National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for water quality protection

  1. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  2. Extension Water Summit-Initiative 2: `Enhancing and Protecting Water Quality, Quantity and Supply.' December 12 and 13, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Extension Water Summit- Initiative 2: `Enhancing and Protecting Water Quality, Quantity and Supply.' December 12 and 13, 2012 1 Initiative 2: `Enhancing and Protecting Water Quality, Quantity and Supply.' Extension Water Summit December 12 and 13, 2012 The Straughn IFAS Extension Professional Development Center

  3. Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotation and Land Preparation easures 1. Farm Ponds 2. Water Harvesting Measures 1. Checkdam/Reservoir 2Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann University of Hannover Use & Land Cover TopographyTopography Semi arid/Sub- humid Climatic Watershed Quantitative Water

  4. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  5. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  6. GROUNDWATER QUALITY PROTECTION PRACTICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;GROUNDWATER QUALITY PROTECTION PRACTICES Submitted to: Environment Canada 224 West Esplanade.............................................................................................1 2.0 GROUNDWATER RESOURCES WITHIN THE FRASER BASIN.................3 2.1 Lower Fraser Region..............................................................................5 3.0 COMMON SOURCES OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION ...............6 3.1 Category 1 - Sources Designed

  7. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality Branch Environmental Protection Dept. BC Environment Victoria, B.C. and Fraser Pollution Abatement Office ..................................................... WATER QUALITY OF UNDISTURBED AREAS ....................... LAND USE EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY

  8. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  9. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos/01/2012 Page 1Water Power

  10. Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension impurities can be corrected if they are a nuisance. Before beginning any treatment plan, have water tested select the most effective and economical treatment method. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications

  11. U.A.C. R317-6: Ground Water Quality Protection | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy ResourcesLake,FallonHazardous5:6: Ground Water

  12. Deep in the Forests: Program works to protect water quality through forestry practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    are following BMPs, representing a ?? percent increase since a monitoring program began in the early ????s. ?e program began in ???? a?er the reauthori- zation of the federal Clean Water Act shi?ed more a?ention to nonpoint source pollution programs... and compared the chemical and biological properties of four East Texas streams before and a?er forestry operations. ?We were looking to see if there were any di?er- ences in stream properties before and a?er these operations,? Simpson said. ?With the use...

  13. Deep in the forests: Program works to protect water quality through forestry practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    are following BMPs, representing a ?? percent increase since a monitoring program began in the early ????s. ?e program began in ???? a?er the reauthori- zation of the federal Clean Water Act shi?ed more a?ention to nonpoint source pollution programs... and compared the chemical and biological properties of four East Texas streams before and a?er forestry operations. ?We were looking to see if there were any di?er- ences in stream properties before and a?er these operations,? Simpson said. ?With the use...

  14. Landscape Design & Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    drainage lines to allow water to filter into surrounding soils. Install gravel sumps or other percolationLandscape Design & Water Quality Landscape Design & Water Quality Create a landscape design that reduces pesticide and fertilizer runoff and conserves water. Good plant choices, proper site preparation

  15. Surface Water Quality Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Standards Team. This advisory group, with representation from water asso- ciations, the agricultural industry, engineering firms, environmental organizations, consumer groups and government entities, is working with TCEQ staff to review and possibly...SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards...

  16. Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . What can I do to help protect storm water quality? Proper use and disposal of hazardous products on campus. Con- taminants, such as oil and grease, can be collected by storm water runoff, washed into storm

  17. Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity March 25, 2015 Cross-cutting Sustainability Platform Review Principle Investigator: Dr. Henriette I. Jager Organization: Oak Ridge National...

  18. Irrigation Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Lemon, Robert G.; Stichler, Charles

    2002-04-11

    Irrigation water quality is determined by the total amounts of salts and the types of salts the water contains. In this publication you'll learn why well water can be salty, what problems salty water can cause, what tests should be done...

  19. WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE STATE OF OHIO COMPONENT OF THE OHIO RIVER BASIN WATER QUALITY TRADING PROGRAM #12;Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water Quality Trading Program #12;2 Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water

  20. Irrigation Water Quality Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and industrial waste water can impact water quality. In most irrigation situations, the primary water qual- ity

  1. Nurseries surveyed in Southern California adopt best practices for water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangiafico, Salvatore S; Newman, Julie; Mochizuki, Maren; Zurawski, Dale; Merhaut, Donald J.; Faber, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Practices to Protect Water Quality. UC ANR Pub 3508.Is collected irrigation water recycled? 42. Are collectionweather? 43. Is runoff water quality regularly monitored,

  2. Water Quality Criteria Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    APPENDIX G Water Quality Criteria CONTENTS Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798 EPA's Water Quality Criteria and Standards Plan -- Priorities for the Future............................798 Compilation of Recommended Water Quality Criteria and EPA's Process for Deriving New

  3. IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE Irrigation Water Background In the past, there were minor of irrigation water in Georgia. This is because only a small amount of acreage under irrigated agriculture utilized potable (suitable for drinking) quality water. Thus, quality of irrigation water was not closely

  4. Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Internet]. Office of Water, U.S. Environmental Protectionfor protecting public drinking water (CALFED 2000), are also1 Current and predicted future water quality conditions at

  5. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY Leadership Team Subcommittee: Mark Clark Karl Havens BJ Jarvis Kelly Morgan Ramesh Reddy #12;Water Quality ­ Situation (resources) Florida has extensive and diverse water resources 54,836 miles of rivers and streams 1.8 million acres of lakes, reservoirs

  6. EO 11514: Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1514: Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality EO 11514: Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality The Federal Government shall provide leadership in...

  7. Geothermal Direct-Use — Meeting Water Quality Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal direct-use applications—such as greenhouses, district and space heating, and aquaculture—can easily meet local and federal water quality standards, which help protect our environment.

  8. Oregon Water Quality Permit Program (Stormwater - Industrial...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Water Quality Permit Program (Stormwater - Industrial Activities) Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Water Quality...

  9. Vermont Water Quality Certification Application for Hydroelectric...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vermont Water Quality Certification Application for Hydroelectric Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Vermont Water Quality...

  10. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various U.S. Environmental Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Improvements at Various U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency Improvements at Various U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water...

  11. Protecting waters of recreational and ecological significance: an analysis of state practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darrow, Jeff T.

    1995-01-01

    and content by: Dr. Ronald A. Kaiser, Chair of Advisory Committee Dr. Carlton S. Van Doren, Committee Member Dr. David M. Pugh, Committee Member December, 1995 Abstract Protecting water quality for recreational purposes is an important goal of the Clean... Water Act. A little known and seldom used provision of the Act, termed the "outstanding national resource water" [ONRW] section provides a significant means for protecting water quality. Basically, ONRW's are waters of "outstanding recreational...

  12. Ground water protection management program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

  13. Assessing Phosphorous Loss to Protect Surface Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raul

    2005-01-01

    programs. It is an integrated approach that considers soil and landscape features in order tx H2O | pg. 10 Assessing Phosphorus Loss to Protect Surface Water to find appropriate phosphorus management practices by estimating phosphorus delivery...

  14. Guidance for the Quality Assurance of Fire Protection Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This quality assurance document is intended to provide guidance for the DOE fire protection community in the continuing effort to ensure the reliability of fire protection systems. This guidance document applies the concepts of DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, to the management of fire protection systems.

  15. WATER QUALITY PLAN MONITORING DATA REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;WATER QUALITY PLAN MONITORING DATA REPORT January to March 1993 TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES FREMP WQWM 93-02 DOE FR4P 1993-31 Prepared for FREMP Water QualityAVaste Management Committee by Don Morse PACIFIC REGION #12;Canadian Cataloging in Publication Data Main entry under title Water quality plan

  16. California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality Certification Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State...

  17. Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater A BiRd'S EyE ViEW foR NEW HAMPSHiRE Co Hampshire Communities Written by: Julia Peterson, New Hampshire Sea Grant and university of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Amanda Stone, university of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension James Houle, university

  18. Storm Water Quality Please report any concerns,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Storm Water Quality Hotline: Please report any concerns, illegal dumping into storm drains, or suspicious activities that may cause environmental harm to the Storm Water Quality Hotline: (831) 4592553) 4594520 http://cleanwater.ucsc.edu Volunteer and intern with the Storm Water Management Program

  19. Federal, State, and Local Water Quality Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    Federal, State, and Local Water Quality Control An Assessment of the Current Laws Affecting 303(d), a TMDL is required to be implemented for any water body in which technology-based controls and non-point sources of pollution. In many situations, this method of water quality control is important

  20. Montana Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Montana Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization, and Permit Fees Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  1. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    leadership for water resources research, education and outreach to help people, industry and governments research and educational needs, identify expertise of contributing institutions, facilitate resource responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

  2. texas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of pollution greatly affect water quality. Identifying and assessing sources of fecal pollution is a key for identifying human and animal sources of fecal pollution. Texas Water Resources Institute 1500 Research Parkwaytexas bacterial source tracking library Protection of our water resources is one of the most

  3. Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem Adaptive management How can our research help farmers ? #12;Discovery Farms concept Core farms

  4. Assessing the Quality of a Water Right

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peck, John C.

    2001-05-01

    stream_size 12 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Assessing_the_quality_of_a_water_right.pdf.txt stream_source_info Assessing_the_quality_of_a_water_right.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  5. COLLABORATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF WATER QUALITY POLLUTION PATTERNS: WORKING WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLLABORATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF WATER QUALITY POLLUTION PATTERNS: WORKING WITH THE KYUQUOT and Environmental Management Title of Research Project: Collaborative Investigations of Water Quality Pollution about water quality sampling and policy agenda setting. Through time and repeated interactions

  6. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

  7. Modeling Water and Sediment Quality in the Coastal Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stolzenbach, Keith D.; McWilliams, James C.

    2008-01-01

    ecosystem, oceanography, pollution, sediment, stratification193 Modeling Water and Sediment Quality in the Coastal Oceana model of water and sediment quality capable of forecasting

  8. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2007-01-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted interim groundwater remedial activities on the Hanford Site since the mid-1990s for several groundwater contamination plumes. DOE established the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project (Technologies Project) in 2006 to evaluate alternative treatment technologies. The objectives for the technology project are as follows: develop a 300 Area polyphosphate treatability test to immobilize uranium, design and test infiltration of a phosphate/apatite technology for Sr-90 at 100-N, perform carbon tetrachloride and chloroform attenuation parameter studies, perform vadose zone chromium characterization and geochemistry studies, perform in situ biostimulation of chromium studies for a reducing barrier at 100-D, and perform a treatability test for phytoremediation for Sr-90 at 100-N. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the Technologies Project. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is based on the quality assurance requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the technology project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

  9. NIOSH testimony on indoor air quality: Selected references before the Subcommittee on Superfund, Ocean and Water Protection, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate by J. Donald Millar, May 26, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has compiled the document in response to an increasing number of requests for information about indoor air quality (IAQ), including sick building syndrome. Included in the publication are: NIOSH Congressional testimony that describes the NIOSH IAQ investigations program and summarizes the results of NIOSH research and findings on IAQ problems, NIOSH guidance for conducting indoor air quality investigations, NIOSH journal article on evaluating building ventilation systems, and list of non-NIOSH publications on indoor air quality. As the Federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for occupational safety and health standards, NIOSH limits its IAQ activities to the occupational environment. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also conducts an IAQ program and can be contacted for information regarding both occupational and non-occupational settings.

  10. Drinking Water and Groundwater Protection Division File Transfer...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drinking Water and Groundwater Protection Division File Transfer Protocol (FTP) Site Instructions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  11. Your Actions Can Help Protect Our Drinking Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie

    2004-06-29

    This publication offers advice on how to protect our drinking water supply by properly selecting, storing, using and disposing of household hazardous products....

  12. Water Quality Professional Certificate Training 1. Catalog Description: Certificate course; Open registration. This course focuses on water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliaccio, Kati White

    Water Quality Professional Certificate Training Syllabus 1. Catalog Description: Certificate course; Open registration. This course focuses on water quality sampling, laboratory assessment, and data analyses. It includes surface water, groundwater, and pore water aspects. The course is divided into 6

  13. EVALUATING TRADEOFFS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW PROTECTIONS AND AGRICULTURAL WATER SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    environmental policy associated with the greatest impacts to water users. Surprisingly, the moderate environmental flow policy had larger impacts to bypass flows than the unregulated management scenarioEVALUATING TRADEOFFS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW PROTECTIONS AND AGRICULTURAL WATER SECURITY T. E

  14. Decentralization and Environmental Quality: An International Analysis of Water Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Hilary

    2009-01-01

    United Nations, Global Environment Monitoring System Waterthe UN’s Global Environment Monitoring System Water Quality

  15. Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

  16. The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related projects that are managed under a master project (project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master project. Each project within the master project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff.

  17. South Asia transboundary water quality monitoring workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betsill, Jeffrey David; Littlefield, Adriane C.; Luetters, Frederick O.; Rajen, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in several regions as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group made up of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and the United States convened in Kathmandu, Nepal, from February 17-23,2002. The workshop was held to further develop the South Asia Transboundary Water Quality Monitoring (SATWQM) project. The project is sponsored in part by the CMC located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico through funding provided by the US. Department of State, Regional Environmental Affairs Office, American Embassy, Kathmandu, Nepal, and the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. This report summarizes the SATWQM project, the workshop objectives, process and results. The long-term interests of the participants are to develop systems for sharing regional environmental information as a means of building confidence and improving relations among South Asian countries. The more immediate interests of the group are focused on activities that foster regional sharing of water quality data in the Ganges and Indus River basins. Issues of concern to the SATWQM network participants include studying the impacts from untreated sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, salinity increases in fresh waters, the siltation and shifting of river channels, and the environmental degradation of critical habitats such as wetlands, protected forests, and endangered aquatic species conservation areas. The workshop focused on five objectives: (1) a deepened understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of additional regional and national government and non-government organizations in South Asia involved in river water quality monitoring; (3) identification of sites within the region at which water quality data are to be collected; (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process; and, (5) training of partners in the use of water quality monitoring equipment.

  18. FAPRI-UMC Report #01-07 Estimating Water Quality,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon and Carbon Sequestration...................................10 CRP EffectsFAPRI-UMC Report #01-07 Estimating Water Quality, Air Quality, and Soil Carbon Benefits Quality, Air Quality, and Soil Carbon Benefits of the Conservation Reserve Program FAPRI-UMC Report #01

  19. Water quality issues and energy assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.

    1980-11-01

    This report identifies and evaluates the significant water quality issues related to regional and national energy development. In addition, it recommends improvements in the Office assessment capability. Handbook-style formating, which includes a system of cross-references and prioritization, is designed to help the reader use the material.

  20. Water protection in coke-plant design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

  1. Enhanced monitor system for water protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, David E. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rodriquez, Jr., Miguel [Oak Ridge, TN; Greenbaum, Elias (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2009-09-22

    An automatic, self-contained device for detecting toxic agents in a water supply includes an analyzer for detecting at least one toxic agent in a water sample, introducing a means for introducing a water sample into the analyzer and discharging the water sample from the analyzer, holding means for holding a water sample for a pre-selected period of time before the water sample is introduced into the analyzer, and an electronics package that analyzes raw data from the analyzer and emits a signal indicating the presence of at least one toxic agent in the water sample.

  2. WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    water quality, and water percolating through the disposaland quality of water applied to surface disposal piles Topeffect on water quality Spent-Shale Disposal Piles Similar

  3. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 1 Impaired Waters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 1 Impaired Waters and 303(d) Lists Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: U.S. Environmental...

  4. Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

  5. WATER QUALITY AND SURVIVABILITY OF DIDYMOSPHENIA GEMINATA Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS WATER QUALITY AND SURVIVABILITY OF DIDYMOSPHENIA GEMINATA Submitted by Johannes Beeby: John D. Stednick Co-Advisor: Steven R. Fassnacht William H. Clements #12;ii ABSTRACT WATER QUALITY, and is even growing in waters that were thought not ideal habitat for Didymo. Previous research on how water

  6. ADEQ Water Quality Forms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as401 Water Quality

  7. SEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    these concerns? Waste Water Treatment Facilities treat water to Waste Water Treatment Facilities treat water and disinfect anyy microorganisms that may be present The majority of Recycled water produced in ArizonaSEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY

  8. atershed water quality concerns in the Northeast have focused on surface water,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    W atershed water quality concerns in the Northeast have focused on surface water, particularly practices, attempt to improve water quality by altering farm hydrology so as to reduce surface runoff for water quality BMPs are contained in the National Handbook of Conservation Practices (NRCS, 1996

  9. Water Quality Improvement Policies: Lessons Learned from the Implementation of Proposition O in Los Angeles, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Mi-Hyun; Stenstrom, Michael; Pincetl, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Stenstrom MK (1999) Storm-water impact. Available at http://ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Water Quality Improvement Policies:under the federal Clean Water Act. Funding water quality

  10. Water Quality Assessment and Recommended Objectives for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Quality Assessment and Recommended Objectives for the Salmon River Summary Report February and Parks Water Management Branch Prepared pursuant to: Section 2(e) Environmental Management Act, 1981 of Environment, Lands and Parks' Water Quality Assessment and Objectives series. It has received formal review

  11. Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed, British Columbia in the Brunette 1994/95 Water Quality and Stormwater Contaminants in the Brunette River Watershed, British Westminster. Past and currently ongoing projects have studied the water, sediment, and biota within

  12. Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB Beef Cattle Extension Veterinarian University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Water is an essential nutrient for humans and livestock and drinking water is the primary source of water for most cattle. The most important aspect of water

  13. Mining withdrawals by water quality and State, 2005. EXPLANATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mining withdrawals by water quality and State, 2005. 0 to 10 10 to 50 50 to 100 100 to 200 200 mining withdrawals Freshwater mining withdrawals Saline-water mining withdrawals Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 2005 - Mining USGS Water-Science School -- http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/wumi.html Source

  14. Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce; Mechell, Justin; Clayton, Brent; Gerlich, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    water for industrial use, including cooling water for a natural gas?fired steam electric power plant and the Comanche Peak nuclear power plant. It is also a recreation haven for local water enthusiasts. Declining water quality in Lake Granbury has...-7442-9-486 INTRODUCTION The overall goal for this project was to provide a mechanism to educate local stakeholders about water quality issues that affect Lake Granbury. This project provided an assessment of existing and potential water quality threats related to on...

  15. Reference materials for water and wastewater analyses in USEPA (U. S. Environmental Protection Agency)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory at Cincinnati provides quality assurance support for EPA's water-related programs in response to the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act, the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, and the Toxic Substances Control Act. Two important segments of this support are: (1) the Quality Control (QC) Sample Program which provides samples of known concentrations for use as independent Hazardous Materials which provides calibration standards for trace organic analyses of interest to the Agency. The samples and standards are prepared as stable concentrated solutions in all-glass ampuls. Each series contains one or more related analyses, each with a true or reference value. These are provided for dilution to volume and analyses as needed by EPA, EPA contractor/grantees, and other federal, state and local agencies.

  16. Software platform for integrated water quality decision support systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software platform for integrated water quality decision support systems P. Cianchi*, S. Marsili Processing) modules with limited computing capacity. Defining agents as a self contained software program

  17. OAR 340-048 - Certification of Compliance with Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 - Certification of Compliance with Water Quality Requirements and Standards Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  18. Oregon Directive for NPDES Permits and Section 401 Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Directive for NPDES Permits and Section 401 Water Quality Certifications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance -...

  19. Water quality and business aspects of sachet-vended water in Tamale, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okioga, Teshamulwa (Teshamulwa Irene)

    2007-01-01

    Microbial water quality analyses were conducted on 15 samples of factory-produced sachet water and 15 samples of hand-tied sachet water, sold in Tamale, Ghana. The tests included the membrane filtration (MF) test using ...

  20. Numerically Efficient Water Quality Modeling and Security Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Angelica

    2013-02-04

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.4 Summary of contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2 THE MERLION WATER QUALITY MODEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2.1 Model development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2.2 Origin... tracking algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.3 Merlion water quality model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.4 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3 EFFICIENT MULTI...

  1. Racing to Success 2005 Southern Region Water Quality Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AE06-11 Racing to Success 2005 Southern Region Water Quality Conference Lexington, Kentucky. It was the tenth biennial conference organized and conducted by the Southern Region Water Quality Planning area provided the framework for the conference. A description of these 12 programs in addition to much

  2. WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION SPECIAL. Suomela, Commissioner WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION Report--Fisheries No. 290 Washington, D. C. March 1959 #12;Library of Congress catalog card for the Fish

  3. WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION iW''^^, ^^c, Commissioner WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION by Robert 0 No. 290 Washington, D. C. March 1959 #12;Library of Congress catalog card for the Fish and Wildlife

  4. Water Quality: Its Relationship to Livestock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faries Jr., Floron C.; Sweeten, John M.; Reagor, John C.

    1998-06-30

    Safe supplies of water are essential for livestock. This publication discusses the common causes of unsafe water and lists concentrations of various elements that would make water hazardous for livestock consumption....

  5. Hybrid fuzzy and optimal modeling for water quality evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dong; Singh, Vijay P.; Zhu, Yuansheng

    2007-05-08

    modeling for water quality evaluation Dong Wang, 1 Vijay P. Singh, 2 and Yuansheng Zhu 3 Received 1 September 2006; revised 16 December 2006; accepted 19 January 2007; published 8 May 2007. [1] Water quality evaluation entails both randomness and fuzziness..., the proposed models are flexible and adaptable for diagnosing the eutrophic status. Citation: Wang, D., V. P. Singh, and Y. Zhu (2007), Hybrid fuzzy and optimal modeling for water quality evaluation, Water Resour. Res., 43, W05415, doi:10.1029/2006WR005490. 1...

  6. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water Quality

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:ClayBurnVita Jump to:Protection Tool for

  7. Catalog of publications, Office of Science and Technology (Office of Water, Environmental Protection Agency), 1999 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-08-01

    This catalog focuses on the following: Introduction to the Office of Science and Technology (OST); Industrial Effluent Limitations and Guidelines (Listed alphabetically by Point Source); Water Quality Standards; Ambient Water Quality Criteria; Biological Quality Criteria; Nutrient Criteria; Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Guidelines (Sediment Quality Criteria); Drinking Water Criteria; Drinking Water Health Advisories; Water Quality Modeling and Total Maximum Daily Loads Guidance; Analytical Laboratory Methods; Contaminated Sediments; Fish Tissue Quality; Municipal Sewage Sludge; Great Lakes Guidance; Beach Water Quality; Pollution Prevention-IP3 Reports; Videotapes; and Datafiles and Software.

  8. Pesticide Properties that Affect Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Douglas; Baumann, Paul A.; Jackman, John A.

    1997-06-30

    . over the land before running into rivers, aquifers and lakes. It also seeps into underground aquifers. Irrigation and drinking water come from both surface and ground water. Eventually, all of the chemicals we use can pollute our water supplies (see Fig... or disposal of pesticides can lead to water pollution. There is reason for optimism, however. Without being oppressive, the regulation of pesticides is reducing pesticide pollution of surface and ground water. Understanding Pesticides Pesticides are poisons...

  9. LANL Water Protection Status Report - FY12 3rd Qtr. (Apr thru Jun 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglass, Craig R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-12

    Continued monitoring of the Buckman Direct Diversion and Los Alamos County Water Supply Wells; Groundwater Protection - Continued implementation of the Interim Facility-Wide Groundwater Monitoring Plan (IFGMP); Surface Water Protection - Continued protection of surface water through implementation of the Individual Stormwater Permit (IP); Buckman Early Notification System operability at 100% per MOU Requirements.

  10. Informa(on and Resources Herbicides and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    How do herbicides get into surface water? · Washed off soil, hard surfaces, or treated plants by rain conditions determine the availability of water to help herbicides move · Runoff is likely with rainInforma(on and Resources Herbicides and Water Quality What is an herbicide

  11. Addressing Water Quality Mitigation Challenges Through Evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthold, Troy Allen

    2014-05-27

    barriers to management practice adoption through incentive programs, and 3) What areas of the agricultural component of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan have been implemented effectively according to agricultural producer perception? Sixteen...

  12. COSTS OF WATER TREATMENT DUE TO DIMINISHED WATER QUALITY: A CASE STUDY IN TEXAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    COSTS OF WATER TREATMENT DUE TO DIMINISHED WATER QUALITY: A CASE STUDY IN TEXAS David Dearmont and Resources Portland State University P O Box 751 Portland OR 97207-0751 October, 1997 Draft of paper in Water Resources Research, 34(4), 849-854, 1998. #12;2 CHEMICAL COSTS OF WATER TREATMENT DUE TO DIMINISHED WATER

  13. QoWaterA crowd-sourcing approach for assessing the water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopouli, Maria

    QoWater­A crowd-sourcing approach for assessing the water quality Nikolaos Rapousis, Michalis Science, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas ABSTRACT This paper presents QoWater, a novel user, and irrigation water. The QoWater follows a client-to-server architecture. Via QoWa- ter clients, users upload

  14. Water Quality Modeling Hydraulics and Hydrology Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : ­ Streamflows ­ Lake basin ­ Meteorology (wind/sun/precip...) · Outputs: ­ Vertical Temperature distribution ­ E. Coli · Temperature changes ­ Long term and short term · Lake circulation ­ Lake circulation ­ Outputs: · Oxygen distribution in water column · Nutrient distribution in water column (N

  15. Associations among Plankton Abundance, Water Quality And Sediment Quality In The San Francisco Bay: Nitrogen And Phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritsch, Monica

    2011-01-01

    pollution of Surface Waters with Phosphorus and Nitrogen.J.N. (2006). The Effect of Water Quality Disturbances onUSA. VI. Phytoplankton and water quality, 1987 to 1998.

  16. Water Scarcity, Climate Change, and Water Quality: Three Economic Essays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Yongxia

    2010-07-14

    ........................................................ 22 Figure 2-6. Marginal benefit curve when water demand is non-rival ............................. 22 Figure 2-7. Water shortage for major cities in Texas (thousand ac-ft) ........................... 47 Figure 2-8. Water surplus for major cities... (thousand ac-ft) ............................................ 49 Figure 2-9. Water shortage for major industrial counties (thousand ac-ft) ..................... 52 Figure 2-10. Water surplus for major industrial counties (thousand ac...

  17. Enforcement-driven financing of water quality in California: The case of supplemental environmental projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Press, Daniel; Holloran, Pete; Petersen, Brian

    2010-01-01

    water treatment plants, on-site sewage facilities, Edwards Aquifer protection, stormwater, and sludge

  18. Water Quality Guide for Livestock and Poultry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1998-09-30

    This publication discusses some of the most common contaminants in the drinking water of livestock and poultry. A table lists the Maximum Contaminant Level of some harmful substances.

  19. Impervious Areas: Examining the Undermining Effects on Surface Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, De'Etra Jenra

    2012-02-14

    lot study. Results indicated that day since last rain event had the most significant effect on surface water quality. Furthermore, concrete produced higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), potassium and calcium...

  20. New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill Permits webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Surface...

  1. DISSERTATION PREDICTING THE LIKELIHOOD OF WATER QUALITY IMPAIRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Advisor ____________________________________ Co-Advisor ____________________________________ Department water quality impaired stream segments. To meet this goal, I developed a predictive model that incorporated spatial autocorrelation and combined coarse-scale geographic information system (GIS) data

  2. Septic Systems in the Coastal Environment: Multiple Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    ....................................................... 82 4.2 Septic System Pollutants and Treatment Processes4 Septic Systems in the Coastal Environment: Multiple Water Quality Problems in Many Areas Michael .................................................................. 82 4.3 Septic Systems and Fecal Microbial Pollution

  3. WAC - 173-210A Water Quality Standards for Surface Waters of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Water Quality Standards for Surface Waters of the State of Washington Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC...

  4. CEGR 6090 -Water Quality Control Course Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    dispersion, turbulent diffusion, transport across interfaces, thermal pollution, eutrophication, pollution. "Environmental Modeling: Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Water, Air, and Soil." Wiley-Interscience, New York. Transport in estuaries. V. Impacts of conventional pollutants on surface waters VI. Eutrophication VII

  5. It's worth the work: Proposed water quality standards move Texas closer to cleaner waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    been working with stakeholders on expanding its water quality standards, including those standards for recreational use. TCEQ has proposed expanding the categories for contact recreation use from two categories?contact recre- ation and non... categories of contact recre- ation, and, depending on the associated bacteria counts, some of the water bodies may no longer be listed on the state?s impaired water body list. The proposed expanded contact recreation use and water quality standards...

  6. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  7. Reference samples for water-related programs in the US Environmental Protection Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.A.

    1985-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory at Cincinnati provides quality assurance (QA) support for US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water-related programs. Two important segments of this support are the Quality Control Sample Program, which furnishes samples of known concentrations for use as independent checks on intralaboratory QA activities, and the EPA's Repository for Toxic and Hazardous Materials, which provides calibration standards and spiking solutions for trace organic analyses of interest to the Agency. Each series contains one or more analytes, with true or reference values. The samples and standards are prepared as stable concentrated solutions in all-glass ampuls for dilution to volume, and analyses by EPA, its contractors and grantees, and other federal, state, and local agencies. 1 reference, 6 tables.

  8. Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    and disposal of hazardous products. (Photo at right) Do not pour anything down storm drains. Please contact car on campus. Con- taminants, such as oil and grease, can be collected by storm water runoff, washed

  9. Water Quality Modeling in Kranji Catchment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granger, Erika C

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the process and results of applying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to characterize bacterial fate and transport in the Kranji Catchment of Singapore. The goal of this process is to predict ...

  10. Censored Regression Trend Analyses for Ambient Water Quality Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Censored Regression Trend Analyses for Ambient Water Quality Data Gordon K. Smyth 1 , Melanie Cox 2 regression; logistic distribution; regression splines; seasonal trends. 1 Introduction Water is a very. A censored regression strat- egy is used to accommodate arbitrary detection limits for the indicator

  11. Ground Water Protection Programs Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-05-05

    This Guide provides a description of the elements of an integrated site-wide ground water protection program that can be adapted to unique physical conditions and programmatic needs at each DOE site. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  12. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

  13. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality Characterization Using Rapidly Deployable Networked Infomechanical Systems (NIMS RD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas C. Harmon; Richard F. Ambrose; Robert M. Gilbert; Jason C. Fisher; Michael Stealey; William J. Kaiser

    2006-01-01

    High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality1594. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Qualityobserving spatiotemporal hydraulic and chemical properties

  14. ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ground Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpkins, William W.

    for an unfractured till (Freeze als that preclude vertical and horizontal transport of and Cherry, 1979; JournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ground Water Quality Fracture-Controlled Nitrate and Atrazine Transport in Four Iowa Till Units Martin F-quantify the influence of fractures on solute fate and transport using three conservative and two nonconservative tracers

  15. EO 11514: Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEE Deer Creek Lodge514,

  16. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality in Sandia Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.

    1994-05-01

    In 1990, field studies of water quality and stream macroinvertebrate communities were initiated in Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The studies were designed to establish baseline data and to determine the effects of routine discharges of industrial and sanitary waste. Water quality measurements were taken and aquatic macroinvertebrates sampled at three permanent stations within the canyon. Two of the three sample stations are located where the stream regularly receives industrial and sanitary waste effluents. These stations exhibited a low diversity of macroinvertebrates and slightly degraded water quality. The last sample station, located approximately 0.4 km (0.25 mi) downstream from the nearest wastewater outfall, appears to be in a zone of recovery where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams in the Los Alamos area. A large increase in macroinvertebrate diversity was also observed at the third station. These results indicate that effluents discharged into Sandia Canyon have a marked effect on water quality and aquatic macroinvertebrate communities.

  17. Bacteria and Surface Water Quality Standards Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires that each state set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bodies that support oyster harvesting, called oyster waters, have four clas- sifications which determineBacteria and Surface Water Quality Standards Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act requires that each state set water quality standards to ensure all uses of a water body have the ap- propriate water

  18. Alaska Water Quality Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 -Telephone Co Jump to:Elec Coop, Inc Jump to:Water

  19. Water Quality of a Reservoir Used for Reclaimed Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Peter S; Scherfig, Jan

    1981-01-01

    off from upper Santiago Creek and Colorado River water fromSantiago Reservoir (by this time a blend of surface run-off and Colorado RiverSantiago Reservoir, the inputs are derived from direct surface run-off and Colorado River

  20. Do constructed flow through wetlands improve water quality in the San Joaquin River?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T

    2006-01-01

    disposal of agricultural tailwaters and total maximum daily load (TMDL) efforts related water quality

  1. Population Recovery and Conservation Habitat Restoration Water Use and Hydropower Forests and Fish EAST FORK OWYHEE RIVER SALMON AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population Recovery and Conservation · Habitat Restoration · Water Use and Hydropower · Forests........................................................................................................................................... 18 Water Quality Analysis ....................................................................................................................... 18 Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Water Quality Sampling

  2. Review of Wildfire Effects on Chemical Water Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly Bitner; Bruce Gallaher; Ken Mullen

    2001-05-01

    The Cerro Grande Fire of May 2000 burned almost 43,000 acres of forested land within the Pajarito Plateau watershed in northern New Mexico. Runoff events after the fire were monitored and sampled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Changes in the composition of runoff water were noted when compared to runoff water composition of the previous 20 years. In order to understand the chemical water quality changes noted in runoff water after the Cerro Grande Fire, a summary of the reported effects of fire on runoff water chemistry and on soils that contribute to runoff water chemistry was compiled. The focus of this report is chemical water quality, so it does not address changes in sediment transport or water quantity associated with fires. Within the general inorganic parameters, increases of dissolved calcium, magnesium, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium and pH in runoff water have been observed as a result of fire. However, the dissolved sodium, carbon, and sulfate have been observed to increase and decrease as a result of fire. Metals have been much less studied, but manganese, copper, zinc, and cesium-137 have been observed to increase as a result of fire.

  3. texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality problems exist, affecting the environment and economy. Texas needs solutions. At the Texas Water Resources Institute, we help solve these pressing water

  4. Delta Drinking Water Quality and TreatmentDelta Drinking Water Quality and Treatment WeiWei--Hsiang ChenHsiang Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ­ ozonation use, ()- Under construction SOURCE: CALFED (2005) and MWDSC (http://www.mwdh2o.com/index.htm ) #1211 Delta Drinking Water Quality and TreatmentDelta Drinking Water Quality and Treatment CostsCosts · Treatments for Delta water quality conditions to minimize cost within technology limits. · Results using

  5. Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district heating system ­ and makes a proposal for a technical and economic improvement. Monitoring of water quality in district heating systems is necessary

  6. The Impact of Water Quality on Southern California Beach Recreation: A Finite Mixture Model Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilger, James; Hanemann, W. Michael

    2008-01-01

    estimate the e?ect of coastal water quality on beach choiceDemand Studies, 1968-1988; Water Resources Research, March,Measuring the bene?ts of water quality improvements in a

  7. Chemical drinking water quality in Ghana: Water costs and scope for advanced treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, Helfrid M.A.; Owusu, Peter A; Awuah, Esi; MacDonald, Alan M; Schäfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    To reduce child mortality and improve health in Ghana boreholes and wells are being installed across the country by the private sector, NGOs and the Ghanaian government. Water quality is not generally monitored once a ...

  8. How do you treat water based on water quality from different water sources? Authors: Wendy Lane and Kim Sciarrone Seattle Public Schools; Seattle, WA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    How do you treat water based on water quality from different water sources Why? Water from different sources will contain different contaminants, and water treatment will vary depending on these contaminants. In this activity we

  9. The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote regional collaboration,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention and Pesticide Management · Pollution Assessment and Prevention · Watershed Management · Water Quantity activities in watershed management and protection and pollution prevention. For example, the Project has

  10. Institute of Water Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on research, and extended education programs on watershed management and surface and ground water protection, microcomputer, nitrogen, nonpoint source pollution, pesticides, pollutants, pollution control, ponds, research transfer, urban water systems, water quality, water quality management, watershed management, wetlands

  11. The Hopi and the Black Mesa: An Argument for Protection of Sacred Water Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimes, Tamisha

    2008-07-28

    THE HOPI AND THE BLACK MESA: AN ARGUMENT FOR PROTECTION OF SACRED WATER SITES BY Copyright 2008 Tamisha Grimes B.A., New Mexico State University, 2006 Submitted to the Department of Indigenous Nations Studies... version of the following thesis: THE HOPI AND THE BLACK MESA: AN ARGUMENT FOR PROTECTION OF SACRED WATER SITES Committee: ______________________________ Professor Stephanie Fizgerald, Chair...

  12. Follow Water Quality Robots on Twitter On May 9, 2012, UC Berkeley researchers launched a fleet of 100 water quality sensors into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with water control boards. #12;Up to Top Nature Art: Patterns A Massive Starling Murmuration Becomes "A Real05/22/2012 Follow Water Quality Robots on Twitter On May 9, 2012, UC Berkeley researchers launched a fleet of 100 water quality sensors into Northern California's Sacramento River. Designed to track water

  13. A SWOT Analysis of the Great Lakes Water Quality Protocol 2012: The Good, the Bad and the Opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jetoo, Savitri; Krantzberg, Gail

    2014-01-01

    and Anderson, S. (2007). Healthy Waters, Strong Economy: Theof the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Michigan StateBiennial Report on Great Lakes Water Quality. IJC. Windsor,

  14. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate Scale Water Quality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-10-01

    The Salish Sea, including Puget Sound, is a large estuarine system bounded by over seven thousand miles of complex shorelines, consists of several subbasins and many large inlets with distinct properties of their own. Pacific Ocean water enters Puget Sound through the Strait of Juan de Fuca at depth over the Admiralty Inlet sill. Ocean water mixed with freshwater discharges from runoff, rivers, and wastewater outfalls exits Puget Sound through the brackish surface outflow layer. Nutrient pollution is considered one of the largest threats to Puget Sound. There is considerable interest in understanding the effect of nutrient loads on the water quality and ecological health of Puget Sound in particular and the Salish Sea as a whole. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a coupled hydrodynamic and water quality model. The water quality model simulates algae growth, dissolved oxygen, (DO) and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound to inform potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or control human impacts to DO levels in the sensitive areas. The project did not include any additional data collection but instead relied on currently available information. This report describes model development effort conducted during the period 2009 to 2012 under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cooperative agreement with PNNL, Ecology, and the University of Washington awarded under the National Estuary Program

  15. Home Landscape Practices to Protect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    weeds, protects trees from lawn mower wounds, helps reduce erosion, and protects roots near the soil of pollutants washing through the soil and reaching our water supplies. · Mow high and often. Setting your mower. Keep your lawn healthy A properly maintained lawn looks beautiful and also helps protect water quality

  16. Youth Water Camp: Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info Youth water camp.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5692 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Youth water camp.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2O | pg. 24... A plant chemist directs Water Camp youth in basic water analysis at a local power plant during a tour. Story by Danielle Supercinski Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality In January 1991, a committee...

  17. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  18. A Surface Water Protection Assessment Tool that uses Digital Elevation Models1 Darwin L. Sorensen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    . A first approximation estimate of pollutant concentration reaching the drinking water treatment plant of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities in the watershed. Surface water of pollution under various storm intensities can be analyzed. The influences of shallow ground water quality (e

  19. An alternative approach to achieving water quality-based limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, C.M.; Graeser, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    Since May 1982, members of the Iron and Steel Industry have been required to meet effluent limits based on Best Available Technology (BAT) for a process water discharge to receiving stream. US Steel Clairton Works has been successful in meeting these limits in the last three years; however, the current regulatory thrust is toward more stringent limits based on water quality. In cases of smaller streams such as the receiving stream for Clairton Works` process outfall, these limits can be very rigid. This paper will discuss the alternative approaches investigated to meet the new more stringent limits including the solution chosen.

  20. Approaches to verification of two-dimensional water quality models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butkus, S.R. . Water Quality Dept.)

    1990-11-01

    The verification of a water quality model is the one procedure most needed by decision making evaluating a model predictions, but is often not adequate or done at all. The results of a properly conducted verification provide the decision makers with an estimate of the uncertainty associated with model predictions. Several statistical tests are available for quantifying of the performance of a model. Six methods of verification were evaluated using an application of the BETTER two-dimensional water quality model for Chickamauga reservoir. Model predictions for ten state variables were compared to observed conditions from 1989. Spatial distributions of the verification measures showed the model predictions were generally adequate, except at a few specific locations in the reservoir. The most useful statistics were the mean standard error of the residuals. Quantifiable measures of model performance should be calculated during calibration and verification of future applications of the BETTER model. 25 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Appendix B of Attachment 3: Groundwater hydrology report, Attachment 4: Water resources protection strategy, Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Attachment 3 Groundwater Hydrology Report describes the hydrogeology, water quality, and water resources at the processing site and Dry Flats disposal site. The Hydrological Services calculations contained in Appendix A of Attachment 3, are presented in a separate report. Attachment 4 Water Resources Protection Strategy describes how the remedial action will be in compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater standards.

  2. Real-Time Water Quality Management in the Grassland Water District

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josphine R.; Taylor, Christophe M.; Marciochi, Don; Lower, Scott; Woodruff, Veronica; Wright, Diane; Poole, Tim

    2004-12-10

    The purpose of the research project was to advance the concept of real-time water quality management in the San Joaquin Basin by developing an application to drainage of seasonal wetlands in the Grassland Water District. Real-time water quality management is defined as the coordination of reservoir releases, return flows and river diversions to improve water quality conditions in the San Joaquin River and ensure compliance with State water quality objectives. Real-time water quality management is achieved through information exchange and cooperation between shakeholders who contribute or withdraw flow and salt load to or from the San Joaquin River. This project complements a larger scale project that was undertaken by members of the Water Quality Subcommittee of the San Joaquin River Management Program (SJRMP) and which produced forecasts of flow, salt load and San Joaquin River assimilative capacity between 1999 and 2003. These forecasts can help those entities exporting salt load to the River to develop salt load targets as a mechanism for improving compliance with salinity objectives. The mass balance model developed by this project is the decision support tool that helps to establish these salt load targets. A second important outcome of this project was the development and application of a methodology for assessing potential impacts of real-time wetland salinity management. Drawdown schedules are typically tied to weather conditions and are optimized in traditional practices to maximize food sources for over-wintering wildfowl as well as providing a biological control (through germination temperature) of undesirable weeds that compete with the more proteinaceous moist soil plants such as swamp timothy, watergrass and smartweed. This methodology combines high resolution remote sensing, ground-truthing vegetation surveys using established survey protocols and soil salinity mapping using rapid, automated electromagnetic sensor technology. This survey methodology could be complemented with biological surveys of bird use and invertebrates to produce a robust long-term monitoring strategy for habitat health and sustainability.

  3. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Water Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎RAPID/BulkTransmission/SiteWater Quality < RAPID‎ |

  4. Water Quality 101 Dr. Mike Mallin and Matthew McIver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Solids A measure of suspended particles in water, similar to turbidity Filter volume of water and weigh1 Water Quality 101 Dr. Mike Mallin and Matthew McIver Aquatic Ecology Laboratory UNCW-Center for Marine Science Common Water Quality Sampling Parameters and Analytical Procedures Water temperature

  5. 2009-12 "Hold a Planned DOE-EM Meeting on LANL Water Quality...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 "Hold a Planned DOE-EM Meeting on LANL Water Quality Programs in a Northern New Mexico Location" 2009-12 "Hold a Planned DOE-EM Meeting on LANL Water Quality Programs in a...

  6. Water quality modeling for the Kennet and Avon Canal, a navigational canal in an inland catchment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeckoski, Rebecca

    2010-10-12

    The Kennet and Avon Canal in southern England is experiencing severe water quality problems caused by inorganic sediment and algae. These water quality problems are affecting the angling sport of fishermen downstream of the confluence of the canal...

  7. Understanding the role of trading in water quality management : based on U.S. experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pharino, Chanathip

    2006-01-01

    This research demonstrates an overview of the performance of water quality trading programs currently implemented within the U.S. The role of trading in water quality management is identified through systematical comparisons ...

  8. Senate Committee Report on 2004 Appropriations for Energy and Water Strongly Endorses the Department's Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Senate Committee Report on 2004 Appropriations for Energy and Water Strongly Endorses the Department's Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP)

  9. WATER QUALITY IN THE FRASER RIVER ESTUARY JANUARY, 1993 TO MARCH, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;WATER QUALITY IN THE FRASER RIVER ESTUARY JANUARY, 1993 TO MARCH, 1994 TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES Consultants Ltd., Victoria, B.C. 2 EnviroEd Consultants Ltd., Victoria, B.C. for FREMP Water Quality Waste- Water quality in the Fraser River Estuary, January 1993 to March 1994 (Technical report series ; WQM 94

  10. Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process Abstract: The study investigates water quality pollution impacts on urbanization by analyzing temporal the greatest contributors of surface water quality pollution from 1996 to 2003. High values existed

  11. Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2010-01-01

    and water quality sondes) and dataloggers with software thatdata quality assurance and introduces a new software producteroded. Software tools for continuous data quality assurance

  12. Physico-chemical water quality in Ghana: Prospects for water supply technology implementation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Rossiter, H.M.A.; Owusu, P.A.; Richards, B.S.; Awuah, E.

    2009-01-01

    During an extensive sampling trial in Ghana, a number of physico-chemical water quality problems have been identified. For example, pH values of the collected samples ranged from 3.69 to 8.88, while conductivity ranged from 10 to 45,000 m...

  13. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include: evaluation of water treatment technology, source water protection planning, mitigation of nitrate Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Nitrate Contamination, Non Point Pollution, SoluteIllinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Illinois Water

  14. A computerized storage and retrieval system for water quality data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparr, Ted M

    1969-01-01

    processing run, The system designer cannot assure data base credibility if machine failure occurs during processing. For example, a par- tially completed data input action can leave directories which are no longer consistent with data that they index...~ a, I D E Col: 4a ' E b e e (Me', aber) A8STRACT A Computerized Storage and Retrieval System for Water Quality Data. (August l969) Ted H. Sparr, B. A. , Ohio Wesleyan Univereity; Directed by; Dr. Roy W, Harm, Jr, Automated data storage...

  15. EPA 401 Water Quality Certification website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsAreaforInformation ECrNEPAState NPDES401 Water Quality

  16. ADEQ 401 Water Quality Forms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as401 Water Quality Forms Jump to:

  17. Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Prevent runoff and shrubs, either through directly killing plants or making them more prone to disease. Fertilizer runoff into storm drains pollutes waterways. Maintain plant health and protect water quality by fertilizing

  18. Water Quality, Lake Sensitivity Ratings, and Septic Seepage Surveys of Six Lakes in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Water Quality, Lake Sensitivity Ratings, and Septic Seepage Surveys of Six Lakes in the Bridge..................................................................................... 6 3.1.4 Water Clarity................................................................................... 12 3.2.4 Water Clarity

  19. Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

    2003-10-14

    Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

  20. Advancing the concept of real-time water quality management in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    quality objectives #12;ALTERNATIVE TO SALT TMDL LOAD MANAGEMENT Real Time Component: Allows additional Project selenium load management Seasonal wetland water quality management in Grasslands Ecological Area JOAQUIN RIVER WATER QUALITY FORECASTING MODEL #12;GRASSLAND BYPASS PROJECT SELENIUM LOAD MANAGEMENT #12

  1. Research grants (For periods including 2004) Dynamic intra-seasonal irrigation management under water scarcity, water quality, irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prigozhin, Leonid

    Potential of Indigenous Water Harvesting System in the Karakum Desert U.S. Agency for International water scarcity, water quality, irrigation technology and environmental constraints. Y. Tsur, U. Shani, D of vegetation patterns in water limited systems M. Shachak and E. Meron Grantor: Israel Science Foundation

  2. In Press Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management -2009 INTEGRATED OPTIMIZATION OF A DUAL QUALITY WATER AND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    OF A DUAL QUALITY WATER AND1 WASTEWATER SYSTEM: A CASE STUDY OF GREATER BEIRUT, LEBANON2 3 Patrick A. Ray1 Greater Beirut25 2. Total unit costs to supply, reuse, and dispose of water in Greater Beirut, year 200026, disposal and reuse.39 Innovative water management strategies in general, and opportunities for water reuse

  3. Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management; Urban areas; Hydraulic models; Sand, filter; Parameters; Estimation; Water treatment. Author and nutrient removal is often low. Water quality performance of the sand filter can be evaluated by comparing a surface sand filter. If the water quality attributes of the sand filter can be confidently mod- eled

  4. Sewage disposal in the Musi-River, India: water quality remediation through irrigation infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    Sewage disposal in the Musi-River, India: water quality remediation through irrigation + Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract The disposal of untreated urban sewage in to open water bodies is common. This paper presents a 14 month (December 2003 ­ January 2005) water quality survey which aimed to quantify

  5. Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream using Itezhi-Tezhi Reservoir (Zambia) as a model system aims at defining optimized turbine withdrawal. The water depth of turbine withdrawals was varied in a set of simulations to optimize outflow water quality

  6. Hydrodynamics and Water Quality in Rodeo Lagoon, a Hypereutrophic Coastal Lagoon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cousins, Mary Alice Melugin

    2010-01-01

    influences on sediment resuspension and export in a shallowrelation to sedimentation, resuspension, water quality andsuch as sedimentation, resuspension, and turbulent mixing.

  7. 16 TAC, part 1, chapter 3, rule 3.93 Water Quality Certification...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 16 TAC, part 1, chapter 3, rule 3.93 Water Quality Certification DefinitionsLegal Abstract These rules outline the definitions...

  8. Decentralization and Environmental Quality: An International Analysis of Water Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Hilary

    2009-01-01

    Accounting Of?ce. Water Pollution: Differences in IssuingDecentralization and water pollution spillovers: EvidenceBene?t/Cost Analyses in Water Pollution Control, Washington,

  9. Water quality prediction for recreational use of Kranji Reservoir, Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yangyue

    2011-01-01

    Singapore has been making efforts in relieving its water shortage problems and has been making great progress through its holistic water management. Via the Active, Beautiful, Clean Waters (ABC Waters) Programme, Singapore's ...

  10. Virus removal by soil passage at field scale and ground-water protection of sandy aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    Virus removal by soil passage at field scale and ground- water protection of sandy aquifers J; The Netherlands (E-mail: Majid@ct.tudelft.nl) Abstract Virus removal from groundwater by soil passage often for attachment than thereafter. A model is presented which interprets virus removal as a function of collision

  11. There is a clear need in the public health and water resource management communities to develop modeling systems which provide robust predictions of water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contribution to the nearshore water quality. Specifically, it assumes that pollution introducedBackground There is a clear need in the public health and water resource management communities to develop modeling systems which provide robust predictions of water quality and water quality standard

  12. BENEFITS OF IMPROVING WATER QUALITY IN THE ABBOTSFORD AQUIFER: AN APPLICATION OF CONTINGENT VALUATION METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the surface in many places; this does not allow the soil to filter much fertilizer or fecal waste. Water. As well, defense expenditures (actual outlays on bottled water and water filters) and a ranking method#12;BENEFITS OF IMPROVING WATER QUALITY IN THE ABBOTSFORD AQUIFER: AN APPLICATION OF CONTINGENT

  13. Water Quality Improvements: How do we know if we're doing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Water Quality Improvements: How do we know if we're doing Good? Steven J. Taff Department of Applied Economics University of Minnesota Water Seminar Series University of Nebraska - Lincoln February drive water policy (and, hence values: flooding, Grand Forks, ND 6 #12;Water pollution, Lake Superior 7

  14. Shallow ground-water flow, water levels, and quality of water, 1980-84, Cowles Unit, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, D.A.; Shedlock, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Cowles Unit of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in Porter County, northwest Indiana, contains a broad dune-beach complex along the southern shoreline of Lake Michigan and a large wetland, called the Great Marsh, that occupies the lowland between the shoreline dunes and an older dune-beach complex farther inland. Water levels and water quality in the surficial aquifer were monitored from 1977 to 1984 near settling ponds on adjacent industrial property at the western end of the Cowles Unit. Since 1980, when the settling pond bottoms were sealed, these intradunal lowlands contained standing water only during periods of high snowmelt or rainfall. Water level declines following the cessation of seepage ranged from 6 feet at the eastern-most settling pond to nearly 14 feet at the western-most pond. No general pattern of water table decline was observed in the Great Marsh or in the shoreline dune complex at distances > 3,000 ft east or north of the settling ponds. Since the settling ponds were sealed, the concentration of boron has decreased while concentrations of cadmium, arsenic, zinc, and molybdenum in shallow ground-water downgradient of the ponds show no definite trends in time. Arsenic, boron and molybdenum have remained at concentrations above those of shallow groundwater in areas unaffected by settling pond seepage. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Selecting a Green Roof Medium for Water Quality Benefits Brett Long, S. ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Selecting a Green Roof Medium for Water Quality Benefits Brett Long, S. ASCE1 ; Shirley E. Clark, F: rdb4@psu.edu ABSTRACT Green roofs are a best management practice for urban areas where land roofs that will improve roof runoff quality while maintaining the known water retention benefits

  16. Hurricane Effects on Water Quality and Benthos in the Cape Fear Watershed: Natural and Anthropogenic Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Hurricane Effects on Water Quality and Benthos in the Cape Fear Watershed: Natural 1999 by the Ecolog~calSociety of America HURRICANE EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY AND BENTHOS IN THE CAPE, southeastern North Carolina, United States, was struck by two hurricanes, with the second (Hurricane Fran

  17. Surface Water Quality Modeling Pollutant Release from a Surface Source during Rainfall Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Surface Water Quality Modeling Pollutant Release from a Surface Source during Rainfall Runoff M. Todd Walter,* J.-Y. Parlange, M. F. Walter, X. Xin, and C. A. Scott ABSTRACT different pollutants were is recognized as an impor- Agricultural runoff water quality research has primar-tant mode of nonpoint

  18. Erosion Control Progress in the HUA IDAHO SNAKE-PAYETTE RIVERS --HUA WATER QUALITY PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Erosion Control Progress in the HUA IDAHO SNAKE-PAYETTE RIVERS -- HUA WATER QUALITY PROJECT FINAL water quality within the HUA used in #12;2 -- Erosion Control IDAHO SNAKE-PAYETTE RIVERS -- HUA WATER from farms­thus improving surface water quality. The technologies used to improve erosion control

  19. PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH THE TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    is being utilized to improve the characteristics of manure for beneficial reuse in crop production systems are available for each production field. Livestock manures have been used for centuries in crop production Protection Agency through the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Using Dairy ManureUsing Dairy Manure

  20. PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH THE TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    operations, municipal wastewater treatment facilities, and food industries. A properly composted product such as rice hulls, sawdust, yard waste or manures should be fully composted. Odor No foul odor Material should Protection Agency through the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Using CompostUsing Compost

  1. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental, LLC

    2011-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

  2. Feasibility Study of the Effects of Water Quality on Soil Properties in the Red River Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerard, C. J.; Hipp, B. W.; Runkles, J. R.; Bordovsky, D. J.; McCully, W. G.

    1981-01-01

    The suitability of water for irrigation depends upon many factors, of primary concern is the quantity and quality of salts present in the water Ayers and Wescot1. If total dissolved solids in the irrigation water are too high, salts accumulate...

  3. Informa(on and Resources The Impact of Pes/cides on Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    . · Water moves from high to low elevations after rainfall, snowmelt, or irrigation. · Rain, melting snowInforma(on and Resources The Impact of Pes/cides on Water Quality What is a watershed and why is it important? · A watershed is an area of land that drains into a common body of water

  4. ABSTRACT: The concern about water quality in inland water bodies such as lakes and reservoirs has been increasing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaubey, Indrajeet

    , many researchers have employed the digital evaluation of remote sensing information at visible and near infrared (NIR) wavelengths to assess these water quality parameters in various water bod- ies (e sensor radiances to surface concentrations are effective, and the results are relatively good (Baruah et

  5. Quality and Membrane Treatability of the Lake Houston Water Supply 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chellam, Shankar; Sharma, Ramesh; Shetty, Grishma; Wei, Ying

    2001-10-01

    fouling rates and increase chemical cleaning intervals during surface water nanofiltration (NF) (4). Therefore, an integrated membrane system employing MF or UF pretreatment to NF is expected to be an important treatment candidate for Lake Houston water...

  6. Managing Grazing for Water Quality Integrating research and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    tool box ­ not silver bullet. Factors that increase risk of water pollution with pathogens Distribution areas Distribution spaceDistribution space Factors that reduce risk of water pollution with pathogens that increase risk of water pollution with pathogens Distribution timeDistribution time cattle defecate near

  7. LINKING WATER QUALITY WITH AGRICULTURAL INTENSIFICATION IN A RURAL WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    , agricultural pollution, animal waste, land-water interactions, nitrate, nitrogen surplus, nonpoint source pollution, water pollution, watershed management 1. Background Agriculture is rapidly emerging not require extra nutrients. Animal waste is primarily applied to soils, Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 127

  8. South Asia Water Resources Workshop: An effort to promote water quality data sharing in South Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAJEN,GAURAV; BIRINGER,KENT L.; BETSILL,J. DAVID

    2000-04-01

    To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group comprised of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the US convened at the Soaltee Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, September 12 to 14, 1999. The workshop was sponsored in part by the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The CMC promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in regions throughout the world as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. In the long term, the workshop organizers and participants are interested in the significance of regional information sharing as a means to build confidence and reduce conflict. The intermediate interests of the group focus on activities that might eventually foster regional management of some aspects of water resources utilization. The immediate purpose of the workshop was to begin the implementation phase of a project to collect and share water quality information at a number of river and coastal estuary locations throughout the region. The workshop participants achieved four objectives: (1) gaining a better understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of existing regional organizations promoting environmental cooperation in South Asia; (3) identifying sites within the region at which data is to be collected; and (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process.

  9. Distrbuted Sensing Systems for Water Quality Assesment and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    system require service? Has a sewer reached capacity duringManagement of Combined Sewer Overflows 1. Sensors andQuality 4.4 Combined Sewer Overflows 5. Recommendations for

  10. Water Quality and Quantity in Intermittent and Continuous Piped Water Supplies in Hubli-Dharwad, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumpel, Emily Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Household and utility metrics under intermittent water2.5 Mechanisms when water supply is on . . . . . . . . .5.2.1 Household water

  11. Just Water? Social Disparities and Drinking Water Quality in California's San Joaquin Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balazs, Carolina Laurie

    2011-01-01

    and multiple community water board collaboration: Modelsto secure, safe and affordable drinking water for all. UCMerced, Merced, CA. American Water Works Association. 2003.

  12. Prediction of postmine ground-water quality at a Texas surface lignite mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Clifton Farrell

    1995-01-01

    The prediction Of postmine ground-water quality is encumbered with many complications resulting from the complex hydrologic system found in mine spoils. Current analytical methods such as acid/base accounting have only had limited success...

  13. Effects of Biochar Recycling on Switchgrass Growth and Soil and Water Quality in Bioenergy Production Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husmoen, Derek Howard

    2012-07-16

    sources of mineral nutrients and organic carbon for sustaining biomass productivity and preserving soil and water. Yet, research is needed to verify that recycling of pyrolysis biochars will enhance crop growth and soil and environmental quality similar...

  14. WAC - 173-200 Water Quality Standards for Groundwaters of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    200 Water Quality Standards for Groundwaters of the State of Washington Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC...

  15. The Impact of Harvesting and Site Preparation on Stormflow and Water Quality in East Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Knight, R. W.; Weichert, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    In 1979, nine small forested watersheds were instrumented in East Texas to determine the effect of intensive forest management practices on water quantity and quality. Three replications of three treatments were used: 1) clearcutting - followed...

  16. Radioactive Water Treatment at a United States Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Site - 12322

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, John C.

    2012-07-01

    A water treatment system at a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Superfund site impacted by radiological contaminants is used to treat water entering the site. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is actively managing the remedial action for the USEPA using contracts to support the multiple activities on site. The site is where former gas mantle production facilities operated around the turn of the century. The manufacturing facilities used thorium ores to develop the mantles and disposed of off-specification mantles and ore residuals in the surrounding areas. During Site remedial actions, both groundwater and surface water comes into contact with contaminated soils and must be collected and treated at an on-site treatment facility. The radionuclides thorium and radium with associated progeny are the main concern for treatment. Suspended solids, volatile organic compounds, and select metals are also monitored during water treatment. The water treatment process begins were water is pumped to a collection tank where debris and grit settle out. Stored water is pumped to a coagulant tank containing poly-aluminum chloride to collect dissolved solids. The water passes into a reaction tube where aspirated air is added or reagent added to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC'S) by mass transfer and convert dissolved iron to a solid. The water enters the flocculent polymer tank to drop solids out. The flocculated water overflows to a fluidized bed contact chamber to increase precipitation. Flocculation is where colloids of material drop out of suspension and settle. The settled solids are periodically removed and disposed of as radioactive waste. The water is passed through filters and an ion exchange process to extract the radionuclides. Several million liters of water are processed each year from two water treatment plants servicing different areas of the remediation site. Ion exchange resin and filter material are periodically replaced and disposed of as radioactive waste. A total of 0.85 m{sup 3} of waste sludge per year requires disposal on average, in addition to another 6.6 m{sup 3} of waste cartridge filters. All water discharges are regulated by a state of New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit implemented by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Clean Water Act). Laboratory analyses are required to satisfy requirements of the state NPDES permit. Specific monitoring parameters and discharge rates will be provided. Use of the water treatment systems drastically reduces the amount of contaminated water requiring solidification and water disposal to near zero. Millions of liters of potentially contaminated water from excavation activities is treated and released within permit limits. A small volume of solid radioactive waste (21 cubic meters) is generated annually from water treatment process operations. Management of ground and surface water is effectively controlled in remediation areas by the use of sumps, erosion control measures and pumping of water to storage vessels. Continued excavations can be made as water impacting the site is effectively controlled. (authors)

  17. Green Roofs: Optimizing the Water Quality of Rooftop Runoff Brett Long1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Green Roofs: Optimizing the Water Quality of Rooftop Runoff Brett Long1 , Shirley E. Clark1 roofing is an accepted stormwater control technology, little is known about the quality of the roof runoff. In Phase I of this research, several green roof media (formed from commonly-used expanded minerals

  18. A Modeling Study of the Potential Water Quality Impacts from In-Stream Tidal Energy Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-09

    To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system. Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. However, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.

  19. Water quantity and quality model for the evaluation of water-management strategies in the Netherlands: application to the province of Friesland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, J.J.; Griffioen, P.S.; Groot, S.; Los, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    The Netherlands have a rather complex water-management system consisting of a number of major rivers, canals, lakes and ditches. Water-quantity management on a regional scale is necessary for an effective water-quality policy. To support water management, a computer model was developed that includes both water quality and water quantity, based on three submodels: ABOPOL for the water movement, DELWAQ for the calculation of water quality variables and BLOOM-II for the phytoplankton growth. The northern province of Friesland was chosen as a test case for the integrated model to be developed, where water quality is highly related to the water distribution and the main trade-off is minimizing the intake of (eutrophicated) alien water in order to minimize external nutrient load and maximizing the intake in order to flush channels and lakes. The results of the application of these models to this and to a number of hypothetical future situations are described.

  20. Water Quality Surface and Ground | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland: EnergyPage EditWater Power ForumWaterWater

  1. EM Completes Project to Maintain Water Quality of Spent Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and CH2M-WG, Idaho (CWI) removed and replaced tiny, beaded media, called resin, used to filter millions of gallons of water necessary to cool and provide radiological shielding...

  2. Decentralization and Environmental Quality: An International Analysis of Water Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Hilary

    2009-01-01

    D. Political institutions and pollution control, Review ofAccounting Of?ce. Water Pollution: Differences in IssuingReal Story of the War on Air Pollution. Washington, DC: Cato

  3. Water Quality Issues facing Indigenous Peoples in North America and Siberia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehl, Heidi Elizabeth

    2009-04-29

    .........................................................................................................................71 References Cited..........................................................................................................................................72 Figures 1. Map showing ecoregions and location of water-quality monitoring sites... ..............................................................................................47 14. Relation between triazine herbicide concentrations determined by enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay and atrazine concentrations determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for samples collected from surface-water monitoring sites...

  4. Evaluation of water quality in an agricultural watershed as affected by almond pest management practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    management practices (PMPs) on water quality. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was employed orchard use. This paper presented a novel method of studying the environmental impacts of different prac- tices (PMPs), such as the application of organophosphate (OP) pesticides and oil mixtures during

  5. La Jolla Children's Pool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvement Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elwany, Hany; Flick, Reinhard; Nichols, Jean; Lindquist, Anne-Lise

    1998-01-01

    LA JOLLA CHILDREN'S POOL BEACH MANAGEMENT AND WATER QUALITY98-9 La Jolla Children's Pool Beach Management and WaterHISTORY OF CHILDREN'S POOL B E A C H 3. B A S E L I N E S U

  6. Watershed modelling of hydrology and water quality in the Sacramento River watershed, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    Watershed modelling of hydrology and water quality in the Sacramento River watershed, California contamination in California's Sacramento River watershed where 8500 km2 of agricultural land influences water components were assessed for the Sacramento River watershed. To represent flood conveyance in the area

  7. Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Surface Water Quality Pollutant Removal Efficacy of Three Wet Detention Ponds Michael A. Mallin the natureand outflowing water nutrient concentrations. There were substantial suburban runoff inputs entering-circuited pollutant removal contact time. The golf course pond geometry of the system. showed significant increases

  8. TOXICITY OF SEDIMENTS As water quality has improved over the past three decades in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T TOXICITY OF SEDIMENTS Overview As water quality has improved over the past three decades in North America, diffuse sources of pollution such as storm- water runoff and sediments are now recognized as long-term, widespread pollutant sources to aquatic systems. Substantial impacts on the ecosystem from sediment

  9. CE-QUAL-W2 Version 3: Hydrodynamic and Water Quality River Basin Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    and Oregon; the Bull Run River basin composed of 3 water sup- ply reservoirs and 2 river sections with a 2CE-QUAL-W2 Version 3: Hydrodynamic and Water Quality River Basin Modeling S. A. Wells Department for deep, long, and narrow waterbodies. The current model, Version 2, has been used in over 200 river

  10. Hydrodynamic and water quality river basin modeling using CE-QUAL-W2 version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    of the Lower Snake River in the Northwestern USA; the Bull Run River basin composed of 3 water supplyHydrodynamic and water quality river basin modeling using CE-QUAL-W2 version 3 Scott A. Wells for deep, long, and narrow waterbodies. The current model, Version 2, has been used in over 200 river

  11. Tissue-based water quality biosensors for detecting chemical warfare agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN); Sanders, Charlene A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2003-05-27

    A water quality sensor for detecting the presence of at least one chemical or biological warfare agent includes: a cell; apparatus for introducing water into the cell and discharging water from the cell adapted for analyzing photosynthetic activity of naturally occurring, free-living, indigenous photosynthetic organisms in water; a fluorometer for measuring photosynthetic activity of naturally occurring, free-living, indigenous photosynthetic organisms drawn into the cell; and an electronics package that analyzes raw data from the fluorometer and emits a signal indicating the presence of at least one chemical or biological warfare agent in the water.

  12. Social Perceptions of Drinking Water Quality in South Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Victor

    2011-04-28

    The lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of Texas is one of the poorest regions with the largest population lacking suitable water supply in the entire United States. The region is characterized by low-income, rural and peri-urban communities called...

  13. Waste stream recycling: Its effect on water quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, D.A. (Environmental Engineering and Technology Inc., Newport Ness, VA (United States)); Lee, R.G. (Illinois-American Water Co., Belleville, IL (United States))

    1994-11-01

    Waste streams recycled to the influent of a water treatment plant typically contain contaminants at concentrations that are of concern. These contaminants may include giardia and Cryptosporidium, trihalomethanes, manganese, and assimilable organic carbon. This research shows that proper management--treatment, equalization, and monitoring--of the waste streams can render them suitable for recycling in many situations.

  14. 16 au Spring 2012 esri.com Areas of concern defined by ZIP Code Water quality monitoring station and hydro buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Bureau of Water, Division of Water Quality) Control Projects on impaired water bodies in South Carolina. Water bodies that do not meet water quality16 au Spring 2012 esri.com Areas of concern defined by ZIP Code Water quality monitoring station

  15. Utah Division of Water Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:PowerNewPumaty Jump to:UAC R930-6CommerceQuality Jump

  16. Utah Water Quality Standards Workgroup Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:PowerNewPumaty JumpRules ofOfficeQuality Standards

  17. WDEQ-Water Quality Division | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)Vossloh Kiepe Jump to: navigation,Quality

  18. Regional Water Quality Control Boards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield1989) JumpLiterature Review |

  19. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  20. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practice Case Study #12 - Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blakley, H.

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. The projects highlighted in this case study demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in laboratory and medical equipment by implementing vacuum pump and steam sterilizer replacements and retrofits. Due to the success of the initial vacuum pump and steam sterilizer projects described here, EPA is implementing similar projects at several laboratories throughout the nation.

  1. A modeling approach to evaluate the impacts of water quality management plans implemented in a watershed in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of polluted water bodies, the United States * Corresponding author. Tel.: C1 2547746000; fax: C1 2547746001. E water quality standards, allocates pollution control responsibilities among pollution sourcesA modeling approach to evaluate the impacts of water quality management plans implemented

  2. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - 401 Water Quality Certification

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarren Park,| Open Energy Information 401 Water

  3. Two-dimensional water quality modeling of Town Creek embayment on Guntersville Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, M.D.; Shiao, Ming C.; Hauser, G.E. . Engineering Lab.); Butkus, S.R. . Water Quality Dept.)

    1990-09-01

    TVA investigated water quality of Town Creek embayment using a branched two-dimensional model of Guntersville Reservoir. Simulation results were compared in terms of algal biomass, nutrient concentrations, and volume of embayment with depleted dissolved oxygen. Stratification and flushing play a significant role in the embayment water quality. Storms introduce large loadings of organics, nutrients, and suspended solids. Dissolved oxygen depletion is most severe after storms followed by low flow that fails to flush the embayment. Embayment water quality responses to potential animal waste and erosion controls were explored. Modeling indicated animal waste controls were much more cost-effective than erosion controls. Erosion controls will decrease embayment suspended solids and thereby increase algal biomass due to greater light penetration. 29 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Design and installation of continuous flow and water qualitymonitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower SanJoaquin River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-01-20

    This project deliverable describes a number ofstate-of-the-art, telemetered, flow and water quality monitoring stationsthat were designed, instrumented and installed in cooperation with localirrigation water districts to improve water quality simulation models ofthe lower San Joaquin River, California. This work supports amulti-disciplinary, multi-agency research endeavor to develop ascience-based Total Maximum Daily Load for dissolved oxygen in the SanJoaquin River and Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel.

  5. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Recreation, Waste Water Descriptors: Water Quality Standards,Water Quality Monitoring, Water Quality, Viruses

  6. Application of Specialized Optimization Techniques in Water Quantity and Quality Management with Respect to Planning for the Trinity River Basi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier Jr., W. L.; Shih, C. S.

    1970-01-01

    One of the major problems in the United States today involves controlling and limiting the pollution of the nation's water resources. The quality of water in streams, reservoirs and estuaries is continually being altered by natural and man...

  7. Authority of states of use section 401 water quality certification to deny or condition Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licenses. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, E.O.

    1994-09-01

    This thesis discusses a recent United States Supreme Court case that will have a profound influence on the licensure of hydroelectric projects and the related ability of States to protect the quality of their waters. On October 4, 1993, the Supreme Court granted a Writ of Certiorari to resolve a conflict among the state courts of last resort. This case involves two fundamental and competing national interests: the nation's thirst for cheap, dependable power versus its equally strong desire to improve the quality of its water resources. It also involves two underlying regulatory regimes that overlap and conflict with each other in some ways. This case illustrates how those two national interests and their underlying regulatory regimes cannot always be reconciled. It also demonstrates how Congress, with its muddled ways of passing legislation, can create conflicts between federal and state regulatory agencies.

  8. Headwater Influences on Downstream Water Quality Walter K. Dodds Robert M. Oakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodds, Walter

    streams Á Nonpoint source pollution Á Riparian zones Á Watershed management Introduction Nonpoint source quality variation among watersheds. These findings suggest that nonpoint pollution control strategies pollution is a serious problem that degrades surface waters and aquatic ecosystems. Loading of nutrients

  9. SEISMIC IMAGING TO HELP UNDERSTAND AND MANAGE WATER QUALITY IN COASTAL BENIN, WEST AFRICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    SEISMIC IMAGING TO HELP UNDERSTAND AND MANAGE WATER QUALITY IN COASTAL BENIN, WEST AFRICA WHERE mitigate saltwater intrusion. WHO: Boise State University; Gonzaga University; l'Université d intrusion and this problem is likely to worsen without significant steps to improve management

  10. Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R bioaccumulation in localized areas of shale gas wastewater disposal. INTRODUCTION The safe disposal of large States, oil and gas wastewater is managed through recycling of the wastewater for shale gas operations

  11. The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling be the result of drilling activities, including shale gas drilling. Monitoring techniques exist for detecting discuss these techniques in more detail within the context of shale gas drilling activities in New York

  12. A new technique to monitor ground-water quality at municipal solid waste landfills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Steven Charles

    1989-01-01

    31 37 37 37 40' 41 SITE CHARACTERIZATION Test Site , Geology . Hydrogeology Soil Characteristics Climate . . . , . . . . . . Baseline Geophysical Investigation Site Investigation Methodology Results and Discussion Geology Rainfall... Hydrogeology . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . Ground-water quality TEST OF RESISTIVITY MONITORING TECHNIOUE Methods Results and Discussion Station 3+00 Station 11+00 Station 33+00 Summary CONCLUSIONS RECOMMENDATIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX A CORE...

  13. Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected by Hydropower Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydroelectric projects are run-of-river facilities with very limited capability for storage and flow regulationAppendix E Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected in the Columbia River was identified in the 1960's and 1970's as a potential detriment to salmon. Those concerns

  14. The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foust, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    stream_source_info The battle of bacteria.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5899 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name The battle of bacteria.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 txH2O... | pg. 20 Story by Margaret Foust Bacteria is the No. 1 pollutant of water in Texas, causing many of the state?s water bodies to be placed on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet contact recreation use standards...

  15. The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foust, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info The battle of bacteria.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5899 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name The battle of bacteria.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 txH2O... | pg. 20 Story by Margaret Foust Bacteria is the No. 1 pollutant of water in Texas, causing many of the state?s water bodies to be placed on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet contact recreation use standards...

  16. Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division: Best Management Practice Case Study #14; Alternate Water Sources (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-02-01

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the air handler condensate recovery program at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division.

  17. Water quality analysis of the piped water supply in Tamale, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Allison Jean

    2014-01-01

    The United Nation's Millennium Development Goal Target 7.C is to "halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water". While the UN claimed to have met this goal, studies ...

  18. Reservoir/River System Reliability Considering Water Rights and Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Torres, Gerardo; Dunn, David D.

    1994-01-01

    availability studies. However, from a practical water management perspective, these are the controlling factors in many river basins in Texas and elsewhere. The study documented by this report provides expanded capabilities for modeling and analysis...

  19. Monitoring Phosphorus Content in a Tropical Estuary Lagoon using an Hyperspectral Sensor and its Application to Water Quality Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 Monitoring Phosphorus Content in a Tropical Estuary Lagoon using an Hyperspectral Sensor and its Application to Water Quality Modeling Project Number: 2005PR20B Start: 03/01/2004 End: 12 Quality Board (EQB), conducted water and sediments sampling survey on the SJBNE. While on certain sections

  20. By contributing the collected data to the California Environmental Data Exchange Network (CEDEN) and in turn EPA's Water Quality Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    By contributing the collected data to the California Environmental Data Exchange Network (CEDEN) and in turn EPA's Water Quality Exchange (WQX), the Bay-Delta Regional Data Center (RDC) will ensure broad to standardize and manage water quality data, and align resource-management and regulatory needs. Upload data

  1. Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy

    2009-03-30

    The ISEMP program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the spring 2008, PNW redeployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. This resumed previous data collection that was interrupted by river ice in early December 2007. Instruments were again removed from the river in early December 2008. This annual report covers the period from December 2007 through December 2008. The highest pH values occurred during the low-flow period from midsummer through the following midspring then dropped sharply during the annual snowmelt runoff period from late spring through early summer. Water temperature began rapidly increasing during the receding limb of the annual snowmelt hydrograph. Highest mean monthly temperatures occurred in July and August, while instantaneous maxima occurred during the period July-September. Dissolved oxygen reached its lowest levels during the period of highest water temperature in July-September. Specific conductivity remained very low at all sites throughout the year.

  2. Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state of Florida to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the air and waters of the state. This Act authorizes the Department of Environmental Protection to enact...

  3. PAPA--Univ. Calif. IPM Program--SF Bay Water Quality Control Board Integrated Pest Management for Landscapes and Public Agencies Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    PAPA--Univ. Calif. IPM Program--SF Bay Water Quality Control Board Integrated Pest Management Quality Janet O'Hara, Water Resource Control Engineer, SFB Water Quality Control Board 9:05 IPM Update - Ag Commissioner's Office Representative 8:30 New Regulations Related to Pesticides and Water

  4. Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems for Great Lakes water quality monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lathrop, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of three operational satellite remote sensing systems, namely, the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), the SPOT High Resolution Visible (HRV) sensors and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), were evaluated as a means of estimating water quality and surface temperature. Empirical calibration through linear regression techniques was used to relate near-simultaneously acquired satellite radiance/reflectance data and water quality observations obtained in Green Bay and the nearshore waters of Lake Michigan. Four dates of TM and one date each of SPOT and AVHRR imagery/surface reference data were acquired and analyzed. Highly significant relationships were identified between the TM and SPOT data and secchi disk depth, nephelometric turbidity, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids (TSS), absorbance, and surface temperature (TM only). The AVHRR data were not analyzed independently but were used for comparison with the TM data. Calibrated water quality image maps were input to a PC-based raster GIS package, EPPL7. Pattern interpretation and spatial analysis techniques were used to document the circulation dynamics and model mixing processes in Green Bay. A GIS facilitates the retrieval, query and spatial analysis of mapped information and provides the framework for an integrated operational monitoring system for the Great Lakes.

  5. Synthesis of gold nano-particles in a microfluidic platform for water quality monitoring applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Sayak

    2009-05-15

    the quality of drinking water supplies. According to the source of this article, the chemistry and the microchips have been formulated and tested for optical detection of ammonium, phosphorus and aluminium. The response time for ammonium detection...) types. Jerman [28] fabricated a bi-metallic microvalve with a Silicon layer of 8-micrometer thickness and an Aluminium layer of 5-micron thickness. Rich and Wise [29] developed a microvalve based on the thermo-pneumatic concept. Ruzzu et al. [30...

  6. Water Quality Monitoring in the Buck Creek Watershed and Facilitation of Buck Creek Watershed Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Dyer, P.

    2013-01-01

    & 20376); two are in AU 0207A_02 (stations 20365 & 20368) and one is located on a tributary of the creek (station 20367). Building on this recommendation, two additional sites were included in the Interim Monitoring project. These added stations... the Interim Monitoring project Table 1. Water quality monitoring station descriptions Project? Site?No.?? TCEQ? Monitoring? Station?No.? General?Station?Location?&?Description? County? TCEQ Assessment Unit Station is Located In BC 03 20365 Buck...

  7. Implementation of a Geographic Information System for municipal water quality assurance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Eileen Marie

    1996-01-01

    Design and Project documents to replace the old CADnet system. 2. Continue to develop and improve tbe new Automated Mapping System. ~ acquire Piauimetric Maps of newly annexed area in tbe Tideflats including any areas outside the City required for thc... for the degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE May 1996 Major Subject: Natural Resources Development IMPLEMENTATION OF A GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR MUNICIPAL WATER QUALITY ASSURANCE A Professional Paper by Eileen Marie Murphy Approved as to style...

  8. Attachment B: Jamaica Bay Watershed Protection Plan Update 1. WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Bay. Ongoing NYCDEP continues to limit shipments. NA NA DEP See attached status report. Upgrade will accommodate daily transshipments instead of a few times a week to ensure all Jamaica sludge is treated via excess algae and sea lettuce to reduce nitrogen and produce biodiesel fuels. Design anticipated to begin

  9. Fall even years Spring odd years CE G7100 Water & Wastewater Quality CE G0800 GIS in WREE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Drinking Water Treatment CE H0800 Applied Hydraulics CE 58300/H8300 Air Pollution and Control CE 56600/H7600 Biological Wastewater Treatment CE 58400/H8400 Solid Waste Management CE 48200 WaterFall even years Spring odd years CE G7100 Water & Wastewater Quality CE G0800 GIS in WREE CE G8100

  10. Associations among Plankton Abundance, Water Quality And Sediment Quality In The San Francisco Bay: Nitrogen And Phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritsch, Monica

    2011-01-01

    2. Comparison of water pollution (estimated by phosphate andsediment pollution, water pollution, and plankton abundancea connection between water pollution levels and plankton

  11. Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01

    tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course... AgriLife Research, the River Systems Institute at Texas State University, Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research at Tarleton State University, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create the Texas Watershed Planning...

  12. Protecting Solar Rights in California Through an Exploration of the California Water Doctrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedman, Anna

    2011-01-01

    New Rights in Western Waters.  Lincoln: University of Arthur L. , and Eric L.  Garner.  California Water II.  Managing California's Water.  San Francisco, CA: Public 

  13. Protecting Solar Rights in California Through an Exploration of the California Water Doctrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedman, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Nevertheless water and solar energy share many similar resource.  Water and solar energy share several  properties that both water and solar energy share that  make the 

  14. Protecting Solar Rights in California Through an Exploration of the California Water Doctrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedman, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the potential for solar access conflicts One potential drawback, however, from establishing solar potential installers throughout California.      In order to secure protection for solar 

  15. Protecting Solar Rights in California Through an Exploration of the California Water Doctrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedman, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Issue  While both water and solar energy share many similar to make rooftop solar energy capture a substantial Nevertheless water and solar energy share many similar 

  16. A cost-effective, environmentally-responsive ground-water monitoring procedure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doucette, Richard Charles

    1994-01-01

    Ground-water monitoring is the primary method used to protect our ground-water resources. The primary objectives of monitoring programs are to detect, to attribute, and to mitigate any changes in-water quality or quantity. Previous monitoring...

  17. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  18. Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G; Stewart, Arthur J; Loar, James M

    2011-01-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  19. Effect of Forest Site Preparation and Livestock Grazing on Stormflow and Water Quality in the South East 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, T. K.; Blackburn, W. H.; Weichert, A. T.; Dobrowolski, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    of Texas. However, little is known about the influence of intensive forest practices or livestock grazing on water quality, yield or site productivity in Texas. This is the only instrumented watershed study in Texas or Louisiana that is currently evaluating...

  20. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) for assessment of microbial water quality: current progress, challenges, and future opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, BoonFei

    Water quality is an emergent property of a complex system comprised of interacting microbial populations and introduced microbial and chemical contaminants. Studies leveraging next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies ...

  1. Amending constructed roadside and urban soils with large volume-based compost applications: effects on water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Nels Edward

    2007-04-25

    Mineral nutrients imported in composted dairy manure (CDM) and municipal biosolid (CMB) amendments for highway-rights-of-way and urban landscapes can pose a threat to surface water quality. Treatments were developed to evaluate recommendations...

  2. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  3. Water quality improvements in the Upper North Bosque River watershed due to phosphorous export through turfgrass sod 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, George Russell

    2005-02-17

    -1 WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN THE UPPER NORTH BOSQUE RIVER WATERSHED DUE TO PHOSPHOROUS EXPORT THROUGH TURFGRASS SOD A Thesis by GEORGE R. STEWART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN THE UPPER NORTH BOSQUE RIVER WATERSHED DUE...

  4. Field study of gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions: Protective Barrier Program Status Reprt - FY 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Thiede, M.E.; Kemp, C.J.; Cadwell, L.L. Link, S.O.

    1990-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) are collaborating on a field study of the effects of gravel admixtures on plant growth and soil water storage in protective barriers. Protective barriers are engineered earthern covers designed to prevent water, plants, and animals from contacting buried waste and transporting contaminants to groundwater or the land surface. Some of the proposed designs include gravel admixtures or gravel mulches on the barrier surface to control soil loss by wind and runoff. The purpose of this study is to measure, in a field setting, the influence of surface gravel additions on soil water storage and plant cover. The study plots are located northwest of the Yakima Gate in the McGee Ranch old field. Here we report the status of work completed in FY 1989 on the creation of a data management system, a test of water application uniformity, field calibration of neutron moisture gages, and an analysis of the response of plants to various combinations of gravel admixtures and increased rainfall. 23 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. E-mail: whare@udc.eduhttp://www.udc.edu//wrri Integrating Water Quality Monitoring and Modeling as a Tool for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    of mathematical models as a predictive tool for water resource management. Pollution Sources and Consequences system Ground water quality Storm water Wastewater treatment plant Rainfall runoff Environmental treatment modeling and process optimization ·SWMM Model: Storm water quantity and quality modeling and urban

  6. U.A.C. R317-15: Water Quality Certification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy ResourcesLake,FallonHazardous5: Water Quality

  7. File:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdf Jump to:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf Jump

  8. Evaluation of Ships' Ballast Water as a Vector for Transfer of Pathogenic Bacteria to Marine Protected Areas in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Theresa L

    2013-05-10

    . These organisms have moved to the forefront of ballast water management (BWM) trepidations because they compose serious threats to human health as well as Marine Protected Area (MPA) ecosystems such as coral reefs. Ballasting activities of ships calling...

  9. West Village Community: Quality Management Processes and Preliminary Heat Pump Water Heater Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakin, B.; Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.; German, A.

    2012-11-01

    West Village, a multi-use project underway at the University of California Davis, represents a ground-breaking sustainable community incorporating energy efficiency measures and on-site renewable generation to achieve community-level Zero Net Energy (ZNE) goals. The project when complete will provide housing for students, faculty, and staff with a vision to minimize the community's impact on energy use by reducing building energy use, providing on-site generation, and encouraging alternative forms of transportation. This focus of this research is on the 192 student apartments that were completed in 2011 under Phase I of the West Village multi-year project. The numerous aggressive energy efficiency measures implemented result in estimated source energy savings of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. There are two primary objectives of this research. The first is to evaluate performance and efficiency of the central heat pump water heaters as a strategy to provide efficient electric water heating for net-zero all-electric buildings and where natural gas is not available on site. In addition, effectiveness of the quality assurance and quality control processes implemented to ensure proper system commissioning and to meet program participation requirements is evaluated. Recommendations for improvements that could improve successful implementation for large-scale, high performance communities are identified.

  10. West Village Community. Quality Management Processes and Preliminary Heat Pump Water Heater Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakin, B.; Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.; German, A.

    2012-11-01

    West Village, a multi-use project underway at the University of California Davis, represents a ground-breaking sustainable community incorporating energy efficiency measures and on-site renewable generation to achieve community-level Zero Net Energy (ZNE) goals. When complete, the project will provide housing for students, faculty, and staff with a vision to minimize the community’s impact on energy use by reducing building energy use, providing on-site generation, and encouraging alternative forms of transportation. This focus of this research is on the 192 student apartments that were completed in 2011 under Phase I of the West Village multi-year project. The numerous aggressive energy efficiency measures implemented result in estimated source energy savings of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. There are two primary objectives of this research. The first is to evaluate performance and efficiency of the central heat pump water heaters as a strategy to provide efficient electric water heating for net-zero all-electric buildings and where natural gas is not available on site. In addition, effectiveness of the quality assurance and quality control processes implemented to ensure proper system commissioning and to meet program participation requirements is evaluated. Recommendations for improvements that could improve successful implementation for large-scale, high performance communities are identified.

  11. Protecting Solar Rights in California Through an Exploration of the California Water Doctrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedman, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Nevertheless water and solar energy share many similar to realizing additional solar energy generation throughout installation of a  solar energy systems.    Solar Easement 

  12. Preliminary geohydrologic site characterization and proposed water quality well locations for WAG 4, WAG 5, WAG 3, and SWSA 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baughn, D.C. [MCI/Consulting Engineers, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess general site conditions and to recommend water quality well locations at Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) 4, 5 and 3 and Solid Waste Storage Area 1 (SWSA 1) within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) complex. The subject sites are identified on the general site location map. For reference, the relationship of the subject sites to other WAGs are shown. WAGs are regions prescribed by Martin Marietta throughout the ORNL complex that require environmental assessment which will include design and installation of ground water monitoring systems. WAGs contain solid waste management units such as SWSAs, as well as pipelines, spill sites, buildings, ponds and experimental test sites. These solid waste management units are considered to be potential sources of contamination requiring further evaluation. This report recommends locations for water quality wells which will be installed at WAG boundaries in order to gather water quality data.

  13. Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

    2009-11-24

    Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters Affecting Protection of Water Resources at Hanford WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, J.D.

    2002-02-08

    The scope of this analysis was to assess the sensitivity of contaminant fluxes from the vadose zone to the water table, to several parameters, some of which can be controlled by operational considerations.

  15. The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2004-01-01

    The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales 503 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) © EGU The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water Email for corresponding author: cn@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Results for long term water quality monitoring

  16. Studien-und Prfungsordnung der Universitt Stuttgart fr den auslandsorientierten Studiengang Air Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyle, Uwe

    Air Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering (WASTE) mit Abschluss Master Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering" (WASTE) beschlossen. Der Rektor hat Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering" (WASTE) überblickt werden, die Fähigkeit

  17. The effects of an intermittent piped water network and storage practices on household water quality in Tamale, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vacs Renwick, Deborah Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include a target to halve the number of people without access to "improved" water sources, which include piped water supply. However, an "improved" source of water does not ...

  18. Application of a spatially referenced water quality model to predict E. coli flux in two Texas river basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Deepti

    2009-05-15

    REFERENCED WATER QUALITY MODEL TO PREDICT E. coli FLUX IN TWO TEXAS RIVER BASINS A Thesis by DEEPTI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008... Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering APPLICATION OF A SPATIALLY REFERENCED WATER QUALITY MODEL TO PREDICT E. coli FLUX IN TWO TEXAS RIVER BASINS A Thesis by DEEPTI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

  19. Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    Systems? , State Water Resources Control Board, Final Draftsweeping as a water pollution control measure: lessons483-495. SWRCB (State Water Resources Control Board) (2006a)

  20. Water Quality Improvement Policies: Lessons Learned from the Implementation of Proposition O in Los Angeles, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Mi-Hyun; Stenstrom, Michael; Pincetl, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    implementing storm-water pollution abatement projectsimplementation of storm-water pollution abatement projectsworld of nonpoint source water pollution now often involve

  1. Heterogeneous Preferences for Water Quality: A Finite Mixture Model of Beach Recreation in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilger, James; Hanemann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Coastal Hazards: Storm Water Pollution. Coastal Management,through a reduction of water pollution. These bound thebene?ts of storm water pollution control. 1 Not only is

  2. The Impact of Water Quality on Southern California Beach Recreation: A Finite Mixture Model Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilger, James; Hanemann, W. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Coastal Hazards: Storm Water Pollution. Coastal Management,through a reduction of water pollution. The FML segmentfor a reduction in beach water pollution and illustrates how

  3. Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final Annual Report to BPA and NOAA Fisheries, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy

    2008-03-11

    The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Project (ISEMP) program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the late spring 2007, PNW deployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. Data collection was seasonally interrupted by river ice in early December. Daily average pH did not exceed the water quality standard of 8.5 at any of the measurements sites. However, instantaneous values did exceed this standard near the mouth of the Entiat River during late summer-fall period. This suggested that in the lowest portion of the river peaks in pH may be occurring because of photosynthesis caused by high rates of periphyton productivity in response to increased sunlight, temperature, and possible nutrient enrichment. Conversely, dissolved oxygen reached annual low levels during this same late summer-fall period, in part because of increased water temperatures and increased biochemical oxygen demand.

  4. Changing the spatial location of electricity generation to increase water availability in areas with drought: a feasibility study and quantification of air quality impacts in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacsi, Adam P

    The feasibility, cost, and air quality impacts of using electrical grids to shift water use from drought-stricken regions to areas with more water availability were examined. Power plant cooling represents a large portion ...

  5. Design and installation of continuous flow and water quality monitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquin River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-01-01

    district telemetry and/or SCADA systems. Water Districtsintegrated with the current District SCADA systems (TID andMID use different SCADA systems, requiring different system

  6. WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF ABOVE-STREAM FISH FEEDERS IN LOW-NUTRIENT NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAIN STREAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF ABOVE-STREAM FISH FEEDERS IN LOW- NUTRIENT NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAIN STREAMS EFFECTS OF ABOVE-STREAM FISH FEEDERS IN LOW- NUTRIENT NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAIN STREAMS James F. Gilliam and Thomas A. Cady Department of Zoology College of Agriculture and Life Sciences North Carolina State

  7. An interactive georeferenced water quality model S. Marsili Libelli, G. Pacini, C. Barresi, E. Petti, F. Sinacori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , abstraction points, wastewater treatment plants, non-point sources, etc.) in their geographical context locations along the river reach is of primary importance in water quality studies. This paper proposes into their geographical context. This feature is considered of primary importance (Johnston, 1998; Lang, 1998). This paper

  8. Protecting and Restoring our Nation's Waters: The Effects of Science, Law, and Policy on Clean Water Act Jurisdiction with a focus on the Arid West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbilt, Forrest

    2013-01-01

    Mitsch, W. J. (1987). Water pollution from oil and gasnavigable waters” (b)). Water Pollution Control Act of 1948,USC 1251. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments

  9. A non-intrusive screening methodology for environmental hazard assessment at waste disposal sites for water resources protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simons, B.A.; Woldt, W.E.; Jones, D.D. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The environmental and health risks posed by unregulated waste disposal sites are potential concerns of Pacific Rim regions and island ares because of the need to protect aquifers and other valuable water resources. A non-intrusive screening methodology to determine site characteristics including possible soil and/or groundwater contamination, areal extent of waste, etc. is being developed and tested at waste disposal sites in Nebraska. This type of methodology would be beneficial to Pacific Rim regions in investigating and/or locating unknown or poorly documented contamination areas for hazard assessment and groundwater protection. Traditional assessment methods are generally expensive, time consuming, and potentially exacerbate the problem. Ideally, a quick and inexpensive assessment method to reliably characterize these sites is desired. Electromagnetic (EM) conductivity surveying and soil-vapor sampling techniques, combined with innovative three-dimensional geostatistical methods are used to map the data to develop a site characterization of the subsurface and to aid in tracking any contaminant plumes. The EM data is analyzed to determine/estimate the extent and volume of waste and/or leachate. Soil-vapor data are analyzed to estimate a site`s volatile organic compound (VOC) emission rate to the atmosphere. The combined information could then be incorporated as one part of an overall hazard assessment system.

  10. Health and water quality monitoring of Pure Home Water's ceramic filter dissemination in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sophie M. (Sophie Marie)

    2007-01-01

    Pure Home Water (PHW) is a social enterprise that promotes and disseminates household drinking water technologies in the Northern Region of Ghana. Currently their main product is a pot-shaped Potters for Peace-type ceramic ...

  11. Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1983-07-01

    Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

  12. Title 10 Chapter 49 Protection of Navigable Waters and Shorelands | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinox Jump to: navigation,TirSection7 WaterEnergy

  13. 1 UCOWRWATER RESOURCES UPDATE UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    126, PAGES 1-10, NOVEMBER 2003 Non-Point Source Pollution and the Clean Water Act: Policy Problem protection of water quality from point-source (PS), NPS, and ground-water pollution. However By the late 1980s, early efforts to reduce water pollution from PSs (e.g. industries and sewage treatment

  14. A Multivariate Water Quality Investigation of Select Drainage Ditches in the Arroyo Colorado River Watershed, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uddameri, V.; Singaraju, S.

    2012-01-01

    Drainage ditches are widely used for agricultural water management to help remove excess water from fields, which mitigates the effects of water logging and salinization. These ditches act as a direct hydraulic link between the agricultural field...

  15. Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    recreational coastal water pollution—A case study in Orangefrom: http://www.nrdc.org/water/pollution/storm/stoinx.asp.1984) Street sweeping as a water pollution control measure:

  16. Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    from: http://www.nrdc.org/water/pollution/storm/stoinx.asp.1984) Street sweeping as a water pollution control measure:still lagging on water pollution abatement. Los Angeles

  17. Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

    2006-01-01

    received 10.89 in of rain during this water year thus far,rain gauge stations listed on the California Data Exchange Center website (http://cdec.water.ca.gov), managed by the California Department of Water

  18. Trends in Surface Water Quality at the University of Florida, Gainesville.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    that include municipal waste water treatment plants, industrial discharge, urban stormwater drains and water. The NPDES required that the University of Florida implement a stormwater management program (Lindhoss

  19. Protection of the Groundwater Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection of the Groundwater Resource Protection of the Groundwater Resource Monitoring wells act as sentinels between suspected LANL contamination and the water supply. August 1,...

  20. Water resource management planning guide for Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, J.E.; Stephenson, D.E.; Steele, J.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.); Gordon, D.E. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant)

    1988-10-01

    The Water Resource Management Planning Guide provides an outline for the development of a Savannah River Plant Water Resource Management Plan (WRMP) to protect, manage, and monitor the site's water resources. The management plan is based on three principle elements: (1) protection of the water quality, (2) management of the water quantity, and (3) monitoring of the water quality and quantity. The plan will assure that changes in water quality and quantity are identified and that corrective action is implemented as needed. In addition, water management activities within and between Savannah River Plant (SRP) organizations and departments will be coordinated to ensure the proper management of water resources. This document is intended as a guide to suggest goals and objectives that will provide a basis for the development of a water resource plan for SRP. Planning should be flexible rather than rigid, and the plan outlines in this document was prepared to be modified or updated as conditions necessitate. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  2. Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S; Coutant, Charles C

    2006-07-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

  3. Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air, Lithium-Water & Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visco, Steven J

    2015-11-30

    The global demand for rechargeable batteries is large and growing rapidly. Assuming the adoption of electric vehicles continues to increase, the need for smaller, lighter, and less expensive batteries will become even more pressing. In this vein, PolyPlus Battery Company has developed ultra-light high performance batteries based on its proprietary protected lithium electrode (PLE) technology. The Company’s Lithium-Air and Lithium-Seawater batteries have already demonstrated world record performance (verified by third party testing), and we are developing advanced lithium-sulfur batteries which have the potential deliver high performance at low cost. In this program PolyPlus Battery Company teamed with Corning Incorporated to transition the PLE technology from bench top fabrication using manual tooling to a pre- commercial semi-automated pilot line. At the inception of this program PolyPlus worked with a Tier 1 battery manufacturing engineering firm to design and build the first-of-its-kind pilot line for PLE production. The pilot line was shipped and installed in Berkeley, California several months after the start of the program. PolyPlus spent the next two years working with and optimizing the pilot line and now produces all of its PLEs on this line. The optimization process successfully increased the yield, throughput, and quality of PLEs produced on the pilot line. The Corning team focused on fabrication and scale-up of the ceramic membranes that are key to the PLE technology. PolyPlus next demonstrated that it could take Corning membranes through the pilot line process to produce state-of-the-art protected lithium electrodes. In the latter part of the program the Corning team developed alternative membranes targeted for the large rechargeable battery market. PolyPlus is now in discussions with several potential customers for its advanced PLE-enabled batteries, and is building relationships and infrastructure for the transition into manufacturing. It is likely that the next step will be accomplished through a combination of joint venture partnering and licensing of the technology.

  4. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-168. 1998. 45 Effects of Forest Harvest on Stream-Water Quality and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-168. 1998. 45 Effects of Forest Harvest on Stream-Water:Abstract:Abstract:Abstract:Abstract: The effects of forest harvest on stream-water quality and nitrogen cycling were examined for a redwood to gain insights into changes in nitrogen cycling after harvesting activities. Stream-water nitrate

  5. PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH THE TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Compost forManure Compost for Corn ProductionCorn Production Dairy Compost UtilizationDairy Compost be made only if soil test results are available for each production field. Livestock manures have been water in runoff. Increasingly, composting is being utilized to improve the characteristics of manure

  6. Trading pollution for water quality : assessing the effects of market-based instruments in three basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Katherine Hay

    2007-01-01

    Since its passage in 1972, the majority of pollution reduction under the federal Clean Water Act has resulted from technology-based limits imposed on point source dischargers. However, most U.S. water bodies are unmonitored ...

  7. Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 gallons), such an approach can be wasteful, increasing energy costs for the well pump to refill the tank-gallon bucket and fill the bucket with clean water. Thoroughly mix together the chlorine and water before

  8. International cooperation between the United States and Mexico: addressing water quality of the Lower Rio Grande 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouch, Kellie Gene

    1997-01-01

    Water quantities of the Lower Rio Grande were apportioned between Mexico and Texas through a treaty in 1944. The treaty defines the mandate of the International Boundary and Water Commission, an international institution ...

  9. Ceramic filter manufacturing in Northern Ghana : water storage and quality control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiman, Shanti Lisa

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, Pure Home Water (PHW), a Ghana based non-profit organization working to provide affordable and safe drinking water to people in the Northern Region of Ghana, began the construction of a ceramic pot filter (CPF) ...

  10. Legacy of historic mining and water quality in a heavily mined Scottish river catchment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haunch, Simon

    2013-11-28

    Mine abandonment and the discharge of contaminated mine water is recognised globally as a major source of surface water and groundwater pollution. Contamination generally arises from the oxidation of sulphide minerals, ...

  11. Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Wythe tx H2O | pg. 2 BACTERIA MANAGING tx H2O | pg. 3 IN TEXAS WATERS POLLUTION Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters tx H2O | pg. 4 W ith 310 water bodies in Texas failing to meetwater quality standards because of bacteria,managing bacteria... pollution is commanding the attention of water agencies, researchers and stake- holders across Texas. These water bodies are listed in the 2006 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet the standards designed to protect...

  12. Stakeholder Quotes for USGS Circulars 1352-1360 on Water Quality of the Nation's Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Nation's Groundwater Examples of How USGS Science is Informing Groundwater Quality Management of groundwater quality in the High Plains aquifer will be invaluable for local and statewide management toward sustainable groundwater resources of this important aquifer system."--Jim Goeke, Professor and Research

  13. An evaluation of water and sediment quality along the Texas Gulf Intracoastal Waterway 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesler, Ralph Steven

    1975-01-01

    and nitrate nutrient concentrations. Data was also obtained for the amount of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc dissolved in the water. In January, bottom samples were obtained to provide information regarding the pH, Eh, and heavy metal concentration... Water PH Values Surface Water Eh Values in (mv) Surface Water Turbidity Middepth Phosphate Values Middepth Ammonia Values Middepth Nitrate Values Middepth Total Suspended Solids Middepth Volatile Suspended Solids Middepth Total Organic Carbon...

  14. Waters LANL Protects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN AProject Assessment Customer5-25901 Docker:

  15. Protecting Our Water: Tracking Sources of Bacterial Contamination Numerous surface waterbodies in Texas are classified as having high levels of fecal coliform bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Texas are classified as having high levels of fecal coliform bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution. coli and other fecal coliform bacteria do not provide information on whether the source of pollution of pollution need to be identified to implement effective pollution control strategies to improve water quality

  16. Protecting and Restoring our Nation's Waters: The Effects of Science, Law, and Policy on Clean Water Act Jurisdiction with a focus on the Arid West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbilt, Forrest

    2013-01-01

    quality criteria for substances applied in risk assessment of discharges from offshore drilling operations Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management (

  17. Effects of dairy manure and inorganic fertilizer on runoff water quality on common bermudagrass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaudreau, Jason Edward

    1999-01-01

    treatments exceeded composted dairy manure performance ratings for color, quality, and density. Inorganic fertilizer treatments elevated tissue N concentrations above composted dairy manure treatment concentrations. Phosphorous tissue concentrations were...

  18. Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

    2009-10-01

    Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

  19. Drinking Water Quality and Child Health in South Asia: The Role of Secondary Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ercumen, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    DPHE.  2001.  Arsenic  contamination  of  groundwater  in  for  microbial  contamination  of  well  water.   J.  al.  2011.  Fecal   contamination  of  shallow  tubewells  

  20. Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    preventing water pollution from motor vehicles would be muchgroundwater pollution; motor-vehicle transportation;the environmental costs of motor vehicle transportation in

  1. Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    groundwater pollution; motor-vehicle transportation;pads. Second, as motor vehicle pollution is often created apreventing water pollution from motor vehicles would be much

  2. he U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assess-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and provide water for house- hold uses, including drinking, food prepa- ration, watering lawns and gardens, bathing, and washing clothes. The sam- ples from these wells were analyzed for 55 volatile organic. Gasoline oxygenates, refriger- ants, gasoline hydrocarbons, fumigants, and chemicals used in organic

  3. In 2006 and 2007, the Division of Water Qual-ity, North Carolina Department of Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    In 2006 and 2007, the Division of Water Qual- ity, North Carolina Department of Environment-friendly, alternative stormwater man- agement practice. Much research has been conducted across North Carolina Roofs, and Water Harvesting (AG-588-6). As the use of permeable pavement increases in North Carolina

  4. The Quality of Our Nation's Waters Mercury in the Nation's Streams--Levels, Trends, and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards, and the environment, visit http investments in assessing, managing, regulating, and conserving natural resources, such as water, minerals ecosystems depends on the availability of sound water-resources data and information to develop effective

  5. Protecting and Restoring our Nation's Waters: The Effects of Science, Law, and Policy on Clean Water Act Jurisdiction with a focus on the Arid West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbilt, Forrest

    2013-01-01

    control, pollution, treatment, use and management of waterowned treatment works and to States for water pollution

  6. Energy, Agriculture, and Environment in Rural New York For several years, Congress has been funding research on water quality in the Susquehanna River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Energy, Agriculture, and Environment in Rural New York Abstract For several years, Congress has been funding research on water quality in the Susquehanna River basin in New York. Until 2009 environmental quality in the rural environments of New York State in the 21st Century. The Program continues

  7. Preliminary evaluation of VTA effectiveness to protect runoff water quality on small pork production facilities in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, K.; Harmel, D.; Higgs, K.

    2013-01-01

    GBRA Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority N Nitrogen NH4-N Ammonium-Nitrogen NMPs Nutrient management plans NO2-N Nitrite-Nitrogen NO3-N Nitrate-Nitrogen NPDES National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System NPS Nonpoint source...), ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N), and ortho-phosphate (PO4-P) phosphorus, total N and total P. Samples from Bell, Brazos, and Robertson Counties were analyzed by Texas A&M AgriLife Research Soil and Aquatic Research Laboratory (SAML) for E. coli. The Guadalupe-Blanco...

  8. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Delaware has more than 2, fishing, etc.). Delaware has promulgated surface water quality standards which are designed to protect meet the standards for their designated uses, the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental

  9. WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    on the other oil-shale related solid wastes. This tsbulationPiles Solid wastes from the shale-oil recovery process alsooil shale, and other mine spoils and solids from water and waste-

  10. Effect of shrub management techniques on water quality and quantity on Coastal Bend rangeland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Michael Patrick

    2003-01-01

    the impacts of various rangeland management practices (grazing, herbicide treatment of the woody shrubs, and herbicide treatment of the shrubs followed by burning) on water yield and (2) to assess the impacts of various rangeland management practices...

  11. Assessing the Effectiveness of Water Quality Best Management Practices for Grazing-Lands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clary, Calvin Russell

    2013-12-10

    grazing evaluated how stocking rate affected bacterial loading. E. coli concentrations in runoff samples were compared between plots with various stocking rates. GPS collars were used to determine how a shade pavilion, water source, or rip-rap effected...

  12. Use of compost filter bermsfor sediment trapping: primary focus on water quality and structural stability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raut Desai, Aditya Babu

    2004-11-15

    Runoff from road construction and maintenance sites is responsible for erosion and deposition of sediments in the receiving water bodies. In addition to soil particles from erosion, runoff also transports other pollutants such as rubber, toxic...

  13. Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, D.E.; Czanderna, A.W.; Kennedy, C.E.

    1996-01-30

    A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualities for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}--COOH which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces. 8 figs.

  14. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  15. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies are used for agriculture, natural resources, salt water intrusion protection, drinking water, industry

  16. Engineers, are focused on advanced water quality modeling on the Cumberland River in Kentucky and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    111-11) producing a new understanding of future hydroelectric generation from federal facilities hydroelectricity generation and water management. · The NHAAP New Stream-reach Development (NSD) project uses segments that do not currently have hydroelectric facilities. · The NHAAP Environmental Attribution

  17. SCS-2009-08 Mark L. McFarland, Professor and Extension State Water Quality Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -site disposal of drilling fluids used in the drilling process can create problems if not managed properly. Drilling fluids have been and currently are land applied in many parts of Texas. In some areas, the use of clayey drilling fluids on sandy soils has improved water holding capacity and plant growth. However

  18. Freshwater mussels and water quality: A review of the effects of hydrologic and instream habitat alterations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watters, G. Thomas

    , The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 ABSTRACT: Hydraulic impacts represent a suite of habitat. These hydraulic impacts thus overlap each other to one degree or another. I have attempted to break them down Perhaps mankinds earliest attempt to manipulate free- flowing water was the dam. Dams could be used

  19. West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Department of Environmental Protection West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association Gen is dedicated to the preservation and restoration of the natural environment through research and outreach and protect the quality of our State's water resources, we are also dedicated to expanding the understanding

  20. Quality indexes based on water measurements for low and medium energy x-ray beams: A theoretical study with PENELOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chica, U.; Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A. M.; Vilches, M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose : To study the use of quality indexes based on ratios of absorbed doses in water at two different depths to characterize x-ray beams of low and medium energies. Methods : A total of 55 x-ray beam spectra were generated with the codes XCOMP5R and SPEKCALC and used as input of a series of Monte Carlo simulations performed with PENELOPE, in which the percentage depth doses in water and thek{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} factors, defined in the TRS-398 protocol, were determined for each beam. Some of these calculations were performed by simulating the ionization chamber PTW 30010. Results : The authors found that the relation betweenk{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} and the ratios of absorbed doses at two depths is almost linear. A set of ratios statistically compatible with that showing the best fit has been determined. Conclusions : The results of this study point out which of these ratios of absorbed doses in water could be used to better characterize x-ray beams of low and medium energies.

  1. Development of conductometric biosensors based on alkaline phosphatases for the water quality control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berezhetskyy, A

    2008-01-01

    Researches are focused on the elaboration of enzymatic microconductometric device for heavy metal ions detection in water solutions. The manuscript includes a general introduction, the first chapter contains bibliographic review, the second chapter described the fundamentals of conductometric transducers, the third chapter examining the possibility to create and to optimize conductometric biosensor based on bovine alkaline phosphatase for heavy metals ions detection, the fourth chapter devoted to creation and optimization of conductometric biosensor based on alkaline phosphatase active microalgae and sol gel technology, the last chapter described application of the proposed algal biosensor for measurements of heavy metal ions toxicity of waste water, general conclusions stating the progresses achieved in the field of environmental monitoring

  2. Water Clean Water Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Keep Our Water Clean Keep Our Water Clean Home and garden pesticides and fertilizers are polluting residues wash into gutters, storm drains, and streams by rain,garden watering,or cleaning up drinking water. Follow these tips to keep our rivers, creeks, and oceans clean. What can you do to protect

  3. Factors Influencing the Adoption of Water Quality Best Management Practices by Texas Beef Cattle Producers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2014-05-28

    and ranchers in preparing soil and water conservation plans to meet each land unitâ??s specific capabilities and needs. Plans include appropriate land treatment practices, Table 1.5 Best management practices for Texas livestock producers. BMP Category BMP... words. And finally to Mark, thank you for your continued guidance, patience, and quest for adventure. v ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The combined effort of a number of individuals made the completion of this dissertation possible. First...

  4. CEGR 4090/5090 Water Quality Analysis Test 1 Sample Spring 2003 February 9, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    Test 1 - Sample Units and Measures 1. How much mass (in g) of water and salt is contained in 2.5 L or supercritical) (d) bed slope to give critical flow (e) hydraulic radius 2. A 1-m deep river has a Manning's n of 0.030. Give the corresponding Darcy friction fators (f) and Chezy c values, with the proper units. 3

  5. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/NevadaaToolsRadioactiveRadiometricsIII

  6. Sandia Energy - White House Business Council Roundtable on Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protected: White House Business Council Roundtable on Water Home Climate Water Security Protected: White House Business Council Roundtable on Water Previous Next Protected: White...

  7. Ground Water Surveillance Monitoring Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-06-24

    This Guide assists DOE sites in establishing and maintaining surveillance monitoring programs to detect future impacts on ground water resources from site operations, to track existing ground water contamination, and to assess the potential for exposing the general public to site releases. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  8. ARM 17-30-101 - Water Quality: 401 Certification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgramInformation ALLETE,ARCHDecisions |30-101 - Water

  9. Site Suitability Assessment for Irrigating Urban Landscapes with Water of Elevated Salinity in the Southwest. Consolidated Final Report. Part 1. Water Quality and Plant Tolerance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    With increasing population and the demand for potable water, water with elevated salinity and reclaimed water are now commonly used for irrigating urban landscape in many communities in the arid Southwest. It not only saves potable water, but also...

  10. Protecting and Restoring our Nation's Waters: The Effects of Science, Law, and Policy on Clean Water Act Jurisdiction with a focus on the Arid West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbilt, Forrest

    2013-01-01

    N. (1999). Effects of a low-head dam and water abstractionin a river impounded by low-head dams Copeia (Vol. 2005, pp.evaluations downstream of low-head weirs on small and large

  11. Biomass production, forage quality, and cation uptake of Quail bush, four-wing saltbush, and seaside barley irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauder, J.W.; Browning, L.S.; Phelps, S.D.; Kirkpatrick, A.D. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The study reported here investigated capacity of Atriplex lentiformis (Torr.) S. Wats. (Quail bush), Atriplex X aptera A. Nels. (pro sp.) (Wytana four-wing saltbush), and Hordeum marinum Huds. (seaside barley) to produce biomass and crude protein and take up cations when irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water, in the presence of a shallow water table. Water tables were established at 0.38, 0.76, and 1.14m below the surface in sand-filled columns. The columns were then planted to the study species. Study plants were irrigated for 224 days; irrigation water was supplied every 7 days equal to water lost to evapotranspiration (ET) plus 100mL (the volume of water removed in the most previous soil solution sampling). Water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) or coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wastewater. Biomass production did not differ significantly between water quality treatments but did differ significantly among species and water table depth within species. Averaged across water quality treatments, Hordeum marinum produced 79% more biomass than A. lentiformis and 122% more biomass than Atriplex X aptera, but contained only 11% crude protein compared to 16% crude protein in A. lentiformis and 14% crude protein in Atriplex X aptera. Atriplex spp. grown in columns with the water table at 0.38m depth produced more biomass, took up less calcium on a percentage basis, and took up more sodium on a percentage basis than when grown with the water table at a deeper depth. Uptake of cations by Atriplex lentiformis was approximately twice the uptake of cations by Atriplex X aptera and three times that of H. marinum. After 224 days of irrigation, crop growth, and cation uptake, followed by biomass harvest, EC and SAR of shallow groundwater in columns planted to A. lentiformis were less than EC and SAR of shallow ground water in columns planted to either of the other species.

  12. Quality Assurance | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality Assurance Is A Key Focus At Jefferson Lab Quality assurance is a critical function at Jefferson Lab, protecting workers, lab facilities, the environment and the public. A D...

  13. The Failure of EPA's Water Quality Reforms: From Environment-Enhancing Competition to Uniformity and Polluter Profits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Andrew P.; Yandle, Bruce; Meiners, Roger E.

    2001-01-01

    Regulation. II. The Need for Federalism in Water PollutionIntegrated Approaches to Water Pollution: Lessons from theAccoUNTING OFFICE, WATER POLLUTION: DIFFERENCES AMONG THE

  14. Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

    2007-01-01

    In general, preventing water pollution from motor vehiclestransportation on water pollution (Litman 2002), and acosts of controlling water pollution from motor vehicles. It

  15. The Failure of EPA's Water Quality Reforms: From Environment-Enhancing Competition to Uniformity and Polluter Profits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Andrew P.; Yandle, Bruce; Meiners, Roger E.

    2001-01-01

    there were no federal water pollution control statutes.Regulation. II. The Need for Federalism in Water PollutionIntegrated Approaches to Water Pollution: Lessons from the

  16. Small drains, big problems: The impact of dry weather runoff on shoreline water quality at enclosed beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    novel economic instrument. Water Sci. Technol. 2011, 64, 494in Inland and Coastal Waters; Academic Press Inc. : Newin fresh and saline waters. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2002,

  17. Impacts of Delayed Drawdown on Aquatic Biota and Water Quality in Seasonally Managed Wetlands of the Grasslands Ecological Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2009-01-01

    and Wildlife Service, 1982. Grassland Water District. 2008.www.grasslandwetlands.org/>. Grassland Water District. "Ecological and Water Management Characterization of

  18. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    the water quality and waste water elements. At the sameAll water supply, waste water, and flood control agenciesprovide services like waste water treatment and drinking

  19. Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-29

    This Order ensures that the quality of DOE/NNSA products and services meets or exceeds the customer's expectations. This Order cancels DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance, dated 9-29-99, and Attachment 1, paragraph 8, and Attachment 2, paragraph 22, of DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees, dated 3-27-98. Cancels: DOE O 414.1A and DOE O 440.1A, parts as noted.

  20. West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oil and Natural Gas Association GenPower Services, LLC U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation U Virginia Water Research Institute is dedicated to the preservation and restoration of the natural on exploring and implementing technologies to improve and protect the quality of our State's water resources

  1. Green Roofs: Optimizing the Water Quality of Rooftop Runoff Brett Long, Dr. Shirley E. Clark, Dr. Katherine Baker, Dr. Robert Berghage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Green Roofs: Optimizing the Water Quality of Rooftop Runoff Brett Long, Dr. Shirley E. Clark, Dr, Middletown, PA 17057 and Center for Green Roof Research at University Park, PA 16802 Introduction Green roofs (vegetative roof covers) are a relatively-new stormwater management practice for urban areas where land

  2. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

  3. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30

    U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta Drake Process Unit (DPU) was developed and deployed for operation in the Powder River Basin. First year operatio

  4. Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District: WV 1 Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Waste Water, Treatment, Recreation Descriptors: post mining land use, waste water,water quality, site selection, waste reduction, parameter

  5. United Sates Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    United Sates Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water (4305) EPA/823/B/95/003 August 1995 QUAL2E Windows Interface User's Guide #12;QUAL2E Windows Interface User's Guide United States

  6. Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-01-15

    To implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by the Department of Energy (DOE) operations and by which DOE cost effectively meets or exceeds compliance with applicable environmental; public health; and resource protection laws, regulations, and DOE requirements. Cancels DOE 5400.1 and DOE N 450.4.

  7. Computeer-based decision support tools for evaluation of actions affecting flow and water quality in the San Joaquin Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1993-01-01

    This document is a preliminary effort to draw together some of the important simulation models that are available to Reclamation or that have been developed by Reclamation since 1987. This document has also attempted to lay out a framework by which these models might be used both for the purposes for which they were originally intended and to support the analysis of other issues that relate to the hydrology and to salt and water quality management within the San Joaquin Valley. To be successful as components of a larger Decision Support System the models should to be linked together using custom designed interfaces that permit data sharing between models and that are easy to use. Several initiatives are currently underway within Reclamation to develop GIS - based and graphics - based decision support systems to improve the general level of understanding of the models currently in use, to standardize the methodology used in making planning and operations studies and to permit improved data analysis, interpretation and display. The decision support systems should allow greater participation in the planning process, allow the analysis of innovative actions that are currently difficult to study with present models and should lead to better integrated and more comprehensive plans and policy decisions in future years.

  8. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  9. Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas (Interim Report) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Knight, R. W.; Weichert, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    The commercial forestlands of East Texas and Louisiana are the most water-efficient producing areas of the two states. Current and projected water shortages for Texas makes this water-rich area extremely important to future ...

  10. The culture of selected marine fish in ponds receiving thermal effluent from a power station and their use as biological monitors of water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pane, Joseph John

    1976-01-01

    THE CULTURE OF SELECTED MARINE FISH IN PONDS RECEIVING THERMAL EFFLUENT FROM A POWER STATION AND THEIR USE AS BIOLOGICAL MONITORS OF WATER QUALITY A Thesis by JOSEPH JOHN PANE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE CULTURE OF SELECTED MARINE FISH IN PONDS RECEIVING THERMAL EFFLUENT FROM A POWER STATION AND THEIR USE...

  11. Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Water Quality Food Web) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality...

  12. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  13. Conservation: The Water We Don't Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guz, K.

    2011-01-01

    , PR ? Reasonable Regulation City Ordinance described by AWE as most inclusive in the country ? Financial Investment Capital program, tiered rate structure, rebate programs, free products and customer consultations, water quality protection... Three-legged stool November 9, 2011 Energy & Water Nexus Page 5 Kick the Can FREE Toilets Watersaver Landscape & Irrigation Retrofit Rebates Commercial Wash Right Washing Machine Rebate Hot Water On Demand Rebate Weekly E-newsleter San...

  14. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part II Availability of Flow and Water Quality Data for the Rio Grande Project Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    of the Rio Grande flow between Elephant Butte Dam and American Dam by using data collected in the first development phase of the PdNWC/Corps Coor dinated Water Resources Database and to enhance the data portal capabilities of the PdNWC Coordinated... monitoring sites from associated canals, drains, and dams along the Rio Grande. Flow data for the years from 1908 through 2002 and water quality data for the years 1938 to 2005 collected periodically by different agencies include historic chemical...

  15. A field-based study of alternative microbial indicator tests for drinking water quality in Northern Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Keefe, Samantha F

    2012-01-01

    Safe drinking water is essential for human survival, yet it is unavailable to over 1 billion of the world's people living in poverty (World Bank, 2009). The current methods used to identify drinking water sources are ...

  16. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on water quality issues including water recycling, operation of wastewater treatment facilities, wind-powered

  17. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District: 1 Research Category: Not Applicable Focus Category: Groundwater, Waste Water, Water Quality

  18. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciences Focus Category #1 Toxic Substances Focus Category #2 Waste Water Focus Category #3 Water Quality

  19. High Recovery Desalination of Brackish Water by Chemically-Enhanced Seeded Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCool, Brian Carey

    2012-01-01

    for quality water supply and waste water disposal.disposal. Management of agricultural drainage water quality,brine disposal) at the optimal recovery a . AD Water Quality

  20. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report, Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental protection regulations to correct and prevent groundwater contamination resulting from processing activities at inactive uranium milling sites (40 CFR 192). The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 designated responsibility to the US Department of Energy (DOE) for assessing the inactive uranium milling sites. The DOE has determined that each assessment shall include information on site characterization, a description of the proposed action, and a summary of the water resources protection strategy that describes how the proposed action will comply with the EPA groundwater protection standards. To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes that supplemental standards be applied at the Dry Flats disposal site because of Class III (limited use) groundwater in the uppermost aquifer (the basal sandstone of the Cretaceous Burro Canyon Formation) based on low yield. The proposed remedial action will ensure protection of human health and the environment.

  1. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  2. Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta; Smith, Brennan T

    2008-02-01

    Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

  3. Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-01-15

    To implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by the Department of Energy (DOE) operations and by which DOE cost effectively meets or exceeds compliance with applicable environmental; public health; and resource protection laws, regulations, and DOE requirements. Chg 1, dated 1-24-05; Chg 2, dated 12-7-05; Admin Chg 1, dated 1-3-07. Cancels DOE 5400.1 and DOE N 450.4.

  4. Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04

    The objective is to implement sound stewardship practices that are protective of the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources impacted by DOE operations, and meet or exceed compliance with applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection requirements cost effectively. The revision provides specific expectations for implementation of Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environment, Energy, and Transportation Management. Cancels DOE O 450.1. Canceled by DOE O 436.1.

  5. Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

  6. The Sacramento Area Water Forum: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connick, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    quality, reservoir operations, ground water, water reclamation, water needs of jurisdictions outside the Sacramento area, and water management

  7. Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  8. Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

    2007-01-01

    groundwater pollution; motor-vehicle transportation;Non-point Source Water Pollution Motor vehicles are a majorSecond, as motor vehicle pollution is often released in tiny

  9. Small drains, big problems: The impact of dry weather runoff on shoreline water quality at enclosed beaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    fecal pollution during dry weather Research and Education (R. Characterizing Dry Weather Runo?, Sediment Resuspension,Problems: The Impact of Dry Weather Runo? on Shoreline Water

  10. A SWOT Analysis of the Great Lakes Water Quality Protocol 2012: The Good, the Bad and the Opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jetoo, Savitri; Krantzberg, Gail

    2014-01-01

    between the Watershed and Offshore Waters. Work Group Reportfrom Dredging onshore and offshore facilities Phosphorousfrom Onshore and Offshore Facilities Joint Contingency Plan

  11. Installation of River and Drain Instrumentation Stations to Monitor Flow and Water Quality and Internet Data Sharing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Z.; Brown, C.; Creel, B.; Srinivasan, R.; Michelsen, A.; Fahy, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    IMS, data sharing and transfer, user needs assessment, Rio Grande, Rio Grande Project, gage station, surface water flow, groundwater, downloadable Microsoft Access database....

  12. Effects of coal fly-ash disposal on water quality in and around the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana. Water-resources investigations (final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, M.A.

    1981-04-01

    Dissolved constituents in seepage from fly-ash settling ponds bordering part of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (the Lakeshore) have increased trace elements, and gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity in ground water and surface water downgradient from the settling ponds. Data suggest that concentrations of some dissolved trace elements may be greater beneath interdunal pond 2 than in the pond. The soil system downgradient from the settling ponds seems to have affected the concentrations of dissolved ions in the settling-pond seepage. Calcium concentrations were greater in ground water downgradient from the settling ponds than in the ponds. Where organic material was present downgradient from the settling ponds, concentrations of arsenic, fluoride, molybdenum, potassium, sulfate, and strontium were greater in the ground water than in the ponds. In contrast, the concentrations of cadmium, copper, nickel, aluminum, cobalt, lead, and zinc were less.

  13. The culture of marine fish and their use as biological monitors of water quality in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Donald Ray

    1974-01-01

    For Individual Fish Tables 1 through 12. Length-Weight and Standard Length-Total Length Relationships for Each Sample Of Fish Tables 1 through 9 173 174 247 332 345 xx LIST OF TABLES Table Page Distribution of experimental fish populations... were periodically sampled to determine growth, survival, snd condi- tion. LITERATURE REVIEW Effects of Power Station Effluents Power stations normaljy discharge water which is 6 to 9 C above ambient water temperature (Davidson and Bradshaw 1967; de...

  14. What waters does LANL protect?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos andSeminars andWeylWhat the Blank Makes

  15. Nanotechnology creates potential for enhanced quality of life light-emitting diodes for energy-efficient water purification, new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linke, Heiner

    -efficient water purification into a reality, along with high-efficiency solar power cells and new methods-efficient water purification, new energy-saving electronic components, high-efficiency solar cells and new methods is home to one of the world's leading research environments in the field, the Nanometer Structure

  16. Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California, March 1985 to March 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, R.

    1988-01-01

    Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. The water samples increased in specific conductance and concentrations of total arsenic, total recoverable boron and total recoverable molybdenum going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. 6 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. The culture of Penaeid shrimp in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a steam electric generating station, and their use as indicators of water quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsema, Lawrence Alan

    1975-01-01

    University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Sub9ect: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE CULTURE OF PENAEID SHRIMP IN PONDS RECEIVING HEATED DISCHARGE WATER FROM A STEAM ELECTRIC... 70. 0 to 89. 9 mm in length. Shrimp were tagged, tagged and dyed, or left unmarked. Brown shrimp survival was lower. in these ponds than in ponds stocked with postlarvae at the same stocking rate in the brown shrimp experrment. The growth...

  18. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollution, Surface Water, Water Quality Descriptors: Bacteria, Suspended Sediments, Water Quality Monitoring Pollution, Surface Water, WInstitute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction In fiscal year 2002

  19. Integration of numerical modeling and Bayesian analysis for setting water quality criteria in Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    in Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, Canada Maryam Ramin a , Serguei Stremilov a , Tanya Labencki b , Alexey Gudimov & Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M1C 1A4 b Water Monitoring & Reporting Section, Environmental Monitoring and Reporting Branch, Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto

  20. Using mathematical modelling to inform on the ability of stormwater ponds to improve the water quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using mathematical modelling to inform on the ability of stormwater ponds to improve the water the mathematical modelling of flow and solute transport through stormwater ponds. The model is based on appropriate decreased. Keywords Dilution; flow attenuation; mathematical modelling; solute transport; stormwater ponds

  1. Utilization of the upper Houston Ship Channel by fish and macroinvertebrates with respect to water quality trends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiler, Richard Dale

    1994-01-01

    on utilization was evaluated. seine, gillnet and revolving screen collections from two deep-water and six shoreline sampling stations in upper HSC stream segments 1006 (downstream) and 1007 (upstream) during May 1988 through July 1989 yielded 33,042 nektonic...

  2. Fire Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-05

    This Standard was developed to provide acceptable methods and approaches for meeting DOE fire protection program and design requirements and to address special or unique fire protection issues at DOE facilities that are not comprehensively or adequately addressed in national consensus standards or other design criteria.

  3. A User’s Guide to the Comprehensive Water Quality Database for Groundwater in the Vicinity of the Nevada Test Site, Rev. No.: 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene

    2006-09-01

    This water quality database (viz.GeochemXX.mdb) has been developed as part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Program with the cooperation of several agencies actively participating in ongoing evaluation and characterization activities under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The database has been constructed to provide up-to-date, comprehensive, and quality controlled data in a uniform format for the support of current and future projects. This database provides a valuable tool for geochemical and hydrogeologic evaluations of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and surrounding region. Chemistry data have been compiled for groundwater within the NTS and the surrounding region. These data include major ions, organic compounds, trace elements, radionuclides, various field parameters, and environmental isotopes. Colloid data are also included in the database. The GeochemXX.mdb database is distributed on an annual basis. The extension ''XX'' within the database title is replaced by the last two digits of the release year (e.g., Geochem06 for the version released during the 2006 fiscal year). The database is distributed via compact disc (CD) and is also uploaded to the Common Data Repository (CDR) in order to make it available to all agencies with DOE intranet access. This report provides an explanation of the database configuration and summarizes the general content and utility of the individual data tables. In addition to describing the data, subsequent sections of this report provide the data user with an explanation of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) protocols for this database.

  4. Army Regulation 2001 Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 200­1 Environmental Quality Environmental Protection and Enhancement Headquarters Environmental Protection and Enhancement *Army Regulation 200­1 Effective 27 December 2007 History in the summary of change. Summary. This regulation covers envi- ronmental protection and enhancement and provides

  5. Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

    2007-05-01

    This report and its accompanying Microsoft Excel workbooksummarize water data we found to support efforts of the EnvironmentalProtection Agency s WaterSense program. WaterSense aims to extend theoperating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities and prolongthe availability of water resourcesby reducing residential andcommercial water consumption through the voluntary replacement ofinefficient water-using products with more efficient ones. WaterSense hasan immediate need for water consumption data categorized by sector and,for the residential sector, per capita data available by region. Thisinformation will assist policy makers, water and wastewater utilityplanners, and others in defining and refining program possibilities.Future data needs concern water supply, wastewater flow volumes, waterquality, and watersheds. This report focuses primarily on the immediateneed for data regarding water consumption and product end-use. We found avariety of data on water consumption at the national, state, andmunicipal levels. We also found several databases related towater-consuming products. Most of the data are available in electronicform on the Web pages of the data-collecting organizations. In addition,we found national, state, and local data on water supply, wastewater,water quality, and watersheds.

  6. Water Efficiency Goal Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued water efficiency goal guidance in Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514. This...

  7. Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-10-01

    One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

  8. Development and chemical quality of a ground-water system in cast overburden as the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borbely, Evelyn Susanna

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogeochemistry of Reclaimed Spoil RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Field Methods Monitoring Well Locations Drilling and Spoil Sampling Installation and Development of Monitoring Wells Ground-Water Sampling Hydraulic Conductivity Testing Page V1 1X X111 14 21 22... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Locations of research stations in reclaimed portions of the A and B surface mining pits Distribution of Texas near-surface lignite (Kaiser et al. , 1974) Fayette fluvial-delta system and dip profile, Jackson Group, central and East Texas...

  9. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District: 2nd District Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Waste Water, Agriculture, Surface

  10. John Redshaw Scottish Environment Protection Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Redshaw Scottish Environment Protection Agency Air quality & health research: Some end-user perspectives #12;Why are we concerned? "Good air quality is essential for good quality of life and achieving area to another and one pollutant to another. Nitrogen dioxide Particulate Matter Objective Generated

  11. Fire Protection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Eric L.; Studd, S. D.

    1958-11-25

    The first object of fire protection is to ensure safety of life; the second is to preserve from damage, resulting from the occasional outbreak, the activities (or occupancies) housed in buildings. Occupancies are usually ...

  12. Protective Force

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    Establishes requirements for management and operation of the DOE Protective Force (PF), establishes requirements for firearms operations and defines the firearms courses of fire. Cancels: DOE M 473.2-1A DOE M 473.2-2

  13. Protective Force

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-03-07

    The manual establishes requirements for management and operation of the DOE Protective Force, establishes requirements for firearms operations and defines the firearms courses of fire. Chg 1 dated 3/7/06. DOE M 470.4-3A cancels DOE M 470.4-3, Chg 1, Protective Force, dated 3-7-06, Attachment 2, Contractor Requirement Document (CRD) only (except for Section C). Chg 1, dated 3-7-06, cancels DOE M 470.4-3

  14. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Chg 1, dated 3/7/06. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B

  15. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    Establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B.

  16. Water and Energy Sustainability: A Balance of Government Action and Industry Innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Grunewald

    2009-12-31

    By completing the tasks and subtasks of the project, the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) through its state regulatory agency members and oil and gas industry partners, will bring attention to water quality and quantity issues and make progress toward water and energy sustainability though enhanced water protection and conservation thus enhancing the viability of the domestic fossil fuel industry. The project contains 4 major independent Tasks. Task 1 - Work Plan: Water-Energy Sustainability: A Symposium on Resource Viability. Task 2 - Work Plan: A Regional Assessment of Water and Energy Sustainability. Task 3 - Work Plan: Risk Based Data Management System-Water Water and Energy Module. Task 4 - Work Plan: Identification and Assessment of States Regulatory Programs Regarding Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems. Each task has a specific scope (details given).

  17. San Antonio Water System Title XVI Feasibility Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .................................................................... 20 4.5 Disposal Water Quality Requirements............................................................................ 9 2.4 Water Quality Concerns San Antonio Water System Title XVI Feasibility Report Brackish Groundwater Desalination Program

  18. An Afternoon with Professor Hermanowicz: Exploring Sustainability and Water Filtration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    focuses on the process of water quality treatment so thatthe quality of stored water. In this interview, Dr.health, on providing safe water, sanitation, and cleaning

  19. Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water QualityManagement for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2004-12-20

    The San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration Program (SJRRP) has recognized the potential importance of real-time monitoring and management to the success of the San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration endeavor. The first step to realizing making real-time management a reality on the middle San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River will be the installation and operation of a network of permanent telemetered gauging stations that will allow optimization of reservoir releases made specifically for fish water temperature management. Given the limited reservoir storage volume available to the SJJRP, this functionality will allow the development of an adaptive management program, similar in concept to the VAMP though with different objectives. The virtue of this approach is that as management of the middle SJR becomes more routine, additional sensors can be added to the sensor network, initially deployed, to continue to improve conditions for anadromous fish.

  20. Sandia Energy - Water Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sources and water distribution systems are protected from accidental of intentional contamination events and that reliable systems are in place should an event occur. As water...

  1. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in water resources, including the management of water resources among competing uses; controlling pollution Quality Focus Category: Water Quality, Sediments, Non Point Pollution Descriptors: AgricultureWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program Research

  2. Rack protection monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

    2000-01-01

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  3. Rack Protection Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, Stanley G.

    1998-10-21

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  4. Guidance document for groundwater protection needs assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, R.P.; Berg, R.C.; Wehrmann, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to serve as a guidebook for conducting Groundwater Protection Needs Assessments (GPNA). The intent of a GPNA is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the groundwater protection measures necessary in order to assure a long-term supply of potable water that is not highly vulnerable to contamination. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA), the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) and the Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS) have developed the approach discussed for undertaking of GPNA.

  5. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Lowman, Idaho. Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The DOE proposes to achieve compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards (Subparts A and B of 40 CFR 192) by meeting the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLs) or background concentrations for designated hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer (alluvium/weathered granodiorite) at the point of compliance (POC) at the Lowman disposal site near Lowman, Idaho. The proposed remedial action in conjunction with existing hydrogeological conditions at the Lowman site will ensure sufficient protection of human health and the environment. The DOE has concluded that the EPA groundwater protection standards will be met at the POC because, with the exception of antimony, none of the hazardous constituents that exceed laboratory method detection limits within the radioactive sand pore fluids were above the proposed concentration limits. The DOE has demonstrated that antimony will meet the proposed concentration limits at the POC through attenuation in subsoils beneath the disposal cell and by dilution in groundwater underflow. The Lowman processing site is in compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 192 because statistical analyses of groundwater samples indicate no groundwater contamination.

  6. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-23

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of interests under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) purview ranging from facilities, buildings, Government property, and employees to national security interests such as classified information, special nuclear material (SNM), and nuclear weapons. Cancels Section A of DOE M 470.4-2 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  7. Providing quality water, power and service at a competitive price that our customers value 2320 California Street Everett, WA 98201 / Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1107 Everett, WA 98206-1107

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    levels with our retailers if we withdraw from the lighting market. 2. Residential behavior: We haveProviding quality water, power and service at a competitive price that our customers value 2320-783-1000 · Toll-free in Western Washington at 1-877-783-1000 · www.snopud.com October 30, 2014 Northwest Power

  8. Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

  9. WATER CONSERVATION WITH SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION Prepared for the Drought Symposium sponsored by Senator Larry Craig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    frequent basis need be diverted from a stream or reservoir, thus helping to also protect water quality erosion within the field, loss of nutrients and sediment from the field to drains or streams, washing to the environmental aspects of SDI. On a clay loam soil with drip tubes placed .45 meters below the soil surface

  10. UC Sustainable Water Systems Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    , or lubricating equipment. Purified Water: Water that is free of impurities such as microorganisms, particulate consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including water quality standards for human consumption. Reclaimed or Recycled Water: Wastewater treated

  11. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation | CenterPressthis siteProspective UsersProtecting

  12. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich MatricesstudentsProjectsProperty -Protected

  13. Office of Quality Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Quality Management develops and interprets Government-wide policies and procedures and conducts training to ensure the accurate identification of information and documents that must be classified or controlled under statute or Executive order to protect the national security and controlled unclassified Official Use Only information for the effective operation of the Government.

  14. STORM WATER Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

  15. Danish Environmental Protection Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Danish Environmental Protection Agency Waste in Denmark Ministry of Environment and Energy, Denmark Danish Environmental Protection Agency #12;Danish Environmental Protection Agency Waste in Denmark Ministry of Environment and Energy, Denmark Danish Environmental Protection Agency #12;Contents Waste

  16. Institute of Water Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system focusing on research, and extended education programs on watershed management and surface, Michigan, microcomputer, nitrogen, nonpoint source pollution, pesticides, pollutants, pollution control analysis, technology transfer, urban water systems, water quality, water quality management, watershed

  17. Choosing and Using Safe Water Technologies: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luoto, Jill Emily

    2010-01-01

    A.1 Water Testing Procedures . . . . .Provision on Usage and Water Quality 1.3.1.1 Sustained1.2.2.2 Water Quality Summary Statistics . . . . . . .

  18. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 8 -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GROUNDWATER PROTECTION 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 8 - 1 Chapter 8 GROUNDWATER PROTECTION Groundwater protection at BNL is addressed by both prevention and minimization environmen- tal emissions, and active remediation in areas where past operations have impacted groundwater quality. All remediation work

  19. Getting Our Feet Wet: Water Management at Mt. Laguna in Cleveland National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, William Cade

    2013-01-01

    11 California State Water Resources Control Board, The WaterSan Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board, “Watershed73 California State Water Resources Control Board, The Water

  20. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Sandia Energy - Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sources and water distribution systems are protected from accidental of intentional contamination events and that reliable systems are in place should an event occur. As water...

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-07-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  3. What's In My Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-04-21

    You can learn about the quality of your water by sending a sample to a laboratory for analysis. This publication will help you understand the lab report by explaining the properties, components and contaminants often found in water. It describes...

  4. A Systems Framework for Assessing Plumbing Products-Related Water Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Young, J. E. (1998). Saving Water, Saving Dollars: EfficientProducts and the Protection of America's Waters. Pape, T. (Green Building Codes: Improving Water Efficiency. WaterSmart

  5. MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING MODELS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Harvey J.

    ~ngenvironmental quality. The scope includes air, water, and land quality, stemming from the first works in the 1960s, and the mathematical program is designed to pre- scribe decisions for operations and planning to minimize cost subject. Sections 2-4 sum- marize the literature on mathematical programming models for air, land, and water quality

  6. Drinking Water Problems: Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    valves and other water control surfaces, creating leaks inside and outside of valves and faucetsDrinking Water Problems: Corrosion Mark L. McFarland, Tony L. Provin, and Diane E. Boellstorff* Professor and Extension Water Quality Coordinator, Professor and Extension Water Testing Laboratory Director

  7. Protecting Life on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01

    Review: Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to thePeter B. Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to theof Protecting Life on Earth is “to explain to an intelligent

  8. Hurricane Rita Preliminary Water Levels Report *For the purpose of timely release, data contained within this report have undergone a "limited" NOS Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane Rita Preliminary Water Levels Report *For the purpose of timely release, data contained water levels during the landfall of Hurricane RITA from Vaca Key, FL to Port Isabel, TX. Station of Storm Tide Anomoly is discounted. Hurricane RITA made landfall on 24 September 2005 at 2:38 CDT (7

  9. PUBLIC NOTICE CLEAN WATER ACT PROPOSED RULE FOR DEFINITION OF WATERS OF THE U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PUBLIC NOTICE CLEAN WATER ACT PROPOSED RULE FOR DEFINITION OF WATERS OF THE U.S. On 21 April 2014 the scope of waters protected under the Clean Water Act (CWA), in light of the U.S. Supreme Court cases in U by increasing clarity as to the scope of "waters of the United States" protected under the Act. Developing

  10. Office of Physical Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Physical Protection is comprised of a team of security specialists engaged in providing Headquarters-wide physical protection.

  11. Bare knuckle and better technics: trajectories of access to safe water in history and in the global south

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben

    2007-01-01

    Improved water quality Improved excreta disposal Improveddisposal and proper use of water for personal and domestic hygiene, rather than to drinking water quality. . .

  12. INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES P. Cianchi*, S. Marsili such a computing architecture can be implemented using current internet technologies. Based on the "intelligent a normal web browser. KEYWORDS River water quality, Environmental management, Internet computing, Systems

  13. CAREER: Climate Informed Uncertainty Analyses for Integrated Water Resources Sustainability Principal Investigator: Sankarasubramanian Arumugam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arumugam, Sankar

    CAREER: Climate Informed Uncertainty Analyses for Integrated Water Resources Sustainability the relative roles of climate variability in modulating seasonal streamflow and water quality variability over forecasts in improving water supply and water quality management and in developing adaptive water management

  14. 1982 UCC-ND/GAT environmental protection seminar: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This environmental protection seminar was divided into seven sessions: (1) general environmental protection, (2) air and water pollution control, (3) spill control and countermeasures, (4) toxic materials control, (5) hazardous materials control, (6) environmental protection projects, and (7) cost benefit analysis. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 41 papers presented therein. (ACR)

  15. Assessing data quality for a federal environmental restoration project: Rationalizing the requirements of multiple clients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiszka, V.R.; Carlsen, T.M.

    1994-07-01

    Most environmental restoration projects at federal facilities face the difficult task of melding the quality assurance (QA) requirements of multiple clients, as well as dealing with historical data that are often of unknown quality. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we have successfully integrated the requirements of our multiple clients by carefully developing a QA program that efficiently meets our clients` needs. The Site 300 Experimental Test Site is operated by LLNL in support of its national defense program. The responsibility for conducting environmental contaminant investigations and restoration at Site 300 is vested in the Site 300 Environmental Restoration Project (Site 300 ERP) of LLNL`s Environmental Restoration Division. LLNL Site 300 ERP must comply with the QA requirements of several clients, which include: the LLNL Environmental Protection Department, the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region IX (EPA), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board -- Central Valley Region, and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control. This comprehensive QA program was used to determine the acceptability of historical data. The Site 300 ERP began soil and ground water investigations in 1982. However, we did not begin receiving analytical quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) data until 1989; therefore, the pre-1989 data that were collected are of unknown quality. The US EPA QAMS-005/80 defines data quality as the totality of features and characteristics of data that bears on its ability to satisfy a given purpose. In the current context, the characteristics of major importance are accuracy, precision, completeness, representativeness, and comparability. Using our established QA program, we determined the quality of this historical data based on its comparability to the post-1989 data. By accepting this historical data, we were able to save a considerable amount of money in recharacterization costs.

  16. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

  17. Comparison of EC-Kit with Quanti-Tray[tm] : testing, verification, and drinking water quality mapping in Capiz Province, Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Patty

    2010-01-01

    This thesis accomplishes three tasks. First, it verifies the EC-Kit under different water source conditions by comparing it to a laboratory standard method, the IDEXX Quanti-Tray[tm]. The EC-Kit is a simple, inexpensive ...

  18. Best Management Practices for Surface Water Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Mick Wiest, B&W Y-12 Technical Services, L.L.C., Y-12 National Security Complex Track 7-8

  19. Google Earth Tour: Waters LANL Protects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUsefulJorge Gardea-Torresdey,GoodofDOE

  20. Fire Protection Program Metrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Perry E. D ’Antonio, P.E., Acting Sr. Manager, Fire Protection - Sandia National Laboratories

  1. Water Use in the Development and Operation of Geothermal Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters....

  2. Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters....

  3. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Water Quality, Ecology Descriptors: Erosion Control, Construction, Sediments, Bioassessment LeadWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The Alabama Water dissemination on water. Over the years, our mission has expanded from an early focus on State Water Quality

  4. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, erosion and pollution, water qualityArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  5. Headquarters Water Mission Area Water Science Field Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Headquarters Water Mission Area Water Science Field Team John Ho mann(Tucson, AZ) Chief William Guertal Deputy Associate Director for Water Katie Orsi Executive Assistant Harry House Senior Data Science Support Manager Water Business Operations Gene Summerhill O ce of Water Quality Donna Myers Chief Dave

  6. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction Research Program Research priorities for the Illinois Water Resources Center (IWRC) include: Watershed and stream protection; integrated water management for multiple users; wetland processes; and emerging issues, including other

  7. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the hydrologic cycle over a range of time and areal scales Risk assessment and management of water quality and quantity Water quality standards and regulation for Hawaii Pipeline forensics and asset replacement

  8. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are: · Monitor streambed temperatures in the Lower Bull Run River to characterize vertical Focus Category: Models, Sediments, Water Quality Descriptors: TMDLs, water quality modeling, Bull Run River, temperature modeling Principal Investigators: Scott A. Wells, Robert L. Annear Publication #12

  9. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  10. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  11. Taking the "waste" out of "wastewater" for human water security and ecosystem sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    water use) (16). water harvesting depend on engineeringHigher-quality water rainwater-harvesting schemes are Lower-stormwater harvesting b City Regeneration of water, but here

  12. Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2010-01-01

    Unfortunately software systems for data quality assurancedata quality management using a novel software tool,and water quality sondes) and dataloggers with software that

  13. Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and regulatory activities regarding water quality and water resource management in North Carolina. The problem of the state's coastal waters; 2) water quality implications of animal operations; and 3) soil erosion The microbial quality of water resources and the management of the microbially laden wastes generated

  14. The Expanding Dairy Industry: Impact on Ground Water Quality and Quantity with Emphasis on Waste Management System Evaluation for Open Lot Dairies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.; Wolfe, Mary Leigh

    1993-01-01

    manner that is similar to practices in the desert Southwest. Typical animal spacings in open lots are 56 m2 (600 square feet) pa cow. Large amounts of water are used for manure removal and milk sanitation, resulting in significant volumes of process...

  15. WATER ADVISORY PARTNERSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    COCONINO PLATEAU WATER ADVISORY COUNCIL& WATERSHED PARTNERSHIP 3624 E. Mesquite St. Gilbe~t, Arizona 85296" 1832 Participants: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Arizona Department of Water City ofFlagstaff City of Page City of Sedona City of Williams Coconino County Doney Park Water Company

  16. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection``, and DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria``. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ``Glove Box Fire Protection`` and ``Filter Plenum Fire Protection``. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  17. Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier to furnish us with most. Water Source The Clemson University Water System is supplied by Duke Water Systems, Hartwell Lake Filter1 Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC 2000 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  18. Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier to furnish us with most. Water Source The Clemson University Water System is supplied by Duke Water Systems, Hartwell Lake Filter1 Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC 1999 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  19. Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    not actually filter or treat our water and therefore depend on our water supplier to furnish us with most. Water Source The Clemson University Water System is supplied by Duke Water Systems, Hartwell Lake Filter1 Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC 2001 Annual Water-Quality Report Clemson University

  20. Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Introduction 1 #12;Biomass Harvest and Nutrient Management Systems Impacts on Water Quality. Basic Information Title: Biomass Harvest and Nutrient Management Systems Impacts on Water Quality. Project Number There are no publications. Biomass Harvest and Nutrient Management Systems Impacts on Water Quality. Biomass Harvest

  1. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water, Water Quality, Ecology Descriptors: stream restoration, secondary production, macroinvertebratesKentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Kentucky Water of the Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute. Additional research, service, and technology transfer

  2. Water, Power, and Development in Twenty-First Century China: The Case of the South-North Water Transfer Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow-Miller, Brittany Leigh

    2013-01-01

    water-quality-water-pollution-water-resources. Liu, Jianguo,Xue; Devra Lee Davis. “Water Pollution and Human Health inof cities, and severe water pollution— in order to mitigate

  3. Protection Program Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-14

    This Order establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Protective Forces (FPF), Contractor Protective Forces (CPF), and the Physical Security of property and personnel under the cognizance of DOE.

  4. Protective Force Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

  5. Voluntary Protection Program Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary O'Leary formally announced a new initiative, "The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOEVPP)," which is designed to recognize contractor sites that are providing excellent safety and health protection to their employees.

  6. Interaction, protection and epidemics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Sanjeev; Vigier, Adrien

    2015-03-06

    unique equilibrium: individuals who invest in protection choose to interact more relative to those who do not invest in protection. Changes in the contagiousness of the disease have non-monotonic effects: as a result interaction initially falls...

  7. Livestock Risk Protection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

    2008-10-21

    Livestock risk protection (LRP) insurance policies protect producers from adverse price changes in the livestock market. This publication explains how LRP works, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these polices, and gives examples...

  8. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  9. Evaluating the Potential of Biochars and Composts as Organic Amendments to Remediate a Saline-Sodic Soil Leached with Reclaimed Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaganti, Vijayasatya Nagendra

    2014-01-01

    Effects of drainage on water quality in arid and semiaridR. , Westcot, D. , 1985. Water quality for agriculture. FAOIrrigation with saline water: benefits and environmental

  10. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  11. RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2002 D. Delacroix* J. P. Guerre** P. Leblanc'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

  12. Impact of Projected Biofuel Production on Water Use and Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact of Projected Biofuel Production on Water Use and Water Quality March 27-29, 2015 Analysis and Sustainability WBS:4.2.1.10 May Wu Argonne National Laboratory This...

  13. Fire Protection Program Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  14. 6 September 2006 Genetic Quality Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    6 September 2006 Genetic Quality Control Genetic Quality Monitoring by Biochemical Marker monitoring program to ensure the genetic quality of mice strains. This monitoring program is useful treatment, RBCs are lysed in a fourfold volume of iodoacetic acid solution instead of water. Plasma

  15. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION: APPLICATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 5 WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION: APPLICATION OF SIMULATED ANNEALING Fred E. Goldman Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 5.1 INTRODUCTION The operation of water distribution systems affects the water quality in these systems. EPA regulations require that water quality be maintained

  16. Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable InformationProtected Health Information Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable InformationProtected Health...

  17. Cooperating for Cleaner Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    . This TMDL plan will budget how much bacteria pollution from point sources (like wastewater treatment facilities) and nonpoint sources (runoff from land) can occur in a single day and still maintain water quality standards. Kerry Niemann, TCEQ project... of water on its 303(d) list (a list of water segments that do not meet water quality standards) and to develop a TMDL for each pollutant that impairs any segment, according to TCEQ docu- ments. TCEQ has adopted 63 TMDLs with EPA approving 60 of those...

  18. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1995. Water data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1996-05-01

    Water resources data for the 1995 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 65 gaging stations; stage only for 40 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 23 gage stations) and 76 wells; and water levels for 217 observation wells. Also included are data for 113 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  19. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1994. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1995-03-01

    Water resources data for the 1994 water year for Louisiana consists of records for stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 45 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 51 surface-water stations (including 24 gage stations) and 84 wells; and water levels for 209 observations wells. Also included are data for 115 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  20. Resilience and Water Governance Addressing Fragmentation and Uncertainty in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control Act, commonly known as the Clean Water Act (CWA), to dean up point source discharges fromFIVE Resilience and Water Governance Addressing Fragmentation and Uncertainty in Water Allocation and Water Quality Law BARBARA A. COSENS AND CRAIG A. STOW The U.S. EPA reports that almost half