of a large central flow tube filled with coolant combined with a two-ring fuel assembly, have enabled significant improvements compared to earlier concepts. These improvements include a reduction in coolant void reactivity (CVR) by more than 10 mk, and an almost 40% increase in fuel exit burnup, which is achieved via balanced power distribution between the fuel pins in the fuel assembly. In this paper the evolution of the physics concept is reviewed, and the present lattice and core physics concepts are presented.

Pencer, J.; Colton, A.; Wang, X.; Gaudet, M.; Hamilton, H.; Yetisir, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production  

SciTech Connect

The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thermal analysis and design of a passive reflux condenser for the simplified boiling water reactor  

SciTech Connect

At present, the advanced light water reactors (ALWRS) in the United States are being designed to remove reactor decay heat for a period of 72 h following a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The water in the pools external to the containment is evaporated or boiled off to remove the decay heat. It is presumed that the water in the pools can be replenished within 72 h through operator actions or outside assistance. Some countries in Europe require that the plant be designed to remove the reactor decay heat for a much longer duration than 72 h without external assistance. This paper presents an analysis and design of a passive heat exchanger called a reflux condenser (RC), which was considered for an ALWR-the 600-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor. The RC is required to condense the steam formed when the water in the pool in which the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) is immersed boils following a LOCA. The RCs are nuclear non-safety related. This paper presents steady-state performance of an RC at various outdoor air dry-bulb temperatures under still air conditions.

Bijlani, C.; Patti, F. (Burns Roe Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States)); Prasad, V. (SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Fatigue Damage in Piping Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Fatigue Damage in Piping Light water reactor sustainability (LWRS) nondestructive evaluation (NDE) Workshops were held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during July 30th to August 2nd, 2012. This activity was conducted to help develop the content of the NDE R&D roadmap for the materials aging and degradation (MAaD) pathway of the LWRS program. The workshops focused on identifying NDE R&D needs in four areas: cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessel, and piping. A selected group of subject matter experts (SMEs) from DOE national laboratories, academia, vendors, EPRI, and NRC were invited to each

126

TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from of different integrated low-cost wastewater treatment systems, comprising one ABR as first treatment step filter and a vertical flow constructed wetland. A mixture of septage and domestic wastewater was used

Richner, Heinz

128

Knowledge base expert system control of spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current xenon oscillation control methods used in pressurized water reactors are knowledge intensive, and heuristic in nature. An expert system is developed to implement the heuristic constant axial offset control procedure to aid reactor operators in increasing the plant reliability by reducing the human error component of the failure probability. An expert system is written in the production system language, OPS5, with a forward chaining algorithm. It samples the reactor core with a certain time interval, evaluates the core status to determine the necessary corrective actions in terms of reactivity insertion, and selects the control parameter to realize this reactivity insertion. The amount of control action is determined using a knowledge base which consists of the differential rod worth curves, and the boron reactivity worth of a given reactor. The controller has been tested using a one-dimesional core model for verification of the rules and the code. It has been shown that, having the reactor dependent parameters in its knowledge base, the controller is able to follow a typical load demand for a daily cycle of a reactor, and is able to keep the axial offset within a target band.

Serhat Alten; Richard A Danofsky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Physics characteristics of a large, passive, pressure tube light water reactor with voided calandria  

SciTech Connect

A light water cooled and moderated pressure tube reactor concept has been developed that can survive loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) without scram and without replenishing primary coolant inventory, while maintaining safe temperature limits on the fuel and pressure tube. The reactor employs a solid SiC-coated graphite fuel matrix in the pressure tubes and a calandria tank containing a low-pressure gas, surrounded by a graphite reflector. This normally voided calandria is connected to a light water heat sink. The cover gas displaces light water from the calandria during normal operation, while during LOCAs it allows passive calandria flooding. It is shown that such a system, with high void fraction in the core region, exhibits a high degree of neutron thermalization and a large prompt neutron lifetime, similar to D{sub 2}O moderated cores, although light water is used as both coolant and moderator. Moreover, the extremely large neutron migration length results in a strongly coupled core with a flat thermal flux profile and inherent stability against xenon spatial oscillations. The heterogeneous arrangement of the fuel and moderator ensures a negative void coefficient under all circumstances. Flooding of the calandria space with light water results in redundant reactor shutdown. Use of particle fuel allows attainment of high burnups.

Hejzlar, P.; Driscoll, M.J.; Todreas, N.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Developmental Pre-Developmental INL EBR-II Wash Water Treatment Technologies (PBS # ADSHQTD0100 (0003199)) EBR-II Wash Water Workshop - The majority of the sodium has been removed, remaining material is mostly passivated. Similar closure projects have been successfully completed. Engineering needs to be developed to apply the OBA path. Page 1 of 2 Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop Challenge In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated. The facility was placed in cold shutdown, engineering began on sodium removal, the sodium was drained in 2001 and the residual sodium chemically passivated to render it less reactive in 2005. Since that time, approximately 700 kg of metallic sodium and 3500 kg of sodium bicarbonate remain in the facility. The

132

Reactor Materials Program process water piping indirect failure frequency  

SciTech Connect

Following completion of the probabilistic analyses, the LOCA Definition Project has been subject to various external reviews, and as a result the need for several revisions has arisen. This report updates and summarizes the indirect failure frequency analysis for the process water piping. In this report, a conservatism of the earlier analysis is removed, supporting lower failure frequency estimates. The analysis results are also reinterpreted in light of subsequent review comments.

Daugherty, W.L.

1989-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

21 - Plant life management (PLiM) practices for pressurised heavy water nuclear reactors (PHWR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The chapter begins with the history of evolution of pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) technology in Canada and India and its importance to the three stage Indian Nuclear Power Programme. An insight into the technology and its variants in use in Canada and India has been provided. Regulatory practices followed in India for renewal of operating licences and also for re-licensing of older plants have been highlighted. Several technological advancements, both in the inspection technology and reactor design concepts have been briefly described to give a glimpse of development trends in future.

R.K. Sinha; S.K. Sinha; K.B. Dixit; A.K. Chakrabarty; D.K. Jain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures  

SciTech Connect

Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 C). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr- 4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

Walter G. Luscher; David J. Senor; Keven K. Clayton; Glen R. Longhurst

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Piping benchmark problems for the General Electric Advanced Boiling Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boiling water reactor standard design, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set.

Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (US)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Implications for accident management of adding water to a degrading reactor core  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates both the positive and negative consequences of adding water to a degraded reactor core during a severe accident. The evaluation discusses the earliest possible stage at which an accident can be terminated and how plant personnel can best respond to undesired results. Specifically discussed are (a) the potential for plant personnel to add water for a range of severe accidents, (b) the time available for plant personnel to act, (c) possible plant responses to water added during the various stages of core degradation, (d) plant instrumentation available to understand the core condition and (e) the expected response of the instrumentation during the various stages of severe accidents.

Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J.; Pafford, D.J.; Quick, K.S.; Witt, R.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Nonlinear dynamics and stability of boiling water reactors: Part 2 - Quantitative analysis  

SciTech Connect

A physical model of nonlinear boiling water reactor (BWR) dynamics has been developed and employed to calculate the amplitude of limit cycle oscillations and their effects on fuel integrity over a wide range of operating conditions in the Vermont Yankee reactor. These calculations have confirmed that, beyond the threshold for linear stability, the reactor's state variables undergo limit cycle oscillations. This work shows that the amplitudes of these oscillations are very sensitive to changes in operating conditions and are not restricted to small magnitudes as observed in previous stability tests. Consequently, large-amplitude limit cycle oscillations become a possible scenario for BWR operation at low-flow conditions. The effects on fuel integrity of such large-amplitude oscillations have been studied in detail. In particular, it has been shown that limit cycles that oscillate with frequencies higher than 0.25 Hz and that reach the high-power safety scram level of 120 % are not likely to compromise fuel integrity.

March-Leuba, J.; Cacuci, D.G.; Perez, R.B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A SCOPING STUDY: Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Reactivity Insertion Accidents During Shutdown In U.S. Commercial Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the scoping study of developing generic simplified fuel damage risk models for quantitative analysis from inadvertent reactivity insertion events during shutdown (SD) in light water pressurized and boiling water reactors. In the past, nuclear fuel reactivity accidents have been analyzed both mainly deterministically and probabilistically for at-power and SD operations of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since then, many NPPs had power up-rates and longer refueling intervals, which resulted in fuel configurations that may potentially respond differently (in an undesirable way) to reactivity accidents. Also, as shown in a recent event, several inadvertent operator actions caused potential nuclear fuel reactivity insertion accident during SD operations. The set inadvertent operator actions are likely to be plant- and operation-state specific and could lead to accident sequences. This study is an outcome of the concern which arose after the inadvertent withdrawal of control rods at Dresden Unit 3 in 2008 due to operator actions in the plant inadvertently three control rods were withdrawn from the reactor without knowledge of the main control room operator. The purpose of this Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Model development project is to develop simplified SPAR Models that can be used by staff analysts to perform risk analyses of operating events and/or conditions occurring during SD operation. These types of accident scenarios are dominated by the operator actions, (e.g., misalignment of valves, failure to follow procedures and errors of commissions). Human error probabilities specific to this model were assessed using the methodology developed for SPAR model human error evaluations. The event trees, fault trees, basic event data and data sources for the model are provided in the report. The end state is defined as the reactor becomes critical. The scoping study includes a brief literature search/review of historical events, developments of a small set of comprehensive event trees and fault trees and recommendation for future work.

S. Khericha

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Outdoor field evaluation of passive tritiated water vapor samplers at Canadian power reactor sites  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is one of several radioactive nuclides routinely monitored in and around CANDU{reg_sign} (CANada Deuterium Uranium) power reactor facilities. Over the last ten years, passive samplers have replaced active sampling devices for sampling tritiated water vapor in the workplace at many CANDU stations. The potential of passive samplers for outdoor monitoring has also been realized. This paper presents the result of a 1-y field trial carried out at all five Canadian CANDU reactor sites. The results indicate that passive samplers can be used at most sampling locations to measure tritiated water vapor in air concentrations as low as 1 Bq m{sup -3} over a 30-d sampling period. Only in one of the five sampling locations was poor agreement observed between active and passive monitoring data. This location, however, was very windy and it is suspected that the gusty winds were the source of the discrepancies observed. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Wood, M.J. [Chalk River Lab., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies of conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference boiling water reactor (BWR) described in the earlier study; and defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in three areas concerning decommissioning of the reference BWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Advanced pressurized water reactor for improved resource utilization, part II - composite advanced PWR concept  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the enhanced resource utilization in an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept using a composite of selected improvements identified in a companion study. The selected improvements were in the areas of reduced loss of neutrons to control poisons, reduced loss of neutrons in leakage from the core, and improved blanket/reflector concepts. These improvements were incorporated into a single composite advanced PWR. A preliminary assessment of resource requirements and costs and impact on safety are presented.

Turner, S.E.; Gurley, M.K.; Kirby, K.D.; Mitchell, W III

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

Carl R.F. Lund

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

End-of-life destructive examination of light water breeder reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)  

SciTech Connect

Destructive examination of 12 representative Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods was performed following successful operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station for 29,047 effective full power hours, about five years. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were unique in that the thorium oxide and uranium-233 oxide fuel was contained within Zircaloy-4 cladding. Destructive examinations included analysis of released fission gas; chemical analysis of the fuel to determine depletion, iodine, and cesium levels; chemical analysis of the cladding to determine hydrogen, iodine, and cesium levels; metallographic examination of the cladding, fuel, and other rod components to determine microstructural features and cladding corrosion features; and tensile testing of the irradiated cladding to determine mechanical strength. The examinations confirmed that Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod performance was excellent. No evidence of fuel rod failure was observed, and the fuel operating temperature was low (below 2580/sup 0/F at which an increased percentage of fission gas is released). 21 refs., 80 figs., 20 tabs.

Richardson, K.D.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

IAEA coordinated research project on thermal-hydraulics of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWRs)  

SciTech Connect

The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is an innovative water-cooled reactor concept, which uses supercritical pressure water as reactor coolant. It has been attracting interest of many researchers in various countries mainly due to its benefits of high thermal efficiency and simple primary systems, resulting in low capital cost. The IAEA started in 2008 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermal-Hydraulics of SCWRs as a forum to foster the exchange of technical information and international collaboration in research and development. This paper summarizes the activities and current status of the CRP, as well as major progress achieved to date. At present, 15 institutions closely collaborate in several tasks. Some organizations have been conducting thermal-hydraulics experiments and analysing the data, and others have been participating in code-to-test and/or code-to-code benchmark exercises. The expected outputs of the CRP are also discussed. Finally, the paper introduces several IAEA activities relating to or arising from the CRP. (authors)

Yamada, K. [Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Aksan, S. N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Status of Silicon Carbide Joining Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

Advanced, accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems are currently being investigated for potential application in currently operating light water reactors (LWR) or in reactors that have attained design certification. Evaluation of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) relative to Zr-based alloys, including increased corrosion resistance, reduced oxidation and heat of oxidation, and reduced hydrogen generation under steam attack (off-normal conditions). If demonstrated to be applicable in the intended LWR environment, SiC could be used in nuclear fuel cladding or other in-core structural components. Achieving a SiC-SiC joint that resists corrosion with hot, flowing water, is stable under irradiation and retains hermeticity is a significant challenge. This report summarizes the current status of SiC-SiC joint development work supported by the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Significant progress has been made toward SiC-SiC joint development for nuclear service, but additional development and testing work (including irradiation testing) is still required to present a candidate joint for use in nuclear fuel cladding.

Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Assessment of typical BWR (boiling water reactor) vessel configurations and examination coverage  

SciTech Connect

Even though boiling water reactors (BWRs) are not susceptible to the kind of incident known as pressurized thermal shock that must be considered in the design and operation of pressurized water reactors, BWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) have experienced higher than expected embrittlement caused by fast neutron irradiation. This has required the vessel to be at a higher temperature than originally projected before the plant can be taken to power operation. In addition, many BWR plants have received exemption from the 10-year volumetric nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the vessel as required by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B PV) Code Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components,'' because NDE access is severely restricted. Since many RPV welds have not been examined after being placed in service and the potential for service-induced flaws exists, regulatory authorities are looking closely at examination relief requests. BWR reactor vessel examination coverage is typically limited by plant design. Most BWR plants were designed when inservice examination codes were in the early stages of development, and very little consideration was give to designing for NDE access. Consequently, there is restricted access for many areas of the RPV. Since an increase in examination requirements has been placed in ASME B PV Code Section XI in these areas, efforts have begun on a thorough analysis of the vessel weld volumes examined during inservice examination and an evaluation of possibility expanding the RPV examination coverage. Because of these concerns, an investigation of the accessibility of the reactor vessel for NDE was performed to define the present status and to determine the improvements in coverage that can be accomplished in the near future. 7 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Walker, S.M. (EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center, Charlotte, NC (USA)); Feige, E.J.; Ingamells, J.R. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Calhoun, G.L.; Davis, J.; Kapoor, A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Adaptation of gas tagging for failed fuel identification in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses experience with noble gas tagging and its adaptation to commercial reactors. It reviews the recent incidence of fuel failures in light water reactors, and methods used to identify failures, and concludes that the on-line technique of gas tagging could significantly augment present flux tilting, sipping and ultrasonic testing of assemblies. The paper describes calculations on tag gas stability in-reactor, and tag injection tests that were carried out collaboratively with Commonwealth Edison Company in the Byron-2 pressurized water reactor (P%a) and with Duke Power Company and Babcock and Wilcox Fuel Company in the Oconee-2 PWM. The tests gave information on: (a) noble gas concentration dynamics as the tag gases were dissolved in and eventually removed from subsystems of the RCS; and (b) the suitability of candidate Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopes for tagging PWR fuel. It was found that the activity of Xe{sup 125} (the activation product of the tag isotope Xe{sup 124}) acted as a ``tag of a tag`` and tracked gas through the reactor; measured activities are being used to model gas movement in the RCS. Several interference molecules (trace contaminants normally present at sub-ppM concentrations in RCS samples) and entrained air in the RCS were found to affect mass spectrometer sensitivity for tag isotopes. In all instances the contaminants could be differentiated from the tag isotopes by operating the mass spectrometer at high resolution (2500). Similarly, it was possible to distinguish all the candidate tag gases against a high background of air. The test results suggested, however, that for routine analysis a high resolution static mass spectrometer will be preferable to the dynamic instrument used for the present analyses.

Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Depiante, E.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Callis, E.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Egebrecht, P.M. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Downers Grove, IL (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydordesulfurization of dibenzothiophene using hydrogen generated in situ by the water-gas shift reaction in a trickle bed reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis BRUCE DAVID HOOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis by BRUCE...

Hook, Bruce David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Non-Proliferative, Thorium-Based, Core and Fuel Cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Two of the major barriers to the expansion of worldwide adoption of nuclear power are related to proliferation potential of the nuclear fuel cycle and issues associated with the final disposal of spent fuel. The Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) concept proposed by Professor A. Radkowsky offers a partial solution to these problems. The main idea of the concept is the utilization of the seed-blanket unit (SBU) fuel assembly geometry which is a direct replacement for a 'conventional' assembly in either a Russian pressurized water reactor (VVER-1000) or a Western pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed-blanket fuel assembly consists of a fissile (U) zone, known as seed, and a fertile (Th) zone known as blanket. The separation of fissile and fertile allows separate fuel management schemes for the thorium part of the fuel (a subcritical 'blanket') and the 'driving' part of the core (a supercritical 'seed'). The design objective for the blanket is an efficient generation and in-situ fissioning of the U233 isotope, while the design objective for the seed is to supply neutrons to the blanket in a most economic way, i.e. with minimal investment of natural uranium. The introduction of thorium as a fertile component in the nuclear fuel cycle significantly reduces the quantity of plutonium production and modifies its isotopic composition, reducing the overall proliferation potential of the fuel cycle. Thorium based spent fuel also contains fewer higher actinides, hence reducing the long-term radioactivity of the spent fuel. The analyses show that the RTF core can satisfy the requirements of fuel cycle length, and the safety margins of conventional pressurized water reactors. The coefficients of reactivity are comparable to currently operating VVER's/PWR's. The major feature of the RTF cycle is related to the total amount of spent fuel discharged for each cycle from the reactor core. The fuel management scheme adopted for RTF core designs allows a significant decrease in the amount of discharged spent fuel, for a given energy production, compared with standard VVER/PWR. The total Pu production rate of RTF cycles is only 30 % of standard reactor. In addition, the isotopic compositions of the RTF's and standard reactor grade Pu are markedly different due to the very high burnup accumulated by the RTF spent fuel.

Todosow M.; Todosow M.; Raitses, G. (BNL) Galperin, A. (Ben Gurion University)

2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the second year of a project investigating water-gas shift catalysts for use in membrane reactors. It has been established that a simple iron high temperature shift catalyst becomes ineffective in a membrane reactor because the reaction rate is severely inhibited by the build-up of the product CO{sub 2}. During the past year, an improved microkinetic model for water-gas shift over iron oxide was developed. Its principal advantage over prior models is that it displays the correct asymptotic behavior at all temperatures and pressures as the composition approaches equilibrium. This model has been used to explore whether it might be possible to improve the performance of iron high temperature shift catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The model predicts that weakening the surface oxygen bond strength by less than 5% should lead to higher catalytic activity as well as resistance to rate inhibition at higher CO{sub 2} partial pressures. Two promoted iron high temperature shift catalysts were studied. Ceria and copper were each studied as promoters since there were indications in the literature that they might weaken the surface oxygen bond strength. Ceria was found to be ineffective as a promoter, but preliminary results with copper promoted FeCr high temperature shift catalyst show it to be much more resistant to rate inhibition by high levels of CO{sub 2}. Finally, the performance of sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure was simulated using an available microkinetic model for water-gas shift over this catalyst. The model suggests that this catalyst might be quite effective in a medium temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor, provided that the membrane was resistant to the H{sub 2}S that is required in the feed.

Carl R.F. Lund

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Chemical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction in light water reactor fuel elements  

SciTech Connect

In contrast to the extensive literature on the mechanical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical features of this phenomenon are so poorly understood that there is still disagreement concerning the chemical agent responsible. Since the earliest work by Rosenbaum, Davies and Pon, laboratory and in-reactor experiments designed to elucidate the mechanism of PCI fuel rod failures have concentrated almost exclusively on iodine. The assumption that this is the reponsible chemical agent is contained in models of PCI which have been constructed for incorporation into fuel performance codes. The evidence implicating iodine is circumstantial, being based primarily upon the volatility and significant fission yield of this element and on the microstructural similarity of the failed Zircaloy specimens exposed to iodine in laboratory stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests to cladding failures by PCI.

Olander, D.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effect of heat treatment on stress corrosion of Alloy 718 in pressurized-water-reactor primary water  

SciTech Connect

Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were conducted in 360{degrees}C pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) primary water using alloy 718 in various heat treatment conditions. Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition and an experimental heat of an alloy 718 variation, Hicoroy, were also tested for comparison. Fatigue-precracked, 12.5-mm-thick compact fracture specimens were subjected to a constant extension rate of 1.3 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s. Crack growth rate was measured during testing using a reversing DC potential drop technique. Results in the form of SCC crack growth rate versus applied stress intensity demonstrate that the SCC resistance of alloy 718 in the PWR primary-side environment can be improved by changes in heat treatment.

Miglin, M.T.; Monter, J.V.; Wade, C.S. [Babcock & Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States); Nelson, J.L. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

High Temperature Water Heat Pipes Radiator for a Brayton Space Reactor Power System  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature water heat pipes radiator design is developed for a space power system with a sectored gas-cooled reactor and three Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engines, for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and energy conversion and rejection. The CBC engines operate at turbine inlet and exit temperatures of 1144 K and 952 K. They have a net efficiency of 19.4% and each provides 30.5 kWe of net electrical power to the load. A He-Xe gas mixture serves as the turbine working fluid and cools the reactor core, entering at 904 K and exiting at 1149 K. Each CBC loop is coupled to a reactor sector, which is neutronically and thermally coupled, but hydraulically decoupled to the other two sectors, and to a NaK-78 secondary loop with two water heat pipes radiator panels. The segmented panels each consist of a forward fixed segment and two rear deployable segments, operating hydraulically in parallel. The deployed radiator has an effective surface area of 203 m2, and when the rear segments are folded, the stowed power system fits in the launch bay of the DELTA-IV Heavy launch vehicle. For enhanced reliability, the water heat pipes operate below 50% of their wicking limit; the sonic limit is not a concern because of the water, high vapor pressure at the temperatures of interest (384 - 491 K). The rejected power by the radiator peaks when the ratio of the lengths of evaporator sections of the longest and shortest heat pipes is the same as that of the major and minor widths of the segments. The shortest and hottest heat pipes in the rear segments operate at 491 K and 2.24 MPa, and each rejects 154 W. The longest heat pipes operate cooler (427 K and 0.52 MPa) and because they are 69% longer, reject more power (200 W each). The longest and hottest heat pipes in the forward segments reject the largest power (320 W each) while operating at {approx} 46% of capillary limit. The vapor temperature and pressure in these heat pipes are 485 K and 1.97 MPa. By contrast, the shortest water heat pipes in the forward segments operate much cooler (427 K and 0.52 MPa), and reject a much lower power of 45 W each. The radiator with six fixed and 12 rear deployable segments rejects a total of 324 kWth, weights 994 kg and has an average specific power of 326 Wth/kg and a specific mass of 5.88 kg/m2.

El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Suppression of thermal stratification in gravity driven water pool of an advanced reactor using shrouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advanced and innovative reactor systems are considering the use of large pools as heat sink for various safety functions like decay heat removal or containment cooling. These designs generally have heat exchangers immersed in the pool. For enhanced safety and reliability, preferred heat transfer mode is considered to be passive so that heat sink availability is maintained even in failure of power supply and active components. However, heat transfer by natural convection in large pools poses a problem of thermal stratification. As a result of natural convection, hot layers of water may accumulate over the relatively cold one and in turn inhibit the natural convection itself. Not only the heat transfer performance may get deteriorated but some structural parts of the pool like concrete wall may be subjected to high temperature which is not desirable. In this paper, a new concept of employing shrouds around the heat source is proposed. These shrouds provide multiple natural circulation loops around the heat source, thereby facilitating mixing of hot and cold fluid, which eliminate stratification. The concept has been applied to the Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP) of Advance Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) in which Isolation Condensers (ICs) tubes are submerged for decay heat removal of AHWR using ICS and thermal stratification phenomenon was predicted without and with ICS. Results indicate that the shrouds have application in elimination of thermal stratification in GDWP.

P.K. Verma; A.K. Nayak; Vikas Jain; P.K. Vijayan; K.K. Vaze

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

BWR (boiling-water reactor) radiation control: In-plant demonstration at Vermont Yankee: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results of the RP1934 program, which was established by EPRI in 1981 to demonstrate the adequacy of BRAC program (RP819) principles for BWR radiation control at Vermont Yankee, are presented. Evaluations were performed of the effectiveness of optimization of purification system performance, control of feedwater dissolved oxygen concentrations, minimization of corrosion product and ionic transport, and improved startup, shutdown, and layup practices. The impact on shutdown radiation levels of these corrective actions was assessed based on extensive primary system radiation survey and component gamma scan data. Implementation of the BRAC recommendations was found to be insufficient to reduce the rate of activity buildup on out-of-core surfaces at Vermont Yankee, and additional corrective actions were found necessary. Specifically, replacement of cobalt-bearing materials in the control rod drive pins and rollers and feedwater regulating valves was pursued as was installation of electropolished 316 stainless steel during a recirculation piping replacement program. Aggressive programs to further reduce copper concentrations in the reactor water by improving condensate demineralizer efficiency and to minimize organic ingress to the power cycle by reducing organic concentrations in recycled radwaste also were undertaken. Evaluations of the impact on activity buildup of several pretreatment processes including prefilming in moist air, preexposure to high temperature water containing zinc, and electropolishing also were performed in a test loop installed in the reactor water cleanup system. A significant beneficial impact of electropolishing was shown to be present for periods up to 6000 hours.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Support and Modeling for the Boiling Water Reactor Station Black Out Case Study Using RELAP and RAVEN  

SciTech Connect

The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated. In order to evaluate the impact of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the impact of power uprate on the safety of a boiled water reactor system. The case study considered is a loss of off-site power followed by the loss of diesel generators, i.e., a station black out (SBO) event. Analysis is performed by using a thermo-hydraulic code, i.e. RELAP-5, and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at INL, i.e. RAVEN. Starting from the event tree models contained in SAPHIRE, we built the input file for RELAP-5 that models in great detail system dynamics under SBO conditions. We also interfaced RAVEN with RELAP-5 so that it would be possible to run multiple RELAP-5 simulation runs by changing specific keywords of the input file. We both employed classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. We also employed advanced data analysis and visualization tools that helped us to correlate simulation outcome such as maximum core temperature with a set of input uncertain parameters. Results obtained gave a detailed overview of the issues associated to power uprate for a SBO accident scenario. We were able to quantify how timing of safety related events were impacted by a higher reactor core power. Such insights can provide useful material to the decision makers to perform risk-infomed safety margins management.

Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith; Thomas Riley; John Schroeder; Cristian Rabiti; Aldrea Alfonsi; Joe Nielsen; Dan Maljovec; Bie Wang; Valerio Pascucci

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Chimney for enhancing flow of coolant water in natural circulation boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chimney which can be reconfigured or removed during refueling to allow vertical removal of the fuel assemblies is disclosed. The chimney is designed to be collapsed or dismantled. Collapse or dismantlement of the chimney reduces the volume required for chimney storage during the refueling operation. Alternatively, the chimney has movable parts which allow reconfiguration of its structure. In a first configuration suitable for normal reactor operation, the chimney is radially constricted such that the chimney obstructs vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. In a second configuration suitable for refueling or maintenance of the fuel core, the parts of the chimney which obstruct access to the fuel assemblies are moved radially outward to positions whereas access to the fuel assemblies is not obstructed. 11 figs.

Oosterkamp, W.J.; Marquino, W.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Spacetime kinetics modeling of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor for control studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents the mathematical modeling of the spacetime kinetics phenomena in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR), a 920MW (thermal), vertical pressure tube type thorium based nuclear reactor. The physical dimensions and the internal feedback effects of the AHWR are such that it is susceptible to xenon induced spatial oscillations. For the study of spatial effects and design of suitable control strategy, the need for a suitable mathematical model which is not of a very large order arises. In this paper, a mathematical model of the reactor within the framework of nodal modeling is derived with the two group neutron diffusion equation as the basis. A linear model in standard state space form is formulated from the set of equations so obtained. It has been shown that comparison of linear system properties could be helpful in deciding upon an appropriate nodalization scheme and thus obtaining a reasonably accurate model. For validation, the transient response of the simplified model has been compared with those from a rigorous finite-difference model.

S.R. Shimjith; A.P. Tiwari; M. Naskar; B. Bandyopadhyay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Nonlinear dynamics and stability of boiling water reactors: qualitative and quantitative analyses  

SciTech Connect

A phenomenological model has been developed to simulate the qualitative behavior of boiling water reactors (BWRs) in the nonlinear regime under deterministic and stochastic excitations. After the linear stability threshold is crossed, limit cycle oscillations appear due to interactions between two unstable equilibrium points and the phase-space trajectories. This limit cycle becomes unstable when the feedback gain exceeds a certain critical value. Subsequent limit cycle instabilities produce a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations that leads to a periodic pulsed behavior. Under stochastic excitations, BWRs exhibit a single characteristic resonance, at approx.0.5 Hz, in the linear regime. By contrast, this work shows that harmonics of this characteristic frequency appear in the nonlinear regime. Furthermore, this work also demonstrates that amplitudes of the limit cycle oscillations do not depend on the variance of the stochastic excitation and remain bounded at all times. A physical model of nonlinear BWR dynamics has also been developed and employed to calculate the amplitude of limit cycle oscillations and their effects on fuel integrity over a wide range of operating conditions in the Vermont Yankee reactor. These calculations have confirmed that, beyond the threshold for linear stability, the reactor's state variable undergo limit cycle oscillations.

March-Leuba, J.; Cacuci, D.G.; Perez, R.B.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Results of the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test  

SciTech Connect

The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment investigated the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered reactor accident. This experiment, which was carried out in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories, was performed under the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program. The DF-4 test is described herein and results from the experiment are presented. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B{sub 4}C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. Hydrogen generation was found to continue throughout the experiment, diminishing slightly following the relocation of molten oxidizing zircaloy to the lower extreme of the test bundle. A large blockage which was formed from this material continued to oxidize while steam was being fed into the the test bundle. The results of this test have provided information on the initial stages of core melt progression in BWR geometry involving the heatup and cladding oxidation stages of a severe accident and terminating at the point of melting and relocation of the metallic core components. The information is useful in modeling melt progression in BWR core geometry, and provides engineering insight into the key phenomena controlling these processes. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Assessment of the use of extended burnup fuel in light water power reactors  

SciTech Connect

This study has been conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the environmental and economic impacts associated with the use of extended burnup nuclear fuel in light water power reactors. It has been proposed that current batch average burnup levels of 33 GWd/t uranium be increased to above 50 GWd/t. The environmental effects of extending fuel burnup during normal operations and during accident events and the economic effects of cost changes on the fuel cycle are discussed in this report. The physical effects of extended burnup on the fuel and the fuel assembly are also presented as a basis for the environmental and economic assessments. Environmentally, this burnup increase would have no significant impact over that of normal burnup. Economically, the increased burnup would have favorable effects, consisting primarily of a reduction: (1) total fuel requirements; (2) reactor downtime for fuel replacement; (3) the number of fuel shipments to and from reactor sites; and (4) repository storage requirements. 61 refs., 4 figs., 27 tabs.

Baker, D.A.; Bailey, W.J.; Beyer, C.E.; Bold, F.C.; Tawil, J.J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Control of xenon oscillations in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor via two-stage decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Xenon induced spatial oscillations developed in large nuclear reactors, like Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) need to be controlled for safe operation. Otherwise, a serious situation may arise in which different regions of the core may undergo variations in neutron flux in opposite phase. If these oscillations are left uncontrolled, the power density and rate of change of power at some locations in the reactor core may exceed their respective thermal limits, resulting in fuel failure. In this paper, a state feedback based control strategy is investigated for spatial control of AHWR. The nonlinear model of AHWR including xenon and iodine dynamics is characterized by 90 states, 5 inputs and 18 outputs. The linear model of AHWR, obtained by linearizing the nonlinear equations is found to be highly ill-conditioned. This higher order model of AHWR is first decomposed into two comparatively lower order subsystems, namely, 73rd order slow subsystem and 17th order fast subsystem using two-stage decomposition. Composite control law is then derived from individual subsystem feedback controls and applied to the vectorized nonlinear model of AHWR. Through the dynamic simulations it is observed that the controller is able to suppress xenon induced spatial oscillations developed in AHWR and the overall performance is found to be satisfactory.

R.K. Munje; J.G. Parkhe; B.M. Patre

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

169

Refueling Simulation Strategy of a CANDU Reactor Based on Optimum Zone Controller Water Levels  

SciTech Connect

An optimum refueling simulation method was developed for application to a Canada deuterium uranium 713-MW(electric) (CANDU-6) reactor. The objective of the optimization was to maintain the operating range of the zone controller unit (ZCU) water level so that the reference zone power distribution is reproduced following the refueling operation. The zone controller level on the refueling operation was estimated by the generalized perturbation method, which provides sensitivities of the zone power to an individual refueling operation and the zone controller level. By constructing a system equation of the zone power, the zone controller level was obtained, which was used to find the most suitable combination of the refueling channels. The 250-full-power-day refueling simulations showed that the channel and bundle powers are well controlled below the license limits when the ZCU water level remains in the typical operating range.

Choi, Hangbok; Kim, Do Heon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

A simple photolytic reactor employing Ag-doped ZnO nanowires for water purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Well-aligned native zinc oxide (ZnO) and silver-doped ZnO (Ag-ZnO) films were deposited on borosilicate glass via a simple, low-cost, low-temperature, scalable hydrothermal process. The as-synthesized ZnO and Ag-ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction; scanning electron microscopy, UVvisible spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A simple photolytic reactor was fabricated and later used to find the optimum experimental conditions for photocatalytic performance. The photodegradation of methyl orange in water was investigated using as-prepared ZnO and Ag-ZnO nanowires, and was compared to P25 (a commercial photocatalyst) in both visible and UV radiations. The P25 and Ag-ZnO showed a similar photodegradation performance under UV light, but Ag-ZnO demonstrated superior photocatalytic activity under visible irradiation. The optimized doping of Ag in Ag-ZnO enhanced photocatalytic activity in a simple reactor design and indicated potential applicability of Ag-ZnO for large-scale purification of water under solar irradiation.

Innocent Udom; Yangyang Zhang; Manoj K. Ram; Elias K. Stefanakos; Aloysius F. Hepp; Radwan Elzein; Rudy Schlaf; D. Yogi Goswami

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

In-Situ Safeguards Verification of Low Burn-up Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

A novel in-situ gross defect verification method for light water reactor spent fuel assemblies was developed and investigated by a Monte Carlo study. This particular method is particularly effective for old pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies that have natural uranium in their upper fuel zones. Currently there is no method or instrument that does verification of this type of spent fuel assemblies without moving the spent fuel assemblies from their storage positions. The proposed method uses a tiny neutron detector and a detector guiding system to collect neutron signals inside PWR spent fuel assemblies through guide tubes present in PWR assemblies. The data obtained in such a manner are used for gross defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. The method uses 'calibration curves' which show the expected neutron counts inside one of the guide tubes of spent fuel assemblies as a function of fuel burn-up. By examining the measured data in the 'calibration curves', the consistency of the operator's declaration is verified.

Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S; Park, I; Kim, J; Ahn, G

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

172

Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Generic programming in Scala  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generic programming is a programming methodology that aims at producing reusable code, defined independently of the data types on which it is operating. To achieve this goal, that particular code must rely on a set of requirements known as concepts...

N'guessan, Olayinka

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

175

Baseline risk assessment of the perched water system at the INEL test reactor area  

SciTech Connect

A baseline health risk assessment (HRA) was prepared to evaluate potential risks to human health and the environment posed by the Perched Water System (PWS) at the Test Reactor Area (TRA). The PWS has been designated Operable Unit 2-12, one of the 13 operable units identified at TRA. During the period from 1962 to 1990, a total of 6770 million gal of water were discharged from the TRA to unlined surface ponds. Wastewater discharged to the surface ponds at TRA percolates downward through the surficial alluvium and the underlying basalt bedrock. A resulting shallow perched water zone has formed at the interface between the surficial sediments and the underlying basalt. Further downward movement of groundwater is again impeded by a low-permeability layer of silt, clay, and sand encountered at a depth of [approximately]150 ft. The deep perched water zone occurs on top of this low-permeability interbed. An evaluation was made as to whether potential risks for the PWS could justify implementing a remedial action. The risk evaluation consisted of two parts, the human health evaluation and the ecological evaluation.

Gordon, J.W.; Sinton, P.O. (Dames Moore, Denver, CO (United States)); Jensen, N. (DOE, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); McCormick, S. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding material both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 m. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric] (ORCID:0000000280704475)

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed  

SciTech Connect

A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics  

SciTech Connect

The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nations nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industrys success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, metrics describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly insertion into a commercial reactor within the desired timeframe (by 2022).

Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors  

SciTech Connect

A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Core and System Design of Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features  

SciTech Connect

In order to ensure the sustainable energy supply in Japan, research and developments of reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) have been performed. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as high burn-up, long operation cycle, multiple recycling of plutonium and effective utilization of uranium resources, based on the matured LWR technologies. MOX fuel assemblies in the tight-lattice fuel rod arrangement are used to reduce the moderation of neutron, and hence, to increase the conversion ratio. The conceptual design has been accomplished for the small 330 MWe RMWR core with the discharge burn-up of 60 GWd/t and the operation cycle of 24 months, under the natural circulation cooling of the core. A breeding ratio of 1.01 and the negative void reactivity coefficient are simultaneously realized in the design. In the plant system design, the passive safety features are intended to be utilized mainly to improve the economy. At present, a hybrid one under the combination of the passive and the active components, and a fully passive one are proposed. The former has been evaluated to reduce the cost for the reactor components. (authors)

Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Yonomoto, Taisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Takeda, Renzo; Moriya, Kumiaki [Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan); Kanno, Minoru [The Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Analysis of assembly serial number usage in domestic light-water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Domestic light-water reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies are identified by a serial number that is placed on each assembly. These serial numbers are used as identifiers throughout the life of the fuel. The uniqueness of assembly serial numbers is important in determining their effectiveness as unambiguous identifiers. The purpose of this study is to determine what serial numbering schemes are used, the effectiveness of these schemes, and to quantify how many duplicate serial numbers occur on domestic LWR fuel assemblies. The serial numbering scheme adopted by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) ensures uniqueness of assembly serial numbers. The latest numbering scheme adopted by General Electric (GE), was also found to be unique. Analysis of 70,971 fuel assembly serial numbers from permanently discharged fuel identified 11,948 serial number duplicates. Three duplicate serial numbers were found when analysis focused on duplication within the individual fuel inventory at each reactor site, but these were traced back to data entry errors and will be corrected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). There were also three instances where the serial numbers used to identify assemblies used for hot cell studies differed from the serial numbers reported to the EIA. It is recommended that fuel fabricators and utilities adhere to the ANSI serial numbering scheme to ensure serial number uniqueness. In addition, organizations collecting serial number information, should request that all known serial numbers physically attached or associated with each assembly be reported and identified by the corresponding number scheme. 10 refs., 5 tabs.

Reich, W.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Moore, R.S. (Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Thermodynamic and transport properties of thoriaurania fuel of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High temperature thermochemistry of thoriaurania fuel for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor was investigated. Oxygen potential development within the matrix and distribution behaviors of the fission products (fps) in different phases were worked out with the help of thermodynamic and transport properties of the fps as well as fission generated oxygen and the detailed balance of the elements. Some of the necessary data for different properties were generated in this laboratory while others were taken from literatures. Noting the behavior of poor transports of gases and volatile species in the thoria rich fuel (thoria3mol% urania), the evaluation shows that the fuel will generally bear higher oxygen potential right from early stage of burnup, and Mo will play vital role to buffer the potential through the formation of its oxygen rich chemical states. The problems related to the poor transport and larger retention of fission gases (Xe) and volatiles (I, Te, Cs) are discussed.

M. Basu (Ali); R. Mishra; S.R. Bharadwaj; D. Das

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Advanced UNpPu fuel to achieve long-life core in heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to look at the possibility of approaching the long-life core comparable with reactor life-time. The main issues are centered on UNpPu fuel in a tight lattice design with heavy water as a coolant. It is found that in a hard neutron spectrum thus obtained, a large fraction of 238Pu produced by neutron capture in 237Np not only protects plutonium against uncontrolled proliferation, but substantially contributes in keeping criticality due to improved fissile properties (its capture-to-fission ratio drops below unit). Equilibrium fuel composition demonstrates excellent conversion properties that yield the burn-up value as high as 200 GWd/t at extremely small reactivity swings.

K. Nikitin; M. Saito; V. Artisyuk; A. Chmelev; V. Apse

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Categorization of failed and damaged spent LWR (light-water reactor) fuel currently in storage  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study that was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute are described in this report. The purpose of the study was to (1) estimate the number of failed fuel assemblies and damaged fuel assemblies (i.e., ones that have sustained mechanical or chemical damage but with fuel rod cladding that is not breached) in storage, (2) categorize those fuel assemblies, and (3) prepare this report as an authoritative, illustrated source of information on such fuel. Among the more than 45,975 spent light-water reactor fuel assemblies currently in storage in the United States, it appears that there are nearly 5000 failed or damaged fuel assemblies. 78 refs., 23 figs., 19 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

Collins, Emory D.; Delcul, Guillermo D.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Johnson, Jared A.; Spencer, Barry B.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud  

SciTech Connect

Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder.

Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

Collins, Emory D; Delcul, Guillermo D; Hunt, Rodney D; Johnson, Jared A; Spencer, Barry B

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants  

SciTech Connect

Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) plants  

SciTech Connect

Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES  

SciTech Connect

In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conferences. This work is also relevant to the ongoing efforts of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section XI, Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria (WGOPC) efforts to incorporate nozzle fracture mechanics solutions into a revision to ASME B&PV Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix G.

Walter, Matthew [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Stevens, Gary [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Sommerville, Daniel [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Palm, Nathan [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA; Heinecke, Carol [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

192

Research and Development of High Temperature Light Water Cooled Reactor Operating at Supercritical-Pressure in Japan  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the status and future plans of research and development of the high temperature light water cooled reactor operating at supercritical-pressure in Japan. It includes; the concept development; material for the fuel cladding; water chemistry under supercritical pressure; thermal hydraulics of supercritical fluid; and the conceptual design of core and plant system. Elements of concept development of the once-through coolant cycle reactor are described, which consists of fuel, core, reactor and plant system, stability and safety. Material studies include corrosion tests with supercritical water loops and simulated irradiation tests using a high-energy transmission electron microscope. Possibilities of oxide dispersion strengthening steels for the cladding material are studied. The water chemistry research includes radiolysis and kinetics of supercritical pressure water, influence of radiolysis and radiation damage on corrosion and behavior on the interface between water and material. The thermal hydraulic research includes heat transfer tests of single tube, single rod and three-rod bundles with a supercritical Freon loop and numerical simulations. The conceptual designs include core design with a three-dimensional core simulator and sub-channel analysis, and balance of plant. (authors)

Yoshiaki Oka [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 112-0006 (Japan); Katsumi Yamada [Isogo Nuclear Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The computational-and-experimental investigation into the head-flow characteristic of the two-stage ejector for the emergency core cooling system of the NPP with a water-moderated water-cooled power reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of the computational-and-experimental investigation into the two-stage ejector for the emergency cooling system of the core of the water-moderated water-cooled power reactor. The results of experiment...

Yu. V. Parfenov

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A nondiffusive solution method for RETRAN-03 boiling water reactor stability analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that boiling water reactors (BWRs) are susceptible to thermal-hydraulic instabilities that must be considered in BWR design and operation. Early BWRs were designed to be very stable while operating under natural-circulation conditions. As reactor designs have been modified, stability margins have been reduced, and the potential for stability events, such as occurred at the La Salle and Vermont Yankee plants, has increased. These events and other considerations point to the need for a reliable analysis tool for predicting the dynamic behavior of these events. Transient thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes have been used to analyze hydrodynamic instabilities, and although the results are often reasonable and exhibit the expected behavior, they are sensitive to changes in node and time-step size and a converged solution cannot be demonstrated by reducing the node and time-step sizes. This sensitivity is due to numerical-diffusion that limits the use of most time domain system analysis codes for BWR stability analyses since it directly affects the decay (or growth) ratio compared for stability events. A conservation equation transport model using the method of characteristics has been developed for use with the RETRAN-03 mixture energy and vapor continuity equations. The model eliminates numerical diffusion in the RETRAN solution. The development and validation of a conservation equation transport model for the RETRAN-03 time domain thermal-hydraulic analysis code that extends the range of application to simulating the dynamic behavior of stability events are presented. RETRAN-03 analyses are presented that compare simulations of hydrodynamic instability events with data.

Paulsen, M.P.; Shatford, J.G.; Westacott, J.L. (Computer Simulation and Analysis, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Agee, L.J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Pyroprocessing of Light Water Reactor Spent Fuels Based on an Electrochemical Reduction Technology  

SciTech Connect

A concept of pyroprocessing light water reactor (LWR) spent fuels based on an electrochemical reduction technology is proposed, and the material balance of the processing of mixed oxide (MOX) or high-burnup uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) spent fuel is evaluated. Furthermore, a burnup analysis for metal fuel fast breeder reactors (FBRs) is conducted on low-decontamination materials recovered by pyroprocessing. In the case of processing MOX spent fuel (40 GWd/t), UO{sub 2} is separately collected for {approx}60 wt% of the spent fuel in advance of the electrochemical reduction step, and the product recovered through the rare earth (RE) removal step, which has the composition uranium:plutonium:minor actinides:fission products (FPs) = 76.4:18.4:1.7:3.5, can be applied as an ingredient of FBR metal fuel without a further decontamination process. On the other hand, the electroreduced alloy of high-burnup UO{sub 2} spent fuel (48 GWd/t) requires further decontamination of residual FPs by an additional process such as electrorefining even if RE FPs are removed from the alloy because the recovered plutonium (Pu) is accompanied by almost the same amount of FPs in addition to RE. However, the amount of treated materials in the electrorefining step is reduced to {approx}10 wt% of the total spent fuel owing to the prior UO{sub 2} recovery step. These results reveal that the application of electrochemical reduction technology to LWR spent oxide fuel is a promising concept for providing FBR metal fuel by a rationalized process.

Ohta, Hirokazu; Inoue, Tadashi; Sakamura, Yoshiharu; Kinoshita, Kensuke

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

A neutron poison tritium breeding controller applied to a water cooled fusion reactor model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The generation of tritium in sufficient quantities is an absolute requirement for a next step fusion device such as DEMO due to the scarcity of tritium sources. Although the production of sufficient quantities of tritium will be one of the main challenges for DEMO, within an energy economy featuring several fusion power plants the active control of tritium production may be required in order to manage surplus tritium inventories at power plant sites. The primary reason for controlling the tritium inventory in such an economy would therefore be to minimise the risk and storage costs associated with large quantities of surplus tritium. In order to ensure that enough tritium will be produced in a reactor which contains a solid tritium breeder, over the reactor's lifetime, the tritium breeding rate at the beginning of its lifetime is relatively high and reduces over time. This causes a large surplus tritium inventory to build up until approximately halfway through the lifetime of the blanket, when the inventory begins to decrease. This surplus tritium inventory could exceed several tens of kilograms of tritium, impacting on possible safety and licensing conditions that may exist. This paper describes a possible solution to the surplus tritium inventory problem that involves neutron poison injection into the coolant, which is managed with a tritium breeding controller. A simple PID controller and is used to manage the injection of the neutron absorbing compounds into the water coolant of a stratified blanket model, depending on the difference between the required tritium excess inventory and the measured tritium excess inventory. The compounds effectively reduce the amount of low energy neutrons available to react with lithium compounds, thus reducing the tritium breeding ratio. This controller reduces the amount of tritium being produced at the start of the reactor's lifetime and increases the rate of tritium production towards the end of its lifetime. Thus, a relatively stable tritium production level may be maintained, allowing the control system to minimize the stored tritium with obvious safety benefits. The FATI code (Fusion Activation and Transport Interface) will be used to perform the tritium breeding and controller calculations.

L.W.G. Morgan; L.W. Packer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Grizzly Year-End Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The Grizzly software application is being developed under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to address aging and material degradation issues that could potentially become an obstacle to life extension of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years of operation. Grizzly is based on INLs MOOSE multiphysics simulation environment, and can simultaneously solve a variety of tightly coupled physics equations, and is thus a very powerful and flexible tool with a wide range of potential applications. Grizzly, the development of which was begun during fiscal year (FY) 2012, is intended to address degradation in a variety of critical structures. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) was chosen for an initial application of this software. Because it fulfills the critical roles of housing the reactor core and providing a barrier to the release of coolant, the RPV is clearly one of the most safety-critical components of a nuclear power plant. In addition, because of its cost, size and location in the plant, replacement of this component would be prohibitively expensive, so failure of the RPV to meet acceptance criteria would likely result in the shutting down of a nuclear power plant. The current practice used to perform engineering evaluations of the susceptibility of RPVs to fracture is to use the ASME Master Fracture Toughness Curve (ASME Code Case N-631 Section III). This is used in conjunction with empirically based models that describe the evolution of this curve due to embrittlement in terms of a transition temperature shift. These models are based on an extensive database of surveillance coupons that have been irradiated in operating nuclear power plants, but this data is limited to the lifetime of the current reactor fleet. This is an important limitation when considering life extension beyond 60 years. The currently available data cannot be extrapolated with confidence further out in time because there is a potential for additional damage mechanisms (i.e. late blooming phases) to become active later in life beyond the current operational experience. To develop a tool that can eventually serve a role in decision-making, it is clear that research and development must be perfomed at multiple scales. At the engineering scale, a multiphysics analysis code that can capture the thermomechanical response of the RPV under accident conditions, including detailed fracture mechanics evaluations of flaws with arbitrary geometry and orientation, is needed to assess whether the fracture toughness, as defined by the master curve, including the effects of embrittlement, is exceeded. At the atomistic scale, the fundamental mechanisms of degradation need to be understood, including the effects of that degradation on the relevant material properties. In addition, there is a need to better understand the mechanisms leading to the transition from ductile to brittle fracture through improved continuum mechanics modeling at the fracture coupon scale. Work is currently being conducted at all of these levels with the goal of creating a usable engineering tool informed by lower length-scale modeling. This report summarizes progress made in these efforts during FY 2013.

Benjamin Spencer; Yongfeng Zhang; Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner; Marie Backman; Brian Wirth; Stephen Novascone; Jason Hales

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Development of Generic Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Guidance for Ambient Background Assessment Kentucky Guidance for Ambient Background Assessment January 8, 2004 Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet Introduction This guidance document is intended to assist in comparing site data and background data for sites undergoing environmental assessment. These procedures provide a simplified statistical procedure for determining if the site data is part of the background population. It also provides generic statewide background values for inorganic chemicals that may be used in lieu of collecting site-specific background samples. The statistical procedures may be used for site- specific data or the generic statewide values in Tables 1 and 2. This guidance does not preclude other appropriate statistical comparisons from being made, but rather a simplified screening

199

Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

Owen, M.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Qualification Requirements of Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Inspection of Piping in Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are being increasingly used for both NDT and monitoring of piping. GUW offers advantages over many conventional NDE technologies due to the ability to inspect large volumes of piping components without significant removal of thermal insulation or protective layers. In addition, regions rendered inaccessible to more conventional NDE technologies may be more accessible using GUW techniques. For these reasons, utilities are increasingly considering the use of GUWs for performing the inspection of piping components in nuclear power plants. GUW is a rapidly evolving technology and its usage for inspection of nuclear power plant components requires refinement and qualification to ensure it is able to achieve consistent and acceptable levels of performance. This paper will discuss potential requirements for qualification of GUW techniques for the inspection of piping components in light water reactors (LWRs). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has adopted ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements in Sections V, III, and XI for nondestructive examination methods, fabrication inspections, and pre-service and in-service inspections. A Section V working group has been formed to place the methodology of GUW into the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code but no requirements for technique, equipment, or personnel exist in the Code at this time.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

Research and development (R&D) activities on advanced, higher performance Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels have been ongoing for the last few years. Following the unfortunate March 2011 events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the R&D shifted toward enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs. Qualitative attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance, such as improved reaction kinetics with steam resulting in slower hydrogen generation rate, provide guidance for the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. A common set of technical metrics should be established to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs on a more quantitative basis. Metrics describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. This report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to evaluate the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed toward qualification.

Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Multivent effects in a large scale boiling water reactor pressure suppression system  

SciTech Connect

The steam-driven GKSS pressure suppression test facility, which contains 3 full scale vent pipes, has been used for 5 years to investigate the postulated loss-of-coolant accident in a Mark II and Type 69 boiling water reactor. Using the results from several of these tests, wetwell boundary load data (peak pressures and spectral power) during the chugging stage, have been evaluated for sparse pool response (one and two vents in the three vent pool) and for full pool response (one, two, or three vent operation in pools of constant wetwell pool area per vent). The sparse pool results indicate the pool-system, chug event boundary loads are strongly dependent on wetwell pool area per vent, with the load increasing with decreasing area. The full pool results show a substantial increase in the pool-system, chug event boundary loads upon a change from single cell to double cell operation; only minor change occurs in going from double to triple cell operation.

McCauley, E.W.; Aust, E.; Schwan, H.

1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

Electrolytic Reduction of Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel Bench-Scale Experiment Results  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments were performed to demonstrate the electrolytic reduction of spent light water reactor fuel at bench-scale in a hot cell at the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex. The process involves the conversion of oxide fuel to metal by electrolytic means, which would then enable subsequent separation and recovery of actinides via existing electrometallurgical technologies, i.e., electrorefining. Four electrolytic reduction runs were performed at bench scale using ~500 ml of molten LiCl 1 wt% Li2O electrolyte at 650 C. In each run, ~50 g of crushed spent oxide fuel was loaded into a permeable stainless steel basket and immersed into the electrolyte as the cathode. A spiral wound platinum wire was immersed into the electrolyte as the anode. When a controlled electric current was conducted through the anode and cathode, the oxide fuel was reduced to metal in the basket and oxygen gas was evolved at the anode. Salt samples were extracted before and after each electrolytic reduction run and analyzed for fuel and fission product constituents. The fuel baskets following each run were sectioned and the fuel was sampled, revealing an extent of uranium oxide reduction in excess of 98%.

Steven D. Herrmann

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Application of LBB to high energy pipings of a pressurized water reactor in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The application of the leak before break (LBB) technology to the newly constructed pressurized water reactors (PWRs) has been approved in Korea for several high energy systems that can meet rigorous acceptance criteria. The LBB application in Korea is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commision (USNRC) requirements. The purpose of the LBB evaluation is to eliminate the dynamic effects associated with the postulated double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) from design basis loads, as well as to eliminate pipe whip restraints and jet impingement barriers. There were several issues on the application of LBB to the primary coolant loop and the pressurizer surge line. Of concern were the material properties for the carbon steel for the primary coolant loop, estimation of the crack opening area at the pipe-to-nozzle interface considering the asymmetry, and the leakage crack size which barely meets the required margin of 2 for the surge line, etc. Some additional work was required by the safety authority to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper describes the regulatory application of LBB in Korea, and the issues encountered during the regulatory review.

Jeong-Bae Lee; Young Hwan Choi

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the cor...

Clerc, Thomas; Leroyer, Hadrien; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Ponot, Aglique

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Aldana, J. [NES, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cosmogony of Generic Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of formation of generic structures in the Universe is addressed, whereby first the kinematics of inertial continua for coherent initial data is considered. The generalization to self--gravitating continua is outlined focused on the classification problem of singularities and metamorphoses arising in the density field. Self--gravity gives rise to an internal hierarchy of structures, and, dropping the assumption of coherence, also to an external hierarchy of structures dependent on the initial power spectrum of fluctuations.

T. Buchert

1994-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced water-cooled reactors Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor Concept", Nucl... Cooled, Fast, Subcritical Advanced Burner ... Source: MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center Collection:...

209

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated.

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced light-water reactors Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of low-energy antineutrino detectors, together... Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with ... Source: Gratta, Giorgio - Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics...

211

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Semiannual report, October 1990--March 1991: Volume 13  

SciTech Connect

The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties.

Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Safety evaluation report related to the Department of Energy`s proposal for the irradiation of lead test assemblies containing tritium-producing burnable absorber rods in commercial light-water reactors. Project Number 697  

SciTech Connect

The NRC staff has reviewed a report, submitted by DOE to determine whether the use of a commercial light-water reactor (CLWR) to irradiate a limited number of tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) in lead test assemblies (LTAs) raises generic issues involving an unreviewed safety question. The staff has prepared this safety evaluation to address the acceptability of these LTAs in accordance with the provision of 10 CFR 50.59 without NRC licensing action. As summarized in Section 10 of this safety evaluation, the staff has identified issues that require NRC review. The staff has also identified a number of areas in which an individual licensee undertaking irradiation of TPBAR LTAs will have to supplement the information in the DOE report before the staff can determine whether the proposed irradiation is acceptable at a particular facility. The staff concludes that a licensee undertaking irradiation of TPBAR LTAs in a CLWR will have to submit an application for amendment to its facility operating license before inserting the LTAs into the reactor.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Efficiency of producing additional power in units of nuclear power stations containing water-cooled-water-moderated reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a basic possibility to raise the maximum power of a unit containing the VVR-1000 reactor in the course of the fuel charge burn-up and with lowering the coefficient of the energy-release nonuniformity...

R. Z. Aminov; V. A. Khrustalev; A. A. Serdobintsev

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013  

SciTech Connect

Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

Bruce Hallbert; Ken Thomas

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

An Investigation of the Use of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of the utilization of TRistructural- ISOtropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles for the burning of plutonium/neptunium (Pu/Np) isotopes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors is presented. Though numerous studies have evaluated the burning of transuranic isotopes in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing Pu/Np-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and formed into pellets, constituting the fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel concept that can be loaded into standard LWR fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of Pu/Np burning and, by virtue of the multibarrier TRISO particle design and SiC matrix properties, will allow for greater burnup of Pu/Np material, plus improved fuel reliability and thermal performance. In this study, a variety of heterogeneous assembly layouts, which utilize a mix of FCM rods and typical UO2 rods, and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core designs herein reported are not fully optimized and require fine-tuning to flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing Pu/Np production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in pressurized water reactors.

Gentry, Cole A [ORNL] [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL] [ORNL; Powers, Jeffrey J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide the status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1995 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced RISMC toolkit that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Features of temperature control of fuel element cladding for pressurized water nuclear reactor WWER-1000 while simulating reactor accidents  

SciTech Connect

During the experiments simulating NPR (nuclear power reactor) accidents with a coolant loss fuel elements behavior in a steam-hydrogen medium was studied at the temperature changed with the rate from 1 to 100K/s within the range of 3001500 C. Indications of the thermocouples fixed on the cladding notably differ from real values of the cladding temperatures in the area of measuring junction due to thermal resistance influence of the transition zones cladding-junction and junction-coolant. The estimating method of a measurement error was considered which can provide adequate accounting of the influence factors. The method is based on thermal probing of a thermocouple by electric current flashing through thermoelements under the coolant presence or absence, a response time registration and processing, calculation of thermal inertia value for a thermocouple junction. A formula was derived for calculation of methodical error under stationary mode and within the stage of linear increase in temperature, which will determine the conditions for the cladding depressurization. Some variants of the formula application were considered, and the values of methodical errors were established which reached ?5% of maximum value by the final moment of the stage of linear increase in the temperature.

Zaytsev, P. A.; Priymak, S. V.; Usachev, V. B.; Oleynikov, P. P.; Soldatkin, D. M. [Scientific Research Institute, Scientific Industrial Association LUCH, Podolsk (Russian Federation)] [Scientific Research Institute, Scientific Industrial Association LUCH, Podolsk (Russian Federation)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

Atmospheric Water Vapor Pressure over Land Surfaces: A Generic Algorithm with Data Input Limited to Air Temperature, Precipitation and Geographic Location  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lack of information for surface water vapor pressure (WVP) represents a major impediment to model-assisted ecosystem analysis for understanding plant-environment interactions or for projecting biospheric re...

X. Yin

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessment of possible consequences of a hypothetical reactivity accident associated with a {open_quotes}Topaz-2{close_quotes} spacecraft reactor entering water  

SciTech Connect

An accident analysis for a Russian Topaz-2 nuclear reactor is summarized. The accident scenario involves emergency return from orbit, severe damage to reactor structural elements, and subsequent falling of the reactor core into the ocean. The thermionic converter reactor, used in spacecraft, has a large neutron leakage which decreases when water enters the inner core cavity. Preliminary results of numerical modeling, summarized in the article, show that the possible consequences of the hypothetical accidental submersion are limited. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Glushkov, E.S.; Ermoshin, M.Yu.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi; Skorlygin, V.V.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A pilot study for errors of commission for a boiling water reactor using the CESA method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) typically focuses on the errors leading to the non-performance of required actions (Errors of Omission, EOOs). On the other hand, Errors Of Commission (EOCs) refer to inappropriate, undesired actions that aggravate an accident scenario. The challenges to their treatment in PSA relate to both their identification (which error events should be included in the PSA) and to the quantification of their probabilities. This paper presents the results from a plant-specific study to identify potential EOC vulnerabilities and quantify their risk significance. The study addresses a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) in Switzerland. It is one of the first EOC analyses ever made for BWRs. The Commission Error Search and Assessment (CESA) method was used to identify EOC scenarios. The EOC probabilities were estimated using the elicitation approach developed as part of the ATHEANA method (A Technique for Human Event Analysis), with input from interviews with plant personnel (with oral as well as written questions). The basis for the quantification was a qualitative analysis of the scenario, the operator response and its procedural basis, and of the opportunities for the EOC and its recovery. The results suggest that the contribution to risk of the most important \\{EOCs\\} is comparable to that of the most important errors of omission, i.e. the required actions typically treated in a PSA; thus, they highlight the significance of \\{EOCs\\} in the overall risk profile of the plant. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a systematic treatment of \\{EOCs\\} for large-scale applications and contributes to understanding the importance of \\{EOCs\\} in the plant risk profile.

L. Podofillini; V.N. Dang; O. Nusbaumer; D. Dres

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

An analytical model of the swirl vane steam separator for boiling water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Currently, no comprehensive mechanistic model for the two-phase flow through a swirl vane steam separator is available. Therefore, an attempt has been made to develop an analytical model, using fundamental fluid mechanics, which is capable of predicting separator performance over a wide range of conditions. The developed model subdivides a typical boiling water reactor swirl vane steam separator into four distinct regions: the standpipe region, the swirl vane region, the transition region, and the free vortex region. In each region, the vapor and liquid components are treated separately and the behavior of individual droplets is determined from the drag force induced by the vapor continuum. The analytical model is used to first determine the vapor velocities throughout the separator. The drag force on the droplets is then determined, and the droplets are tracked through the separator in order to determine the exit position of each droplet. Separator performance can then be determined from this final position in terms of the fraction of droplets removed from the flow stream. In order to assess the validity of this model, the computer code SEPARATOR was developed. Among other capabilities, the code is capable of determining separator performance in terms of carryover, carryunder, and exit quality. However, due to the simplicity of the single-phase fluid treatment of the vapor continuum and the lack of data related to the average droplet diameter for flows of this nature, the results are not of significant quantitative value. The investigation performed does, however, suggest that the developed methodology, upon refinement of the single-phase fluids treatment, will yield quantitatively accurate results for nearly all separator operating conditions of interest.

Betts, C.M.; Galvin, M.R.; Green, J.R.; Guymon, V.M.; Slater, S.M.; Klein, A.C. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A MELCOR Application to Two Light Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant Core Melt Scenarios with Assumed Cavity Flooding Action  

SciTech Connect

The MELCOR 1.8.4 code Bottom Head package has been applied to simulate two reactor cavity flooding scenarios for when the corium material relocates to the lower-plenum region in postulated severe accidents. The applications were preceded by a review of two main physical models, which highly impacted the results. A model comparison to available bibliography models was done, which allowed some code modifications on selected default assumptions to be undertaken. First, the corium convective heat transfer to the wall when it becomes liquid was modified, and second, the default nucleate boiling regime curve in a submerged hemisphere was replaced by a new curve (and, to a much lesser extent, the critical heat flux curve was slightly varied).The applications were devoted to two prototypical light water reactor nuclear power plants, a 2700-MW(thermal) pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a 1381-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR). The main conclusions of the cavity flooding simulations were that the PWR lower-head survivability is extended although it is clearly not guaranteed, while in the BWR sequence the corium seems to be successfully arrested in the lower plenum.Three applications of the CFX 4.4 computational fluid dynamics code were carried out in the context of the BWR scenario to support the first modification of the aforementioned two scenarios for MELCOR.Finally, in the same BWR context, a statistic predictor of selected output parameters as a function of input parameters is presented, which provides reasonable results when compared to MELCOR full calculations in much shorter CPU processing times.

Martin-Fuertes, Francisco; Martin-Valdepenas, Juan Manuel; Mira, Jose; Sanchez, Maria Jesus [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are similar to those obtained with the traditional UO2 nuclear fuel.

Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty for the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor II: Full core analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Uncertainties in nuclear data are a fundamental source of uncertainty in reactor physics calculations. To determine their contribution to uncertainties in calculated reactor physics parameters, a nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty study is performed on the Canadian supercritical water reactor (SCWR) concept. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to the neutron multiplication factor k eff are 6.31 mk for the SCWR at the beginning of cycle (BOC) and 6.99 mk at the end of cycle (EOC). Both of these uncertainties have a statistical uncertainty of 0.02 mk. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR) are 1.0 mk and 0.9 mk for BOC and EOC, respectively, both with statistical uncertainties of 0.1 mk. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to other reactivity parameters range from as low as 3% of to as high as ten times the values of the reactivity coefficients. The largest contributors to the uncertainties in the reactor physics parameters are Pu-239, Th-232, H-2, and isotopes of zirconium.

S.E. Langton; A. Buijs; J. Pencer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs.

Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Wagner, K.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Thermal hydraulic performance analysis of a small integral pressurized water reactor core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermal hydraulic analysis of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) core has been performed. Thermal margins for steady state and a selection of Loss Of Flow Accidents have been assessed using three ...

Blair, Stuart R. (Stuart Ryan), 1972-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Expert assessments of the cost of light water small modular reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Schrattenholzer (S1) report learning...include technical progress economies...suggests, the result we report are probably...high temperature gas cooled reactor...adapted from the report in question (29...storage systems 3) Turbine plant equipmentHigh...

Ahmed Abdulla; Ins Lima Azevedo; M. Granger Morgan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

Not Available

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Subchannel Thermal-Hydraulic Experimental Program (STEP). Volume 1. Mixing in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume describes an experiment that was performed to determine the mixing characteristics of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle. The objective of this project was to improve the subchannel computer code models of the reactor core. The experimental technique was isokinetic subchannel withdrawal of the entire flow from two sample subchannels. Once withdrawn, the sample fluid was condensed and its enthalpy was measured by regenerative heat exchange calorimetry. The test bundle was a 4 x 6 electrically heated array with a 50% power upset. The COBRA IIIC code was used to model the experiment and to determine the value of the thermal mixing coefficient, ..beta.., that was necessary to predict the measured results. Both single- and two-phase data were obtained over a range of PWR operating conditions. The results indicate that both single- and two-phase mixing is small. The COBRA model predicts the enthalpy data using a turbulent mixing coefficient, ..beta.. approx. = 0.002.

Barber, A.R.; Zielke, L.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

233

Analysis of a duo-selecting membrane reactor for the water-gas shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water-gas shift reaction is an exothermic and reversible catalytic process that converts carbon monoxide and water (steam) to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. In regard to energy-related issues, the water-gas shift is part ...

Hardy, AliciA Jillian Jackson, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Neutronic analysis of candidate accident-tolerant cladding concepts in pressurized water reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A study analyzed the neutronics of alternate cladding materials in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment. Austenitic type 310 (310SS) and 304 stainless steels, ferritic Fe-20Cr-5Al (FeCrAl) and APMT alloys, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based materials were considered and compared with Zircaloy-4. SCALE 6.1 was used to analyze the associated neutronics penalty/advantage, changes in reactivity coefficients, and spectral variations once a transition in the cladding was made. In the cases examined, materials containing higher absorbing isotopes invoked a reduction in reactivity due to an increase in neutron absorption in the cladding. Higher absorbing materials produced a harder neutron spectrum in the fuel pellet, leading to a slight increase in plutonium production. A parametric study determined the geometric conditions required to match cycle length requirements for each alternate cladding material in a PWR. A method for estimating the end of cycle reactivity was implemented to compare each model to that of standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. By using a thinner cladding of 350?m and keeping a constant outer diameter, austenitic stainless steels require an increase of no more than 0.5wt% enriched 235U to match fuel cycle requirements, while the required increase for FeCrAl was about 0.1%. When modeling SiC (with slightly lower thermal absorption properties than that of Zircaloy), a standard cladding thickness could be implemented with marginally less enriched uranium (?0.1%). Moderator temperature and void coefficients were calculated throughout the depletion cycle. Nearly identical reactivity responses were found when coolant temperature and void properties were perturbed for each cladding material. By splitting the pellet into 10 equal areal sections, relative fission power as a function of radius was found to be similar for each cladding material. FeCrAl and 310SS cladding have a slightly higher fission power near the pellets periphery due to the harder neutron spectrum in the system, causing more 239Pu breeding. An economic assessment calculated the change in fuel pellet production costs for use of each cladding. Implementing FeCrAl alloys would increase fuel pellet production costs about 15% because of increased 235U enrichment and the additional UO2 pellet volume enabled by using thinner cladding.

Nathan Michael George; Kurt Terrani; Jeff Powers; Andrew Worrall; Ivan Maldonado

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

3D Simulation of Missing Pellet Surface Defects in Light Water Reactor Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect

The cladding on light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods provides a stable enclosure for fuel pellets and serves as a first barrier against fission product release. Consequently, it is important to design fuel to prevent cladding failure due to mechanical interactions with fuel pellets. Cladding stresses can be effectively limited by controlling power increase rates. However, it has been shown that local geometric irregularities caused by manufacturing defects known as missing pellet surfaces (MPS) in fuel pellets can lead to elevated cladding stresses that are sufficiently high to cause cladding failure. Accurate modeling of these defects can help prevent these types of failures. Nuclear fuel performance codes commonly use a 1.5D (axisymmetric, axially-stacked, one-dimensional radial) or 2D axisymmetric representation of the fuel rod. To study the effects of MPS defects, results from 1.5D or 2D fuel performance analyses are typically mapped to thermo-mechanical models that consist of a 2D plane-strain slice or a full 3D representation of the geometry of the pellet and clad in the region of the defect. The BISON fuel performance code developed at Idaho National Laboratory employs either a 2D axisymmetric or 3D representation of the full fuel rod. This allows for a computational model of the full fuel rod to include local defects. A 3D thermo-mechanical model is used to simulate the global fuel rod behavior, and includes effects on the thermal and mechanical behavior of the fuel due to accumulation of fission products, fission gas production and release, and the effects of fission gas accumulation on thermal conductivity across the fuel-clad gap. Local defects can be modeled simply by including them in the 3D fuel rod model, without the need for mapping between two separate models. This allows for the complete set of physics used in a fuel performance analysis to be included naturally in the computational representation of the local defect, and for the effects of the local defect to be coupled with the global fuel rod model. This approach for modeling fuel with MPS defects is demonstrated and compared with alternative techniques. The effects of varying parameters of the MPS defect are studied using this technique and presented here.

B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; R.L. Williamson

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The use of metal alloy fuels in a PWR was investigated. It was found that it would be feasible and competitive to design PWRs with metal alloy fuels but that there seemed to be no significant benefits. The new technology would carry with it added economic uncertainty and since no large benefits were found it was determined that metal alloy fuels are not recommended. Initially, a benefit was found for metal alloy fuels but when the oxide core was equally optimized the benefit faded. On review of the optimization of the current generation of ``advanced reactors,`` it became clear that reactor design optimization has been under emphasized. Current ``advanced reactors`` are severely constrained. The AP-600 required the use of a fuel design from the 1970`s. In order to find the best metal alloy fuel design, core optimization became a central effort. This work is ongoing.

Lancaster, D.

1992-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

237

ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

Lewis, M E

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

Lata

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sliding Mode Control for Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactors in load following operations with bounded xenon oscillations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the important operations in nuclear power plants is load-following in which imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation considered to be a constraint for the load-following operation. In this paper, sliding mode control (SMC) which is a robust nonlinear controller is designed to control the Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor (PWR) power for the load-following operation problem that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO) strategy to maintain xenon oscillations to be bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for load-following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model and one delayed neutron group. The stability analysis is given by means Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the sliding mode control exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load-following operation is sufficiently effective so that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the considered region.

G.R. Ansarifar; S. Saadatzi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......during their short/long term-storage is investigated in...radio-toxicity of radioactive waste is widely regarded...exchangers of the spent fuel storage bay. The decay power...VVER type reactors at long-term storage. Radiat. Prot. Dosim......

S. Anand; K. D. S. Singh; V. K. Sharma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

242

Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+{trademark} Design Certification Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW{sub t} (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

A GASFLOW analysis of a steam explosion accident in a typical light-water reactor confinement building  

SciTech Connect

Steam over-pressurization resulting from ex-vessel steam explosion (fuel-coolant interaction) may pose a serious challenge to the integrity of a typical light-water reactor confinement building. If the steam generation rate exceeds the removal capacity of the Airborne Activity Confinement System, confinement over pressurization occurs. Thus, there is a large potential for an uncontrolled and unfiltered release of fission products from the confinement atmosphere to the environment at the time of the steam explosion. The GASFLOW computer code was used to analyze the effects of a hypothetical steam explosion and the transport of steam and hydrogen throughout a typical light-water reactor confinement building. The effects of rapid pressurization and the resulting forces on the internal structures and the heat exchanger service bay hatch covers were calculated. Pressurization of the ventilation system and the potential damage to the ventilation fans and high-efficiency particulate air filters were assessed. Because of buoyancy forces and the calculated confinement velocity field, the hydrogen diffuses and mixes in the confinement atmosphere but tends to be transported to its upper region.

Travis, J.R. [ESSI Inc. (United States); Wilson, T.L.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rao, D.V. [SEA Inc. (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 14, Semiannual report, April 1991--September 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWR`s); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1991 through September 1991.

Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Good, M.S.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 15, Semiannual report: October 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1991 through March 1992.

Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Semiannual report, April 1992--September 1992: Volume 16  

SciTech Connect

The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs);using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a programs report covering the programmatic work from April 1992 through September 1992.

Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Argonaut Reactor - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Training Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

248

Advanced nuclear reactor safety analysis: the simulation of a small break loss of coolant accident in the simplified boiling water reactor using RELAP5/MOD3.1.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal hydraulic simulation code RELAP5/MOD3.1.1 was utilized to model General Electric's Simplified Boiling Water Reactor plant. The model of the plant was subjected to a small break loss of coolant accident occurring from a guillotine shear...

Faust, Christophor Randall

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

New Fuel Cycle and Fuel Management Options in Heavy Liquid Metal-Cooled Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Fuel Management of Reactors Other Than Light Water Reactors

Ehud Greenspan; Pavel Hejzlar; Hiroshi Sekimoto; Georgy Toshinsky; David Wade

250

Feasibility of Burning First- and Second-Generation Plutonium in Pebble Bed High-Temperature Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Fuel Management of Reactors Other Than Light Water Reactors

J. B. M. De Haas; J. C. Kuijper

251

Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A., E-mail: sedov@dhtp.kial.ru; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

A comparison of factors impacting on radiation buildup at the Vermont Yankee and Monticello BWRs (boiling-water reactors): Interim report  

SciTech Connect

Design and operating features of the Monticello and Vermont Yankee BWRs were compared in an attempt to explain why shutdown radiation levels at Vermont Yankee were significantly higher than at Monticello. The plants were shown to be similar in many respects, for example, condenser and feedwater system design and materials, condensate treatment system design, feedwater iron and copper concentrations, reactor water piping materials and fabrication techniques, reactor water cleanup system flowrates and equipment type, fuel cycle lengths, and fuel failure history. Differences were noted in core power density, jet pump design, reactor water conductivity, volume of radwaste recycle, and the amount of Stellite bearing materials in the feedwater system. Corrosion films on reactor system decontamination flanges from the two plants also were very different. At Monticello, the film was typical of that observed at other BWRs. The Vermont Yankee film contained significantly higher levels of zinc, chromium, and cobalt. Since reactor water Co-60 concentrations at Monticello were about twice those at Vermont Yankee, the Vermont Yankee corrosion film must exhibit a greater tendency to incorporate Co-60.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Generic CTS Data Upload Templates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generic CTS Data Upload Templates Generic CTS Data Upload Templates Generic CTS Data Upload Templates October 8, 2013 - 2:03pm Addthis These generic Excel templates are being made available to the public so that Federal contractors and service providers can provide their clients with reports and findings consistent with the formats required for agencies to easily upload the data into CTS. Agencies may refer their energy/water audit contractors and project developers/evaluators to these templates as a reference for required data elements and reporting. Data may be batch imported by the Federal agencies into CTS using the following Excel spreadsheet templates. The "Agency Acronym" and facility identifying data contained in these templates must correspond to the existing IDs used in CTS. Contractors populating these templates for agency

254

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The direct liquefaction portion of the PETC generic direct coal liquefaction process development unit (PDU) is being designed to provide maximum operating flexibility. The PDU design will permit catalytic and non-catalytic liquefaction concepts to be investigated at their proof-of-the-concept stages before any larger scale operations are attempted. The principal variations from concept to concept are reactor configurations and types. These include thermal reactor, ebullating bed reactor, slurry phase reactor and fixed bed reactor, as well as different types of catalyst. All of these operating modes are necessary to define and identify the optimum process conditions and configurations for determining improved economical liquefaction technology.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor  

SciTech Connect

700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Nabhikiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai, PIN-400094 (India)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Computed phase equilibria for burnable neutron absorbing materials for advanced pressurized heavy water reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Burnable neutron absorbing materials are expected to be an integral part of the new fuel design for the Advanced CANDU[CANDU is as a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited.] Reactor. The neutron absorbing material is composed of gadolinia and dysprosia dissolved in an inert cubic-fluorite yttria-stabilized zirconia matrix. A thermodynamic model based on Gibbs energy minimization has been created to provide estimated phase equilibria as a function of composition and temperature. This work includes some supporting experimental studies involving X-ray diffraction.

E.C. Corcoran; B.J. Lewis; W.T. Thompson; J. Hood; F. Akbari; Z. He; P. Reid

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case  

SciTech Connect

The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN/DER/SPRC Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Low-temperature rupture behavior of Zircaloy clad pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods under dry storage conditions  

SciTech Connect

Creep rupture studies on five well-characterized Zircaloy clad pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods, which were pressurized to a hoop stress of approximately 145 MPa, were conducted for up to 2101 h at 323/sup 0/C. The conditions were chosen for limited annealing of in-reactor irradiation-hardening. No cladding breaches occurred, although significant hydride agglomeration and reorientation took place in rods that cooled under stress. Observations are interpreted in terms of a conservatively modified Larson-Miller curve to provide a lower bound on permissible maximum dry-storage temperatures, assuming creep rupture as the life-limiting mechanism. If hydride reorientation can be ruled out during dry storage, 305/sup 0/C is a conservative lower bound, based on the creep rupture mechanism, for the maximum storage temperature of rods with irradiation hardened cladding to ensure a 100-year cladding lifetime in an inert atmosphere. An oxidizing atmosphere reduces the lower bound on the maximum permissible storage temperature by approx. 5/sup 0/C. While high-temperature tests based on creep rupture as the limiting mechanism indicate that storage at temperatures between 400/sup 0/C and 440/sup 0/C may be feasible for rods which are annealed, tests to study rod performance in the 305/sup 0/ to 400/sup 0/C temperature range have not been conducted. 37 references, 10 figures, 7 tables.

Einziger, R.E.; Kohli, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Low-temperature rupture behavior of Zircaloy-clad pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods under dry storage conditions  

SciTech Connect

Creep rupture studies on five well-characterized Zircaloy-clad pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods, which were pressurized to a hoop stress of about145 MPa, were conducted for up to 2101 h at 323/sup 0/C. The conditions were chosen for limited annealing of in-reactor irradiation hardening. No cladding breaches occurred, although significant hydride agglomeration and reorientation took place in rods that cooled under stress. Observations are interpreted in terms of a conservatively modified Larson-Miller curve to provide a lower bound on permissible maximum dry-storage temperatures, assuming creep rupture as the life-limiting mechanism. If hydride reorientation can be ruled out during dry storage, 305/sup 0/C is a conservative lower bound, based on the creep-rupture mechanism, for the maximum storage temperature of rods with irradiation-hardened cladding to ensure a 100-yr cladding lifetime in an inert atmosphere. An oxidizing atmosphere reduced the lower bound on the maximum permissible storage temperature by about5/sup 0/C. While this lower bound is based on whole-rod data, other types of data on spent fuel behavior in dry storage might support a higher limit. This isothermal temperature limit does not take credit for the decreasing rod temperature during dry storage. High-temperature tests based on creep rupture as the limiting mechanism indicate that storage at temperatures between 400 and 440/sup 0/C may be feasible for rods that are annealed.

Einsiger, R.E.; Kohli, R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne fast source reactor Sample Search...  

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of the Omega Reactor Facility, Summary: fission. The benefits of a fast reactor over the water boiler reactor were a high intensity source offast... Reactors at Other Locations...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Development of an internally cooled annular fuel bundle for pressurized heavy water reactors  

SciTech Connect

A number of preliminary studies have been conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to explore the potential of using internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) in CANDU reactors including finite element thermo-mechanical modelling, reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, fabrication and mechanical design. The most compelling argument for this design compared to the conventional solid-rod design is the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperature for equivalent LERs (linear element ratings). This feature presents the potential for power up-rating or higher burnup and a decreased defect probability due to in-core power increases. The thermal-mechanical evaluation confirmed the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperatures for ICAF fuel compared to solid-rod fuel for equivalent LER. The maximum fuel temperature increase as a function of LER increase is also significantly less for ICAF fuel. As a result, the sheath stress induced by an equivalent power increase is approximately six times less for ICAF fuel than solid-rod fuel. This suggests that the power-increase thresholds to failure (due to stress-corrosion cracking) for ICAF fuel should be well above those for solid-rod fuel, providing improvement in operation flexibility and safety.

Hamilton, H.; Armstrong, J.; Kittmer, A.; Zhuchkova, A.; Xu, R.; Hyland, B.; King, M.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Livingstone, S.; Bergeron, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

263

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Acceptance Criteria for Light Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage System [OCRWM PER REV2  

SciTech Connect

As part of the decommissioning of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells there is a need to remove commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presently stored in these hot cells. To enable fuel removal from the hot cells, the commercial LWR SNF will be packaged and shipped to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) in a manner that satisfies site requirements for SNF interim storage. This document identifies the criteria that the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cell Clean-out Project must satisfy for acceptance of the LWR SNF by the SNF Project at the 200 Area ISA. In addition to the acceptance criteria identified herein, acceptance is contingent on adherence to applicable Project Hanford Management Contract requirements and procedures in place at the time of work execution.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components  

SciTech Connect

Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Computerized operating procedures for shearing and dissolution of segments from LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) fuel rods  

SciTech Connect

This report presents two detailed computerized operating procedures developed to assist and control the shearing and dissolution of irradiated fuel rods. The procedures were employed in the destructive analysis of end-of-life fuel rods from the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) that was designed by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. Seventeen entire fuel rods from the end-of-life core of the LWBR were sheared into 169 precisely characterized segments, and more than 150 of these segments were dissolved during execution of the LWBR Proof-of-Breeding (LWBR-POB) Analytical Support Project at Argonne National Laboratory. The procedures illustrate our approaches to process monitoring, data reduction, and quality assurance during the LWBR-POB work.

Osudar, J.; Deeken, P.G.; Graczyk, D.G.; Fagan, J.E.; Martino, F.J.; Parks, J.E.; Levitz, N.M.; Kessie, R.W.; Leddin, J.M.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

EIS-0288; Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

iii iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: United States Department of Energy Cooperating Agency: Tennessee Valley Authority Title: Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor Contact: For additional information on this Final Environmental Impact Statement, write or call: Jay Rose Office of Defense Programs U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Attention: CLWR EIS Telephone: (202) 586-5484 For copies of the CLWR Final EIS call: 1-800-332-0801 | For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Carol M. Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance (EH-42) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585

267

Transmutation Performance Analysis for Inert Matrix Fuels in Light Water Reactors and Computational Neutronics Methods Capabilities at INL  

SciTech Connect

The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF, thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCmCf, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu. The results of this infinite lattice assembly-wise study using SCALE 5.1 indicate that it may be feasible to recycle TRU in this manner using an otherwise typical PWR assembly without violating peaking factor limits.

Michael A. Pope; Samuel E. Bays; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; Mehdi Asgari; Benoit Forget

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Bacterial Colonization of Pellet Softening Reactors Used during Drinking Water Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pellets, while assimilable organic carbon (AOC), dissolved organic carbon, and flow...These organisms removed as much as 60 of AOC from the water during treatment, thus contributing...Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and AOC. The concentration of assimilable organic...

Frederik Hammes; Nico Boon; Marius Vital; Petra Ross; Aleksandra Magic-Knezev; Marco Dignum

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gigawatt-year nuclear-geothermal energy storage for light-water and high-temperature reactors  

SciTech Connect

Capital-intensive, low-operating cost nuclear plants are most economical when operated under base-load conditions. However, electricity demand varies on a daily, weekly, and seasonal basis. In deregulated utility markets this implies high prices for electricity at times of high electricity demand and low prices for electricity at times of low electricity demand. We examined coupling nuclear heat sources to geothermal heat storage systems to enable these power sources to meet hourly to seasonal variable electricity demand. At times of low electricity demand the reactor heats a fluid that is then injected a kilometer or more underground to heat rock to high temperatures. The fluid travels through the permeable-rock heat-storage zone, transfers heat to the rock, is returned to the surface to be reheated, and re-injected underground. At times of high electricity demand the cycle is reversed, heat is extracted, and the heat is used to power a geothermal power plant to produce intermediate or peak power. When coupling geothermal heat storage with light-water reactors (LWRs), pressurized water (<300 deg. C) is the preferred heat transfer fluid. When coupling geothermal heat storage with high temperature reactors at higher temperatures, supercritical carbon dioxide is the preferred heat transfer fluid. The non-ideal characteristics of supercritical carbon dioxide create the potential for efficient coupling with supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles. Underground rock cannot be insulated, thus small heat storage systems with high surface to volume ratios are not feasible because of excessive heat losses. The minimum heat storage capacity to enable seasonal storage is {approx}0.1 Gigawatt-year. Three technologies can create the required permeable rock: (1) hydro-fracture, (2) cave-block mining, and (3) selective rock dissolution. The economic assessments indicated a potentially competitive system for production of intermediate load electricity. The basis for a nuclear geothermal system with LWRs exists today; but, there is need for added research and development before deployment. There are significantly greater challenges for geothermal heat storage at higher temperatures. Such systems are strongly dependent upon the local geology. (authors)

Forsberg, C. W.; Lee, Y.; Kulhanek, M.; Driscoll, M. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, Plenary sessions, reactor licensing topics, NUREG-1150, risk analysis/PRA applications, innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors, severe accident modeling and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 1, discusses the following: plenary sessions; reactor licensing; NUREG-1150; risk analysis; innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors; and severe accident modeling and analysis. Thirty-two reports have been cataloged separately.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Review of experiments to evaluate the ability of electrical heater rods to simulate nuclear fuel rod behavior during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Issues related to using electrical fuel rod simulators to simulate nuclear fuel rod behavior during postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors are summarized. Experimental programs which will provide a data base for comparing electrical heater rod and nuclear fuel rod LOCA responses are reviewed.

McPherson, G D; Tolman, E L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The COMETHE 4D Release 23 computer code was used to evaluate the thermal, chemical and mechanical performance of weapons-grade MOX fuel irradiated under U.S. light water reactor typical conditions. Comparisons were made to and UO? fuels exhibited...

Bellanger, Philippe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Benchmark calculations for a heavy water research reactor using the WIMS-D4M code and a ENDF/B-V based library  

SciTech Connect

The results of unit-cell and global diffusion and transport calculations performed for the Georgia Tech heavy water research reactor using the WIMS-D4m code and a new ENDF/B-V based library are presented in this paper. Key cross sections, eigenvalues, neutron fluxes and peak power densities obtained from global diffusion calculations are compared.

Mo, S.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping ... Future chemical plants may be required to have much higher flexibility and agility than existing process facilities in order to be able to handle new hybrid combinations of power and chemical units. ...

Patrick J. Robinson; William L. Luyben

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage.

Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

13 - Generation IV reactor designs, operation and fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter looks at Generation IV nuclear reactors, such as the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR), the supercritical water reactor (SCWR), the molten salt reactor (MSR), the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), the lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) and the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR). Reactor designs and fuel cycles are also described.

N. Cerullo; G. Lomonaco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Bacterial Colonization of Pellet Softening Reactors Used during Drinking Water Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mM) was mixed with the SYBR Green I working solution at a ratio...fixed wavelength of 488 nm. Green fluorescence was collected at...The trigger was set on the green fluorescence channel, and data...obtained by mixing 50 bottled mineral water and 50 nonchlorinated...

Frederik Hammes; Nico Boon; Marius Vital; Petra Ross; Aleksandra Magic-Knezev; Marco Dignum

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Determination of Light Water Reactor Fuel Burnup with the Isotope Ratio Method  

SciTech Connect

For the current project to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be extended to zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies we report new analyses on irradiated samples obtained from a reactor. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers new measurements done on irradiated and unirradiated zirconium alloys, Unirradiated zircaloy samples serve as reference samples and indicate starting values or natural values for the Ti isotope ratio measured. New measurements of irradiated samples include results for 3 samples provided by AREVA. New results indicate: 1. Titanium isotope ratios were measured again in unirradiated samples to obtain reference or starting values at the same time irradiated samples were analyzed. In particular, 49Ti/48Ti ratios were indistinguishably close to values determined several months earlier and to expected natural values. 2. 49Ti/48Ti ratios were measured in 3 irradiated samples thus far, and demonstrate marked departures from natural or initial ratios, well beyond analytical uncertainty, and the ratios vary with reported fluence values. The irradiated samples appear to have significant surface contamination or radiation damage which required more time for SIMS analyses. 3. Other activated impurity elements still limit the sample size for SIMS analysis of irradiated samples. The sub-samples chosen for SIMS analysis, although smaller than optimal, were still analyzed successfully without violating the conditions of the applicable Radiological Work Permit

Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fracture mechanics models developed for piping reliability assessment in light water reactors: piping reliability project  

SciTech Connect

The efforts concentrated on modifications of the stratified Monte Carlo code called PRAISE (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events) to make it more widely applicable to probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of nuclear reactor piping. Pipe failures are considered to occur as the result of crack-like defects introduced during fabrication, that escape detection during inspections. The code modifications allow the following factors in addition to those considered in earlier work to be treated: other materials, failure criteria and subcritical crack growth characteristic; welding residual and vibratory stresses; and longitudinal welds (the original version considered only circumferential welds). The fracture mechanics background for the code modifications is included, and details of the modifications themselves provided. Additionally, an updated version of the PRAISE user's manual is included. The revised code, known as PRAISE-B was then applied to a variety of piping problems, including various size lines subject to stress corrosion cracking and vibratory stresses. Analyses including residual stresses and longitudinal welds were also performed.

Harris, D.O.; Lim, E.Y.; Dedhia, D.D.; Woo, H.H.; Chou, C.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Investigations on optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident in a VVER-1000 pressurized water reactor  

SciTech Connect

The reactor safety issues are of primary importance for preserving the health of the population and ensuring no release of radioactivity and fission products into the environment. A part of the nuclear research focuses on improvement of the safety of existing nuclear power plants. Studies, research and efforts are a continuing process at improving the safety and reliability of existing and newly developed nuclear power plants at prevention of a core melt accident. Station blackout (loss of AC power supply) is one of the dominant accidents taken into consideration at performing accident analysis. In case of multiple failures of safety systems it leads to a severe accident. To prevent an accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences, accident management measures must be performed. The present paper outlines possibilities for application and optimization of accident management measures following a station blackout accident. Assessed is the behaviour of the nuclear power plant during a station blackout accident without accident management measures and with application of primary/secondary side oriented accident management measures. Discussed are the possibilities for operators ' intervention and the influence of the performed accident management measures on the course of the accident. Special attention has been paid to the effectiveness of the passive feeding and physical phenomena having an influence on the system behaviour. The performed simulations show that the effectiveness of the secondary side feeding procedure can be limited due to an early evaporation or flashing effects in the feed water system. The analyzed cases show that the effectiveness of the accident management measures strongly depends on the initiation criteria applied for depressurization of the reactor coolant system. (authors)

Tusheva, P.; Schaefer, F.; Kliem, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The effects of water radiolysis on local redox conditions in the Oklo, Gabon, natural fission reactors 10 and 16  

SciTech Connect

In an underground nuclear waste repository, the chemical behavior of some stored fission products and actinides depends on the redox conditions during their long-term evolution. In this respect, radiolysis is an important phenomenon which can significantly modify the local redox conditions. The Oklo natural fission zones are good examples where the effect of radiolysis can be deduced from a mineralogical and geochemical study. Zones 10 and 16 were studied because they are located at depth of 270 m in an area devoid of any recent water circulation and not subject to the effect of the lateritic alteration occurring elsewhere in this area. In zone 10, there is a marked evolution of the U-Pb-Fe-S mineralogy from the center to the periphery of the reactor zone. In the center, uraninite shows silicification and coffinitisation with the formation of galena and native lead; the PbO content of uraninite can be as much as 20 wt%. In the periphery of the reactor zone, some radiogenic lead is present as minimum (Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and in Pb-bearing calcite. In the surrounding sandstones, hematite is widespread. In zone 16, the mineral paragenesis is generally comparable with that of zone 10 but with some differences. Galena is the only Pb-bearing mineral associated with uraninite crystals. The PbO content of uraninite is always <7 wt%. In the periphery of the alteration zone, barite partly replaces quartz. In the reactor zone, hematite is sometimes replaced by pyrite. In an area where the fission zone 10 is in contact with sandstones devoid of organic matter, H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2} {+-} CH{sub 4} inclusions were observed in healed microcracks in the detrital quartz grains. Based on microthermometric measurements, the salinity of the aqueous solution ranges from 0.2 to 18 wt% eq. NaCl. Raman analysis of the gas phase indicates that the hydrogen to oxygen ratio differs from an inclusion to the other. 41 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Savary, V.; Pagel, M. [CREGU and G.R. CNRS-CREGU, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [CREGU and G.R. CNRS-CREGU, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2  

SciTech Connect

This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately.

Weiss, A. J. [comp.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Analysis of a natural circulation cooldown transients in a Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor using TRAC-PF1/MOD1 and TRAC-PF1/MOD2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circulation Cooldown Transient in a Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor Using TRAC-PF1/MOD1 and TRAC-PF1/MOD2. (December 1988) Evelyn Marie Breiner, B. S. , Texas AgtM University Chair of Advisory Committee; Dr. B. Nassersharif To perform transient.... 22). The four-loop model differs from the two-loop 35 TABLE 5 Component Actuation Timing Component Action Transient Time (s) 4-Loo Mod 1 Transient Time (s) 2-Loo M 1 4" break occurs CVCS initiation Low pressurizer pressure trip Reactor trip...

Breiner, Evelyn Marie

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Functional issues and environmental qualification of digital protection systems of advanced light-water nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Issues of obsolescence and lack of infrastructural support in (analog) spare parts, coupled with the potential benefits of digital systems, are driving the nuclear industry to retrofit analog instrumentation and control (I&C) systems with digital and microprocessor-based systems. While these technologies have several advantages, their application to safety-related systems in nuclear power plants raises key issues relating to the systems` environmental qualification and functional reliability. To bound the problem of new I&C system functionality and qualification, the authors focused this study on protection systems proposed for use in ALWRs. Specifically, both functional and environmental qualification issues for ALWR protection system I&C were addressed by developing an environmental, functional, and aging data template for a protection division of each proposed ALWR design. By using information provided by manufacturers, environmental conditions and stressors to which I&C equipment in reactor protection divisions may be subjected were identified. The resulting data were then compared to a similar template for an instrument string typically found in an analog protection division of a present-day nuclear power plant. The authors also identified fiber-optic transmission systems as technologies that are relatively new to the nuclear power plant environment and examined the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber-optic components and systems. One reason for the exercise of caution in the introduction of software into safety-critical systems is the potential for common-cause failure due to the software. This study, however, approaches the functionality problem from a systems point of view. System malfunction scenarios are postulated to illustrate the fact that, when dealing with the performance of the overall integrated system, the real issues are functionality and fault tolerance, not hardware vs. software.

Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Wood, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2002, 4th Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR. The Generation IV Roadmap effort has identified the thermal spectrum SCWR (followed by the fast spectrum SCWR) as one of the advanced concepts that should be developed for future use. Therefore, the work in this NERI project is addressing both types of SCWRs.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

BWRSAR (Boiling Water Reactor Severe Accident Response) calculations of reactor vessel debris pours for Peach Bottom short-term station blackout  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes recent analyses performed by the BWR Severe Accident Technology (BWRSAT) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to estimate the release of debris from the reactor vessel for the unmitigated short-term station blackout accident sequence. Calculations were performed with the BWR Severe Accident Response (BWRSAR) code and are based upon consideration of the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. The modeling strategies employed within BWRSAR for debris relocation within the reactor vessel are briefly discussed and the calculated events of the accident sequence, including details of the calculated debris pours, are presented. 4 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Hodge, S.A.; Ott, L.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Application of steam injector to improved safety of light water reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Steam injector (SI) is a simply designed passive jet pump which does not require external power source or internal mechanical parts. The SI utilizes direct contact condensation between steam and water as an operational mechanism and is capable of producing higher pressure water than the inlet fluid pressures. The accident in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused setback to the credibility and reliability of nuclear power. One way to regain its trust from the global community, it is suggested to develop and install passive coolant injection systems that are operable even during the station black out. In this review paper, thorough and complete review of the SI system was completed and applicability of the SI system as the passive core cooling system is discussed in details. Due to its high heat removal capability, the system can possibly be applied as a high efficiency heat exchanger as well. Its design and operational mechanisms, and fundamental thermal-hydraulic theory utilized in the analysis and experimental work are reviewed. In addition, its possible application towards existing nuclear power plant systems is reviewed.

Yuto Takeya; Shuichiro Miwa; Takashi Hibiki; Michitsugu Mori

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Microsoft Word - power_reactors_briggs.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Water Reactors About 80% of the world's nuclear reactors used for generating electricity are either boiling water reactors or pressurized water reactors. Of these, about 30% are boiling water reactors and 70% are pressurized water reactors. All power reactors currently in use in the United States are of these two types. Both types of reactors have been very successfully used for reliable, on-demand, emissions-free electricity generation for decades. How does a boiling water reactor work? Water flows from the bottom of the fuel to the top of the fuel, and as it moves past the fuel, it carries away the heat produced by the

293

Vertical Integration and Market Entry in the Generic Pharmaceutical Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Generic Pharmaceutical Industry . 2.2.1 Marketingin the Generic Pharmaceutical Industry 3.4 EconometricIntegration in the Generic Pharmaceutical Industry 2.1

Kubo, Kensuke

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Materials Reliability Program Resistance to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 690, 52, and 152 in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-111)  

SciTech Connect

Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. Repairs and replacements have generally utilized wrought Alloy 690 material and its compatible weld metals (Alloy 152 and Alloy 52), which have been shown to be very highly resistant to PWSCC in laboratory experiments and have been free from cracking in operating reactors over periods already up to nearly 15 years. It is nevertheless prudent for the PWR industry to attempt to quantify the longevity of these materials with respect to aging degradation by corrosion in order to provide a sound technical basis for the development of future inspection requirements for repaired or replaced component items. This document first reviews numerous laboratory tests, conducted over the last two decades, that were performed with wrought Alloy 690 and Alloy 52 or Alloy 152 weld materials under various test conditions pertinent to corrosion resistance in PWR environments. The main focus of the present review is on PWSCC, but secondary-side conditions are also briefly considered.

H.Xu, S.Fyfitch, P.Scott, M.Foucault, R.Kilian, and M.Winters

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Dysprosium as a resonance absorber and its effect on the coolant void reactivity in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dysprosium has been used as a slow neutron absorber in the fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) to achieve a negative coolant void reactivity. Dysprosium as occurring in nature has as many as seven isotopes namely, 156Dy, 158Dy, 160Dy, 161Dy, 162Dy, 163Dy, and 164Dy. Of these, the isotope 164Dy has the largest absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. In the past, nuclear data libraries used in our studies have considered only 164Dy isotope and this was sufficient for performing foil activation studies of Dy. The other isotopes of Dy have significant resonances and could affect the design. The treatment of the dysprosium isotopes with resonance tabulations is required for a more accurate estimation of the lattice characteristics like the coolant void reactivity. The use of resonance tabulations for the dysprosium isotopes and its effect on the coolant void reactivity of AHWR fuel cluster has been studied in this paper. Also, the treatment of the stand-alone structural rod with dysprosium as burnable absorber having resonance tabulations has been done for the first time.

Umasankari Kannan; S. Ganesan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining  

SciTech Connect

A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl 1 wt% Li2O at 650 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

S. D. Herrmann; S. X. Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Efficient Generation of Generic Entanglement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find that generic entanglement is physical, in the sense that it can be generated in polynomial time from two-qubit gates picked at random. We prove as the main result that such a process generates the average entanglement of the uniform (Haar) measure in at most $O(N^3)$ steps for $N$ qubits. This is despite an exponentially growing number of such gates being necessary for generating that measure fully on the state space. Numerics furthermore show a variation cut-off allowing one to associate a specific time with the achievement of the uniform measure entanglement distribution. Various extensions of this work are discussed. The results are relevant to entanglement theory and to protocols that assume generic entanglement can be achieved efficiently.

R. Oliveira; O. C. O. Dahlsten; M. B. Plenio

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

298

Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone. A radiation annealing model was developed based on the elimination of dislocation loops by vacancy absorption. Results showed that there were indeed, time-temperature annealing combinations that leave the radiation induced segregation profile largely unaltered while the dislocation microstructure is significantly reduced. Proton irradiation of 304 stainless steel irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons to 1.0 or 2.5 dpa resulted in grain boundary depletion of chromium and enrichment of nickel and a radiation damaged microstructure. Post irradiation annealing at temperatures of 500 ? 600C for times of up to 45 min. removed the dislocation microstructure to a greater degree with increasing temperatures, or times at temperature, while leaving the radiation induced segregation profile relatively unaltered. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments in 288C water containing 2 ppm O2 and with a conductivity of 0.2 mS/cm and at a strain rate of 3 x 10-7 s-1 showed that the IASCC susceptibility, as measured by the crack length per unit strain, decreased with very short anneals and was almost completely removed by an anneal at 500C for 45 min. This annealing treatment removed about 15% of the dislocation microstructure and the irradiation hardening, but did not affect the grain boundary chromium depletion or nickel segregation, nor did it affect the grain boundary content of other minor impurities. These results indicate that RIS is not the sole controlling feature of IASCC in irradiated stainless steels in normal water chemistry. The isolation of the irradiated microstructure was approached using low temperature irradiation or combinations of low and high temperature irradiations to achieve a stable, irradiated microstructure without RIS. Experiments were successful in achieving a high degree of irradiation hardening without any evidence of RIS of either major or minor elements. The low temperature irradiations to doses up to 0.3 dpa at T<75C were also very successful in producing hardening to levels considerably above that for irradiations conducted under nominal conditions of 1 dpa at 360C. However, the microstructure consisted of an extremely fine dispersion of defect clusters of sizes that are not resolvable by either transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The microstructure was not stable at the 288C IASCC test temperature and resulted in rapid reduction of hardening and presumably, annealing of the defect clusters at this temperature as well. Nevertheless, the annealing studies showed that treatments that resulted in significant decreases in the hardening produced small changes in the dislocation microstructure that were confined to the elimination of the finest of loops (~1 nm). These results substantiate the importance of the very fine defect microstructure in the IASCC process. The results of this program provide the first definitive evidence that RIS is not the sole controlling factor in the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stain

Gary S. Was; Michael Atzmon; Lumin Wang

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nuclear Reactor (atomic reactor)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor splits Uranium or Plutonium nuclei, and the...235 is fissionable but more than 99% of the naturally occurring Uranium is U238 that makes enrichment mandatory. In some reactors U238 and Thorium23...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of a standard for calculation and measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in water-moderated power reactors  

SciTech Connect

The contents of ANS 19.11, the standard for ``Calculation and Measurement of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity in Water-Moderated Power Reactors,`` are described. The standard addresses the calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) both at standby conditions and at power. In addition, it describes several methods for the measurement of the at-power MTC and assesses their relative advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it specifies a minimum set of documentation requirements for compliance with the standard.

Mosteller, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hall, R.A. [Virginia Power, Glen Allen, VA (United States). Innsbrook Technical Center; Apperson, C.E. Jr. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States); Lancaster, D.B. [TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., Vienna, VA (United States); Young, E.H. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States); Gavin, P.H. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); Robertson, S.T. [Framatome/COGEMA Fuels, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear tors. for of of These studies can examine safety systems or safety research programsnuclear power plants, and at risk. to reduce population The Light-water Reactor Safety Research Program

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development of a Safeguards Verification Method and Instrument to Detect Pin Diversion from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Spent Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

A technical safeguards challenge has remained for decades for the IAEA to identify possible diversion of nuclear fuel pins from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel assemblies. In fact, as modern nuclear power plants are pushed to higher power levels and longer fuel cycles, fuel failures (i.e., ''leakers'') as well as the corresponding fuel assembly repairs (i.e., ''reconstitutions'') are commonplace occurrences within the industry. Fuel vendors have performed hundreds of reconstitutions in the past two decades, thus, an evolved know-how and sophisticated tools exist to disassemble irradiated fuel assemblies and replace damaged pins with dummy stainless steel or other type rods. Various attempts have been made in the past two decades to develop a technology to identify a possible diversion of pin(s) and to determine whether some pins are missing or replaced with dummy or fresh fuel pins. However, to date, there are no safeguards instruments that can detect a possible pin diversion scenario to the requirements of the IAEA. The FORK detector system [1-2] can characterize spent fuel assemblies using operator declared data, but it is not sensitive enough to detect missing pins from spent fuel assemblies. Likewise, an emission computed tomography system [3] has been used to try to detect missing pins from a spent fuel assembly, which has shown some potential for identifying possible missing pins but this capability has not yet been fully demonstrated. The use of such a device in the future would not be envisaged, especially in an inexpensive, easy to handle setting for field applications. In this article, we describe a concept and ongoing research to help develop a new safeguards instrument for the detection of pin diversions in a PWR spent fuel assembly. The proposed instrument is based on one or more very thin radiation detectors that could be inserted within the guide tubes of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assembly. Ultimately, this work could lead to the development of a detector cluster and corresponding high-precision driving system to collect radiation signatures inside PWR spent fuel assemblies. The data obtained would provide the spatial distribution of the neutron and gamma flux fields within the spent fuel assembly, while the data analysis would be used to help identify missing or replaced pins. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to help validate this concept using a realistic 17 x 17 PWR spent fuel assembly [4-5]. The initial results of this study show that neutron profile in the guide tubes, when obtained in the presence of missing pins, can be identifiably different from the profiles obtained without missing pins, Our latest simulations have focused upon a specific type of fission chamber that could be tested for this application.

Ham, Y S; Maldonado, G I; Burdo, J; He, T

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Performance and Safety Analysis of a Generic Small Modular Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for spent fuel from a Westinghouse AP1000. The results showed that from a fuel material standpoint, the SMR and AP1000 had effectively the same PR value. Unable to analyze security systems and methods employed at specific nuclear power plant sites...

Kitcher, Evans Damenortey, 1987-

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Evaluation of cracking in feedwater piping adjacent to the steam generators in Nine Pressurized Water Reactor Plants  

SciTech Connect

Cracking in ASTM A106-B and A106-C feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to the steam generators in a number of pressurized water reactor plants. We received sections with cracks from nine of the plants with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Variations were observed in piping surface irregularities, corrosion-product, pit, and crack morphology, surface elmental and crystal structure analyses, and steel microstructures and mechanical properties. However, with but two exceptions, namely, arrest bands and major surface irregularities, we were unable to relate the extent of cracking to any of these factors. Tensile and fracture toughness (J/sub Ic/ and tearing modulus) properties were measured over a range of temperatures and strain rates. No unusual properties or microstructures were observed that could be related to the cracking problem. All crack surfaces contained thick oxide deposits and showed evidence of cyclic events in the form of arrest bands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fatigue striations on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces from one plant and possibly from three others. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a value of ..delta..sigma = 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses. Although surface irregularities and corrosion pits were sources for crack initiation and corrosion may have contributed to crack propagation, it is proposed that the overriding factor in the cracking problem is the presence of unforeseen cyclic loads.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.; Scott, R.G.

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

306

Descriptive Model of Generic WAMS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energys (DOE) Transmission Reliability Program is supporting the research, deployment, and demonstration of various wide area measurement system (WAMS) technologies to enhance the reliability of the Nations electrical power grid. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program to conduct a study of WAMS security. This report represents achievement of the milestone to develop a generic WAMS model description that will provide a basis for the security analysis planned in the next phase of this study.

Hauer, John F.; DeSteese, John G.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

GLAD: A Generic LAttice Debugger  

SciTech Connect

Today, numerous simulation and analysis codes exist for the design, commission, and operation of accelerator beam lines. There is a need to develop a common user interface and database link to run these codes interactively. This paper will describe a proposed system, GLAD (Generic LAttice Debugger), to fulfill this need. Specifically, GLAD can be used to find errors in beam lines during commissioning, control beam parameters during operation, and design beam line optics and error correction systems for the next generation of linear accelerators and storage rings.

Lee, M.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Estimation of the xenon concentration and delayed neutrons precursors densities in the pressurized-water nuclear reactors (PWR) with sliding mode observer considering xenon oscillations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the important operations in nuclear power plants is load-following in which the imbalance in axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation is considered to be a constraint for the load-following operation. On the other hands, precursors produce delayed neutrons which are important with respect to reactor period and control, but xenon concentration and precursors densities cannot be measured directly. In this paper, the non-linear sliding mode observer which has the robust characteristics facing the parameters uncertainties and disturbances is proposed based on the two point nuclear reactor model equations with three groups of the delayed neutrons to estimate the xenon concentration and delayed neutrons precursor densities of the pressurized-water nuclear reactor (PWR) using reactor power measurements. The stability analysis is provided by means of the Lyapunov approach, thus the system is guaranteed to be stable over a wide range. The employed method is easy to implement. This estimation is done taking into account the effects of reactivity feedback due to temperature and xenon concentration. Simulation results clearly show that the sliding mode observer follows the actual system variables accurately and is satisfactory in the presence of the parameter uncertainties and disturbances.

M.H. Esteki; G.R. Ansarifar; M. Arghand

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Appendix B  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This report consists of Volume 2, which consists of the GALL literature review tables for the NUMARC Industry Reports reviewed for the report.

Kasza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization  

SciTech Connect

A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Sixteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings: Volume 5, NUREG-1150, accident managment, recent advances in severe accident research, TMI-2, BWR Mark l shell failure  

SciTech Connect

This five-volume report contains 141 papers out of the 175 that were presented at the Sixteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 24--27, 1988. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included twenty different papers presented by researchers from Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This document, Volume 5, discusses NUREG-1150, Accident Management, Recent Advances in Severe Accident Research, BWR Mark I Shell Failure, and the Three Mile Island-2 Reactor.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

USING LIGA BASED MICROFABRICATION TO IMPROVE OVERALL HEAT TRANSFER EFFICIENCY OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR: I. Effects of Different Micro Pattern on Overall Heat Transfer.  

SciTech Connect

The Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs in Figure 1) were originally developed for naval propulsion purposes, and then adapted to land-based applications. It has three parts: the reactor coolant system, the steam generator and the condenser. The Steam generator (a yellow area in Figure 1) is a shell and tube heat exchanger with high-pressure primary water passing through the tube side and lower pressure secondary feed water as well as steam passing through the shell side. Therefore, a key issue in increasing the efficiency of heat exchanger is to improve the design of steam generator, which is directly translated into economic benefits. The past research works show that the presence of a pin-fin array in a channel enhances the heat transfer significantly. Hence, using microfabrication techniques, such as LIGA, micro-molding or electroplating, some special microstructures can be fabricated around the tubes in the heat exchanger to increase the heat-exchanging efficiency and reduce the overall size of the heat-exchanger for the given heat transfer rates. In this paper, micro-pin fins of different densities made of SU-8 photoresist are fabricated and studied to evaluate overall heat transfer efficiency. The results show that there is an optimized micro pin-fin configuration that has the best overall heat transfer effects.

Zhang, M.; Ibekwe, S.; Li, G.; Pang, S.S.; and Lian, K.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Production of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural from Glucose Using a Combination of Lewis and Brnsted Acid Catalysts in Water in a Biphasic Reactor with an Alkylphenol Solvent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural from Glucose Using a Combination of Lewis and Brnsted Acid Catalysts in Water in a Biphasic Reactor with an Alkylphenol Solvent ... We report the catalytic conversion of glucose in high yields (62%) to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a versatile platform chemical. ... The development of economically viable processes for the production of chemical intermediates from biomass-derived carbohydrates has become an important challenge for research in this area, such as the development of efficient processes for the production of the platform chemical 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). ...

Yomaira J. Pagn-Torres; Tianfu Wang; Jean Marcel R. Gallo; Brent H. Shanks; James A. Dumesic

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development and validation of a real-time SAFT-UT system for the inspection of light water reactor components. Semiannual report, April 1984-September 1984. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is working to design, fabricate, and evaluate a real-time flaw detection and characterization system based on the synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT). The system is for inservice inspection of light water reactor components. Included objectives of this program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are to develop procedures for system calibration and field operation, to validate the system through laboratory and field inspections, and to generate an engineering data base to support ASME Code acceptance of the technology. This process report covers the programmatic work from April 1984 through September 1984. 58 figs.

Doctor, S.R.; Busse, L.J.; Crawford, S.L.; Hall, T.E.; Gribble, R.P.; Baldwin, A.J.; Van Houten, L.P.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Development and validation of a real-time SAFT-UT system for the inspection of light water reactor components: Annual report, October 1984-September 1985  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is working to design, fabricate, and evaluate a real-time flaw detection and characterization system based on the synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT). The system is designed to perform inservice inspection of light-water reactor components. Included objectives of this program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are to develop procedures for system calibration and field operation, to validate the system through laboratory and field inspections, and to generate an engineering data base to support ASME Code acceptance of the technology. This progress report covers the programmatic work from October 1984 through September 1985.

Doctor, S.R.; Hall, T.E.; Reid, L.D.; Crawford, S.L.; Littlefield, R.J.; Gilbert, R.W.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Scale-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations: Volume 5, North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5  

SciTech Connect

ANSI/ANS 8.1 requires that calculational methods for away-from- reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experiment. This report summarizes part of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial PWRs. Codes and data in the SCALE-4 code system were used. This volume documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. The KENO V.a criticality calculations for the North Anna 1 Cycle 5 beginning-of-cycle model yielded a value for k{sub eff} of 1. 0040{+-}0.0005.

Bowman, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Suto, T. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

B Reactor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » B Reactor B Reactor B Reactor Completed in September 1944, the B Reactor was the world's first large-scale plutonium production reactor. As at Oak Ridge, the need for labor turned Hanford into an atomic boomtown, with the population reaching 50,000 by summer 1944. Similar to the X-10 Graphite Reactor at Oak Ridge in terms of loading and unloading fuel, the B Reactor was built on a much larger scale and used water rather than air as a coolant. Whereas the X-10 had an initial design output of 1,000 kilowatts, the B Reactor was designed to operate at 250,000 kilowatts. Consisting of a 28- by 36-foot, 1,200-ton graphite cylinder lying on its side, the reactor was penetrated through its

322

Graphite-moderated, gas-cooled, and water-moderated, water-cooled reactors as power units in nuclearelectric power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article reviews a number of papers submitted at the Second International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy bearing on water-cooled, water-moderated, graphite-moderated, and gas-coole...

Yu. I. Koryakin

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Generic physical protection logic trees  

SciTech Connect

Generic physical protection logic trees, designed for application to nuclear facilities and materials, are presented together with a method of qualitative evaluation of the trees for design and analysis of physical protection systems. One or more defense zones are defined where adversaries interact with the physical protection system. Logic trees that are needed to describe the possible scenarios within a defense zone are selected. Elements of a postulated or existing physical protection system are tagged to the primary events of the logic tree. The likelihood of adversary success in overcoming these elements is evaluated on a binary, yes/no basis. The effect of these evaluations is propagated through the logic of each tree to determine whether the adversary is likely to accomplish the end event of the tree. The physical protection system must be highly likely to overcome the adversary before he accomplishes his objective. The evaluation must be conducted for all significant states of the site. Deficiencies uncovered become inputs to redesign and further analysis, closing the loop on the design/analysis cycle.

Paulus, W.K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The siting of UK nuclear reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Choosing a suitable site for a nuclear power station requires the consideration and balancing of several factors. Some 'physical' site characteristics, such as the local climate and the potential for seismic activity, will be generic to all reactors designs, while others, such as the availability of cooling water, the area of land required and geological conditions capable of sustaining the weight of the reactor and other buildings will to an extent be dependent on the particular design of reactor chosen (or alternatively the reactor design chosen may to an extent be dependent on the characteristics of an available site). However, one particularly interesting tension is a human and demographic one. On the one hand it is beneficial to place nuclear stations close to centres of population, to reduce transmission losses and other costs (including to the local environment) of transporting electricity over large distances from generator to consumer. On the other it is advantageous to place nuclear stations some distance away from such population centres in order to minimise the potential human consequences of a major release of radioactive materials in the (extremely unlikely) event of a major nuclear accident, not only in terms of direct exposure but also concerning the management of emergency planning, notably evacuation.This paper considers the emergence of policies aimed at managing this tension in the UK. In the first phase of nuclear development (roughly speaking 19451965) there was a highly cautious attitude, with installations being placed in remote rural locations with very low population density. The second phase (19651985) saw a more relaxed approach, allowing the development of AGR nuclear power stations (which with concrete pressure vessels were regarded as significantly safer) closer to population centres (in 'semi-urban' locations, notably at Hartlepool and Heysham). In the third phase (19852005) there was very little new nuclear development, Sizewell B (the first and so far only PWR power reactor in the UK) being colocated with an early Magnox station on the rural Suffolk coast. Renewed interest in nuclear new build from 2005 onward led to a number of sites being identified for new reactors before 2025, all having previously hosted nuclear stations and including the semi-urban locations of the 1960s and 1970s. Finally, some speculative comments are made as to what a 'fifth phase' starting in 2025 might look like.

Malcolm Grimston; William J Nuttall; Geoff Vaughan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Techniques in Active and Generic Software Libraries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction of algorithms for one domain entirely in terms of formalisms from a second domain; the construction of generic algorithms for algorithmic differentiation, implemented as an active library in Spad, language of the Open Axiom computer algebra system...

Smith, Jacob N.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Generic specificity of Aeromonas extracellular antigens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in rabbits. Ouchterlony double diffusion analysis of each antigen in both the homo- logous and heterologous immune systems indicates suffi- cient antigenic relatedness between the species to allow generic identification with the possible exception fh mo... in rabbits. Ouchterlony double diffusion analysis of each antigen in both the homo- logous and heterologous immune systems indicates suffi- cient antigenic relatedness between the species to allow generic identification with the possible exception fh mo...

Brinkley, Allen Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Investigation of the use of nanofluids to enhance the In-Vessel Retention capabilities of Advanced Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanofluids at very low concentrations experimentally exhibit a substantial increase in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) compared to water. The use of a nanofluid in the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) severe accident management strategy, ...

Hannink, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Treatment of methyl t-butyl ether contaminated water using a dense medium plasma reactor, a mechanistic and kinetic investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a mechanistic and kinetic investigation Derek C. Johnson1 , Vasgen A. Shamamian2 , John H. Callahan2 , Ferencz S in the future remediation of water. Chemical and physical mechanisms, together with carbon balances, are used

Dandy, David

329

Invisible Genericity and 0# M.C. Stanley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invisible Genericity and 0# M.C. Stanley February 1995 Abstract. 0# can be invisibly class generic be invisibly generic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3. Two remarks of the predicates P and G in the conclusion of the theorem. It is in this sense that 0# can be "invisibly generic

Stanley, Maurice M.C. "Mack"

330

Development of a PIRT (phenomena identification and ranking table) for a postulated double-ended guillotine break in a production reactor  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has developed a generic methodology to quantify the uncertainty in best estimate computer codes used to license commercial light water reactors. This same methodology is equally applicable to other reactor designs with regards to providing a technical basis which supports the establishment and demonstration of compliance with safe operating margins. One of the cornerstones of the method is the identification and ranking of phenomena that are important to the postulated scenario. This paper references descriptions of the total methodology, describes the first three steps (i.e, through the identification and ranking of phenomena), and summarizes the results of the application of the methodology to a double-ended guillotine break loss of coolant accident in a production reactor. 6 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Hanson, R.G.; Wilson, G.E.; Ortiz, M.G. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Griggs, D.P. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Initiative Science-Based R&D to Extend Nuclear Plant Operation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Updates Dr. Pete Lyons Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy December 9, 2010 NEAC Meeting Leadership Changes Pete Miller retired Pete Lyons - Acting NE-1 Shane Johnson - Acting NE-2 Dennis Miotla - Acting COO Monica Regalbuto - Acting DAS for Fuel Cycle Technologies John Herczeg- Acting ADAS for Fuel Cycle Technologies John Kelly - DAS for Nuclear Reactor Technologies Bob Boudreau- Acting ADAS International Nuclear Energy Coop Monica Regalbuto John Kelly NE University Programs (NEUP) - Overview and FY 2011 Schedule NEUP FY 2011 Solicitations Schedule RPA/FOA Pre- Applications Proposals Due Awards Announced R&D (PS and Blue Sky) Oct. '10 Dec. '10 Feb. '11 May '11 Integrated Research Projects (IRP) Dec. '10 Late Jan '11

332

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Initiative Science-Based R&D to Extend Nuclear Plant Operation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 9, 2010 New Program Proposal for Fiscal Year 2011 - Modified Open Cycle Carter "Buzz" Savage Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting April 29, 2010 Washington, DC April 29, 2010 Recycle of Used Fuel Option to recycle used fuel has been the subject of much debate and discussion. Nonproliferation issues and economics have limited recycle options. Recycle of used fuel enables increased utilization of uranium resource and potential waste management benefits. - Once through fuel cycle uses less than 1% of energy value of the uranium. Courtesy AREVA 2 April 29, 2010 Summary of Fuel Cycle Options 3 Once-Through Fuel Cycle - One pass through reactor, used fuel directly disposed in a geologic repository. Modified Open Cycle - No or limited separations steps and

333

University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates  

SciTech Connect

As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

Sebastien Teysseyre

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

337

Generic clients supported by Web Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generic clients supported by Web Services Xuesong Liu Kongens Lyngby 10th April 2007 #12;Technical With an established Web Services Framework to expose the functionalities of Maconomy ERP system as Web Services (WS is to investigate two specific WS pro- tocols for SOA - "Microsoft Information Bridge Framework (IBF)" and "Web

338

Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Legacy > Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

339

Achievements: Nuclear Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne National Laboratory Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

340

DOE plutonium disposition study: Analysis of existing ABB-CE Light Water Reactors for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Core reactivity and basic fuel management calculations were conducted on the selected reactors (with emphasis on the System 80 units as being the most desirable choice). Methods used were identical to those reported in the Evolutionary Reactor Report. From these calculations, the basic mission capability was assessed. The selected reactors were studied for modification, such as the addition of control rod nozzles to increase rod worth, and internals and control system modifications that might also be needed. Other system modifications studied included the use of enriched boric acid as soluble poison, and examination of the fuel pool capacities. The basic geometry and mechanical characteristics, materials and fabrication techniques of the fuel assemblies for the selected existing reactors are the same as for System 80+. There will be some differences in plutonium loading, according to the ability of the reactors to load MOX fuel. These differences are not expected to affect licensability or EPA requirements. Therefore, the fuel technology and fuel qualification sections provided in the Evolutionary Reactor Report apply to the existing reactors. An additional factor, in that the existing reactor availability presupposes the use of that reactor for the irradiation of Lead Test Assemblies, is discussed. The reactor operating and facility licenses for the operating plants were reviewed. Licensing strategies for each selected reactor were identified. The spent fuel pool for the selected reactors (Palo Verde) was reviewed for capacity and upgrade requirements. Reactor waste streams were identified and assessed in comparison to uranium fuel operations. Cost assessments and schedules for converting to plutonium disposition were estimated for some of the major modification items. Economic factors (incremental costs associated with using weapons plutonium) were listed and where possible under the scope of work, estimates were made.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Comet whole-core solution to a stylized 3-dimensional pressurized water reactor benchmark problem with UO{sub 2}and MOX fuel  

SciTech Connect

A stylized pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem with UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel was used to test the accuracy and efficiency of the coarse mesh radiation transport (COMET) code. The benchmark problem contains 125 fuel assemblies and 44,000 fuel pins. The COMET code was used to compute the core eigenvalue and assembly and pin power distributions for three core configurations. In these calculations, a set of tensor products of orthogonal polynomials were used to expand the neutron angular phase space distribution on the interfaces between coarse meshes. The COMET calculations were compared with the Monte Carlo code MCNP reference solutions using a recently published an 8-group material cross section library. The comparison showed both the core eigenvalues and assembly and pin power distributions predicated by COMET agree very well with the MCNP reference solution if the orders of the angular flux expansion in the two spatial variables and the polar and azimuth angles on the mesh boundaries are 4, 4, 2 and 2. The mean and maximum differences in the pin fission density distribution ranged from 0.28%-0.44% and 3.0%-5.5%, all within 3-sigma uncertainty of the MCNP solution. These comparisons indicate that COMET can achieve accuracy comparable to Monte Carlo. It was also found that COMET's computational speed is 450 times faster than MCNP. (authors)

Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation  

SciTech Connect

In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

Souza Dos Santos, R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear CNEN/IEN, Cidade Universitaria, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75 - Ilha do Fundiao, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores / CNPq (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a standard, UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

NUCLEAR REACTORS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nuclear reactors are devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain (more)

Belachew, Dessalegn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water ... A packed bed of carbon within the reactor catalyzed the gasification of these organic vapors in the water; consequently, the water effluent of the reactor was clean. ... A method for removing plugs from the reactor was developed and employed during an 8-h gasification run involving potato wastes. ...

Michael Jerry Antal, Jr.; Stephen Glen Allen; Deborah Schulman; Xiaodong Xu; Robert J. Divilio

2000-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

PROGRESS ON GENERIC PHASE-FIELD METHOD DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we summarize our current collobarative efforts, involving three national laboratories: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Los Alamos National Laboatory (LANL), to develop a computational framework for homogenous and heterogenous nucleation mechanisms into the generic phase-field model. During the studies, the Fe-Cr system was chosen as a model system due to its simplicity and availability of reliable thermodynamic and kinetic data, as well as the range of applications of low-chromium ferritic steels in nuclear reactors. For homogenous nucleation, the relavant parameters determined from atomistic studies were used directly to determine the energy functional and parameters in the phase-field model. Interfacial energy, critical nucleus size, nucleation rate, and coarsening kinetics were systematically examined in two- and three- dimensional models. For the heteregoneous nucleation mechanism, we studied the nucleation and growth behavior of chromium precipitates due to the presence of dislocations. The results demonstrate that both nucleation schemes can be introduced to a phase-field modeling algorithm with the desired accuracy and computational efficiency.

Biner, Bullent; Tonks, Michael; Millett, Paul C.; Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Martinez, E.; Anderson, D.

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) - Reactors designed/built by Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integral Fast Reactor Integral Fast Reactor About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

348

Transient thermal analysis of a space reactor power system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric Power Conversion Module Heat Pipe Radiator Module . Auxiliary Modules . Flow of Calculation . Transient Test Cases Studied Summary . 10 10 CHAPTER II. ENERGY EQUATION FINITE DIFFERENCING . . 12 Energy Equation for a Solid Finite..., but this stud~ uses a generic liquid metal cooled fast reactor concept as the model to test the code. The space power svstem to be modeled consists of a liquid lithium cooled fast reactor, primarv and secondary loops svith a sell-induced thermoelectric...

Gaeta, Michael J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Early Exploration - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Exploration Early Exploration About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

350

Generic turbine design study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Task 12, Generic Turbine Design Study was to develop a conceptual design of a combustion turbine system that would perform in a pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) application. A single inlet/outlet casing design that modifies the W251B12 combustion turbine to provide compressed air to the PFBC and accept clean hot air from the PFBC was developed. Performance calculations show that the net power output expected, at an inlet temperature of 59{degrees}F, is 20,250 kW.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki [Nuclear Professional School / Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokaimura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan); Mori, Hideo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University (Japan); Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); GOTO, Shoji [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Aluminum hydroxide and hydrogen produced by water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic and kinetic peculiarities of the water electrolysis in a reactor with aluminum electrodes are...

R. R. Salem

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The small volume required for such analysis is beneficial for correlating with the small-scale mechanical testing currently being investigated. Further studies on the...

356

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative mar- gins of fracture toughness for the RPV materials, both during normal operation and under accident...

357

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and nuclear waste disposal. Dr. Corradini has extensive research experience in the phenomenology of beyond design basis Meet the New LWRS Program Pathway Lead accidents in light...

358

naval reactors  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

After operating for 34 years and training over 14,000 sailors, the Department of Energy S1C Prototype Reactor Site in Windsor, Connecticut, was returned to "green field"...

359

High-Cost Generic Drugs Implications for Patients and Policymakers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that new brand-name drugs are often expensive, but U.S. health care is also witnessing a lesser-known but growing and seemingly paradoxical phenomenon: certain older drugs, many of which are generic and not protected by patents or market exclusivity, are now also extremely expensive... Some older generic drugs have become very expensive, owing to factors including drug shortages, supply disruptions, and consolidations in the generic-drug industry. But generics manufacturers that legally obtain a market monopoly can also unilaterally raise prices.

Alpern J.D.Stauffer W.M.Kesselheim A.S.

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

Generic copy of DOEs IDIQ ESPC contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Generic copy of the U.S. Department of Energys Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs) contract.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 of 8 Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Attendees: Representatives from Department...

362

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Generic Natural Systems Evaluation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Generic Natural Systems Evaluation - Thermodynamic Database Development and Data Management Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log...

363

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Description of the Canadian Particulate-Fill WastePackage (WP) System for Spent-Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and its Applicability to Ligh-Water Reactor SNF WPS with Depleted Uranium-Dioxide Fill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3502 3502 Chemical Technology Division DESCRIPTION OF THE CANADIAN PARTICULATE-FILL WASTE-PACKAGE (WP) SYSTEM FOR SPENT-NUCLEAR FUEL(SNF) AND ITS APPLICABILITY TO LIGHT- WATER REACTOR SNF WPS WITH DEPLETED URANIUM-DIOXIDE FILL Charles W. Forsberg Oak Ridge National Laboratory * P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 Tel: (423) 574-6783 Fax: (423) 574-9512 Email: forsbergcw@ornl.gov October 20, 1997 _________________________ Managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 for the * U.S. Department of Energy. iii CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

365

Development and validation of a real-time SAFT-UT (synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing) system for the inspection of light water reactor components: Annual report, October 1985-September 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is working to design, fabricate, and evaluate a real-time flaw detection and characterization system based on the synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT). The system is designed to perform inservice inspection of light-water reactor components. Included objectives of this program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are to develop procedures for system calibration and field operation, to validate the system through laboratory and field inspections, and to generate an engineering data base to support ASME Code acceptance of the technology. This progress report covers the programmatic work from October 1985 through September 1986. 45 figs., 8 tabs.

Doctor, S.R.; Hall, T.E.; Reid, L.D.; Mart, G.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Generic measures for geodesic flows on nonpositively curved manifolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generic measures for geodesic flows on nonpositively curved manifolds Yves Coud`ene, Barbara the generic invariant probability measures for the geodesic flow on connected complete nonpositively curved subset of the set of all probability measures invariant by the geodesic flow. The proof of K. Sigmund

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

367

A technique for generic iteration and its optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Software libraries rely increasingly on iterators to provide generic traversal of data structures. These iterators can be represented either as objects that maintain state or as programs that suspend and resume control. This paper addresses two problems ... Keywords: generic program, iterators

Stephen M. Watt

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Generic planning and control of automated material handling systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the problem to design a generic planning and control architecture for automated material handling systems (AMHSs). We illustrate the relevance of this research direction, and then address three different market sectors where AMHSs ... Keywords: Automated material handling systems, Generic control architecture, Real-time scheduling

S. W. A. Haneyah; J. M. J. Schutten; P. C. Schuur; W. H. M. Zijm

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Observations of the boiling process from a downward-facing torispherical surface: Confirmatory testing of the heavy water new production reactor flooded cavity design  

SciTech Connect

Reactor-scale ex-vessel boiling experiments were performed in the CYBL facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The boiling flow pattern outside the RPV bottom head shows a center pulsating region and an outer steady two-phase boundary layer region. The local heat transfer data can be correlated in terms of a modified Rohsenow correlation.

Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Simpson, R.B.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report The UFD Campaign is developing generic disposal system models (GDSM) of different disposal environments and waste form options. Currently, the GDSM team is investigating four main disposal environment options: mined repositories in three geologic media (salt, clay, and granite) and the deep borehole concept in crystalline rock (DOE 2010d). Further developed the individual generic disposal system (GDS) models for salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal environments. GenericDisposalSystModelFY11.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

371

Descriptive Model of a Generic WAMS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Descriptive Model of a Generic WAMS Descriptive Model of a Generic WAMS Descriptive Model of a Generic WAMS The Department of Energy's (DOE) Transmission Reliability Program is supporting the research, deployment, and demonstration of various wide area measurement system (WAMS) technologies to enhance the reliability of the Nation's electrical power grid. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program to conduct a study of WAMS security. This report represents achievement of the milestone to develop a generic WAMS model description that will provide a basis for the security analysis planned in the next phase of this study. Descriptive Model of a Generic WAMS More Documents & Publications Securing Wide Area Measurement Systems 2012 Advanced Applications Research & Development Peer Review - Day 1

372

Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste disposal in a deep subsurface repository hosted in clay/shale/argillite is a subject of widespread interest given the desirable isolation properties, geochemically reduced conditions, and widespread geologic occurrence of this rock type (Hansen 2010; Bianchi et al. 2013). Bianchi et al. (2013) provides a description of diffusion in a clay-hosted repository based on single-phase flow and full saturation using parametric data from documented studies in Europe (e.g., ANDRA 2005). The predominance of diffusive transport and sorption phenomena in this clay media are key attributes to impede radionuclide mobility making clay rock formations target sites for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The reports by Hansen et al. (2010) and those from numerous studies in clay-hosted underground research laboratories (URLs) in Belgium, France and Switzerland outline the extensive scientific knowledge obtained to assess long-term clay/shale/argillite repository isolation performance of nuclear waste. In the past several years under the UFDC, various kinds of models have been developed for argillite repository to demonstrate the model capability, understand the spatial and temporal alteration of the repository, and evaluate different scenarios. These models include the coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) models (e.g. Liu et al. 2013; Rutqvist et al. 2014a, Zheng et al. 2014a) that focus on THMC processes in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) bentonite and argillite host hock, the large scale hydrogeologic model (Bianchi et al. 2014) that investigates the hydraulic connection between an emplacement drift and surrounding hydrogeological units, and Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF) models (Greenberg et al. 2013) that evaluate thermal evolution in the host rock approximated as a thermal conduction process to facilitate the analysis of design options. However, the assumptions and the properties (parameters) used in these models are different, which not only make inter-model comparisons difficult, but also compromise the applicability of the lessons learned from one model to another model. The establishment of a reference case would therefore be helpful to set up a baseline for model development. A generic salt repository reference case was developed in Freeze et al. (2013) and the generic argillite repository reference case is presented in this report. The definition of a reference case requires the characterization of the waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, EBS backfill, host rock, and biosphere. This report mainly documents the processes in EBS bentonite and host rock that are potentially important for performance assessment and properties that are needed to describe these processes, with brief description other components such as waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, aquifer, and biosphere. A thorough description of the generic argillite repository reference case will be given in Jov Colon et al. (2014).

Zheng, Liange; Jov& #233; Colon, Carlos; Bianchi, Marco; Birkholzer, Jens

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

373

The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors: A preliminary assessment of experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6 and KORA  

SciTech Connect

The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors has been measured in different laboratories under both irradiation and post irradiation conditions. The data from experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6, and in the KORA facility are compared to assess their consistency and complimentarily. The experiments are consistent under comparable experimental conditions and reveal two general mechanisms involving exposed fuel kernels embedded in carbonaceous materials. One is manifest as a strong dependence of fission gas release on the partial pressure of water vapor below 1 kPa and the other, as a weak dependence above 1 kPa.

Myers, B.F.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research legacy - Argonne's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research legacy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

375

Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide nuclear industry -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide nuclear industry About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

376

Safe new reactor for radionuclide production  

SciTech Connect

In late 1995, DOE is schedule to announce a new tritium production unit. Near the end of the last NPR (New Production Reactors) program, work was directed towards eliminating risks in current designs and reducing effects of accidents. In the Heavy Water Reactor Program at Savannah River, the coolant was changed from heavy to light water. An alternative, passively safe concept uses a heavy-water-filled, zircaloy reactor calandria near the bottom of a swimming pool; the calandria is supported on a light-water-coolant inlet plenum and has upflow through assemblies in the calandria tubes. The reactor concept eliminates or reduces significantly most design basis and severe accidents that plague other deigns. The proven, current SRS tritium cycle remains intact; production within the US of medical isotopes such as Mo-99 would also be possible.

Gray, P.L.

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Handling Genericity in Chemical Structures Using the Markush Darc Software  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since an exact search against the entire database would be computationally inconsistent with an online service, screening steps are necessary for reducing the number of candidates to be searched during the atom-by-atom step. ... Markush Darc expresses generic terms as Superatoms, entered by two or three characters code, either in databases or in queries structures. ... fragments from generic structures for full structure and substructure searching is described; these include fragments from components described either in specific or in generic terms, and those which overlap them. ...

Pierre Benichou; Christine Klimczak; Philippe Borne

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, Emil L. (San Jose, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reactor siting risk comparisons related to recommendations of NUREG-0625  

SciTech Connect

This document evaluates how implementing the remote siting recommendations for nuclear reactors (NUREG-0625) made by the Siting Policy Task Force of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) can reduce potential public risk. The document analyzes how population density affects site-specific risk for both light water reactors (LWRs) and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs).

Barsell, A.W.; Dombek, F.S.; Orvis, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

3116 WASTE DETERMINATIONS PUBLIC MEETINGS AND GENERIC TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3116 WASTE DETERMINATIONS PUBLIC MEETINGS AND GENERIC TECHNICAL 3116 WASTE DETERMINATIONS PUBLIC MEETINGS AND GENERIC TECHNICAL ISSUES SUMMARIES 3116 WASTE DETERMINATIONS PUBLIC MEETINGS AND GENERIC TECHNICAL ISSUES SUMMARIES Below are public meeting summaries and general technical issue summaries relating to 3116 waste determinations. The 3116 Public Meeting Summaries cover public meetings that the Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically host to provide the status of activities associated with waste determinations under Section 3116 (a) of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005. 3116 Public Meeting Summaries - July 2007 3116 Public Meeting Summaries - November 2006 The Generic Technical Issues Summaries cover the informal technical discussions between representatives of the Department of Energy (DOE),

382

Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization The assessment of generic Engineered Barrier System (EBS) concepts and design optimization to harbor various disposal configurations and waste types needs advanced approaches and methods to analyze barrier performance. The report addresses: 1) Overview of the importance of Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes to barrier performance, and international collaborations; 2) THMC processes in clay barriers; 3) experimental studies of clay stability and clay-metal interactions at high temperatures and pressures; 4) thermodynamic modeling and database development; 5) Molecular Dynamics (MD) study of clay

383

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models This report summarizes research activities on engineered barrier system (EBS) model integration with the generic disposal system model (GDSM), and used fuel degradation and radionuclide mobilization (RM) in support of the EBS evaluation and tool development within the Used Fuel Disposition campaign. This report addresses: predictive model capability for used nuclear fuel degradation based on electrochemical and thermodynamic principles, radiolysis model to evaluate the U(VI)-H2O-CO2 system, steps towards the evaluation of uranium alteration products, discussion of instant release fraction (IRF) of radionuclides from the nuclear fuel, and

384

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models This report summarizes research activities on engineered barrier system (EBS) model integration with the generic disposal system model (GDSM), and used fuel degradation and radionuclide mobilization (RM) in support of the EBS evaluation and tool development within the Used Fuel Disposition campaign. This report addresses: predictive model capability for used nuclear fuel degradation based on electrochemical and thermodynamic principles, radiolysis model to evaluate the U(VI)-H2O-CO2 system, steps towards the evaluation of uranium alteration products, discussion of instant release fraction (IRF) of radionuclides from the nuclear fuel, and

385

THE CHARACTERISTIC VARIETY OF A GENERIC FOLIATION JORGE VITORIO PEREIRA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CHARACTERISTIC VARIETY OF A GENERIC FOLIATION JORGE VIT´ORIO PEREIRA Abstract. We confirm. characteristic foliation, invariant variety, D-modules. 1 #12;2 JORGE VIT ´ORIO PEREIRA F is non

Pereira, Jorge Vitório

386

A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles for Potential Energy Applications vari- ous nanoparticles onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Charged and nonagglomerated aerosol unique hybrid nanostructures at- tractive for various energy applications. DOI: 10

Chen, Junhong

387

Generic implementations of parallel prefix sums and its applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel prefix sums algorithms are one of the simplest and most useful building blocks for constructing parallel algorithms. A generic implementation is valuable because of the wide range of applications for this method. This thesis presents a...

Huang, Tao

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Generic Sorting in RESOLVE Yu-Shan Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Generic Sorting in RESOLVE Yu-Shan Sun Dept. of Mathematics and Computer Science Denison University Granville OH, 43023, USA Email: sun s@denison.edu Joan Krone Dept. of Mathematics and Computer

389

Generic Models and Their Support in Modeling Problem Solving Behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generic models have received widespread attention in knowledge based systems research (KBS) as an important aid in the process of modeling problem solving behavior. However, little empirical evidence has bee...

Philip Rademakers; Johan Vanwelkenhuysen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort that works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operation of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging

391

Analysis of a 4-inch small-break loss-of-coolant accident in a Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor using TRAC-PF1/MOD1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the transient response of a Westinghouse 4- loop PWR using 17x17 fuel assemblies in a 14-ft. long reactor core to a 4-inch diameter SBLOCA with the computer code TRAC-PF1/MOD1, This is unique in that there are only two Westinghouse PWRs with 14-ft. cores (The... 4-inch SBLOCAs 65 XI. Comparison of RESAR-3S, TRAC and RELAP SBLOCAs . . 70 LIST OF ACRONYMS Acronym Name CCFL CVCS ECCS EPRI FSAR HPI INEL LB LOCA LOCA LPI MSIV NRC PCT PORV PWR RCP RCS RESAR RHR SI SBLOCA Argonne National...

Knippel, Kimberley I.R.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Review and evaluation of the RELAP5YA computer code and the Vermont Yankee LOCA (Loss-of-Coolant Accident) licensing analysis model for use in small and large break BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) LOCAS  

SciTech Connect

A review has been completed of the RELAP5YA computer code to determine its acceptability for performing licensing analyses. The review was limited to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) reactor applications. In addition, a Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) licensing analysis method, using the RELAP5YA computer code, has been reviewed. This method is applicable to the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station to perform full break spectra LOCA and fuel cycle independent analyses. The review of the RELAP5YA code consisted of an evaluation of all Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) incorporated modifications to the RELAP5/MOD1 Cycle 18 computer code from which the licensing version of the code originated. Qualifying separate and integral effects assessment calculations were reviewed to evaluate the validity and proper implementation of the various added models. The LOCA licensing method was assessed by reviewing two RELAP5YA system input models and evaluating several small and large break qualifying transient calculations. A review of the RELAP5YA code modifications and their assessments, as well as the submitted LOCA licensing method, is given and the results of the review are provided.

Jones, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR is an interdisciplinary center for developing an innovative, next-generation nuclear reactor analysis tool that both utilizes and guides the development of exascale computing platforms. Existing reactor analysis codes are highly tuned and calibrated for commercial light-water reactors, but they lack the physics fidelity to seamlessly carry over to new classes of reactors with significantly different design characteristics-as, for example, innovative concepts such as TerraPower's Traveling Wave reactor and Small Modular Reactor concepts. Without vastly improved modeling capabilities, the economic and safety characteristics of these and other novel systems will require tremendous

394

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photocatalytic reactor is described for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane. 4 figs.

Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Idaho National Laboratory Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor Rods and Pellets Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Rods and Pellets waste stream (INEL103597TR2, Revision 2) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream consists of 24 containers with unirradiated fabricated rods and pellets composed of uranium oxide (UO2) and thorium oxide (ThO2) fuel in zirconium cladding. The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream requires an SA because the 229Th, 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U activity concentrations exceed the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

Shott, Gregory [NSTec

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fourteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session, Severe accident sequence analysis, Risk analysis/PRA applications, Reference plant risk analysis - NUREG-1150, Innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors  

SciTech Connect

This six-volume report contains 156 papers out of the 175 that were presented at the Fourteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 27-31, 1986. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included thirty-four different papers presented by researchers from Canada, Czechoslovakia, Finland, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A comprehensive approach to selecting the water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuit in the projects of nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1200 reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents the results obtained from studies on selecting the water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuit carried out for the project of a nuclear power station equipped with a new-generation VVER-12...

V. F. Tyapkov

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Routine and post-accident sampling in nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Review of the Three Mile Island accident by NRC has resulted in new post-accident-sampling-capability requirements for utilities that operate pressurized water reactors and/or boiling water reactors. Several vendors are offering equipment that they hope will suffice to met both the new NRC regulations and an operational deadline of January 1, 1981. The advantages and disadvantages of these systems and projected future-new-system needs for TVA reactors are being evaluated in light of TMI experience.

Armento, W.J.; Kitts, F.G.; German, G.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water reactor generic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A generic material flow control model applied in two industrial sectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of generic planning and control of automated material handling systems (AMHSs). We build upon previous work to provide a proof of concept for generic control of AMHSs in different domains. We present a generic control ... Keywords: Automated material handling systems (AMHSs), Baggage Handling, Distribution, Generic control architecture, Real-time scheduling

S. W. A. Haneyah; P. C. Schuur; J. M. J. Schutten; W. H. M. Zijm

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

GEN-IV Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generation-IV reactors are a set of nuclear reactors currently being developed under international collaborations targeting ... economics, proliferation resistance, and physical protection of nuclear energy. Nuclear

Taek K. Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Netherlands Reactor Centre  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Two illustrated brochures in English have recently J. been issued by the Netherlands Reactor Centre ( ... Centre (Reactor Centrum Nederland). The first* gives a general survey of the ...

S. WEINTROUB

1964-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

SciTech Connect

There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

Stuart Nemser, PhD

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

T-SA-00582-2004.R1 A Generic Audio Classification and Segmentation Approach for Multimedia Indexing and Retrieval 1 A Generic Audio Classification and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T-SA-00582-2004.R1 A Generic Audio Classification and Segmentation Approach for Multimedia Indexing and Retrieval 1 A Generic Audio Classification and Segmentation Approach for Multimedia Indexing and Retrieval of generic and automatic audio classification and segmentation for audio-based multimedia indexing

Gabbouj, Moncef

406

Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix The key piece of knowledge necessary for building defenses capable of withstanding or surviving cyber and kinetic attacks is an understanding of the capabilities posed by threats to a government, function, or system. With the number of threats continuing to increase, it is no longer feasible to enumerate the capabilities of all known threats and then build defenses based on those threats that are considered, at the time, to be the most relevant. Exacerbating the problem for critical infrastructure entities is the fact that the majority of detailed threat information for higher-level threats is held in classified status and is not available for general

407

Why Nuclear Energy? - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy: Nuclear Energy: Why Nuclear Energy? About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

408

Reactor Core Assembly - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Facilities › HFIR › Reactor Core Assembly Home › Facilities › HFIR › Reactor Core Assembly Reactor Core Assembly The reactor core assembly is contained in an 8-ft (2.44-m)-diameter pressure vessel located in a pool of water. The top of the pressure vessel is 17 ft (5.18 m) below the pool surface, and the reactor horizontal mid-plane is 27.5 ft (8.38 m) below the pool surface. The control plate drive mechanisms are located in a subpile room beneath the pressure vessel. These features provide the necessary shielding for working above the reactor core and greatly facilitate access to the pressure vessel, core, and reflector regions. In-core irradiation and experiment locations (cross section at horizontal midplane) Reactor core assembly Reactor core assembly: (1) in-core irradiation and experiment locations,

409

Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

411

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

Manhattan Project: F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX Hanford Engineer Works, 1945 Resources > Photo Gallery Plutonium production area, Hanford, ca. 1945 The F Reactor plutonium production complex at Hanford. The "boxy" building between the two water towers on the right is the plutonium production reactor; the long building in the center of the photograph is the water treatment plant. The photograph was reproduced from Henry DeWolf Smyth, Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb under the Auspices of the United States Government, 1940-1945 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1945). The Smyth Report was commissioned by Leslie Groves and originally issued by the Manhattan Engineer District. Princeton University Press reprinted it in book form as a "public service" with "reproduction in whole or in part authorized and permitted."

413

Corrosion Minimization for Research Reactor Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Existing university research reactors are being converted to use low-enriched uranium fue to eliminate the use of highly-enriched uranium. These conversions require increases in fuel loading that will result in the use of elements with more fuel plates, resulting in a net decrease in the water annulus between fuel plates. The proposed decrease in the water annulus raises questions about the requirements and stability of the surface hydroxide on the aluminum fuel cladding and the potential for runaway corrosion resulting in fuel over-temperature incidents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as regulator for these university reactors, must ensure that proposed fuel modifications will not result in any increased risk or hazard to the reactor operators or the public. This document reviews the characteristics and behavior of aluminum hydroxides, analyzes the drivers for fuel plate corrosion, reviews relevant historical incidents, and provides recommendations on fuel design, surface treatment, and reactor operational practices to avoid corrosion issues.

Eric Shaber; Gerard Hofman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11).  

SciTech Connect

Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R&D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of the disposal system. Clay/shale, salt, and crystalline rock media are selected as the basis for reference mined geologic disposal concepts in this study, consistent with advanced international repository programs, and previous investigations in the U.S. The U.S. pursued deep geologic disposal programs in crystalline rock, shale, salt, and volcanic rock in the years leading up to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, or NWPA (Rechard et al. 2011). The 1987 NWPA amendment act focused the U.S. program on unsaturated, volcanic rock at the Yucca Mountain site, culminating in the 2008 license application. Additional work on unsaturated, crystalline rock settings (e.g., volcanic tuff) is not required to support this generic study. Reference disposal concepts are selected for the media listed above and for deep borehole disposal, drawing from recent work in the U.S. and internationally. The main features of the repository concepts are discussed in Section 4.5 and summarized in Table ES-1. Temperature histories at the waste package surface and a specified distance into the host rock are calculated for combinations of waste types and reference disposal concepts, specifying waste package emplacement modes. Target maximum waste package surface temperatures are identified, enabling a sensitivity study to inform the tradeoff between the quantity of waste per disposal package, and decay storage duration, with respect to peak temperature at the waste package surface. For surface storage duration on the order of 100 years or less, waste package sizes for direct disposal of SNF are effectively limited to 4-PWR configurations (or equivalent size and output). Thermal results are summarized, along with recommendations for follow-on work including adding additional reference concepts, verification and uncertainty analysis for thermal calculations, developing descriptions of surface facilities and other system details, and cost estimation to support system-level evaluations.

Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Dupont, Mark (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Blink, James A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Fratoni, Massimiliano (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Greenberg, Harris (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Carter, Joe (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

416

Use of phenomena identification and ranking (PIRT) process in research related to design certification of the AP600 advanced passive light water reactor (LWR)  

SciTech Connect

The AP600 LWR is a new advanced passive design that has been submitted to the USNRC for design certification. Within the certification process the USNRC will perform selected system thermal hydraulic response audit studies to help confirm parts of the vendor`s safety analysis submittal. Because of certain innovative design features of the safety systems, new experimental data and related advances in the system thermal hydraulic analysis computer code are being developed by the USNRC. The PIRT process is being used to focus the experimental and analytical work to obtain a sufficient and cost effective research effort. The objective of this paper is to describe the application and most significant results of the PIRT process, including several innovative features needed in the application to accommodate the short design certification schedule. The short design certification schedule has required that many aspects of the USNRC experimental and analytical research be performed in parallel, rather than in series as was normal for currently operating LWRS. This has required development and use of management techniques that focus and integrate the various diverse parts of the research. The original PIRTs were based on inexact knowledge of an evolving reactor design, and concentrated on the new passive features of the design. Subsequently, the PIRTs have evolved in two more stages as the design became more firm and experimental and analytical data became available. A fourth and final stage is planned and in progress to complete the PIRT development. The PIRTs existing at the end of each development stage have been used to guide the experimental program, scaling analyses and code development supporting the audit studies.

Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Eltawila, F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

Binford, F.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Proceedings CHI'95, Denver, May 1995 A Generic Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, multimodal interaction requires [3]: · the fusion of different types of data originating from distinct is concerned with the fusion of information produced through distinct interaction techniques. In this article, we present a generic fusion engine that can be embedded in a multi-agent architecture modelling

Nigay, Laurence

419

Proceedings CHI'95, Denver, May 1995 A Generic Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In particular, multimodal interaction requires [3]: . the fusion of different types of data originating from is concerned with the fusion of information produced through distinct interaction techniques. In this article, we present a generic fusion engine that can be embedded in a multi­agent architecture modelling

Nigay, Laurence

420

Towards a Generic Architecture for Autonomous Landing Systems1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

architecture, autonomous unmanned vehicle, small body (comet/asteroid) landing, real-time control 1 interest in small planetary body (comet/asteroid) landing, not least because of the special challengesTowards a Generic Architecture for Autonomous Landing Systems1 James Goodwin, Alan Winfield, Quan

Winfield, Alan FT

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421

Generic Multiversion STM Li Lu and Michael L. Scott  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generic Multiversion STM Li Lu and Michael L. Scott Computer Science Department, University of Rochester Rochester, NY 14627-0226 USA {llu,scott}@cs.rochester.edu Abstract. Multiversion software by the National Science Foundation under grants CCR- 0963759, CCF-1116055, and CNS-1116109. Y. Afek (Ed.): DISC

Scott, Michael L.

422

Nonlinear Adaptive Dynamic Inversion Applied to a Generic Hypersonic Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear Adaptive Dynamic Inversion Applied to a Generic Hypersonic Vehicle Elizabeth Rollins Conclusions Extensions 3 / 50 #12;Motivation Control of Hypersonic Vehicles · Wide range of flight conditions in hypersonic flight · Three main causes of inlet unstarts: 1 A flow to the inlet that is slower than

Valasek, John

423

Nonlinear Adaptive Dynamic Inversion Applied to a Generic Hypersonic Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear Adaptive Dynamic Inversion Applied to a Generic Hypersonic Vehicle Elizabeth Rollins of hypersonic vehicles is challenging because of the wide range of oper- ating conditions encountered and certain aspects unique to high speed flight. A particular safety concern in hypersonic flight is the risk

Valasek, John

424

Type-Based Analysis of Generic Key Management APIs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Type-Based Analysis of Generic Key Management APIs Pedro Ad~ao1,2 , Riccardo Focardi3, Universit`a Ca' Foscari, Venezia, Italy Abstract In the past few years, cryptographic key management APIs. In fact, real APIs provide mechanisms to declare the intended use of keys but they are not strong enough

425

ERP data sharing framework using the Generic Product Model (GPM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays, all product life cycle processes are investigated deeply in order to get an advantage over competitors. To support these processes, several software applications are available. However, this wide range of heterogeneous applications leads to ... Keywords: Enterprise Resource Planning, Generic Product Model, Information sharing, Management data

Souleiman Naciri; Naoufel Cheikhrouhou; Michel Pouly; Jean-Charles Binggeli; Rmy Glardon

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A Generic FMU Interface for Modelica Wuzhu Chen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Generic FMU Interface for Modelica Wuzhu Chen1 Michaela Huhn1 Peter Fritzson2 1 Department-up Unit (FMU) into Modelica simulators, specifically the Open- Modelica environment. Whereas other.0 Specification for model exchange from MOD- ELISAR can be imported into any Modelica simulator. When importing

Zhao, Yuxiao

427

Reasoning with Generic Cases in the Arithmetic of Abstract Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Computer Science, University of Western Ontario www.csd.uwo.ca/watt Abstract. In previous work specifying n. We call this working with "symbolic" or "abstract" values. In previous work we have givenReasoning with Generic Cases in the Arithmetic of Abstract Matrices Alan P. Sexton1 , Volker Sorge1

Sorge, Volker

428

Reasoning with Generic Cases in the Arithmetic of Abstract Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Computer Science, University of Western Ontario www.csd.uwo.ca/~watt Abstract. In previous work specifying n. We call this working with "symbolic" or "abstract" values. In previous work we have givenReasoning with Generic Cases in the Arithmetic of Abstract Matrices Alan P. Sexton1 , Volker Sorge1

Watt, Stephen M.

429

A Generic Ontology for Spatial Frans Coenen and Pepijn Visser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, environmental impact assessment, shape fitting, timetabling and scheduling, and AI problems such as the N 1 #12; statement expressed using the generic ontology described here, and then to ``run be associated with such entities using the ontology. Finally in section 8 we present some conclusions

Coenen, Frans

430

Representative Source Terms and the Influence of Reactor Attributes on Functional Containment in Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs) offer a high degree of passive safety. The low power density of the reactor and the high heat capacity of the graphite core result in slow transients that do not challenge the integrity of the robust TRISO fuel. Another benefit of this fuel form and the surrounding graphite is their superior ability to retain fission products under all anticipated normal and off-normal conditions, which limits reactor accident source terms to very low values. In this paper, we develop estimates of the source term for a generic MHTGR to illustrate the performance of the radionuclide barriers that comprise the MHTGR functional containment. We also examine the influence of initial fuel quality, fuel performance/failure, reactor outlet temperature, and retention outside of the reactor core on the resultant source term to the environment.

D. A. Petti; Hans Gougar; Dick Hobbins; Pete Lowry

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Assessment of industrial attitudes toward generic research needs in tribology  

SciTech Connect

Based on extended discussions during visits with 27 companies representing 13 different parts of the tribology industry (such as bearings, lubricants, coatings, powerplants), it is apparent that only a tiny fraction of the large sums publicly reported as R and D expenditures by industry are used to fund generic tribology research. For example, of the greater than $2 B expenditures reported for R and D in the lubricants sector for 1982, the estimated total for generic tribology research was $12 M. This was the largest expenditure in any sector of the tribology industry and one-third of the total of $36 M. In the automotive industry out of a reported expenditure of $4 B, the estimated generic tribology research was $3 M. In some segments of the tribology industry, for example coatings and filters, there were no expenditures on generic research. There was little tendency to improve the state of the art of the tribology industry through long-term investment in generic R and D in ways that would foster innovation and productivity of energy conservation technology. Expenditures were oriented to development of specific commercial and military products, or to basic research focused on unspecified far term results, although useful spin-off of military developments into commercial fields sometimes occurs. There was a broad consensus in the companies visited that existing research results were not always made easily accessible to potential users in industry. The implication was that industry might benefit more if a larger fraction of the funds were devoted to putting the research results into a form design and development engineers could more readily apply. The need for a more effective presentation of research results was expressed with greater urgency at the smaller companies, but there seemed to be a broad consensus on the need for improvement. Recommendations are given.

Sibley, L.B.; Zlotnick, M.; Levinson, T.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

BASIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH FOR D&D OF R REACTOR STORAGE POND SLUDGE: ELECTROKINETICS, CARBON DIOXIDE EXTRACTION, AND SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D&D operations at DOE sites across the country. Currently, the volume of these wastes is approximately 23,500 m3, and the majority of these wastes (i.e., almost 19,000 m3) consist of PCBs and PCB-contaminated materials. Further, additional PCB-contaminated waste will be generated during D&D operations in the future. The standard process for destruction of this waste is incineration, which generates secondary waste that must be disposed, and the TSCA incinerator at Oak Ridge has an uncertain future. Beyond incineration, no proposed process for the recovery and/or destruction of these persistent pollutants has emerged as the preferred choice for DOE cleanup. The main objective of the project was to investigate and develop a deeper understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic reactions involved in the extraction and destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from low-level mixed waste solid matrices in order to provide data that would permit the design of a combined-cycle extraction/destruction process. The specific research objectives were to investigate benign dense-fluid extraction with either carbon dioxide (USC) or hot water (CU), followed by destruction of the extracted PCBs via either electrochemical (USC) or hydrothermal (CU) oxidation. Two key advantages of the process are that it isolates and concentrates the PCBs from the solid matrices (thereby reducing waste volume greatly and removing the remaining low-level mixed waste from TSCA control), and little, if any, secondary solvent or solid wastes are generated. This project was a collaborative effort involving the University of South Carolina (USC), Clemson University (CU), and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) (including the Savannah River Technology Center, Facilities Decommissioning Division and Regulatory Compliance). T he project was directed and coordinated by the South Carolina Universities Research and Education Foundation (SCUREF), a consortium of the four public research universities in South Carolina. The original plan was to investigate two PCB extraction processes (supercritical carbon dioxide and hot, pressurized water) and two PCB destruction processes (electrochemical oxidation and hydrothermal oxidation). However, at approximately the mid-point of the three year project, it was decided to focus on the more promising extraction process (supercritical carbon dioxide) and the more promising destruction process (supercritical water oxidation). This decision was taken because the investigation of two processes simultaneously by each university was stretching resources too thin, and because the electrochemical oxidation process needed more concentrated research before it would be ready for application to PCB destruction. The solid matrix chosen for experimental work was Toxi-dry, a commonly used adsorbent made from plant material that is used in cleanup of spills and/or liquid solvents. The Toxi-dry was supplied by the research team member from the Facilities Decommissioning Division, WSRC. This adsorbent is a major component of job control waste.

Matthews, Michael A.; Bruce,David; Davis,Thomas; Thies, Mark; Weidner, John; White, Ralph

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Generic TriBITS PRoject, Build, Test, and Install Quick Reference...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generic TriBITS PRoject, Build, Test, and Install Quick Reference Guide Ross Bartlett Oak Ridge National Laboratory CASL-U-2014-0075-000-a CASL-U-2014-0075-000-a Generic TriBITS...

435

Improving support for generic programming in C# with associated types and constraint propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generics has recently been adopted to many mainstream object oriented languages, such as C# and Java. As a particular design choice, generics in C# and Java use a sub-typing relation to constraint type parameters. Failing to encapsulate type...

Srinivasa Raghavan, Aravind

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

A GENERIC AUDIO CLASSIFICATION AND SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR MULTIMEDIA INDEXING AND RETRIEVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A GENERIC AUDIO CLASSIFICATION AND SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR MULTIMEDIA INDEXING AND RETRIEVAL the attention on the area of generic and automatic audio classification and segmentation for audio audio classification and global segmentation framework based on automatic audio analysis providing

Gabbouj, Moncef

437

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds