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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

NuPower LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NuPower LLC NuPower LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name NuPower LLC Place Norwalk, Connecticut Sector Renewable Energy Product Renewable energy project developer, involved in a JV for a 30.0MW wood-fueled power project in Plainfield. Coordinates 43.83033°, -90.622007° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.83033,"lon":-90.622007,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Water Power Program: Publications  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE Water Power Program Information Resources Publications...

3

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Sandia-NREL Wave Energy Converter (WEC)-Sim Development Meeting On August 28, 2013, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Water...

4

Federal Incentives for Water Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This factsheet lists some of the major federal incentives for water power technologies available as of April 2014.

5

Explore Water Power Careers | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Careers Explore Water Power Careers America's oldest and largest source of renewable power is water. To this end, the Water Power Program, part of the Wind and Water...

6

WATER POWER SOLAR POWER WIND POWER  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Generation YOUR HOUSE BIOMASS ENERGY GEOTHERMAL ENERGY Clean energy can come from the sun. 2 The energy in wind can make electricity. We can make energy with moving water....

7

NETL Water and Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

8

Nuclear Power Needs Pure Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Con Edison plans elaborate water treating system for its Indian Point nuclear power plant ... Consolidated Edison expects to put its nuclear power plant at Indian Point, N. Y., on stream sometime in 1961. ...

1959-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

9

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering, Water Power Sandia researchers are investigating the seasonal effects of a wave-energy converter (WEC) array on nearshore wave propagation using SNL-SWAN. WECs were...

10

Researching power plant water recovery  

SciTech Connect

A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

NONE

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power Personnel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PowerWater Power Personnel Water Power Personnel Photo of Diana Bull Diana Bull Engineering Sciences R&D 06122Water Power Technologies Diana Bull is a technical staff member in the...

12

Water Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Gateway Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Water Power Jump to: navigation, search Water Power Basics High-level information about about water power: the clean, affordable electricity that will move our nation towards energy independence by harnessing tides, rivers, currents, wave, and marine energy. Click to learn about Hydropower: Hydroelectric-collage2.jpg When flowing water is captured and turned into electricity, it is called hydroelectric power or hydropower. Hydropower is the largest source of renewable electricity in the United States, allows the nation to avoid 200 million metric tons of carbon emissions each year, and is responsible for

13

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet provides an overview of the Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities.

14

Funding Opportunity Announcement for Water Power Manufacturing...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Funding Opportunity Announcement for Water Power Manufacturing Funding Opportunity Announcement for Water Power Manufacturing April 11, 2014 - 11:23am Addthis On April 11, 2014,...

15

Water Power Events | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Events Water Power Events Below is an industry calendar with meetings, conferences, and webinars of interest to the conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic...

16

NREL: Water Power Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's water power technologies research leverages 35 years of experience developing renewable energy technologies to support the U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program's...

17

Tidal-powered water sampler  

SciTech Connect

A tidal-powered compositing water sampler has been designed to operate over a wide range of tides. It can sample water over long periods without attention and can be made from inexpensive hardware components and two check valves. The working principle of the sampler is to use the reduction of pressure by the falling tide and the stored pressure from the previous high tide to pump water into a collection bottle. The sampler can produce a constant volume of water per tidal cycle over a tidal range of 2 to 4 m.

Hayes, D.W.; Harris, S.D.; Stoughton, R.S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

NREL: Water Power Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Access NREL publications on water power research. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop Report. Driscoll, R.; NREL Report No. MP-5000-51584. 2011 Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report. Li, Y.; NREL Report No. TP-5000-51421; DOE/GO-102011-3374. "Commercialization Path and Challenges for Marine Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy." 2011 IEEE PES (Power and Energy Society) General Meeting: The Electrification of Transportation and the Grid of the Future, 24-28 July 2011, Detroit, Michigan. Piscataway, NJ: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 8 pp.; NREL Report No. CP-5000-49959. Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet). Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). (2011). 2 pp.; NREL Report No. FS-5000-52168;

19

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

20

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Water generator replaces bottled water in nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WaterPure International Incorporated of Doylestown, Pennsylvania, USA, has announced that it has placed its atmospheric water generator (AWG) inside a selected nuclear power plant.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Water Power Program Budget | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Budget Water Power Program Budget The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has allocated 60 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015 funds for the Water Power Program to research and develop...

23

Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Water Power Manufacturing |...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Manufacturing Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Water Power Manufacturing March 24, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis On March 24, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

24

Case Study - Glendale Water and Power  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Glendale Water and Power March 19, 2012 1 A digital photo frame is part of Glendale Water and Power's (GWP's) in-home display pilot that is enabling customers to track their usage...

25

Water Power Budget | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Budget Water Power Budget The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has allocated 58.6 million in fiscal year 2014 funds for the Water Power Program to research and develop marine and...

26

Water Power News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Power News Water Power News RSS December 12, 2013 Energy Department Announces 150 Million in Tax Credits to Invest in U.S. Clean Energy Manufacturing Building on President...

27

Federal Incentives for Water Power (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the federal incentives available as of April 2013 for the development of water power technologies.

Not Available

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants GIS Catalog Graphic Arthur Langhus Layne, LLC will create an internet-based, geographic information system (GIS) catalog of non-traditional sources of cooling water for coal-fired power plants. The project will develop data to identify the availability of oil and gas produced water, abandoned coal mine water, industrial waste water, and low-quality ground water. By pairing non-traditional water sources to power plant water needs, the research will allow power plants that are affected by water shortages to continue to operate at full-capacity without adversely affecting local communities or the environment. The nationwide catalog will identify the location, water withdrawal, and

29

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,500 Provider Rebates Burbank Water and Power is providing incentives for the purchase of solar water heaters. Incentives are only available to residential customers with electric water heaters. There is a limit of one solar water heater per year per property. Applicants must provide access to their residence for a pre-inspection to verify the existing use of an electric water heater. Customers must comply with all code and permit requirements. More

30

Water Power Program Contacts and Organization | Department of...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Program Contacts and Organization Water Power Program Contacts and Organization The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office within the U.S. Department of Energy's...

31

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Power Demand Options in Regions of Water Stress and Future Carbon Management Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a regional modeling assessment of non-traditional water sources for use in thermoelectric power plants. The assessment includes the development of a model to characterize water quantity and quality from several sources of non-traditional water, initially focused within the Southeastern United States. The project includes four primary tasks: (1) identify water sources, needs, and treatment options; (2) assess and model non-traditional water quantity and quality; (3) identify and characterize water treatment options including an assessment of cost; and (4) develop a framework of metrics, processes, and modeling aspects that can be applied to other regions of the United States.

32

FERC approvs NU/PSNH merger, again  

SciTech Connect

At the end of January, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) voted unanimously to approve a rehearing order granting the merger of Northeast Utilities Service Company (NU) and bankrupt Public Service Company of New Hampshire (PSNH). Approval for the merger was initially granted last August, and created quite a furor when, in an attempt to mitigate the merger's anti-competitive effects, FERC required NU to throw open its transmission network to thirdparty wheeling requests. The catch, however, was that third-party firm service would take priority over NU's native-load nonfirm service if the transmission system ever became too constrained to accommodate all power needs simultaneously. The revised order keeps this provision, but FERC reiterates that under no circumstances will NU be required to provide firm wheeling service out of existing transmission capacity where doing so would impair or degrade reliability of service to native-load customers (emphasis in original). The revised order also provides an opportunity for NU to charge lost opportunity costs for wheeling firm power when transmission of that power due to system constraints causes NU to forego economy purchases or off-system sales. Rather than setting out any specific rules or pricing policies for NU to follow, however, FERC instructed NU to submit its own pricing policy based on a series of guidelines drawn up by the commission.

Berg, T.F.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: gateway Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry gateway OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Group members (8) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2084454102

34

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Water Management Power Plant Water Management The availability of clean and reliable sources of water is a critical issue across the United States and throughout the world. Under the Innovations for Existing Plants Program (IEP), the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has pursued an integrated water-energy R&D program that addresses water management issues relative to coal-based power generation. This initiative intended to clarify the link between energy and water, deepen the understanding of this link and its implications, and integrate current water-related R&D activities into a national water-energy R&D program. Please click on each research area for additional information. Non-Traditional Sources of Process and Cooling Water Non-Traditional Sources of Process and Cooling Water

35

Water Power: 2009 Peer Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document represents the 2009 Water Power Peer Review Panels observations and findings, response from the Water Program to these findings, and supporting meeting materials including an agenda and participants list.

36

Water Power Information Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Information Resources Water Power Information Resources How Hydropower Works How Hydropower Works See a detailed view of the inside of a hydropower energy generation system. Read...

37

2014 Water Power Peer Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Water Power Peer Review Meeting was held February 24-28, 2014 in Arlington, VA. Principle investigators from the Energy Department National Laboratories, academic, and industry representatives...

38

Water Power Program | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Water Power Program Now Accepting Applications: 3.6 Million Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program Now Accepting Applications: 3.6 Million Hydroelectric Production Incentive...

39

NREL: Water Power Research - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Us NREL works with industry in a public-private contracting environment to research, design, and build advanced water power technologies. NREL's National Wind...

40

Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Characterization Resource Characterization Building on its success in wind resource characterization and assessment, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has extended its capabilities to the field of water power. NREL's team of scientists, engineers and computer experts has broad experience in physical oceanography, meteorology, modeling, data analysis, and Geographic Information Systems. Many years of experience in wind assessment have enabled NREL to develop the skills and methodologies to evaluate the development potential of many different water-based energy technologies. Read about NREL's current water power resource characterization projects. Printable Version Water Power Research Home Capabilities Design Review & Analysis Device & Component Testing

42

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds CBS (1) community (1) Cost (1) Current (1) current energy (1) DOE (1) forum (1) gateway (1) GMREC (1) LCOE (2) levelized cost of energy (1) marine energy (1) MHK (1) numerical modeling (1) ocean energy (1) OpenEI (1) Performance (1) Tidal (1) Water power (1) Wave (1) Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Group members (8) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

43

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: community Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry community OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

44

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: numerical modeling Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document numerical modeling MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:56 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Group members (8) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 208438428

45

NREL: Water Power Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerial photo of ocean waves breaking as they near the shore. Aerial photo of ocean waves breaking as they near the shore. NREL's water power technologies research leverages 35 years of experience developing renewable energy technologies to support the U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program's efforts to research, test, evaluate, develop and demonstrate deployment of innovative water power technologies. These include marine and hydrokinetic technologies, a suite of renewable technologies that harness the energy from untapped wave, tidal, current and ocean thermal resources, as well as technologies and processes to improve the efficiency, flexibility, and environmental performance of hydropower generation. The vision of the water power team at NREL is to be an essential partner for the technical development and deployment of water power technologies.

46

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: forum Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry forum OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

47

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Systems up to 30 kW have the option of receiving an expected performance based buydown (EPBB) or a performance based incentive (PBI). Systems larger than 30 kW are only eligible for the PBI. EPBB (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $1.40/watt AC Commercial and all PPAs: $0.85/watt AC Non-profits and Government: $1.60/watt AC Income-qualified residential: $4.00/watt PBI (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $0.212/kWh Commercial and all PPAs: $0.129/kWh

48

NuMu Collaboration -March 2006 Solid Targets for Neutrino Factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NuMu Collaboration - March 2006 Solid Targets for Neutrino Factory REPORT to the Collaboration Brookhaven National Laboratory #12;NuMu Collaboration - March 2006 Solid Targets & Power Limits What do we's All ! #12;NuMu Collaboration - March 2006 The Fundamental Problem #12;NuMu Collaboration - March 2006

McDonald, Kirk

49

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Drexel University is conducting research with the overall objective of developing technologies to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. The goal of this research is to develop a scale-prevention technology based on a novel filtration method and an integrated system of physical water treatment in an effort to reduce the amount of water needed for cooling tower blowdown. This objective is being pursued under two coordinated, National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research and development projects. In both projects, pulsed electrical fields are employed to promote the precipitation and removal of mineral deposits from power plant cooling water, thereby allowing the water to be recirculated for longer periods of time before fresh makeup water has to be introduced into the cooling water system.

50

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Water Management Power Plant Water Management A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Impaired Water as Cooling Water in Coal-Based Power Plants – Nalco Company Example of Pipe Scaling The overall objective of this project, conducted by Nalco Company in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory, is to develop advanced-scale control technologies to enable coal-based power plants to use impaired water in recirculating cooling systems. The use of impaired water is currently challenged technically and economically due to additional physical and chemical treatment requirements to address scaling, corrosion, and biofouling. Nalco's research focuses on methods to economically manage scaling issues (see Figure 1). The overall approach uses synergistic

51

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use Photo of a Temperate Wetland. Photo of a Temperate Wetland Applied Ecological Services, Inc. (AES) will study the use of restored wetlands to help alleviate the increasing stress on surface and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling requirements. The project will develop water conservation and cooling strategies using restored wetlands. Furthermore, the project aims to demonstrate the benefits of reduced water usage with added economic and ecological values at thermoelectric power plant sites, including: enhancing carbon sequestration in the corresponding wetlands; improving net heat rates from existing power generation units; avoiding limitations when low-surface

52

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a study on the use of nanofiltration (NF) treatment options to enable use of non-traditional water sources as an alternative to freshwater make-up for thermoelectric power plants. The project includes a technical and economic evaluation of NF for two types of water that contain moderate to high levels of total dissolved solids (TDS): (1) cooling tower recirculating water and (2) produced waters from oil & gas extraction operations. Reverse osmosis (RO) is the most mature and commonly considered option for high TDS water treatment. However, RO is generally considered to be too expensive to make treatment of produced waters for power plant use a feasible application. Therefore, SNL is investigating the use of NF, which could be a more cost effective treatment option than RO. Similar to RO, NF is a membrane-based process. Although NF is not as effective as RO for the removal of TDS (typical salt rejection is ~85 percent, compared to >95 percent for RO), its performance should be sufficient for typical power plant applications. In addition to its lower capital cost, an NF system should have lower operating costs because it requires less pressure to achieve an equivalent flux of product water.

53

Letter of Intent for KASKA: High Accuracy Neutrino Oscillation Measurements with anti-nu_es from Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the current most-demanded experiments in neutrino physics is to measure the last mixing angle theta_13. KASKA is an experiment to detect new type of reactor neutrino oscillation and to measure sin^2 2theta_13 accurately using the world's most powerful nuclear reactor complex; Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station. KASKA utilizes near and far detectors of identical structure at nearly optimized baselines and underground depths to cancel most of the systematics and reduce backgrounds. The expected sensitivity is sin^2 2theta_13~0.015, which is 10 times better sensitivity than the current upper limit measured by CHOOZ reactor experiment. Extension of KASKA project has potential to accurately measure other anti-nu_e oscillation parameters. Intense and precisely known neutrino flux measured by the KASKA-theta_13 phase can be used to pin down sin^2 2theta_12 at a baseline ~50km and to measure Dm^2_13 for the first time at a baseline ~5km. This Letter of Intent describes physics motivation, detector system and expected performance of the KASKA experiment.

M. Aoki; K. Akiyama; Y. Fukuda; A. Fukui; Y. Funaki; H. Furuta; T. Hara; T. Haruna; N. Ishihara; T. Iwabuchi; M. Katsumata; T. Kawasaki; M. Kuze; J. Maeda; T. Matsubara; T. Matsumoto; H. Minakata; H. Miyata; Y. Nagasaka; T. Nakagawa; N. Nakajima; H. Nakano; K. Nitta; M. Nomachi; K. Sakai; Y. Sakamoto; K. Sakuma; M. Sasaki; F. Suekane; H. Sugiyama; T. Sumiyoshi; H. Tabata; N. Tamura; M. Tanimoto; Y. Tsuchiya; R. Watanabe; O. Yasuda

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

54

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems In this project, SPX Cooling Systems, formerly Marley Cooling Technologies, Inc., evaluates the performance of its patented Air2Air(tm) condensing technology in cooling tower applications at coal-fired electric power plants. Researchers quantify Air2Air(tm) water conservation capabilities with results segmented by season and time of day. They determine the pressure drop and energy use during operation. Additionally, SPX Cooling Systems develops a collection method for the recovered water, analyzes water quality, and identifies potential on-site processes capable of utilizing the recovered water.

55

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: MHK Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document MHK MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:33 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253780

56

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: marine energy Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document marine energy MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:33 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

57

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Cost Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document Cost MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:56 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142286501

58

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: CBS Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document CBS MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:33 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234690

59

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Current Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document Current MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:56 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142235402

60

Water Power Program | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Program Report Finds Major Potential to Grow Clean, Sustainable U.S. Hydropower Report Finds Major Potential to Grow Clean, Sustainable U.S. Hydropower The New...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Renewable Energy Powered Water Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many motivations for choosing renewable energy technologies to provide the necessary energy to power water treatment systems for reuse and desalination. These range from the lack of an existing electricity grid, ...

Richards, Bryce S.; Schfer, Andrea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Sandia National Laboratories: Wind & Water Power Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and Water Power Program. Events Register by August 11th to receive discounted rate for...

63

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants Using Energy Stored in Main Condenser Cooling Water - University of Florida This project replaces the cooling tower in a fossil fired power plant with an innovative diffusion driven desalination (DDD) plant that will render the power plant a net producer of fresh water. The energy required to drive the desalination process comes from the main condenser cooling water, which would otherwise be discharged. Saline water is used to condense the low pressure steam exiting the turbine. The hot, saline water exiting the condenser is sprayed into the top of a diffusion tower. The diffusion tower is filled with high surface area packing material such as that used in air stripping towers to enhance the water/air surface area. Air is blown through the bottom of the tower and becomes humidified. The humidified air goes to a direct-contact condenser where the fresh water is condensed. This process has an advantage over conventional desalination technology in that it may be driven by waste heat with very low thermodynamic availability. Also, cold air is a byproduct of this process which can be used to cool buildings.

64

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Carnegie Mellon University, in a joint effort with the University of Pittsburgh, is conducting a study of the use of treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup for coal fired power plants. This project builds upon a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy entitled, "Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants," which showed that treated municipal wastewater is the most common and widespread source in the United States. Data analysis revealed that 81 percent of power plants proposed for construction by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) would have sufficient cooling water supply from one to two publicly owned treatment works (POTW) within a 10-mile radius, while 97 percent of the proposed power plants would be able to meet their cooling water needs with one to two POTWs within 25 miles of these plants. Thus, municipal wastewater will be the impaired water source most likely to be locally available in sufficient and reliable quantities for power plants. Results of initial studies indicate that it is feasible to use secondary treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup. The biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, and phosphorus in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, although current research is demonstrating that these problems can be controlled through aggressive chemical management. It is currently unclear whether tertiary treatment of municipal waste water prior to its re-use can be a cost-effective option to aggressive chemical management of the bulk cooling water volume.

65

2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover.JPG More Documents & Publications NOWEGIS Report Cover...

66

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future Water Power for a Clean Energy Future This document describes some of the accomplishments of the Department of Energy Water Power Program, and...

67

Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover.JPG More Documents & Publications...

68

About the Water Power Program | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

About the Water Power Program About the Water Power Program The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Water Power Program is committed to developing and deploying a portfolio of...

69

Canadian Water Power Developments during 1935  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... may confidently be stated that the actually recorded resources of the Dominion admit of a turbine installation of some 44,700,000 horse power, of which only about 18 per ... the Commission to the actual development and utilization of water power sites, the operation of hydroelectric installations and the production and transmission of hydro-electric energy, as also its purchase ...

Brysson Cunningham

1936-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Subscribe to Water Power Program News Updates | Department of...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

News Subscribe to Water Power Program News Updates Subscribe to Water Power Program News Updates The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) offers a breaking...

71

Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

72

Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural...

73

Water Power Program: 2011 Peer Review Report | Department of...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Program: 2011 Peer Review Report Water Power Program: 2011 Peer Review Report This document contains the peer review panel's observations and findings, responses from...

74

Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants This report summarizes what is...

75

Water Power R&D Opportunity: Energy Department Announces $125...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power R&D Opportunity: Energy Department Announces 125 Million for Transformational Energy Projects Water Power R&D Opportunity: Energy Department Announces 125 Million for...

76

Water Use in the Development and Operation of Geothermal Power...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Operation of Geothermal Power Plants Water Use in the Development and Operation of Geothermal Power Plants This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water...

77

Water Power Program: 2010 Peer Review Report | Department of...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Program: 2010 Peer Review Report Water Power Program: 2010 Peer Review Report This document contains the peer review panel's observations and findings, responses from...

78

Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Elliot E....

79

Direct Water-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate Packaging | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Direct Water-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate Packaging Direct Water-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate Packaging 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit...

80

Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Mark A....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Mark Gabriel,...

82

Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of William K....

83

Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before House Subcommittee on...

84

Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources Committee Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources Committee...

85

Before the House Subcommittee on Water and Power | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Gregory K. Delwiche, Senior Vice President of Power Services Bonneville Power Administration Before The Subcommittee on Water And Power Committee on Natural Resources, U.S....

86

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Groups > Groups > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds There are no feeds from external sites for this group. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load)

87

Water Power Program Contacts and Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Power Program Contacts and Organization Water Power Program Contacts and Organization Water Power Program Contacts and Organization The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) supports the development, deployment, and commercialization of wind and water power technologies. The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office is one Office that contains two distinct Programs: wind and water. The Wind Program and the Water Power Program operate as integrated, but separate entities within the office. Organization This organization chart shows the management structure for the Water Power Program. This organization chart shows the management structure for the Water Power Program. General Information U.S. Department of Energy - Water Power Program

88

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. The project team demonstrates the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Most water consumption in coal-fired power plants occurs due to evaporative water losses. For example, a 500-megawatt (MW) power plant will loose approximately 5,000 - 6,000 gallons per minute (gpm) to evaporation and 500 gpm in the wet FGD system. Installation of regenerative reheat on FGD systems is expected to reduce water consumption to one half of water consumption using conventional FGD technology. Electrostatic Precipitator Researchers are conducting pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assessing the resulting impact on air pollution control (APC) systems. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc. as the prime contractor, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern Company, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). The team is conducting an analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs. The tests are intended to determine the impact of operation at cooler flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate removal (see Figure 1), SO3 removal, and Hg removal. Additionally, tests are conducted to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger.

89

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California, Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Lab GREGOR CAILLIET, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories DAVID MAYER be obvious that large studies like these require the coordinated work of many people. We would first like

90

NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NuMat Technologies, Inc. NuMat Technologies, Inc. National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally designs and synthesizes high performing nanomaterials for gas storage and separation applications. NuMat is commercializing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new kind of nanoporous material that will change how the world stores, transports, and separates gases. Because molecules of gas stick strongly to the surface of their pores, MOFs soak up gases, just like a bath sponge soaks up water. MOFs are inexpensive, simple to manufacture, and can be custom designed at the atomic level for specific applications. NuMat has developed MOFs that enable the production of low-pressure

91

NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NuMat Technologies, Inc. NuMat Technologies, Inc. National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally designs and synthesizes high performing nanomaterials for gas storage and separation applications. NuMat is commercializing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new kind of nanoporous material that will change how the world stores, transports, and separates gases. Because molecules of gas stick strongly to the surface of their pores, MOFs soak up gases, just like a bath sponge soaks up water. MOFs are inexpensive, simple to manufacture, and can be custom designed at the atomic level for specific applications. NuMat has developed MOFs that enable the production of low-pressure

92

NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NuMat Technologies, Inc. NuMat Technologies, Inc. National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally designs and synthesizes high performing nanomaterials for gas storage and separation applications. NuMat is commercializing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new kind of nanoporous material that will change how the world stores, transports, and separates gases. Because molecules of gas stick strongly to the surface of their pores, MOFs soak up gases, just like a bath sponge soaks up water. MOFs are inexpensive, simple to manufacture, and can be custom designed at the atomic level for specific applications. NuMat has developed MOFs that enable the production of low-pressure

93

NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NuMat Technologies, Inc. NuMat Technologies, Inc. National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally designs and synthesizes high performing nanomaterials for gas storage and separation applications. NuMat is commercializing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new kind of nanoporous material that will change how the world stores, transports, and separates gases. Because molecules of gas stick strongly to the surface of their pores, MOFs soak up gases, just like a bath sponge soaks up water. MOFs are inexpensive, simple to manufacture, and can be custom designed at the atomic level for specific applications. NuMat has developed MOFs that enable the production of low-pressure

94

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Lehigh University will conduct pilot-scale testing of a condensing heat exchanger to recover water from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Testing will include using a slipstream of flue gas from a natural gas-fired boiler with sulfur trioxide injection and slipstreams of flue gas from two coal-fired boilers. The project continues the development of condensing heat exchanger technology for coal-fired boilers initially started under the U.S. Department of Energy's Project DE-FC26-06NT42727 (Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas). In particular, Lehigh researchers will: (1) expand the database on water

95

Power, Fresh Water, and Food from Cold, Deep Sea Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...used. 5) Boilers will use the controlled flash evaporation (CFE) system to re-duce losses in pressure and temperature drops...will increase production of both water and power (6, 8). The CFE system also will reduce substan-tially the deaeration costs...

Donald F. Othmer; Oswald A. Roels

1973-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply NickL Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... Posted by: NickL 13 Dec 2013 - 14:38 Hi Vanessa- I connected with one of our MHK experts regarding your question, please see his responses below: 1. There was only one US commercial deployment (selling power to a utility) in... Vanessa.gregory 2013 projects and funding Posted by: Vanessa.gregory 13 Dec 2013 - 09:12 Good morning, I am researching energy generation from waves, tides, ocean currents, and marine thermal gradients for a report and I am looking for two specific sets of information. 1. Any new U.... Alison.labonte Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers

97

Hot-water power from the earth  

SciTech Connect

This article examines geothermal sites on the West Coast in order to show the progress that has been made in converting geothermal energy into usable electric power. Only about 0.5% of the earth's geothermal reserve can be brought to the surface as dry steam. California's Imperial Valley is possibly the largest geothermal resource in the US. Three demonstration generating plants are each producing between 10 and 14 MW of power near the valley's Salton Sea. The high-temperature water (above 410/sup 0/F) at Brawley is drawn from wells tapping the subterranean reservoir. It is proposed that hot-water power will be economical when methods are found to extract maximum energy from a geothermal deposit and to control clogging and corrosion caused by minerals dissolved in the hot fluid.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL has a long history of successful research to understand and improve the cost of renewable energy technologies, their possible deployment scenarios, and the economic impacts of this deployment. As a research laboratory, NREL is a neutral third party and can provide an unbiased perspective of methodologies and approaches used to estimate direct and indirect economic impacts of offshore renewable energy projects. Deployment and Economic Impact NREL's economic analysis team is working to provide stakeholders with the tools necessary to understand potential deployment scenarios of water power technologies and the economic impacts of this deployment. The team is working to improve the representation of marine and

99

Nuclear Power-Water Desalting Combinations Possible by 1975  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Power-Water Desalting Combinations Possible by 1975 ... Combination nuclear power-water desalting plants may be able to provide low-cost fresh water as early as 1975. ... Dr. Roger Revelle, consultant to OST, was chairman of the group, which looked into the prospects of providing both electricity and desalted water from very large combined nuclear power and desalination plants. ...

1964-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

100

Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Operations of Geothermal Power Plants Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Conventional Hydropower Technologies, Wind And Water Power Program...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) Hydropower Projects Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams...

102

NREL: Water Power Research - Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration Grid Integration High-voltage transmission lines and towers silouetted against a blue sky with the first glow of the rising sun on the horizon behind them. The national need for transmission improvements will have a direct impact on the effective use of renewable energy sources. For marine and hydrokinetic technologies to play a larger role in supplying the nation's energy needs, integration into the U.S. power grid is an important challenge to address. Efficient integration of variable power resources like water power is a critical part of the deployment planning and commercialization process. Variable and weather-dependent resources can create operational concerns for grid operators. These concerns include conventional generation ramping, load/generation balancing, and planning

103

New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Reuse ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water Purification Introduction As population growth and associated factors...

104

Geothermal Power Plants Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

105

Water Power Program FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Water Power Program, part of the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office, leads efforts in developing innovative water power technologies to help the United States meet its growing energy demand. The Office is pioneering research and development efforts in marine and hydrokinetic and hydropower technologies, which hold the promise of clean, affordable electricity, and will move our nation toward energy independence.

106

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - New York State Education Department Coal-fired power plants within North America need an effective, economical, and non-polluting technique for managing infestations of zebra mussels within their facilities, particularly in cooling water intake systems. Unfortunately, due to a lack of options, many facilities have relied on the use of broad-spectrum, chemical biocides for control of these freshwater, macro-fouling mussels. Biocide treatments, such as continuous chlorination for three weeks, are widely regarded as environmentally unacceptable. Chlorine, for example, can combine with organic compounds in water resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes, dioxins, and other potentially carcinogenic substances. Because of this, there is growing concern within the power generation industry that such broad-spectrum biocides will be banned by individual states and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This would result in a crisis situation for the electric utility industry. Even if such an outright ban does not occur, the reduction in the use of such biocides is generally viewed by coal-fired and other power generating industries as environmentally prudent and desirable.

107

Assessment of radiological releases from the NuMI facility during MINOS and NOvA operations  

SciTech Connect

This report makes projections of the radiological releases from the NuMI facility during operations for the MINOS and NO ?A experiments. It includes an estimate of the radionuclide levels released into the atmosphere and the estimated tritium and sodium-22 concentrations in the NuMI sump water and Fermilab pond system. The analysis was performed for NuMI operations with a beam power on target increased from the present 400 kW design up to a possible 1500 kW with future upgrades. The total number of protons on target was assumed to be 18 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of MINOS and 78 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of NO ?A.

Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water Resource Management Issues April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1364 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

109

Marietta Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marietta Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Marietta Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marietta Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate $500 Program Info State Georgia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump: $150 Water Heater: $250 Heat Pump and Water Heater: $500 Provider Marietta Power and Water Marietta Power and Water provides rebates for electric water heaters ($250) and electric and dual-fuel heat pumps ($150). If both a water heater and heat pump are installed simultaneously, a rebate of $500 is available. Electric and dual-fuel heat pumps may be installed in newly constructed

110

Water Power Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Power Program Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Water Power Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Peer Review 2011 Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Water Power Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's water power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities.

111

Water Power Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Program Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Water Power Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Peer Review 2011 Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Water Power Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's water power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities.

112

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Water Use for Power Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Use for Power Production Water Use for Power Production Project Summary Full Title: Consumptive Water Use for U.S. Power Production Project ID: 205 Principal Investigator: Paul Torcellini Keywords: Water, energy use, electricity generation Purpose Estimate the water consumption at power plants to provide a metric for determining water efficiency in building cooling systems. Performer Principal Investigator: Paul Torcellini Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-384-7528 Email: paul_torcellini@nrel.gov Additional Performers: R. Judkoff, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; N. Long, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Period of Performance End: December 2003 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis

113

Consolidated Water Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Consolidated Water Power Co Place Wisconsin Utility Id 4247 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0843/kWh Commercial: $0.0557/kWh Industrial: $0.0533/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Consolidated Water Power Co (Wisconsin). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

114

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Provider Energy Efficiency '''''This program reopened on October 3, 2011 for 2012 applications. Funding is limited and must be reserved through online application before the installation of qualifying solar water heating systems. See Gulf Power's [http://www.gulfpower.com/renewable/solarThermal.asp Solar Water Heating] web site for more information.''''' Gulf Power offers a Solar Thermal Water Heating rebate to customers who install water heaters. This program started after the original pilot

115

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) This...

116

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth May 29, 2013 - 12:07pm Addthis A sample image from the AWSIS system. A sample image from the AWSIS system. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy Sobering news from experts: Rising populations, regional droughts, and decreasing groundwater levels are draining the nation's fresh water supply. And it's not just that we're using that water for our personal consumption; even the electricity we rely on to power our society requires a lot of water. In fact, major energy producers - like coal-fired power plants, which produce about 40 percent of our electricity - require about 150 billion gallons of fresh water per day to produce the electricity we

117

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth May 29, 2013 - 12:07pm Addthis A sample image from the AWSIS system. A sample image from the AWSIS system. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy Sobering news from experts: Rising populations, regional droughts, and decreasing groundwater levels are draining the nation's fresh water supply. And it's not just that we're using that water for our personal consumption; even the electricity we rely on to power our society requires a lot of water. In fact, major energy producers - like coal-fired power plants, which produce about 40 percent of our electricity - require about 150 billion gallons of fresh water per day to produce the electricity we

118

Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program (Colorado) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program (Colorado) Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Heating Heat Pumps Insulation Maximum Rebate $500 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 50% of the cost up to $500 Loveland Water and Power (LWP) is providing an incentive for customers living in single-family detached homes or attached townhouses that wish to upgrade the energy efficiency of eligible homes. Customers can schedule a

119

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Refrigerator Recycling: 2 units Insulation: $1,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $150 Central Air Conditioner: $9 per kBTUh Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $500 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 per appliance Insulation: 30% Provider Energy Services Office City Water Light and Power (CWLP) offers rebates to Springfield residential

120

Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Christopher M. Turner, Administrator SWPA Before the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Hydropower Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document contains the compiled hydropower technologies presentations from the U.S. Department of Energy 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review, held February 25-27, 2014.

122

Muscatine Power and Water- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Muscatine Power and Water (MP&W) offers rebates for energy efficient upgrades to commercial and industrial customers. Rebates are available for commercial lighting retrofits, energy efficient...

123

Muscatine Power and Water- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Muscatine Power and Water (MP&W) offers rebates on certain energy efficiency appliances to residential customers. Rebates for new electric refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, clothes washers,...

124

Direct Water-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate Packaging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate Packaging Randy H. Wiles Oak Ridge National Laboratory June 10, 2010 Project ID: APE001 This presentation does not contain any proprietary,...

125

Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator SEPA...

126

Use of Reclaimed Water for Power Plant Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTENTS Chapter 1 - Introduction .......................................................................................................... 1 Power Plants Need Water .................................................................................................. 1 Meeting Water Demands in a Water-Constrained Environment ....................................... 3 Purpose and Structure of the Report .................................................................................. 3 Chapter 2 - Database of Reclaimed Water Use for Cooling ................................................... 5 Data Collection .................................................................................................................. 5 The Database...................................................................................................................... 7

127

Musings on Water (and Power) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Musings on Water (and Power) Musings on Water (and Power) Musings on Water (and Power) January 9, 2012 - 4:46pm Addthis Stephanie Price Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Yes, this is energy related, very directly in my case. My household water comes from a well, and every drop of water that I use in the house has to be pumped out of the ground by an electrically operated pump; therefore, the less water I use, the less the pump has to operate, and the less electricity is used. (This is true for municipal water users too - there's a lot of electricity involved in providing potable water to a city and treating the wastewater.) This past summer I replaced my bathroom faucets with low-flow faucets (kitchen yet to be done). The showerheads are also low flow, as are the toilets, which were replaced years ago, which helps reduce water (and

128

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 January 27, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program

129

Membrane-based processes for sustainable power generation using water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 18 GW of salinity-gradient power. Although 800 GW of power is currently obtained from hydroelectric processes globally, salinity-gradient energy remains a large and untapped resource. Capturing this energy ... not ions through the membranes to produce pressurized water that generates electricity using mechanical turbines. RED uses membranes for ion but not water transport, and the electrical ...

Bruce E. Logan; Menachem Elimelech

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to encourage the utilization of its water resources to the greatest practicable extent, to control the waters of the Commonwealth, and also to construct or reconstruct dams in any rivers or streams within the Commonwealth for the

131

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family unit: $2,000 Two- to three-family units: $4,000 Multi-family units (four or more): $10,000 Businesses: $25,000 Program Info Start Date 03/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% of costs Provider Minnesota Power Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings; $10,000 for buildings

132

Corona Department of Water and Power - Solar Partnership Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corona Department of Water and Power - Solar Partnership Rebate Corona Department of Water and Power - Solar Partnership Rebate Program Corona Department of Water and Power - Solar Partnership Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential:$3,660 Commercial: $30,500 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1.22 per watt-AC Provider Corona Department of Water and Power Corona Department of Water and Power is providing rebates for residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems. The rebate amount for 2013 is $1.22 per watt up to $3,660 for residential systems and $30,500 for commercial systems. Customers must submit an application and receive approval prior to beginning the installation. See website above for

133

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

Not Available

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

SciTech Connect

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Studies of Muon-Induced Radioactivity at NuMIRadioactivity at NuMI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of Muon-Induced Radioactivity at NuMIRadioactivity at NuMI David Boehnlein Fermi National JASMIN Experiment · JASMIN ­ Japanese & American Study of Muon Interactions and Neutron DetectionMuonMIprogress to study activation at the NuMI muon alcoves. July 24, 2009 NuFact09 - David Boehnlein 3NuFact09 - David

McDonald, Kirk

136

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Maximum payment of 400,000 per year for performance-based incentives Program Info Start Date 1/1/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2016 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV rebates will be awarded via lottery on August 12, 2013 Residential PV: $1.28/W CEC-AC Commercial PV (less than 30 kW): $0.97/W CEC-AC Commercial PV (30 kW or larger): ineligible at this time Solar Water Heaters (residential domestic hot water only; not pools):

138

NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL's Economic Analysis and power system modeling integrates data from device deployment and programmatic research into deployment and scenario models to quantify the economic and societal benefits of developing cost-competitive marine and hydrokinetic systems. It also identifies policy mechanisms, market designs, and supply chain needs to support various deployment scenarios, provide information and training to potential members of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry and effectively collaborate with all associated stakeholders. JEDI Modeling NREL worked with industry members to develop and provide public access to an easy-to-use input-output model that estimates the jobs and economic development impacts (JEDI) of MHK projects in the United States. The JEDI

139

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification Technology Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Project Manager: James R. Longanbach Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Norma J. Kuehn Ronald L. Schoff Vladimir Vaysman Jay S. White Power Plant Water Usage and Loss Study i August 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...................................................................................................................... I LIST OF TABLES.............................................................................................................................III

140

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sandia National Laboratories: Wind & Water Power Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on marine current turbine behaviour and on its wake properties, IET Renewable Power Generation November 2010, Volume 4, Issue 6, P.498-509 Chris Chartrand, (505) 845-8750....

142

Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,500 or 50% of installed cost; $2,000 for systems purchased by 12/31/13 Program Info Funding Source LIPA Efficiency Long Island Program Start Date December 2010 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $20 per kBTU (based on SRCC collector rating) Bonus Incentive for systems purchased by 12/31/13: 2 Collector system: $500 bonus rebate 1 Collector system: $250 bonus rebate Provider Long Island Power Authority '''''Note: For system purchased by December 31, 2013, LIPA is providing a

143

South Feather Water and Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feather Water and Power Agency Feather Water and Power Agency Jump to: navigation, search Name South Feather Water and Power Agency Place California Utility Id 14191 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=South_Feather_Water_and_Power_Agency&oldid=41154

144

Redlands Water & Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Redlands Water & Power Company Redlands Water & Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Redlands Water & Power Company Place Colorado Utility Id 15787 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Redlands_Water_%26_Power_Company&oldid=411435" Categories:

145

Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Burbank Water and Power Country United States Headquarters Location Burbank, California Recovery Act Funding $20,000,000.00 Total Project Value $62,650,755.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project Coordinates 34.1808392°, -118.3089661° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

146

Water Power Program Peer Reviews | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Peer Reviews Water Power Program Peer Reviews All programs within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) are required to...

147

Before the House Subcommittee on Water and Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by Lauren Azar, Senior Advisor, Office Of The Secretary Of Energy, U.S. Department Of Energy Before The Subcommittee On Water And Power, Committee On Natural Resources, U.S....

148

GreyStone Power- Solar Water Heating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative serving 103,000 customers in Georgia, introduced a solar water heating rebate in March 2009. This $500 rebate is available to customers regardless of...

149

High speed electrical power takeoff for oscillating water columns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes research into electrical power takeoff mechanisms for Oscillating Water Column (OWC) wave energy devices. The OWC application is studied and possible alternatives to the existing Induction Generator ...

Hodgins, Neil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Impact of Water Use Fees on Dispatching and Water Requirements for Water-Cooled Power Plants in Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Impact of Water Use Fees on Dispatching and Water Requirements for Water-Cooled Power Plants in Texas ... Fees ranging from 10 to 1000 USD per acre-foot were separately applied to water withdrawals and consumption. ... Water consumption for thermoelectricity in Texas in 2010 totaled ?0.43 million acre feet (maf; 0.53 km3), accounting for ?4% of total state water consumption. ...

Kelly T. Sanders; Michael F. Blackhurst; Carey W. King; Michael E. Webber

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Measurement of the Ds(+) -> eta l(+)nu and Ds(+) ? eta'l(+)nu branching ratios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the CLEO II detector we measure B(D-s(+) --> eta e(+)nu)/B(D-s(+) --> phi e(+)nu) = 1.24 +/- 0.12 +/- 0.15, B(D-s(+) --> eta'e(+)nu)/B(D-s(+) --> phi e(+)nu) = 0.43 +/- 0.11 +/- 0.07, and B(D-s(+) --> eta'e(+)nu)/B(D-s(+) --> eta e(+)nu) = 0...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Burbank Water and Power - Green Building Incentive Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water and Power - Green Building Incentive Program Burbank Water and Power - Green Building Incentive Program Burbank Water and Power - Green Building Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider Rebates The U.S. Green Building Council is a non-profit organization that promotes the design and construction of buildings that are environmentally responsible, profitable, and healthy places to live and work. The Green Building Council developed the Leadership in Energy and Environmental

153

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface E&WR - Water-Energy Interface Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation: A Modeling Framework The purpose of this study, conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center at West Virginia University, is to develop and demonstrate a framework for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects, and environmental benefits of using mine water for thermo-electric power generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering, and environmental factors to be considered and evaluated in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. Development and demonstration of the framework involves the following activities: A field investigation and case study conducted for the proposed Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. This 300 megawatt power plant has been proposed to burn coal refuse from the Champion coal refuse pile, which is the largest coal waste pile in Western Pennsylvania. The field study, based on previous mine pool research conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC), identifies mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2,000 to 3,000 gpm power plant water requirement.

154

Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance |...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance, a...

155

USE of mine pool water for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

Water and energy production issues intersect in numerous ways. Water is produced along with oil and gas, water runs off of or accumulates in coal mines, and water is needed to operate steam electric power plants and hydropower generating facilities. However, water and energy are often not in the proper balance. For example, even if water is available in sufficient quantities, it may not have the physical and chemical characteristics suitable for energy or other uses. This report provides preliminary information about an opportunity to reuse an overabundant water source--ground water accumulated in underground coal mines--for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which has implemented a water/energy research program (Feeley and Ramezan 2003). Among the topics studied under that program is the availability and use of ''non-traditional sources'' of water for use at power plants. This report supports NETL's water/energy research program.

Veil, J. A.; Kupar, J. M .; Puder, M. G.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fusion power plant for water desalination and reuse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of industry and agriculture demands a huge fresh water consumption. Exhaust of water sources together with pollution arises a difficult problem of population, industry, and agriculture water supply. Request for additional water supply in next 50 years is expected from industrial and agricultural sectors of many countries in the world. The presented study of fusion power plant for water desalination and reuse is aimed to widen a range of possible fusion industrial applications. Fusion offers a safe, long-term source of energy with abundant resources and major environmental advantages. Thus fusion can provide an attractive energy option to society in the next century. Fusion power tokamak reactor based on RF DEMO-S project [Proc. ISFNT-5 (2000) in press; Conceptual study of RF DEMO-S fusion reactor (2000)] was chosen as an energy source. A steady state operation mode is considered with thermal power of 4.0 GW. The reactor has to operate in steady-state plasma mode with high fraction of bootstrap current. Average plant availability of ?0.7 is required. A conventional type of water cooled blanket is the first choice, helium or lithium coolants are under consideration. Desalination plant includes two units: reverse osmosis and distillation. Heat to electricity conversion schemes is optimized fresh water production and satisfy internal plant electricity demand The plant freshwater capacity is ?6?000?000 m3 per day. Fusion power plant of this capacity can provide a region of a million populations with fresh water, heat and electricity.

A.A. Borisov; A.V. Desjatov; I.M. Izvolsky; A.G. Serikov; V.P. Smirnov; Yu.N. Smirnov; G.E. Shatalov; S.V. Sheludjakov; N.N. Vasiliev; E.P. Velikhov

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nu Energie | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nu Energie Nu Energie Jump to: navigation, search Name Nu-Energie Place Blountville, Tennessee Product Biodiesel producer which develops biodiesel production facility. Coordinates 36.532994°, -82.32641° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.532994,"lon":-82.32641,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

158

Water Power Technologies Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Technologies Office leads efforts in developing innovative water power technologies to help the United States meet its growing energy demand. The Office is pioneering...

159

U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program Funding...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Office Funding in the United States: MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS Fiscal Years 2008 - 2014 WIND AND WATER POWER TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE WIND AND WATER POWER...

160

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology SPX Cooling Technologies is developing physical enhancements for air cooled condensers (ACC) to improve fan airflow in windy conditions. By removing cross-wind effects on ACC fans, the SPX wind guides will increase ACC performance, thereby increasing the overall efficiency of the power plant. This project will add wind guides to an existing ACC cooling process at a selected coal-fired power plant in order to quantify the efficiency improvement. SPX Cooling Technologies will also employ computational fluid dynamic modeling to examine and conduct a pilot-scale test to resolve application and optimization issues and determine the effectiveness of the wind guide technology.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Guangdong Global Power and Water Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Power and Water Industries Ltd Global Power and Water Industries Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Guangdong Global Power and Water Industries Ltd Place Meizhou, Guangdong Province, China Sector Solar Product China-based JV researcher and developer of solar PV and power projects Coordinates 24.321199°, 116.118919° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.321199,"lon":116.118919,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

162

City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Insulation: $3,000 Retro-Commissioning: $50,000 Lighting: $15,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $500/ton Insulation: 30% Retro-Commissioning Study: $0.30 per sq. ft. of conditioned space Retro-Commissioning EMC: varies Lighting: $3 - $35/unit Lighting (Custom): $0.28/Watt reduced Water Loop Heat Pump: Contact CWLP

163

NuSTAR: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array  

SciTech Connect

Bill Craig, an astrophysicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, describes the NASA NuSTAR mission, launched June 13, 2012.

Craig, Bill

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

164

Pasadena Water and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pasadena Water and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Pasadena Water and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Energy Efficiency Partnering Program: The total standard rebate received may not exceed 50% of the project's cost. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficiency Partnership Retrofit Savings: $0.055 - $0.44 per kWh that the new project saves compared to the energy use allowed under Title

165

Direct Power and Water Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power and Water Corporation Power and Water Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Direct Power and Water Corporation Place Albuquerque, New Mexico Zip 87107 Product DP&W is specialised in engineering, designing and installing turnkey photovoltaic systems. Coordinates 35.08418°, -106.648639° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.08418,"lon":-106.648639,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

166

Western Water and Power Production WWPP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water and Power Production WWPP Water and Power Production WWPP Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Water and Power Production (WWPP) Place Albuquerque, New Mexico Zip 88340 Sector Biomass Product Developer and Builder of Biomass Energy Plants. Coordinates 35.08418°, -106.648639° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.08418,"lon":-106.648639,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

167

Recent content in Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent content in Water Power Forum Recent content in Water Power Forum Home Name Post date sort icon Type OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Blog entry Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) Kch 3 Apr 2013 - 14:26 Event MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 9 Apr 2013 - 13:30 Document MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 18 Apr 2013 - 13:41 Document Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers Alison.labonte 26 Nov 2013 - 11:43 Question 2013 projects and funding Vanessa.gregory 13 Dec 2013 - 09:12 Question Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... NickL 13 Dec 2013 - 14:38 Answer Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding

168

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fate of As, Se, Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater - Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Fate of As, Se, Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater - Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) TVA, in cooperation with EPRI and the American Electric Power (AEP), is installing a demonstration passive treatment system at the Paradise Fossil Plant near Drakesboro, Kentucky, to treat ammonia in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) effluent stream. The passive system is used to convert ammonia in the wastewater to nitrate in an aerobic component, followed by denitrification in anaerobic wetlands. In addition to NH 4, the wastewater stream also contains other hazardous pollutants captured from flue gas emissions, including arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg). Biogeochemical reactions could affect the retention and speciation of As, Se, and Hg in the wastewater as it moves through the treatment system. A more thorough understanding of these transformations is needed. For this project, an extraction trench component is being used for removal of As, Se, and Hg. This extraction trench is integrated into the passive system components described above, which is installed and operated by TVA with support from EPRI.

169

rom the beginning of time, the power of water has captured the human imagination and influenced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an essential water-supply reservoir for irrigation, hydroelectric power generation,81 and municipal demands

170

NREL: Water Power Research - Computer-Aided Engineering Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer-Aided Engineering Tools Computer-Aided Engineering Tools Computer simulation of a floating point absorber in water. The water is represented by blue and red stripes. The absorber is represented by a red disk above water connected to a blue disk below water. NREL develops advanced computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools to support the wind and water power industries with state-of-the-art design and analysis capabilities. NREL is developing a suite of integrated CAE tools for wave and tidal energy converters that will provide a full range of simulation capabilities for single devices and arrays for research, development and demonstration efforts at all technology readiness levels. These CAE tools will produce realistic models that simulate the behavior of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) systems in complex environments-waves,

171

Superior Water, Light and Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water, Light and Power Co Water, Light and Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Superior Water, Light and Power Co Place Wisconsin Utility Id 18336 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1050/kWh Commercial: $0.0835/kWh Industrial: $0.0674/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Superior Water, Light and Power Co (Wisconsin). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

172

Glendale Water and Power - Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program Glendale Water and Power - Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount First rebate amount purchased outside Glendale, second purchased inside Glendale. Clothes Washer: $60 - $80 Refrigerator: $60 - $80 Dishwasher: $30 - $40 Room Air Conditioners: $50 - $60 Central Air Conditioners: $100 - $125/ton Ceiling Fan: $15 - $20 Solar Attic Fan $100 - $125 Pool Pump: $100 - $125 Provider GWP Rebate Program Glendale Water and Power (GPW) offers the Smart Home Energy and Water Saving Rebate Program that includes several incentives for residential

173

Goniometric measurement of power scattered from wind driven water surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recently constructed 11?ft 3?axis semiautomatic underwater goniometer has made possible precision measurement of acoustic power scattered from the statistically stationary wind driven water surface at Yale. Measurements have been made over 180 of azimuth and at several grazing angles. These measurements have been corrected for beam patterns and pulse shape to give a scattering cross section for the surfaces and geometries studied. The results of these measurements indicate that current mathematical models of the scattering process are not able to predict spatial distribution of scattered power in all cases.

J. G. Zornig

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Application of membrane technology to power generation waters  

SciTech Connect

Three membrane technlogies (reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, and electrodialysis) for wastewater treatment and reuse at electric generating power plants were examined. Recirculating condenser water, ash sluice water, coal pile drainage, boiler blowdown and makeup treatment wastes, chemical cleaning wastes, wet SO/sub 2/ scrubber wastes, and miscellaneous wastes were studied. In addition, membrane separation of toxic substances in wastewater was also addressed. Waste characteristics, applicable regulations, feasible membrane processes, and cost information were analyzed for each waste stream. A users' guide to reverse osmosis was developed and is provided in an appendix.

Tang, T.L.D.; Chu, T.J.; Boroughs, R.D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Large Liquid Argon TPC for Off-axis NuMI Neutrino Physics  

SciTech Connect

The ICARUS collaboration has shown the power of the liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) technique to image events with bubble-chamber-like quality. I will describe a proposed long-baseline {nu}e appearance experiment utilizing a large ({>=} 15 kton1) LArTPC placed off-axis of Fermilab's NuMI {nu}{mu} beam. The total LArTPC program as it presently stands, which includes a number of smaller R and D projects designed to examine the key design issues, will be outlined.

Menary, Scott [York University, Toronto (Canada)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Loveland Water and Power - Refrigerator Recycling Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refrigerator Recycling Program Refrigerator Recycling Program Loveland Water and Power - Refrigerator Recycling Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Limit one rebate per account per year Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator and Freezer Recycling: $35 Loveland Water and Power is providing an incentive for its customers to recycle their old refrigerators. Interested customers can call the utility to arrange a time to pick up the old refrigerator. The old refrigerator should be brought outside but remain plugged in so the utility can make it is in working condition. the utility will then take the refrigerator to a recycling facility and issue a $35 bill credit. Other Information

177

Glendale Water and Power - Solar Solutions Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Solutions Program Solar Solutions Program Glendale Water and Power - Solar Solutions Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of the gross installed system cost Payment will not exceed $100,000 per customer per fiscal year Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Program is on hold Provider Glendale Water and Power '''''Note: This program is currently closed. Contact the utility for more information or to be put on a wait list for when the program is reopened. ''''' The Solar Solutions program provides all customer groups with an incentive to install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes and buildings. Rebate

178

Los Angeles Department of Water & Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Los Angeles Department of Water & Power (Redirected from City of Los Angeles, California (Utility Company)) Jump to: navigation, search Name Los Angeles Department of Water & Power Place California Utility Id 11208 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile.

179

Affordable Solar Hot Water and Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water and Power LLC Water and Power LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Affordable Solar Hot Water and Power LLC Place Dothan, Alabama Zip 36305 Sector Solar Product Solar and Energy Efficiency for buildings and homes Year founded 2006 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 334-828-1024 Website http://www.asolarpro.com Coordinates 31.2070554°, -85.4994192° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.2070554,"lon":-85.4994192,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

Riding the Clean Energy Wave: New Projects Aim to Improve Water Power Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department announces two projects as part of a larger effort to deploy innovative technologies for clean, domestic power generation from water power resources.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparative study of power and water cogeneration systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of three combined systems using reverse osmosis to produce drinkable water and a Rankine cycle which produces mechanical power have been analyzed and compared. The RO subsystem incorporates a power recovery unit (a hydraulic turbine in the first two cases and a pressure exchange unit in the third case). The coupling between the RO and Rankine subsystems is only mechanical in the first case (the Rankine cycle provides mechanical power to the pumps of the RO subsystem), while in the two other cases the coupling is both mechanical and thermal (the heat rejected by the condenser of the Rankine cycle is transferred to the seawater). The minimum values of the Rankine cycle mass ratio for the three systems and the maximum operating temperature for the two last systems have been established. Energy and exergy efficiencies are also compared for identical entering parameters.

N. Bouzayani; N. Galanis; J. Orfi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

1. Cooling water is one-third of US water usage Basic approach: (a) estimate power consumption, from which you estimate cooling water usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Cooling water is one-third of US water usage Basic approach: (a) estimate power consumption) Water for power consumption I happen to know that total energy usage is roughly 10 kW per person energy usage by a lot. Now we assume that a power plant is 50% efficient. I assumed more than 20%, less

Nimmo, Francis

183

GreenPower Trap Water-Muffler System | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

GreenPower Trap Water-Muffler System GreenPower Trap Water-Muffler System This hydrated EGR system reduces NOx and enhances fuel efficiency, and the DPF is catalyzed by the...

184

4 Must-Have MHK Tools to Help Unlock the Power of Water  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Find out how the Energy Department is helping advance water power technologies by providing useful information and data to industry.

185

CSP and NU(4) Libor Barto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSP and NU(4) Libor Barto joint work with Marcin Kozik Department of Algebra, Charles University of Algebra, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic CSP and NU(4) #12;Everything is finite Everything is finite Libor Barto, Marcin Kozik Department of Algebra, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic CSP

Barto, Libor

186

NU Shuttle Advertising Guidelines University Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NU Shuttle Advertising Guidelines University Services Northwestern University operates several,000 · Average monthly one-way rides during the summer: 40,000 Northwestern offers advertising opportunities on its Evanston shuttle bus fleet. Advertising is currently only available to NU-affiliated departments

Shahriar, Selim

187

Loveland Water and Power - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Loveland Water and Power - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Manufacturing Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $50,000 per year Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See Program Website Cooling Efficiency Room AC: $50 - $110/ton, plus $3.50 - $5.00 for each 0.1 above minimum SEER, IEER, or EER Economizer: $250 Motion Sensor Controls: $75 Building Envelope Window Replacement: $1.50/sq. ft.

188

Burbank Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burbank Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Products purchased from a Burbank retailer are typically awarded higher rebates than those purchased outside Burbank. Inside Burbank: Ceiling Fans: $25 (maximum three) Clothes Washer: $50 Dishwasher: $35 Refrigerator/Freezer: $75 Room A/C: $35 Low E Windows/Doors: $2.00/sq ft

189

Georgia Power- Residential Solar and Heat Pump Water Heater Rebate (Georgia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Georgia Power customers may be eligible for rebates up to $250 each toward the installation costs of a 50 gallon or greater solar water heater or heat pump water heater. The solar water heater or...

190

Numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in a sea bay water area used for water supply to nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Consideration is given to the numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in sea water areas used for both water supply to and dissipation of low-grade heat from a nuclear power plant on the shore of a sea bay.

Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG)' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG)' (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 600: Applications for Licenses and Preliminary Permits Under the Water Power Act (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations provide instructions for applications proposing the construction, repair, or operation of hydropower sources. Applications are reviewed by the Water Power and Control Commission.

192

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Program Water Power Program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new tech- nologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renew- able, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. The program's research and development efforts fall under two categories: Technology Development and Market Acceleration. Technology Development The Water Power Program works with industry partners, universities, and the Department of Energy's national

193

Management Measures of Improving Water Resources Utilization in Guangxi Power Grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

by analyzing the use of water resources situation in Guangxi Power Grid, many deficiencies of the hydropower resources in Guangxi are existed, such as rich but with low development, big gap between peak and valley of power load, the inadequate capacity ... Keywords: Guangxi Power Grid, Water utilization, Management, Technical measures

Jiqing Li; Yong Wang; Cairong Mu; Biao Chen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Anderson Testimony to Water Power Subcommittee, Lewiston Idaho, May 31 1997 Page 1 Testimony of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of reservoir drawdown through funding from the Bonneville Power Administration and the Army Corps of EngineersAnderson Testimony to Water Power Subcommittee, Lewiston Idaho, May 31 1997 Page 1 Testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Water and Power in Lewiston Idaho May 31, 1997

Washington at Seattle, University of

195

Los Angeles Department of Water & Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Los Angeles Department of Water & Power Place California Utility Id 11208 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A-1 Rate A Commercial A-1 Rate B (TOU) Commercial

196

Pasadena Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Pasadena Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Ceiling Fan: Limit two Room A/C: Limit two Attic/Roof Fan: Limit two Shade Screens: Installation must be made to windows on south, west or east walls; screens must reflect 70% of the sun's heat and glare Skylights/Light Tubes: Limit one Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Incentive amounts increase with purchase from Pasadena retailers and with

197

Burbank Water and Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program Burbank Water and Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Each incentive will may not exceed 25% of the installed cost of a measure. The annual customer rebate total may not exceed $100,000. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioning: $150 - $500 per ton Heat Pump Retrofits: $175 - $525 per ton Motor Replacements: $35 - $1,260 Thermal Energy Storage: $800 per KW saved Lighting/Chiller Retrofits/Cool Roofing: $0.05 per first year kWh savings

198

Los Angeles Department of Water & Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from LADWP) (Redirected from LADWP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Los Angeles Department of Water & Power Place California Utility Id 11208 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A-1 Rate A Commercial

199

Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies.

200

Water Use in the Development and Operation of Geothermal Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Love That Dirty Water (It Can Power Your Home) by Susan Kruglinski  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce electricity and clean water in undeveloped areas, Logan notes that sanitizing wastewater usuallyLove That Dirty Water (It Can Power Your Home) by Susan Kruglinski published online September 30, 2004 A quarter of the people in the world still drink filthy water and live miles from electrical power

202

Water Use in the Development and Operation of Geothermal Power...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

...48 Appendix C - Summary of Water Consumption for Electricity Generation Technologies ...51 v FIGURES 1 Example GIS Map: Geothermal Water...

203

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Energy and water are both essential to sustainable development and economic productivity. Ample supplies of water are essential to energy production, and water management is dependent on ample supplies of energy for water treatment and transportation. The critical nexus between energy and water has been recognized in a variety of recent studies, but the policy and regulatory machinery that this nexus depends on is not keeping up with the growing challenges. Population growth and societal demand for improved quality of life will require more clean water for drinking and sanitation, more water for

204

Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants Cédric JOIN Gérard ROBERT for hydroelectric run-of-the river power plants. To modulate power generation, a level trajectory is planned, the set-point is followed even in severe operating conditions. Keywords: Hydroelectric power plants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

205

Brackish groundwater as an alternative source of cooling water for nuclear power plants in Israel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of a high population density in the coastal plain, any future nuclear power plants will be located in the sparsely ... no surface water, the only alternatives to cooling water are piped-in Mediterranean. ...

A. Arad; A. Olshina

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Quenching China's Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China's Renewable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tower plant in China. Renewable and Sustainable Energyby plant in Guangxi. Renewable and Sustainable EnergyChinas Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of

Zheng, Nina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program conducted the 2014 peer review meeting on marine and hydrokinetic technologies February 2427.

208

U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program Funding...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

the intake maintenance device, minimizing the need for burning debris, and thus reducing air pollution. continued > WIND AND WATER POWER TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE 4 Table 1: FY 2008 -...

209

Water chemistry of the system for cooling the electrical generator stator of the power unit at a thermal power station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from studies of the water chemistry used in the system for cooling the stator windings of alternators used in supercritical-pressure power units are presented, and a solution is ... suggested using which ...

B. M. Larin; A. B. Larin; A. N. Korotkov; M. Yu. Oparin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Wind and Water Power Program Realignment | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

agencies, local communities, and research and development consortia. U.S. Department of Energy Wind Power Program Organization U.S. Department of Energy Wind Power Program...

211

Search for the B to K nu nu-bar Decay Using Semi-Leptonic Tags  

SciTech Connect

We present an update of the search for the flavor-changing neutral current B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} decay using 351 X 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory. Due to the presence of two neutrinos in the final state, we require the reconstruction of the companion B in the event through the decay channel B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}X. We find 38 candidates in the data with an expected background of 31{-+} 12. This allows us to set an upper limit on the branching fraction for B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} of 4.5 X 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level.

Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Power of Water Renegotiating the Columbia River Treaty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and release: - Agriculture and food security (THE BIGGEST ISSUE) - Hydroelectric power - Other nonagricultural

213

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

214

NuVant Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NuVant Systems NuVant Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name NuVant Systems Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60616 Product Develops and licenses advanced fuel cell components and component evaluation instrumentation. Coordinates 41.88415°, -87.632409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.88415,"lon":-87.632409,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

215

Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump and pipes were modeled with realistic assumptions using the PEACE module of Thermoflex. A three-dimensional layout of the plant was also generated with the SolidEdge software. The results of the engineering design are as follows: (i) The cycle achieves a net thermal efficiency of 24.13% with 350/460 C reactor inlet/outlet temperatures, {approx}250 bar reactor pressure and 0.75 bar condenser pressure. The steam quality at the turbine outlet is 90% and the total electric consumption of the pumps is about 2500 kWe at nominal conditions. (ii) The overall size of the plant is attractively compact and can be further reduced if a printed-circuit-heat-exchanger (vs shell-and-tube) design is used for the feedwater heater, which is currently the largest component by far. Finally, an analysis of the plant performance at off-nominal conditions has revealed good robustness of the design in handling large changes of thermal power and seawater temperature.

BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Hydropower Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Hydropower Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A thermoacoustic oscillator powered by vaporized water and ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We measure the temperature difference required to drive a thermoacoustic oscillator containing air water vapor and liquid water as the working fluids. The oscillator is composed of a large tube containing an array of narrow tubes connected at one end to a tank of liquid water. When the water is heated the temperature difference across the tube array increases until thermoacoustic oscillations occur. The temperature difference at the onset of oscillation is measured to be 56 ? C significantly smaller (by ? 200 ? C ) than the temperature measured when the tank is filled with dry air instead of water. The temperature difference can be further reduced to 47 ? C by using ethanol instead of water.

Daisuke Noda; Yuki Ueda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) (Redirected from Burbank Water and Power) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery

222

Fiscal Year 2011 Water Power Program Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Review » Fiscal Peer Review » Fiscal Year 2011 Water Power Program Peer Review Fiscal Year 2011 Water Power Program Peer Review In November 2011, the Water Power Program held their Annual Peer Review Meeting in Alexandria, Virginia. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives. At the review, approximately 85 projects were presented, representing a DOE investment of over $100 million over the last few years. In addition to the formal review, this event was an excellent opportunity for the water power community to share ideas and solutions to address challenges facing the hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic energy industries.

223

Model-Independent Determinations of B -> D l nu , D* l nu Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present nonperturbative, model-independent parametrizations of the individual QCD form factors relevant to B -> D* l nu and B -> D l nu decays. These results follow from dispersion relations and analyticity, without recourse to heavy quark symmetry. To describe a form factor with two percent accuracy, three parameters are necessary, one of which is its normalization at zero recoil, F(1). We combine the individual form factors using heavy quark symmetry to extract values for the product |V_{cb}| F(1) from B -> D* l nu data with negligible extrapolation uncertainty.

C. Glenn Boyd; Benjamin Grinstein; Richard F. Lebed

1995-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Assessment of the suitability of agricultural waste water for geothermal power plant cooling in the Imperial Valley. I. Water quality  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the quality of agricultural waste water is the first step in assessing the sitability of agricultural waste water for geothermal power plant cooling. In this study samples of agricultural waste water from the New and Alamo rivers located in the Imperial Valley of California are analyzed. Determinations of standard water quality parameters, solids content, and inorganic compositions of the solids are made. The results are compared with data on samples of irrigation water and steam condensate also obtained from sites in the Imperial Valley. The data are evaluated in relation to cooling tower operation, waste generation, and waste disposal.

Morris, W.F.; Rigdon, L.P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Advanced Feed Water and Cooling Water Treatment at Combined Cycle Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tokyo Gas Yokosuka Power Station is an IPP combined cycle power plant supplied by Fuji Electric Systems...

Ryo Takeishi; Kunihiko Hamada; Ichiro Myogan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

SU(3) Corrections to B -> D l nu Form Factors at O(1/M)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the O(1/M,m_s) heavy quark and SU(3) corrections to B_s -> D_s e nu form factors. In the limit of vanishing light quark mass, B_s -> D_s e nu form factors are given in terms of the the B -> D e nu form factors, the leading order chiral parameter g, and two O(1/M) chiral parameters $g_1$ and $g_2$. All the chiral parameters can be extracted, in principle, from other heavy meson decays. Analytic counterterms proportional to the strange quark mass are presented for completeness, but no predictive power remains when they are included. Anomalously large loop corrections warn of poor convergence of the heavy quark chiral symmetry expansion for these processes. This suggests that naive extrapolations of B \\to D form factors relying on heavy quark and chiral symmetries, as often used in monte carlo simulations of lattice QCD, may incur large errors.

C. Glenn Boyd; Benjamin Grinstein

1995-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Veselka, Argonne National Laboratory Hydropower Advancement Project-Brennan T. Smith, Oak Ridge National Laboratory The 45 Mile Hydroelectric Power Project (formerly the...

228

Water constraints on European power supply under climate change: impacts on electricity prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent warm, dry summers showed the vulnerability of the European power sector to low water availability and high river temperatures. Climate change is likely to impact electricity supply, in terms of both water availability for hydropower generation and cooling water usage for thermoelectric power production. Here, we show the impacts of climate change and changes in water availability and water temperature on European electricity production and prices. Using simulations of daily river flows and water temperatures under future climate (20312060) in power production models, we show declines in both thermoelectric and hydropower generating potential for most parts of Europe, except for the most northern countries. Based on changes in power production potentials, we assess the cost-optimal use of power plants for each European country by taking electricity import and export constraints into account. Higher wholesale prices are projected on a mean annual basis for most European countries (except for Sweden and Norway), with strongest increases for Slovenia (1215%), Bulgaria (2123%) and Romania (3132% for 20312060), where limitations in water availability mainly affect power plants with low production costs. Considering the long design life of power plant infrastructures, short-term adaptation strategies are highly recommended to prevent undesired distributional and allocative effects.

Michelle T H van Vliet; Stefan Vgele; Dirk Rbbelke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Microsoft PowerPoint - epa_clean_water_act.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for 2000 list by regulation 1992 Regulations (cont) Methodology used to develop list States use "all existing and readily available water quality-related information"...

230

Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the...

231

Microsoft PowerPoint - Aluminum Concentrations in Storm Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publication or guarantee its technical correctness. Title: Solid and Dissolved Phase Aluminum in Storm Water Runoff on the Pajarito Plateau, Poster, Individual Permit for Storm...

232

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Water Power Program supports the development of technologies that harness the nation's renewable hydropower resources to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diver- sion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. The program's conventional hydropower activities focus on increasing generating capacity and efficiency at existing hydroelectric facilities, adding hydroelectric generating capacity to exist- ing non-powered dams, adding new low impact hydropower, increasing advanced pumped-storage hydropower capacity, and reducing potential environmental impacts of conven- tional hydropower production. The program's research and

234

Reverse-Osmosis Filtration Based Water Treatment and Special Water Purification for Nuclear Power Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the development and operation of specialized water treatment and water purification systems, based on the principle of reverse-osmosis filtration of water, for the operation of ... P. Ale...

V. N. Epimakhov; M. S. Oleinik; L. N. Moskvin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skip to Main Content Area Skip to Main Content Area Wiki Apps Datasets Community Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon » OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Home > Groups > Water Power Forum Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 28 March, 2013 - 15:16 community forum gateway OpenEI Water power OpenEI has launched a new Water Power Gateway, which contains links to critical public data sets, up-to-date information on technologies and events, a community forum to discuss topics of interest, links to major

236

City of Glendale Water and Power Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water and Power Smart Grid Project Water and Power Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead City of Glendale Water and Power Country United States Headquarters Location Glendale, California Recovery Act Funding $20,000,000.00 Total Project Value $51,302,425.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: City of Glendale Water and Power Smart Grid Project Coordinates 34.1425078°, -118.255075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

237

City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $15,000 per account Program Info Start Date 01/23/2012 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,500/kW Provider City Water Light and Power '''''Note: Funding for the Solar Rewards program has been exhausted. Check the program web site for more information regarding additional funding, expected March 2013.''''' City Water, Light and Power (CWLP) is now offering residential and commercial customers a $1,500 per kilowatt (kW) rebate for installing solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebates are limited to $15,000 per customer

238

Water Use at Pulverized Coal Power Plants with Postcombustion Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water Use at Pulverized Coal Power Plants with Postcombustion Carbon Capture and Storage ... (24) When CO2 is captured, the heat rejected around the primary condenser does not include the steam extracted for CO2 regeneration. ...

Haibo Zhai; Edward S. Rubin; Peter L. Versteeg

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Electrodialysis, powered by solar panels, could provide drinking water for villages in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Off-grid communities in India with salty groundwater could obtain potable water by using electrodialysis, powered by solar panels, shows a study conducted by researchers in the USA at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

FirstEnergy (West Penn Power)- Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

West Penn Power, a First Energy utility, provides rebates to residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a rebate of up...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Photovoltaic-Powered Water Desalination Plant SORO Design, Start Up, Operating Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the framework of a Mexican-German agreement for scientific and technical cooperation a photovoltaic powered water desalination plant is operated jointly as a remote...2...has been designed and fabricated by A...

G. Neuhusser; J. Mohn; G. Petersen

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

NMS 74-6-4 Duties and Powers of the Water Quality Control Commission...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NMS 74-6-4 Duties and Powers of the Water Quality Control Commission Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: NMS 74-6-4...

243

Analysis of recoverable waste heat of circulating cooling water in hot-stamping power system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article studies the possibility of using heat pump instead of cooling tower to decrease temperature and recover waste heat of circulating cooling water of power system. Making use of heat transfer theory ......

Panpan Qin; Hui Chen; Lili Chen; Chong Wang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Solar-Powered Production of Molecular Hydrogen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the present time, the majority of industrial-scale hydrogen is produced by steam?methane reformation (SMR), even though the high-temperature conversion of methane to hydrogen results in the concomitant production of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. ... 7-9 The PV arrays are used to convert solar light to electricity in order to power alkaline (e.g., 27% KOH at pH 14.7) electrolyzers for producing hydrogen gas. ... Narayanan et al. describe a DC-powered hybrid system that drives a methanol fuel cell in reverse,10 while Soler et al. report on a solar-powered photo-Fenton process that produces hydrogen noncatalytically under severe conditions with a limited number of organic substrates. ...

Hyunwoong Park; Chad D. Vecitis; Wonyong Choi; Oleh Weres; Michael R. Hoffmann

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

245

Efficiency of producing additional power in units of nuclear power stations containing water-cooled-water-moderated reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a basic possibility to raise the maximum power of a unit containing the VVR-1000 reactor in the course of the fuel charge burn-up and with lowering the coefficient of the energy-release nonuniformity...

R. Z. Aminov; V. A. Khrustalev; A. A. Serdobintsev

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 WIND & WATER POWER TECHNOLOGIES WIND POWER PROGRAM FY14 BUDGET AT-A-GLANCE Wind and Water Power Technologies accelerates U.S. deployment of clean, affordable and reliable domestic wind power through research, development and demonstration. These advanced technology investments directly contribute to the President's goals for the United States to double renewable electricity generation again by 2020 and to achieve 80 percent of its electricity from clean, carbon-free energy sources by 2035 through reducing costs and increasing performance of wind energy systems. Wind power currently provides 3.5 percent of the nation's electricity, and more wind-powered electricity generation capacity was installed in the United States in 2012 than

247

Stimulated Raman Scattering and Nonlinear Focusing of High-Power Laser Beams Propagating in Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical processes associated with propagation of a high-power (power > critical power for self-focusing) laser beam in water include nonlinear focusing, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), optical breakdown and plasma formation. The interplay between nonlinear focusing and SRS is analyzed for cases where a significant portion of the pump power is channeled into the Stokes wave. Propagation simulations and an analytical model demonstrate that the Stokes wave can re-focus the pump wave after the power in the latter falls below the critical power. It is shown that this novel focusing mechanism is distinct from cross-phase focusing. While discussed here in the context of propagation in water, the gain-focusing phenomenon is general to any medium supporting nonlinear focusing and stimulated forward Raman scattering.

Hafizi, B; Penano, J R; Gordon, D F; Jones, T G; Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pasadena Water & Power RPS Procurement Plan V.1 July 22, 2013 Page 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an intermittent resource, such as solar, or base load energy, such as geothermal or landfill gas generation, or some combination of the two. 7. With purchases from the coal-fired Intermountain Power Project ("IPP#12;Pasadena Water & Power RPS Procurement Plan ­ V.1 July 22, 2013 Page 2 City of Pasadena

249

EIS-0141: Washington Water Power/B.C. Hydro Transmission Interconnection Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of constructing and operating a double-circuit 230-kilovolt electrical transmission line that would link the electrical systems of the Washington Water Power Company and the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority.

250

NREL: Water Power Research - Computer-Aided Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Engineering NREL is collaborating with other national laboratories, federal agencies, universities, and industry members to develop comprehensive and validated sets of computer-aided engineering modeling tools to accelerate the development of marine hydrokinetic technologies and improve the performance of hydroelectric facilities. Recent modeling efforts include: Wave Energy Converter Device and Array Modeling Current Device and Array Performance Modeling and Optimization Reference Model Development Wave Energy Converter Device Modeling Computer simulation that illustrates the flow patterns of water, represented by red circles and dots, around several two-bladed current turbines that appear to e floating in blue water. Simulation of the turbulent flow field entering and passing through an

251

Geographic, Technologic, And Economic Analysis of Using Reclaimed Water for Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additionally, several thermoelectric power plants in Texas currently use reclaimed water for at least some portion of their cooling water needs, including Austin Energys Sand Hill Energy Center; CPS Energys J K Spruce, J T Deely, and O W Sommers plants; Xcel Energys Nichols, Harrington, and Jones facilities; and the Spencer Generating Station near Denton, among others. ...

Ashlynn S. Stillwell; Michael E. Webber

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

Tapping Sun-Warmed Ocean Water for Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...consumers of natural gas, are eager to move to...vapor expands through a turbine and is then condensed...In Mini-OTEC, the turbine drives a 50-kilowatt...years, the projected life of a plant. Chemical...unirrigated ground. The remaining water returns to the...

BEVERLY KARPLUS HARTLINE

1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Colloidal Petcoke-in-Water Suspensions as Fuels for Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colloidal Petcoke-in-Water Suspensions as Fuels for Power Generation ... In this work, it is shown that, despite the low reactivity of petroleum coke (petcoke) and the presence of 40% water, a petcoke suspension having a large colloidal population burned with unprecedented high efficiencies (>99%) without a support fuel. ... Combustion tests of a typical heavy fuel oil (HFO) were carried out to produce baseline data for comparison to the colloidal petcoke in water suspension (CPW) performance. ...

Gustavo A. Nez; Mara I. Briceo; Cebers Gmez; Takeshi Asa; Hamid Farzan; Shengteng Hu; Daniel D. Joseph

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

255

Secretary Chu Announces more than $200 Million for Solar and Water Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

more than $200 Million for Solar and Water more than $200 Million for Solar and Water Power Technologies Secretary Chu Announces more than $200 Million for Solar and Water Power Technologies April 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - On the 40th Anniversary of Earth Day, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced that the Department will invest more than $200 million over five years to expand and accelerate the development, commercialization, and use of solar and water power technologies throughout the United States. This funding underscores the Administration's commitment to foster a robust clean-energy sector in the United States - that will create American manufacturing jobs and a workforce with the required technical training to speed the implementation of cutting-edge technologies. Today's announcement represents a down payment that will help

256

Institutional impediments to using alternative water sources in thermoelectric power plants.  

SciTech Connect

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Obtaining adequate water supplies for cooling and other operations at a reasonable cost is a key factor in siting new and maintaining existing thermoelectric power plant operations. One way to reduce freshwater consumption is to use alternative water sources such as reclaimed (or recycled) water, mine pool water, and other nontraditional sources. The use of these alternative sources can pose institutional challenges that can cause schedule delays, increase costs, or even require plants to abandon their plans to use alternative sources. This report identifies and describes a variety of institutional challenges experienced by power plant owners and operators across the country, and for many of these challenges it identifies potential mitigating approaches. The information comes from publically available sources and from conversations with power plant owners/operators familiar with using alternative sources. Institutional challenges identified in this investigation include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Institutional actions and decisions that are beyond the control of the power plant. Such actions can include changes in local administrative policies that can affect the use of reclaimed water, inaccurate growth projections regarding the amount of water that will be available when needed, and agency workloads and other priorities that can cause delays in the permitting and approval processes. (2) Developing, cultivating, and maintaining institutional relationships with the purveyor(s) of the alternative water source, typically a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and with the local political organizations that can influence decisions regarding the use of the alternative source. Often a plan to use reclaimed water will work only if local politics and power plant goals converge. Even then, lengthy negotiations are often needed for the plans to come to fruition. (3) Regulatory requirements for planning and developing associated infrastructure such as pipelines, storage facilities, and back-up supplies that can require numerous approvals, permits, and public participation, all of which can create delays and increased costs. (4) Permitting requirements that may be difficult to meet, such as load-based discharge limits for wastewater or air emissions limitations for particulate matter (which will be in the mist of cooling towers that use reclaimed water high in dissolved solids). (5) Finding discharge options for cooling tower blowdown of reclaimed water that are acceptable to permitting authorities. Constituents in this wastewater can limit options for discharge. For example, discharge to rivers requires National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits whose limits may be difficult to meet, and underground injection can be limited because many potential injection sites have already been claimed for disposal of produced waters from oil and gas wells or waters associated with gas shale extraction. (6) Potential liabilities associated with using alternative sources. A power plant can be liable for damages associated with leaks from reclaimed water conveyance systems or storage areas, or with mine water that has been contaminated by unscrupulous drillers that is subsequently discharged by the power plant. (7) Community concerns that include, but are not limited to, increased saltwater drift on farmers fields; the possibility that the reclaimed water will contaminate local drinking water aquifers; determining the 'best' use of WWTP effluent; and potential health concerns associated with emissions from the cooling towers that use recycled water. (8) Interveners that raise public concerns about the potential for emissions of emergi

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

257

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

258

Studies of D^+ -> {eta', eta, phi} e^+ nu_e  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first observation of the decay D^+ -> eta' e^+ nu_e in two analyses, which combined provide a branching fraction of B(D+ -> eta' e nu) = (2.16 +/- 0.53 +/- 0.07) x 10^{-4}. We also provide an improved measurement of B(D+ -> eta e nu) = (11.4 +/- 0.9 +/- 0.4) x 10^{-4}, provide the first form factor measurement, and set the improved upper limit B(D+ -> phi e nu) < 0.9 x 10^{-4} (90% C.L.).

CLEO Collaboration; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Xiao; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; L. J. Pearson; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; K. Randrianarivony; G. Tatishvili; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; R. Gray; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Impact of extensive residential solar water heating on power system losses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

South Africa is in the grips of an electricity crisis. Currently, the bulk of power is produced at coal fired power stations which are located far from the large load centres. Solar energy is widely available in South Africa, and could be used to complement this coal based generation, and supply energy at the point of use. This paper aims to investigate the impact of residential solar water heating on power system transmission losses. Initially simulations were carried out in order to determine the impact of solar water heating on a household's electricity demand. These were done for households located in Cape Town, Johannesburg and Durban. A number of solar water heating installations in Cape Town were also monitored, in order to validate the simulation results. Lastly, a power system model was developed in order to investigate the possible impact of large-scale implementation of solar water heating, at varied penetration levels, on a transmission system. Using the model and the results obtained from the simulations, a utility impact analysis was carried out in order to determine the effect on transmission losses. It was concluded that large-scale implementation of solar water heating can be used as a means to alleviate loading and losses on power systems' transmission lines particularly during peak demand.

K.P. Ijumba; A.B. Sebitosi; P. Pillay; K. Folly

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches are considered in this work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches in manufacturing ultrapure water for nuclear power plants. Resins allow the removal of ionic impurities to subparts-per-million. Thereby in nuclear power plants, resins contribute to guarantee personnel safety, to control feed system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes Best Technology Available for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plants steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

Gary Vine

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Smart Grid Demonstration Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angeles Department of Water and Power Smart Grid Demonstration Project Angeles Department of Water and Power Smart Grid Demonstration Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Country United States Headquarters Location Los Angeles, California Recovery Act Funding $60,280,000.00 Total Project Value $120,560,000.00 Coordinates 34.0522342°, -118.2436849° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

263

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power, California (Utility Company) Power, California (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $62,650,755.

264

Measurement of the ratio Beta(D+ -> pi(0)l+nu) Beta(D+ -> (K)over-bar(o)l+nu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the CLEO-II detector, the branching ratio of the Cabibbo suppressed decay D+ --> pi0l+nu, relative to the branching ratio of the Cabibbo favored decay D+ --> K0l+nuBAR, is measured to be B(D+ --> pi0l+nu)/B(D+ --> K0l+nuBAR) = (8.5 +/- 2...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fermilab, Indiana University Horn Optimization for nuSTORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fermilab, Indiana University Horn Optimization for nuSTORM HPTW 05/21/2014 Fermilab, Indiana University Ao Liu* A. Bross, D. Neuffer Fermilab, Indiana University *www.frankliuao.com/research.html #12;Fermilab, Indiana University WHO WE ARE, WHAT WE DO nuSTORM Overview 5/23/2014 Ao Liu 1 #12;Fermilab

McDonald, Kirk

267

Discharge waters from a power plant as an influent of phytoplankton in adjacent estuarine waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). With the demand I' or electrical power doub:iir g every 6-1 0 years (Krenkel and Parker 1969; Cairns 1972), tremendous increa. . es in electrical power production are predicted (Mihursky anrl Kennedy 1967; Dallaire 1970; Levin ei-, al. 19(2; Wastler ancl... Wastler 1972; Nihursky 1975). The thermal ei'ficiency of a pover plant, and the capacity at which a plant, is producing, determine the volume of vsstc 'r. at r leaseu (Zdinger et al. 1968; Levin et al. 1972). Present energy conversion efficiencies...

Strong, Clyde B

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to determine if WSAC technology could cool process water at cycles of concentration considered highly scale forming for mechanical draft cooling towers. At the completion of testing, there was no visible scale on the heat transfer surfaces and cooling was sustained throughout the test period. The application of the WARMF decision framework to the San Juan Basis showed that drought and increased temperature impact water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry) and lead to critical shortages. WARMF-ZeroNet, as part of the integrated ZeroNet decision support system, offers stakeholders an integrated approach to long-term water management that balances competing needs of existing water users and economic growth under the constraints of limited supply and potential climate change.

C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Event Excess in the MiniBooNE Search for {nu}{sub {mu}{yields}{nu}e} Oscillations  

SciTech Connect

The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab reports results from a search for {nu}{sub {mu}{yields}{nu}e} oscillations, using a data sample corresponding to 5.66x10{sup 20} protons on target. An excess of 20.9{+-}14.0 events is observed in the energy range 475nu}}{sup QE}<1250 MeV, which, when constrained by the observed {nu}{sub {mu}} events, has a probability for consistency with the background-only hypothesis of 0.5%. On the other hand, fitting for {nu}{sub {mu}{yields}{nu}e} oscillations, the best-fit point has a {chi}{sup 2} probability of 8.7%. The data are consistent with {nu}{sub {mu}{yields}{nu}e} oscillations in the 0.1 to 1.0 eV{sup 2} {Delta}m{sup 2} range and with the evidence for antineutrino oscillations from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Anderson, C. E.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Spitz, J. [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Marsh, W.; Moore, C. D.; Polly, C. C.; Russell, A. D.; Stefanski, R. J.; Zeller, G. P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Bugel, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Karagiorgi, G.; Nguyen, V. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

270

Static Electricity Powered Copper Oxide Nanowire Microbicidal Electroporation for Water Disinfection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumes a very small amount of energy. Static electricity as the power source can be generated, sanitation, and electricity is estimated to be 66%, 40%, and 21%, respectively, in sharp contrast to 99%, 99 active sites to improve efficiency of water disinfection8-10,15-17 However, the large-scale deployment

Cui, Yi

271

The use of reverse osmosis technology for water treatment in power engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of operation of DVS-M/150 installations for a total output of 150 m3/h (ZAO NPK Mediana-Filtr) at the Water Treatment Department of the Novocherkassk Thermal Power Plant (NchGRES) are presented, and ...

A. N. Samodurov; S. E. Lysenko; S. L. Gromov; A. A. Panteleev

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project - Newsletter #6 - September 2010, (NEWF), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

6 - September 2010 6 - September 2010 WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM PIX 16204 New England and Northeast Look to the Horizon...and Beyond, for Offshore Wind In early December, Boston hosted the American Wind Energy Association's second annual Offshore Wind Project Workshop. U.S. and European offshore wind stakeholders convened to discuss the emerging U.S. offshore wind industry and provided evidence of a significant increase in activity along the Atlantic Coast from the Carolinas to Maine. The wind power industry and policymakers are looking to offshore for long-term growth, driven by aggressive policy goals, economic develop- ment opportunities, a finite set of attractive land-based wind sites, and immense wind energy potential at a modest distance from major population centers.

273

Study of B --> pi l nu and B --> rho l nu decays and determination of |Vub|  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of exclusive charmless semileptonic B-meson decays based on 83 million BBbar pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. Using isospin symmetry, we measure branching fractions B(B0 --> pi- l+ nu) = (1.38 +- 0.10 +- 0.16 +- 0.08) x 10^-4 and B(B0 --> rho- l+ nu) = (2.14 +- 0.21 +- 0.48 +- 0.28) x 10^-4, where the errors are statistical, experimental systematic, and due to form-factor shape uncertainties. We compare the measured distribution in q^2, the momentum-transfer squared, with theoretical predictions for the form factors from lattice QCD and light-cone sum rules, and extract the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |V_{ub}| = (3.82 +- 0.14 +- 0.22 +- 0.11 +0.88 -0.52) x 10^-3 from B --> pi l nu, where the fourth error reflects the uncertainty of the form-factor normalization.

The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

High power water load for microwave and millimeter-wave radio frequency sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high power water load for microwave and millimeter wave radio frequency sources has a front wall including an input port for the application of RF power, a cylindrical dissipation cavity lined with a dissipating material having a thickness which varies with depth, and a rear wall including a rotating reflector for the reflection of wave energy inside the cylindrical cavity. The dissipation cavity includes a water jacket for removal of heat generated by the absorptive material coating the dissipation cavity, and this absorptive material has a thickness which is greater near the front wall than near the rear wall. Waves entering the cavity reflect from the rotating reflector, impinging and reflecting multiple times on the absorptive coating of the dissipation cavity, dissipating equal amounts of power on each internal reflection.

Ives, R. Lawrence (Saratoga, CA); Mizuhara, Yosuke M. (Palo Alto, CA); Schumacher, Richard V. (Sunnyvale, CA); Pendleton, Rand P. (Saratoga, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Development of a cogenerating thermophotovoltaic powered combination hot water heater/hydronic boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cogenerating thermophotovoltaic (TPV) device for hot water hydronic space heating and electric power generation was developed designed fabricated and tested under a Department of Energy contracted program. The device utilizes a cylindrical ytterbia superemissive ceramic fiber burner (SCFB) and is designed for a nominal capacity of 80 kBtu/hr. The burner is fired with premixed natural gas and air. Narrow band emission from the SCFB is converted to electricity by single crystal silicon (Si) photovoltaic (PV) arrays arranged concentrically around the burner. A three-way mixing valve is used to direct heated water to either the portable water storage tank radiant baseboard heaters or both. As part of this program QGI developed a microprocessor-based control system to address the safety issues as well as photovoltaic power management. Flame sensing is accomplished via the photovoltaics a technology borrowed from QGIs Quantum Control safety shut-off system. Device testing demonstrated a nominal photovoltaic power output of 200 W. Power consumed during steady state operation was 33 W with power drawn from the combustion air blower hydronic system pump three-way switching valve and the control system resulting in a net power surplus of 142 W. Power drawn during the ignition sequence was 55 W and a battery recharge time of 1 minute 30 seconds was recorded. System efficiency was measured and found to be more than 83%. Pollutant emissions at determined operating conditions were below the South Coast Air Quality Management Districts (California) limit of 40 ng/J for NOx and carbon monoxide emissions were measured at less than 50 dppm.

Aleksandr S. Kushch; Steven M. Skinner; Richard Brennan; Pedro A. Sarmiento

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

High Temperature Water Heat Pipes Radiator for a Brayton Space Reactor Power System  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature water heat pipes radiator design is developed for a space power system with a sectored gas-cooled reactor and three Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engines, for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and energy conversion and rejection. The CBC engines operate at turbine inlet and exit temperatures of 1144 K and 952 K. They have a net efficiency of 19.4% and each provides 30.5 kWe of net electrical power to the load. A He-Xe gas mixture serves as the turbine working fluid and cools the reactor core, entering at 904 K and exiting at 1149 K. Each CBC loop is coupled to a reactor sector, which is neutronically and thermally coupled, but hydraulically decoupled to the other two sectors, and to a NaK-78 secondary loop with two water heat pipes radiator panels. The segmented panels each consist of a forward fixed segment and two rear deployable segments, operating hydraulically in parallel. The deployed radiator has an effective surface area of 203 m2, and when the rear segments are folded, the stowed power system fits in the launch bay of the DELTA-IV Heavy launch vehicle. For enhanced reliability, the water heat pipes operate below 50% of their wicking limit; the sonic limit is not a concern because of the water, high vapor pressure at the temperatures of interest (384 - 491 K). The rejected power by the radiator peaks when the ratio of the lengths of evaporator sections of the longest and shortest heat pipes is the same as that of the major and minor widths of the segments. The shortest and hottest heat pipes in the rear segments operate at 491 K and 2.24 MPa, and each rejects 154 W. The longest heat pipes operate cooler (427 K and 0.52 MPa) and because they are 69% longer, reject more power (200 W each). The longest and hottest heat pipes in the forward segments reject the largest power (320 W each) while operating at {approx} 46% of capillary limit. The vapor temperature and pressure in these heat pipes are 485 K and 1.97 MPa. By contrast, the shortest water heat pipes in the forward segments operate much cooler (427 K and 0.52 MPa), and reject a much lower power of 45 W each. The radiator with six fixed and 12 rear deployable segments rejects a total of 324 kWth, weights 994 kg and has an average specific power of 326 Wth/kg and a specific mass of 5.88 kg/m2.

El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Laser triggering of water switches in terrawatt-class pulse power accelerators.  

SciTech Connect

Focused Beams from high-power lasers have been used to command trigger gas switches in pulse power accelerators for more than two decades. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was aimed at determining whether high power lasers could also command trigger water switches on high-power accelerators. In initial work, we determined that focused light from three harmonics of a small pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm could be used to form breakdown arcs in water, with the lowest breakdown thresholds of 110 J/cm{sup 2} or 14 GW/cm{sup 2} at 532 nm in the green. In laboratory-scale laser triggering experiments with a 170-kV pulse-charged water switch with a 3-mm anode-cathode gap, we demonstrated that {approx}90 mJ of green laser energy could trigger the gap with a 1-{sigma} jitter of less than 2ns, a factor of 10 improvement over the jitter of the switch in its self breaking mode. In the laboratory-scale experiments we developed optical techniques utilizing polarization rotation of a probe laser beam to measure current in switch channels and electric field enhancements near streamer heads. In the final year of the project, we constructed a pulse-power facility to allow us to test laser triggering of water switches from 0.6- MV to 2.0 MV. Triggering experiments on this facility using an axicon lens for focusing the laser and a switch with a 740 kV self-break voltage produced consistent laser triggering with a {+-} 16-ns 1-{sigma} jitter, a significant improvement over the {+-} 24-ns jitter in the self-breaking mode.

Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Johnson, David Lee (Titan Pulse Sciences, San Leandro, CA); Wilkins, Frank (Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Van De Valde, David (EG& G Technical Services, Albuquerque, NM); Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Zameroski, Nathan D.; Starbird, Robert L. (Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOE/NETL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Non-Traditional Water Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOE/NETL R&D Efforts November 1, 2009 DOE/NETL-311/040609 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

279

Use of caged fish for mariculture and environmental monitoring in a power-plant cooling-water system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-nydrocarbon pesticides in fishes cultured at various locations within the cooling system. 203 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Map of the research site ~g the location of the power plant, cooling-water system, and research facilities 17 Schematic representation... quality might conceivably be available considering the large number of power plants utilizing coastal waters for cooling. Other important benefits of thermal fish-culture include ample water supply, and reduced pumping costs as a result of the massive...

Chamberlain, George William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

280

Above: Power deposition in the superconducting magnets and the tungsten-carbide + water shield inside them, according to a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jet will disrupt the pool, unless mitigated by a splash suppressor. A SOLENOID CAPTURE SYSTEM Collider (MC) Comments Beam Power 4 MW No existing target system will survive at this power Ep 8 GeV yieldAbove: Power deposition in the superconducting magnets and the tungsten-carbide + water shield

McDonald, Kirk

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281

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.

Edward Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Wei Zhang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Effect of motor vibration problem on the power quality of water pumping stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper the effect of motor vibration problems on the dynamic performance and electrical power quality of water pumping stations is studied. A pump unit was tested for a full load and no load operating conditions. The dynamic results indicated that there is a problem of looseness in the motor base plate. The measurements were repeated again after achieving good support to the motor on its base plate. The results indicated that the vibration level decreased about 48% due to good support. The electrical power quality analysis showed that; the total harmonic distortion (THD) increases by about 12% due to the effect of bad motor vibration, and the 5th and 7th harmonic contents also increased by about 0.51.0%. Also the bad motor vibration caused large values of instantaneous flicker. These results indicated that the bad motor support causes many dynamics troubles and causes some power quality problems for the electrical feeder.

Khaled Fetyan; Dalia El_Gazzar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Energy penalty analysis of possible cooling water intake structurerequirements on existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that cooling water intake structures must reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. Many existing power plants in the United States utilize once-through cooling systems to condense steam. Once-through systems withdraw large volumes (often hundreds of millions of gallons per day) of water from surface water bodies. As the water is withdrawn, fish and other aquatic organisms can be trapped against the screens or other parts of the intake structure (impingement) or if small enough, can pass through the intake structure and be transported through the cooling system to the condenser (entrainment). Both of these processes can injure or kill the organisms. EPA adopted 316(b) regulations for new facilities (Phase I) on December 18, 2001. Under the final rule, most new facilities could be expected to install recirculating cooling systems, primarily wet cooling towers. The EPA Administrator signed proposed 316(b) regulations for existing facilities (Phase II) on February 28, 2002. The lead option in this proposal would allow most existing facilities to achieve compliance without requiring them to convert once-through cooling systems to recirculating systems. However, one of the alternate options being proposed would require recirculating cooling in selected plants. EPA is considering various options to determine best technology available. Among the options under consideration are wet-cooling towers and dry-cooling towers. Both types of towers are considered to be part of recirculating cooling systems, in which the cooling water is continuously recycled from the condenser, where it absorbs heat by cooling and condensing steam, to the tower, where it rejects heat to the atmosphere before returning to the condenser. Some water is lost to evaporation (wet tower only) and other water is removed from the recirculating system as a blow down stream to control the building up of suspended and dissolved solids. Makeup water is withdrawn, usually from surface water bodies, to replace the lost water. The volume of makeup water is many times smaller than the volume needed to operate a once-through system. Although neither the final new facility rule nor the proposed existing facility rule require dry cooling towers as the national best technology available, the environmental community and several States have supported the use of dry-cooling technology as the appropriate technology for addressing adverse environmental impacts. It is possible that the requirements included in the new facility rule and the ongoing push for dry cooling systems by some stakeholders may have a role in shaping the rule for existing facilities. The temperature of the cooling water entering the condenser affects the performance of the turbine--the cooler the temperature, the better the performance. This is because the cooling water temperature affects the level of vacuum at the discharge of the steam turbine. As cooling water temperatures decrease, a higher vacuum can be produced and additional energy can be extracted. On an annual average, once-through cooling water has a lower temperature than recirculated water from a cooling tower. By switching a once-through cooling system to a cooling tower, less energy can be generated by the power plant from the same amount of fuel. This reduction in energy output is known as the energy penalty. If a switch away from once-through cooling is broadly implemented through a final 316(b) rule or other regulatory initiatives, the energy penalty could result in adverse effects on energy supplies. Therefore, in accordance with the recommendations of the Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group (better known as the May 2001 National Energy Policy), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), has studied the energy penalty resulting from converting plants with once-through cooling to wet towers or indirect-dry towers. Five l

Veil, J. A.; Littleton, D. J.; Gross, R. W.; Smith, D. N.; Parsons, E.L., Jr.; Shelton, W. W.; Feeley, T. J.; McGurl, G. V.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

284

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production  

SciTech Connect

The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Analyticity, Shapes of Semileptonic Form Factors, and B to pi l nu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a pedagogical discussion of the physics underlying dispersion relation-derived parameterizations of form factors describing B -> pi l nu and B -> D l nu. Moments of the dispersion relations are shown to provide substantially tighter constraints on the f_+ (t) form factor describing B -> pi l nu than the unweighted dispersion relation alone. Heavy quark spin symmetry relations between the B -> pi l nu and B^* -> pi l nu form factors enables such constraints to be tightened even further.

C. Glenn Boyd; Martin J. Savage

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cumulative energy, emissions, and water consumption for geothermal electric power production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A life cycle analysis has been conducted on geothermal electricity generation. The technologies covered in the study include flash binary enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and coproduced gas and electricity plants. The life cycle performance metrics quantified in the study include materials water and energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The life cycle stages taken into account were the plant and fuel cycle stages the latter of which includes fuel production and fuel use (operational). The plant cycle includes the construction of the plant wells and above ground piping and the production of the materials that comprise those systems. With the exception of geothermal flash plants GHG emissions from the plant cycle are generally small and the only such emissions from geothermal plants. Some operational GHGs arise from flash plants and though substantial when compared to other geothermal power plants these are nonetheless considerably smaller than those emitted from fossil fuel fired plants. For operational geothermal emissions an emission rate (g/kW h) distribution function vs. cumulative capacity was developed using California plant data. Substantial GHG emissions arise from coproduced facilities and two other renewable power plants but these are almost totally due to the production and use of natural gas and biofuels. Nonetheless those GHGs are still much less than those from fossil fuel fired plants. Though significant amounts of water are consumed for plant and well construction especially for well field stimulation of EGS plants they are small in comparison to estimated water consumed during plant operation. This also applies to air cooled plants which nominally should consume no water during operation. Considering that geothermal operational water use data are scarce our estimates show the lowest water consumption for flash and coproduced plants and the highest for EGS though the latter must be considered provisional due to the absence of field data. The EGS estimate was based on binary plant data.

J. L. Sullivan; C. Clark; J. Han; C. Harto; M. Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

First measurement of the B->pi l nu and B->rho(omega)l nu branching fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we obtain B(B-0 --> pi(-)l(+)nu) = (1.8 +/- 0.4 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(-4) and B(B-0 --> rho(-)l(+)nu) = (2.5 +/- 0.4(0.7)(+0.5) +/- 0.5) x 10(-4), where the errors are statistical, systematic, and the estimated model dependence. We also estimate \\V...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Water, Power, and Development in Twenty-First Century China: The Case of the South-North Water Transfer Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over basic water management and environmental concerns.to environmental regulation and water pollution managementfiguring into water management is the parallel environmental

Crow-Miller, Brittany Leigh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Water, Power, and Development in Twenty-First Century China: The Case of the South-North Water Transfer Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to environmental regulation and water pollution managementover basic water management and environmental concerns.figuring into water management is the parallel environmental

Crow-Miller, Brittany Leigh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Water footprint of electric power generation : modeling its use and analyzing options for a water-scarce future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interdependency between water and energy, sometimes called the water-energy nexus, is growing in importance as demand for both water and energy increases. Energy is required for water treatment and supply, while virtually ...

Delgado Martn, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Study of B to pi l nu and B to rho l nu Decays and Determination of |V_ub|  

SciTech Connect

We present an analysis of exclusive charmless semileptonic B-meson decays based on 377 million B{bar B} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance. We select four event samples corresponding to the decay modes B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu}, and find the measured branching fractions to be consistent with isospin symmetry. Assuming isospin symmetry, we combine the two B {yields} {pi}{ell}{nu} samples, and similarly the two B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu} samples, and measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.41 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.07) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.75 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.27) x 10{sup -4}, where the errors are statistical and systematic. We compare the measured distribution in q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared, with predictions for the form factors from QCD calculations and determine the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}|. Based on the measured partial branching fraction for B {yields} {pi}{ell}{nu} in the range q{sup 2} < 12 GeV{sup 2} and the most recent LCSR calculations we obtain |V{sub ub}| = (3.78 {+-} 0.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.55}) x 10{sup -3}, where the errors refer to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. From a simultaneous fit to the data over the full q{sup 2} range and the FNAL/MILC lattice QCD results, we obtain |V{sub ub}| = (2.95 {+-} 0.31) x 10{sup -3} from B {yields} {pi}{ell}{nu}, where the error is the combined experimental and theoretical uncertainty.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

U.S. low rank coals contain relatively large amounts of moisture, with the moisture content of subbituminous coals typically ranging from 15 to 30 percent and that for lignites from 25 and 40 percent. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit, for it can result in fuel handling problems and it affects heat rate, stack emissions and maintenance costs. Theoretical analyses and coal test burns performed at a lignite fired power plant show that by reducing the fuel moisture, it is possible to improve boiler performance and unit heat rate, reduce emissions and reduce water consumption by the evaporative cooling tower. The economic viability of the approach and the actual impact of the drying system on water consumption, unit heat rate and stack emissions will depend critically on the design and operating conditions of the drying system. The present project evaluated the low temperature drying of high moisture coals using power plant waste heat to provide the energy required for drying. Coal drying studies were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized bed dryer to gather data and develop models on drying kinetics. In addition, analyses were carried out to determine the relative costs and performance impacts (in terms of heat rate, cooling tower water consumption and emissions) of drying along with the development of optimized drying system designs and recommended operating conditions.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Hugo Caram

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report.

Edward Levy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A novel method of hydrogen generation by water electrolysis using an ultra-short-pulse power supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method of hydrogen generation by water electrolysis using ultra-short-pulse power supply is ... pulse with the width of 300ns, electrolysis takes place with a mechanism dominated by ... from the conventi...

Naohiro Shimizu; Souzaburo Hotta; Takayuki Sekiya

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter ($15 to $60 per 1000 gallons), with treatment costs accounting for 13 ?? 23% of the overall cost. Results from this project suggest that produced water is a potential large source of cooling water, but treatment and transportation costs for this water are large.

Chad Knutson; Seyed Dastgheib; Yaning Yang; Ali Ashraf; Cole Duckworth; Priscilla Sinata; Ivan Sugiyono; Mark Shannon; Charles Werth

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Theoretical study on a novel ammoniawater cogeneration system with adjustable cooling to power ratios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel ammoniawater cogeneration system with adjustable cooling to power ratios is proposed and investigated. In the combined system, a modified Kalina subcycle and an ammonia absorption cooling subcycle are interconnected by mixers, splitters, absorbers and heat exchangers. The proposed system can adjust its cooling to power ratios from the separate mode without splitting/mixing processes in the two subcycles to the combined operation modes which can produce different ratios of cooling and power. Simulation analysis is conducted to investigate the effects of operation parameter on system performance. The results indicate that the combined system efficiency can reach the maximum values of 37.79% as SR1 (split ratio 1) is equal to 1. Compared with the separate system, the combined efficiency and COP values of the proposed system can increase by 6.6% and 100% with the same heat input, respectively. In addition, the cooling to power ratios of the proposed system can be adjusted in the range of 1.83.6 under the given operating conditions.

Zeting Yu; Jitian Han; Hai Liu; Hongxia Zhao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Outdoor field evaluation of passive tritiated water vapor samplers at Canadian power reactor sites  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is one of several radioactive nuclides routinely monitored in and around CANDU{reg_sign} (CANada Deuterium Uranium) power reactor facilities. Over the last ten years, passive samplers have replaced active sampling devices for sampling tritiated water vapor in the workplace at many CANDU stations. The potential of passive samplers for outdoor monitoring has also been realized. This paper presents the result of a 1-y field trial carried out at all five Canadian CANDU reactor sites. The results indicate that passive samplers can be used at most sampling locations to measure tritiated water vapor in air concentrations as low as 1 Bq m{sup -3} over a 30-d sampling period. Only in one of the five sampling locations was poor agreement observed between active and passive monitoring data. This location, however, was very windy and it is suspected that the gusty winds were the source of the discrepancies observed. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Wood, M.J. [Chalk River Lab., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Blue energy: Current technologies for sustainable power generation from water salinity gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Salinity energy stored as the salinity difference between seawater and freshwater is a large-scale renewable resource that can be harvested and converted to electricity, but extracting it efficiently as a form of useful energy remains a challenge. With the development of membrane science and technology, membrane-based techniques for energy extraction from water salinity, such as pressure-retarded osmosis and reverse electro-dialysis, have seen tremendous development in recent years. Meanwhile, many other novel methods for harvesting exergy from water mixing processes, such as electrochemical capacitor and nano-fluidic energy harvesting systems, have been proposed. In this work, an overview and state-of-the-art of the current technologies for sustainable power generation from the water salinity gradient are presented. Characteristics of these technologies are analyzed and compared for this particular application. Based on these entropic energy extracting methods, the water salinity, as the blue energy, will be another source of renewable energy to satisfy the ever-growing energy demand of human society.

Zhijun Jia; Baoguo Wang; Shiqiang Song; Yongsheng Fan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Search for Neutral Heavy Leptons in the NuTeV Experiment at Fermilab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a search for neutral heavy leptons in the NuTeV experiment at Fermilab. The upgraded NuTeV neutrino detector for the 1996-1997 run included an instrumented decay region for the NHL search which, combined with the NuTeV calorimeter, allows detection in several decay modes (mu-mu-nu, mu-e-nu, mu-pi, e-pi, and e-e-nu). We see no evidence for neutral heavy leptons in our current search in the mass range from 0.3 GeV to 2.0 GeV decaying into final states containing a muon.

NuTeV Collaboration; R. B. Drucker

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

Water, Power, and Development in Twenty-First Century China: The Case of the South-North Water Transfer Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spatial-Geographic Models of Water Scarcity and Supply inBS""hijkg,l+ !" +2011m)g 2030 Water Resources Group (WRG). Charting Our Water Future: Economic frameworks to inform

Crow-Miller, Brittany Leigh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Precision Calibration of the NuTeV Calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NuTeV is a neutrino-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering experiment at Fermilab. The detector consists of an iron-scintillator sampling calorimeter interspersed with drift chambers, followed by a muon toroidal spectrometer. We present determinations of response and resolution functions of the NuTeV calorimeter for electrons, hadrons, and muons over an energy range of 4.8 to 190 GeV. The absolute hadronic energy scale is determined to an accuracy of 0.43%. We compare our measurements to predictions from calorimeter theory and GEANT3 simulations.

The NuTeV Collaboration; D. A. Harris; J. Yu

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

The NuMI Neutrino Beam at Fermilab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermilab is due to begin operations in late 2004. NuMI will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam of variable energy 2-20 GeV directed into the Earth at 58 mrad for short (~1 km) and long (~700-900 km) baseline experiments. Several aspects of the design are reviewed, as are potential upgrade requirements to the facility in the event a Proton Driver is built at Fermilab to enhance the neutrino flux.

Sacha E. Kopp

2004-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

305

Ground Motion Studies at NuMI  

SciTech Connect

Ground motion can cause significant deterioration in the luminosity of a linear collider. Vibration of numerous focusing magnets causes continuous misalignments, which makes the beam emittance grow. For this reason, understanding the seismic vibration of all potential LC sites is essential and related efforts in many sites are ongoing. In this document we summarize the results from the studies specific to Fermilab grounds as requested by the LC project leader at FNAL, Shekhar Mishra in FY04-FY06. The Northwestern group focused on how the ground motion effects vary with depth. Knowledge of depth dependence of the seismic activity is needed in order to decide how deep the LC tunnel should be at sites like Fermilab. The measurements were made in the NuMI tunnel, see Figure 1. We take advantage of the fact that from the beginning to the end of the tunnel there is a height difference of about 350 ft and that there are about five different types of dolomite layers. The support received allowed to pay for three months of salary of Michal Szleper. During this period he worked a 100% of his time in this project. That include one week of preparation: 2.5 months of data taking and data analysis during the full period of the project in order to guarantee that we were recording high quality data. We extended our previous work and made more systematic measurements, which included detailed studies on stability of the vibration amplitudes at different depths over long periods of time. As a consequence, a better control and more efficient averaging out of the daytime variation effects were possible, and a better study of other time dependences before the actual depth dependence was obtained. Those initial measurements were made at the surface and are summarized in Figure 2. All measurements are made with equipment that we already had (two broadband seismometers KS200 from GEOTECH and DL-24 portable data recorder). The offline data analysis took advantage of the full Fourier spectra information and the noise was properly subtracted. The basic formalism is summarized if Figure 3. The second objective was to make a measurement deeper under ground (Target hall, Absorber hall and Minos hall - 150 ft to 350 ft), which previous studies did not cover. All results are summarized in Figure 3 and 4. The measurements were covering a frequency range between 0.1 to 50 Hz. The data was taken continuously for at least a period of two weeks in each of the locations. We concluded that the dependence on depth is weak, if any, for frequencies above 1 Hz and not visible at all at lower frequencies. Most of the attenuation (factor of about 2-3) and damping of ground motion that is due to cultural activity at the surface is not detectable once we are below 150 ft underground. Therefore, accelerator currently under consideration can be build at the depth and there is no need to go deeper underground is built at Fermi National Laboratory.

Mayda M. Velasco; Michal Szleper

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

Presented at the NuMat 2012 Conference, 2225 October 2012, Osaka, Japan Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation in the core of a nuclear power plant, the used nuclear fuel is stored in spent fuel poolsPresented at the NuMat 2012 Conference, 22�25 October 2012, Osaka, Japan Effect of thermo and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA b Department of Mechanical

Motta, Arthur T.

307

Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pierina noceti Pierina noceti Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5428 pierina.noceti@netl.doe.gov steven I. apfelbaum Principal Investigator Applied Ecological Services, Inc. 17921 Smith Road P.O. Box 256 Brodhead, WI 53520 608-897-8641 steve@appliedeco.com Wetland Water Cooling PartnershiP: the Use of restored Wetlands to enhanCe thermoeleCtriC PoWer Plant Cooling and mitigate the demand on sUrfaCe Water Use Background Thermoelectric power plants require a significant volume of water to operate, accounting for 39 percent of freshwater (136 billion gallons per day) withdrawn in the United States in 2000, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study. This significant use of water ranks second only to the agricultural sector

308

Graphite-moderated, gas-cooled, and water-moderated, water-cooled reactors as power units in nuclearelectric power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article reviews a number of papers submitted at the Second International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy bearing on water-cooled, water-moderated, graphite-moderated, and gas-coole...

Yu. I. Koryakin

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Event Rates for Off Axis NuMI Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutrino interaction rates for experiments placed off axis in the NuMI beam are calculated. Primary proton beam energy is 120 GeV and four locations at 810 km from target and 6, 12, 30 and 40 km off axis are considered. This report is part of the Joint FNAL/BNL Future Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Study.

B. Viren

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

310

Neutrino Scattering on Glass: NuSOnG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These proceedings describe the physics goals and initial design for a new experiment: NuSOnG -- Neutrino Scattering On Glass. The design will yield about two orders of magnitude higher statistics than previous high energy neutrino experiments, observed in a detector optimized for low hadronic energy and electromagnetic events. As a result, the purely weak processes $\

J. M. Conrad

2007-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Search for B -> l(nu)over bar(l)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for the decays B- --> l(-)(l) in a sample of 2.2 x 10(6) charged B decays using the CLEO detector. We see no evidence for a signal in any channel and set upper limits on the branching fractions of B(B- --> tau(-)<(nu)over bar...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Physics Potential of the Fermilab NuMI beamline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the physics potential of the NuMI beamline with a detector located 10 km off-axis at a distant site (810 km). We study the sensitivity to $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{13}$ and to the CP-violating parameter $\\sin \\delta$ as well as the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy by exploiting the $\

Olga Mena; Stephen Parke

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

313

July 26 NuFACT Target Meeting 1 Simulation of Dynamic Interaction of the Neutrino Factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Following the Successful Completion of the E951 and MERIT Experiments regarding Hg Jet Stability and BeamFACT Target Meeting 10 #12;July 26 NuFACT Target Meeting 11 #12;July 26 NuFACT Target Meeting 12 Bubble Dynamics and Hg Jet/Pool #12;July 26 NuFACT Target Meeting 13 Local pressure outside formed bubble can

McDonald, Kirk

314

Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power- House Committee on Natural Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Proposed FY 2015 Budget for the Western Area Power Administration By: Mark A. Gabriel, Administrator, Western Area Power Administration

315

Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power- House Energy and Natural Resources Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Proposed FY 2015 Budget for the Southeastern Power Administration By: Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator, Southeastern Power Administration

316

Measurement of {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub e} Events in an Off-Axis Horn-Focused Neutrino Beam  

SciTech Connect

We report the first observation of off-axis neutrino interactions in the MiniBooNE detector from the NuMI beam line at Fermilab. The MiniBooNE detector is located 745 m from the NuMI production target, at 110 mrad angle (6.3 deg.) with respect to the NuMI beam axis. Samples of charged-current quasielastic {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub e} interactions are analyzed and found to be in agreement with expectation. This provides a direct verification of the expected pion and kaon contributions to the neutrino flux and validates the modeling of the NuMI off-axis beam.

Adamson, P.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Choudhary, B. C.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Harris, D.; Hylen, J.; Kasper, P.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kourbanis, I.; Marchionni, A.; Marsh, W.; Mills, F.; Moore, C. D.; Prebys, E.; Russell, A. D.; Smart, W.; Spentzouris, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)] (and others)

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

Life cycle analysis of distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power: economics, global warming potential and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on life cycle assessment (LCA) of the economics, global warming potential and water (both for desalination and water use in operation) for a distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power (DCS-CHP) system. Detailed simulation of system performance across 1020 sites in the US combined with a sensible cost allocation scheme informs this LCA. We forecast a levelized cost of $0.25kWh?1 electricity and $0.03kWh?1 thermal, for a system with a life cycle global warming potential of ~80gCO2eqkWh?1 of electricity and ~10gCO2eqkWh?1 thermal, sited in Oakland, California. On the basis of the economics shown for air cooling, and the fact that any combined heat and power system reduces the need for cooling while at the same time boosting the overall solar efficiency of the system, DCS-CHP compares favorably to other electric power generation systems in terms of minimization of water use in the maintenance and operation of the plant. The outlook for water desalination coupled with distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power is less favorable. At a projected cost of $1.40m?3, water desalination with DCS-CHP would be economical and practical only in areas where water is very scarce or moderately expensive, primarily available through the informal sector, and where contaminated or salt water is easily available as feed-water. It is also interesting to note that $0.40$1.90m?3 is the range of water prices in the developed world, so DCS-CHP desalination systems could also be an economical solution there under some conditions.

Zack Norwood; Daniel Kammen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Ignition and combustion drive by powerful laser radiation acting on a water surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ignition and combustion effects in water vapor generated...2-laser radiation on a water surface are investigated...

G. I. Kozlov; V. A. Kuznetsov

319

Final environmental impact statement, Washington Water Power/B.C. Hydro Transmission Interconnection Project  

SciTech Connect

Washington Water Power (WWP) proposes to construct and operate an electric transmission line that would connect with the electrical system of the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority (B.C. Hydro). The project would be composed of a double-circuit, 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line from WWP`s existing Beacon Substation located northeast of Spokane, Washington to the international border located northwest of Metaline Falls, Washington. The original Presidential permit application and associated proposed route presented in the draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) have been modified to terminate at the Beacon Substation, instead of WWP`s initially proposed termination point at the planned Marshall Substation located southwest of Spokane. A supplemental draft EIS was prepared and submitted for review to not only examine the new proposed 5.6 miles of route, but to also compare the new Proposed Route to the other alternatives previously analyzed in the DEIS. This final EIS (FEIS) assesses the environmental effects of the proposed transmission line through construction, operation, maintenance, and abandonment activities and addresses the impacts associated with the Proposed Action, Eastern Alternative, Western Alternative, Northern Crossover Alternative, Southern Crossover Alternative, and No Action Alternative. The FEIS also contains the comments received and the responses to these comments submitted on the DEIS and Supplemental DEIS.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A NuSTAR observation of the fast symbiotic nova V745 Sco in outburst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fast recurrent nova V745 Sco was observed in the 3-79 keV X-rays band with NuSTAR 10 days after the optical discovery. The measured X-ray emission is consistent with a collisionally ionized optically thin plasma at temperature of about 2.7 keV. A prominent iron line observed at 6.7 keV does not require enhanced iron in the ejecta. We attribute the X-ray flux to shocked circumstellar material. No X-ray emission was observed at energies above 20 keV, and the flux in the 3-20 keV range was about 1.6 $\\times$ 10$^{-11}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. The emission measure indicates an average electron density of order of 10$^7$ cm$^{-2}$. The X-ray flux in the 0.3-10 keV band almost simultaneously measured with Swift was about 40 times larger, mainly due to the luminous central supersoft source emitting at energy below 1 keV. The fact that the NuSTAR spectrum cannot be fitted with a power law, and the lack of hard X-ray emission, allow us to rule out Comptonized gamma rays, and to place an upper limit of the order of...

Orio, M; Page, K L; Sokoloski, J L; Harrison, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Climate mitigations impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect

Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sectors use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sectors water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

T Sant; D Buhagiar; R N Farrugia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Quenching China's Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China's Renewable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new solar, wind and large hydro power plants. A closer lookof wind development is lower than coal-fired power plants,wind power in China: A case study of nonrenewable energy cost and greenhouse gas emissions by plant

Zheng, Nina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The computational-and-experimental investigation into the head-flow characteristic of the two-stage ejector for the emergency core cooling system of the NPP with a water-moderated water-cooled power reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of the computational-and-experimental investigation into the two-stage ejector for the emergency cooling system of the core of the water-moderated water-cooled power reactor. The results of experiment...

Yu. V. Parfenov

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Solution nebulization into a low-power argon microwave-induced plasma for atomic emission spectrometry: study of synthetic ocean water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solution nebulization into a low-power argon microwave-induced plasma for atomic emission spectrometry: study of synthetic ocean water ...

Kin C. Ng; Wei Lung Shen

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

Jasbir Gill

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Branching Fraction Measurement of B to omega l nu decays  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} branching fraction based on a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe 1041 {+-} 133 signal decays, corresponding to a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.15 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The dependence of the decay rate on q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared to the lepton system, is compared to QCD predictions of the form factors based on a quark model and light-cone sum rules.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

The waters of Southeastern Wisconsin are vast but vulnerable. We depend on our waters for drinking water, irrigation, industry, transportation, power production,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Understanding our region's water-related issues and future challenges can help us protect clean, abundant water and industry, public health and ecosystem health. Water quality gains more at- tention during summer, when cause illness. The bacteria and other pollutants that affect our water quality come from a variety

Saldin, Dilano

331

Studies of muon-induced radioactivity at NuMI  

SciTech Connect

The JASMIN Collaboration has studied the production of radionuclides by muons in the muon alcoves of the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. Samples of aluminum and copper are exposed to the muon field and counted on HpGe detectors when removed to determine their content of radioactive isotopes. We compare the results to MARS simulations and discuss the radiological implications for neutrino factories and muon colliders.

Boehnlein, David j.; Leveling, A.F.; Mokhov, N.V.; Vaziri, K.; /Fermilab; Iwamoto, Y.; Kasugai, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Nakashima, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Hagiwara, M.; Iwase, Hiroshi; /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyoto U., KURRI /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Shimizu, Tokyo /Tohoku U.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The continuous refill, short-burst, hand-powered water toy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water "blaster" has been one of the most popular toys because it is fun, safe, and easy to operate. The water guns have appeared in many design variations, ranging from the simple squirt gun to motorized water guns. ...

Lam, Long (Long T.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Coagulation/Flocculation Treatments for Flue-Gas-Derived Water from Oxyfuel Power Production with CO2 Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coagulation/Flocculation Treatments for Flue-Gas-Derived Water from Oxyfuel Power Production with CO2 Capture ... The buffered solution is then sent back to the top of the tower, where it is sprayed into the upflowing oxyfuel gas stream, condensing and cleaning the ash-laden gas. ...

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen Gerdemann; John Clark; Cathy Summers

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

334

The effect of wind speed fluctuations on the performance of a wind-powered membrane system for brackish water desalination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wind-powered reverse osmosis membrane (wind-membrane) system without energy storage was tested using synthetic brackish water (2750 and 5500 mg/L NaCl) over a range of simulated wind speeds under both steady-state and ...

Park, Gavin L.; Schfer, Andrea; Richards, Bryce S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power- House Natural Resources Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: FY 2014 Budget Request for the Bonneville Power Administration By: William K. Drummond, Administrator, BPA

336

Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power- House Natural Resources Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Fiscal Year 2014 Budget for Southwestern Power Administration By: Christopher M. Turner, Administrator, SWPA

337

Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power- House Committee on Natural Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Proposed Fiscal Year 2015 Budget By: Elliot E. Mainzer, Administrator, Bonneville Power Administration

338

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Assessment of the use of extended burnup fuel in light water power reactors  

SciTech Connect

This study has been conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the environmental and economic impacts associated with the use of extended burnup nuclear fuel in light water power reactors. It has been proposed that current batch average burnup levels of 33 GWd/t uranium be increased to above 50 GWd/t. The environmental effects of extending fuel burnup during normal operations and during accident events and the economic effects of cost changes on the fuel cycle are discussed in this report. The physical effects of extended burnup on the fuel and the fuel assembly are also presented as a basis for the environmental and economic assessments. Environmentally, this burnup increase would have no significant impact over that of normal burnup. Economically, the increased burnup would have favorable effects, consisting primarily of a reduction: (1) total fuel requirements; (2) reactor downtime for fuel replacement; (3) the number of fuel shipments to and from reactor sites; and (4) repository storage requirements. 61 refs., 4 figs., 27 tabs.

Baker, D.A.; Bailey, W.J.; Beyer, C.E.; Bold, F.C.; Tawil, J.J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Single photon production {nu}{sub l}N{yields}{nu}{sub l}N{gamma} in neutrino-nucleon scattering  

SciTech Connect

The quasielastic charged current (CCQE) {nu}{sub e}n{yields}e{sup -}p scattering is the dominant mechanism to detect appearance of a {nu}{sub e} in an almost {nu}{sub {mu}} flux at the 1 GeV scale. Actual experiments show a precision below 1% and between less known background contributions, but necessary to constraint the event excess, we have the radiative corrections. A consistent model recently developed for the simultaneous description of elastic and radiative {pi}N scattering, pion-photoproduction and single pion production processes, both for charged and neutral current neutrino-nucleon scattering, is extended for the evaluation of the radiative {nu}{sub l}N{yields}{nu}{sub l}N{gamma} cross section. Our results are similar to a previous (but inconsistent) theoretical evaluation in the low energy region, and show an increment in the upper region where the {Delta} resonance becomes relevant.

Barbero, C.; Mariano, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C. C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Maragaret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Water Budget Managers Report to Northwest Power Planning Council, 1986 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In addition to management of the Water Budget, the Water Budget Managers and FPC staff developed and directed the Smolt Monitoring and Water Budget Evaluation Programs of Section 304(d) of the Fish and Wildlife Program. The fishery agencies and tribes also authorized the Water Budget Managers to coordinate agency and tribal system operational requests throughout the year, including spill management for fish passage. This report summarizes Water Budget Manager activities in implementing program measures, including 1986 flow conditions, water budget usage and spill management, and the in-season management portion of the 1986 Smolt Monitoring Program including data management.

Karr, Malcolm; DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Slag-washing water of blast furnace power station with supercritical organic Rankine cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant operating with supercritical ... of a supercritical power plant. Two typical organic fluids with sufficiently low critical parameters were ... study the efficiency of the s...

Song Xiao ??; Shu-ying Wu ???; Dong-sheng Zheng ???

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

346

A Look at Safety Goals and Safety Design Trends for Advanced Light Water Power Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Nuclear Safety

David Okrent

347

rom the beginning of time, the power of water has captured the human imagination and influenced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction as part of the Pirrís hydroelectric power project in Costa Rica, designed to generate 128 MW

348

Static Electricity Powered Copper Oxide Nanowire Microbicidal Electroporation for Water Disinfection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(29-34) Human motion or other mechanical energy can be harvested to generate static electricity of tens to thousands of volts, whereas the output current is only on the order of nano amps to micro amps which is safe to people. ... vibration and more, with great applications in self-powered systems for personal electronics, environmental monitoring, medical science and even large-scale power. ... The TENG was systematically studied and demonstrated as a sustainable power source that can not only drive instantaneous operation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) but also charge a Li ion battery as a regulated power module for powering a wireless sensor system and a com. ...

Chong Liu; Xing Xie; Wenting Zhao; Jie Yao; Desheng Kong; Alexandria B. Boehm; Yi Cui

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

Analysis of D+ to K- pi+ e+ nu_e and D+ to K- pi+ mu+ nu_mu Semileptonic Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a large sample (~11800 events) of D^+ into K^- pi^+ e^+ nu_e and D^+ into K^- pi^+ mu^+ nu_mu decays collected by the CLEO-c detector running at the psi(3770), we measure the helicity basis form factors free from the assumptions of spectroscopic pole dominance and provide new, accurate measurements of the absolute branching fractions for D^+ into K^- pi^+ e^+ nu_e and D^+ into K^- pi^+ mu^+ nu_mu decays. We find branching fractions which are consistent with previous world averages. Our measured helicity basis form factors are consistent with the spectroscopic pole dominance predictions for the three main helicity basis form factors describing D^+ into anti-K*0 ell^+ nu_mu decay. The ability to analyze D^+ into K^- pi^+ mu^+ nu_mu allows us to make the first non-parametric measurements of the mass-suppressed form factor. Our result is inconsistent with existing Lattice QCD calculations. Finally, we measure the form factor that controls non-resonant s-wave interference with the D^+ into anti-K*0 ell^+ nu_mu amplitude and search for evidence of possible additional non-resonant d-wave or f-wave interference with the anti-K*0.

CLEO Collaboration; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; J. M. Hunt; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. Ledoux; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; X. Ting; A. Tomaradze; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; S. Khalil; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; J. Reed; K. Randrianarivony; A. N. Robichaud; G. Tatishvili; E. J. White

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Neutrino Scattering on Glass: NuSOnG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These proceedings describe the physics goals and initial design for a new experiment: NuSOnGNeutrino Scattering On Glass. The design will yield about two orders of magnitude higher statistics than previous high energy neutrino experiments observed in a detector optimized for low hadronic energy and electromagnetic events. As a result the purely weak processes ? ? +e ? ?? ? +e ? and ? ? +e ? ?? e +? ? (inverse muon decay) can be measured with high accuracy for the first time. This allows important precision electroweak tests and well as direct searches for new physics. The high statistics also will yield the world's largest sample of Deep Inelastic (DIS) events for precision parton distribution studies.

J. M. Conrad; NuSOnG EOI

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

NuSTORM {\\mu} Ring -- Design and Injection Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of the NuSTORM muon production beam line and storage ring is discussed. The facility includes a pion production target station with a pion collection horn and transport into a straight section of a storage ring. {\\pi} decay within that straight section provides {\\mu}'s that are stored within the ring for subsequent decay providing precision electron and muon neutrino beams. The ring and transport designs are described and optimized. Genetic Algorithm optimization of the horn and transport into the ring has been performed, providing a significant increase in intensity

Neuffer, David; Bross, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Power Uprate Research and Development Strategy  

SciTech Connect

The economic incentives for low-cost electricity generation will continue to drive more plant owners to identify safe and reliable methods to increase the electrical power output of the current nuclear power plant fleet. A power uprate enables a nuclear power plant to increase its electrical output with low cost. However, power uprates brought new challenges to plant owners and operators. These include equipment damage or degraded performance, and unanticipated responses to plant conditions, etc. These problems have arisen mainly from using dated design and safety analysis tools and insufficient understanding of the full implications of the proposed power uprate or from insufficient attention to detail during the design and implementation phase. It is essential to demonstrate that all required safety margins have been properly retained and the existing safety level has been maintained or even increased, with consideration of all the conditions and parameters that have an influence on plant safety. The impact of the power uprate on plant life management for long term operation is also an important issue. Significant capital investments are required to extend the lifetime of an aging nuclear power plant. Power uprates can help the plant owner to recover the investment costs. However, plant aging issues may be aggravated by the power uprate due to plant conditions. More rigorous analyses, inspections and monitoring systems are required.

Hongbin Zhang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

USE OF PRODUCED WATER IN RECIRCULATING COOLING SYSTEMS AT POWER GENERATING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. Deliverable 1 presents a general assessment of produced water generation in the San Juan Basin in Four Corners Area of New Mexico. Oil and gas production, produced water handling and disposal, and produced water quantities and chemistry are discussed. Legislative efforts to enable the use of this water at SJGS are also described.

Michael N. DiFilippo

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Integration of a "Passive Water Recovery" MEA into a Portable DMFC Power Supply  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Download slides from the presentation by the University of North Florida at the July 17, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, Fuel Cells for Portable Power.

355

NuSTAR Observations of X-Ray Binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As of 2014 August, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) had observed ~30 X-ray binaries either as part of the planned program, as targets of opportunity, or for instrument calibration. The main science goals for the observations include probing the inner part of the accretion disk and constraining black hole spins via reflection components, providing the first observations of hard X-ray emission from quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs), measuring cyclotron lines from accreting pulsars, and studying type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars. Here, we describe the science objectives in more depth and give an overview of the NuSTAR observations that have been carried out to achieve the objectives. These include observation of four "IGR" High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) discovered by INTEGRAL. We also summarize the results that have been obtained and their implications. Among the IGR HMXBs, we focus on the discovery of a cyclotron line in the spectrum of IGR J17544-2619.

Tomsick, John A; Fuerst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bhalerao, Varun; Chakrabarty, Deepto; King, Ashley; Miller, Jon M; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Fermilab E866 (NuSea) Figures and Data Plots  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The NuSea Experiment at Fermilab studied the internal structure of protons, in particular the difference between up quarks and down quarks. This experiment also addressed at least two other physics questions: nuclear effects on the production of charmonia states (bound states of charm and anti-charm quarks) and energy loss of quarks in nuclei from Drell-Yan measurements on nuclei. While much of the NuSea data are available only to the collaboration, figures, data plots, and tables are presented as stand-alone items for viewing or download. They are listed in conjunction with the published papers, theses, or presentations in which they first appeared. The date range is 1998 to 2008. To see these figures and plots, click on E866 publications or go directly to http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/papers.html. Theses are at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866theses/e866theses.html and the presentations are found at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866talks/e866talks.html. Many of the items are postscript files.

E866 NuSea Collaboration

357

Thermal desalination : structural optimization and integration in clean power and water .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A large number of resources are dedicated to seawater desalination and will only grow as world-wide water scarcity increases. In arid areas with high temperature (more)

Zak, Gina Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Brackish water pond culture of fishes and their use as biological monitors of the water quality of thermal effluent from a power station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

designed temperature change (bT) in the cooling water is 11. 1 C. Ponds Adjacent to the discharge canal are 25 ponds (Fig. 2); 16 ponds were used in this study. Each pond had 0. 1 ha suxface area and was 82. 3 m long, 12. 2 m wide, 1. 5 m deep... FIANT CEGAR RAVOU TRINITY BAY ~ 0 . . 000 ?' 8 OGLl II 0 Kll 0 'll El 9'll . 0 LI 0 GALVESTON BAY ll 'll ' I E RA 5 90 MAF AREA GULF OF MEXICO 9 SG Figure 1. --Map showing location of power plant and research facilities. DRAINAGE...

Kaehler, Todd

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown from the existing SJGS Unit 3 tower--during the summer months of 2005. If successful, there may be follow-on testing using produced water. WSAC is discussed in this deliverable. Recall that Deliverable 4, Emerging Technology Testing, describes the pilot testing conducted at a salt water disposal facility (SWD) by the CeraMem Corporation. This filtration technology could be a candidate for future demonstration testing and is also discussed in this deliverable.

Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water  

SciTech Connect

An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mobility of Tritium in Engineered and Earth Materials at the NuMI Facility, Fermilab: Progress report for work performed between June 13 and September 30, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the NuMI project, FERMILAB-TM-2009 and NuMI-B-279, Fermito NuMI beam tunnels, FERMILAB-TM-2083, Fermi Nationalprotection radiation safety, Fermilab report, July 2001.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Study of the decay tau(-)->2 pi(-)pi(+)3 pi(0)nu(tau)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(-)pi(+)eta nu(tau), and pi(-)2 pi(0) eta nu(tau). This is the first observation of this omega decay mode and the branching fraction is measured to be (1.89(-0.67)(+0.74) +/- 0.40) x 10(-4)....

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment  

SciTech Connect

The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

Auty, David John; /Sussex U.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A search for. nu. sub e appearance from stopped. pi. sup + and. mu. sup + decay at LAMPF (Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility)  

SciTech Connect

We report on a recent search for {bar {nu}}{sub e} appearance from stopped {pi}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}} and {mu}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} decay made by the LAMPF experiment E645. The appearance of {bar {nu}}{sub e} may occur from {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e}, {nu}{sub e} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub eL}, or {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub eL} oscillations. Appearance may also occur from rare {mu}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {mu}} decay, which is allowed by a multiplicative lepton charge conservation law. The neutrino energies range from E{sub {nu}} = 0 to 52.8MeV. The neutrino detector, which is located 26.1 meters from the neutrino source, consists of a segmented liquid scintillator and proportional drift tube central detector surrounded by both active and passive shielding. The central detector detects {bar {nu}}{sub e} through the {bar {nu}}{sub e}p {yields} ne{sup +} Charge Current (CC) reaction, which is signaled by the direct detection of the final state positron and neutron. The hydrogen-rich liquid scintillators act as free proton targets for the {bar {nu}}{sub e}p CC reaction. The neutrons are detected through radiative neutron capture on gadolinium. We find no evidence for {bar {nu}}{sub e} appearance in the first year of running. New limits on the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}},{nu}{sub e},{nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillation parameters and the rare {mu}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {mu}} decay branching ratio are presented. 87 refs., 45 figs., 17 tabs.

Fujikawa, B.K. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

NU to partner in major defense research effort OCTOBER 11, 2012 2:45 PM BY KEVIN ABOUREZK /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Star Online 10/18/2012http://journalstar.com/news/local/education/nu-to research effort : The Lincoln Journal Star Online 10/18/2012http://journalstar.com/news/local/education/nu-to

Umstadter, Donald

366

Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate Electricity Using Geothermal Water Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project objectives: Demonstrate technical and financial feasibility of the use of an existing low-temperature geothermal resource for combined heat and power; and Maintain and enhance existing geothermal district heating operation.

367

Method of calculating the cost of water and electrical power for nuclear desalination system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of determining the economic factors of double-purpose systems is set out; this provides separate and fairly strict determinations of the expenses involved in the production of electrical power and fre...

Yu. I. Koryakin; A. A. Loginov; V. A. Chernyaev; I. I. Zakharov

1965-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Indiana (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ind power is one of the fastest-growing forms of ind power is one of the fastest-growing forms of new power generation in the United States. Industry growth in 2007 was an astounding 45%. New wind power installations constituted 35% of all new electric power installations. This growth is the result of many drivers, includ- ing increased economic competitiveness and favorable state policies such as Renewable Portfolio Standards. However, new wind power installations provide more than cost-competitive electricity. Wind power brings economic development to rural regions, reduces greenhouse gas production by displacing fossil fuels, and reduces water consumption in the electric power sector. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers

369

Pilot demonstration of concentrated solar-powered desalination of subsurface agricultural drainage water and other brackish groundwater sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energywater nexus is addressed with the experimental demonstration of a solar-powered desalination process system. This system was designed for high-recovery treatment of subsurface agricultural drainage water as a reuse strategy as well as other brackish groundwater sources. These water sources may exhibit wide fluctuations in salinity and makeup and pose a high risk for operational troubles due to high scaling potential. A first-of-its-kind open-cycle vapor-absorption heat pump is coupled with a multiple-effect distillation train and a large parabolic trough solar thermal concentrator. Without the heat pump, the distillation operation showed a minimum thermal energy consumption of 261.87kWhth/m3. With the heat pump, the thermal energy consumption was reduced by more than 49% to 133.2kWhth/m3. This reduction in thermal energy requirement directly translates into a 49% reduction in solar array area required to power a process with the same freshwater production rate as a system without an integrated heat pump. An optimized design was modeled and the thermal energy performance of a commercial system is projected at 34.9kWhth/m3 using a 10-effect MED operating at 85% recovery.

Matthew D. Stuber; Christopher Sullivan; Spencer A. Kirk; Jennifer A. Farrand; Philip V. Schillaci; Brian D. Fojtasek; Aaron H. Mandell

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Solar Hot Water Technology: Office of Power Technologies (OPT) Success Stories Series Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Program Buildings Program Office of Solar Energy Technologies Every home, commercial building, and indus- trial facility requires hot water. An enormous amount of energy is consumed in the United States producing and maintaining our supply of on-demand hot water; the residential and commercial sectors combined use 3 quads (quadrillion Btus) of energy per year, roughly 3% of the total U.S. energy consumption. As of 1998, 1.2 million systems have been installed on homes in the United States, with 6000 currently being added each year. Yet the potential for growth is huge, as solar hot water systems are supplying less than 2% of the nation's hot water. For industrial applications, the growth potential lies in large-scale systems, using flat-plate and trough-type collectors which are being installed in increasing numbers in

371

Simulation and Modeling of a Constant Voltage Controller Based Solar Powered Water Pumping System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the performance of a squirrel cage induction motor driving a water-pump load is investigated. The induction motor is fed through a Photovoltaic (PV) array. The PV array and the drive is designed ...

Bhavnesh Kumar; Yogesh K. Chauhan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

373

Solar Energy as a Key for Power and Water in the Middle East and North Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter argues that a strategy for energy and water security in the Southern European Union, the Middle East, and North Africa (MENA) can be based on a combination of rational use of energy, renewable ene...

Franz Trieb; Wolfram Krewitt; Nadine May

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Propagation of the low-frequency noise generated by power station water-cooling towers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The propagation of low-frequency noise generated by air turbulent motion in water-cooling towers is investigated by the use of geometrical acoustics of moving media. It is shown that a cooling tower plum acts ...

Sergei P. Fisenko

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A comprehensive approach to selecting the water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuit in the projects of nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1200 reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents the results obtained from studies on selecting the water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuit carried out for the project of a nuclear power station equipped with a new-generation VVER-12...

V. F. Tyapkov

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Analysis of results obtained using the automatic chemical control of the quality of the water heat carrier in the drum boiler of the Ivanovo CHP-3 power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of industrial tests of the new method used for the automatic chemical control of the quality of boiler water of the drum-type power boiler (P d = 13.8 MPa) are described. The possibility o...

A. B. Larin; A. V. Kolegov

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Probing WWgamma coupling through e gamma --> nu W at ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The anomalous WWgamma coupling is probed through e gamma--> nu W at the ILC. With a spectacular single lepton final state, this process is well suited to study the above coupling. Within the narrow-width approximation, a semi-analytical study of the secondary lepton energy-angle double distribution is performed. Cross section measurements can probe delta-kappa-gamma to about +/- 0.004 for a luminosity of 100 /fb at 500 GeV center of mass energy with unpolarised electron beam. The limits derivable on lambda-gamma are comparatively more relaxed. These limits can be improved significantly by considering the angle and energy distributions of the final state muon. More importantly, the angular distributions at fixed energy values, and energy distribution at fixed angles present very interesting possibility of distinguishing the case of lambda-gamma=0, lambda-gamma 0.

Kumar, Satendra

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Power estimation and reliability evaluation of municipal waste water and self-excited induction generator-based micro hydropower generation system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents power estimation and reliability evaluation of the micro hydro power generation system based on municipal waste water. Self-excited induction generator was used in the developed power plant, situated at IIT (BHU) campus, Varanasi, India. The hydro potential of the waste water flowing through sewage system of the Banaras Hindu University has been determined for annual flow duration and daily flow duration curves by ordering the recorded waste water from maximum to minimum flows. This paper estimates output power and determines reliability indices like: failure rate, repair rate, MTTF, MTTR and MTBF of the MWW-based developed generation plant. Design parameters of the SEIG with suitable values of the capacitor have been used and recommended for improvement of the power generation quality and reliability of the system.

Lokesh Varshney; R.K. Saket; Saeid Eslamian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Learn about the Energy Department's commitment to develop and deploy clean, domestic power generation from hydropower, waves, and tides.

380

Modeling and optimization of hybrid windsolar-powered reverse osmosis water desalination system in Saudi Arabia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A hybrid wind/solar powered reverse osmosis desalination system has been modeled and simulated. The results of the simulation have been used to optimize the system for the minimum cost per cubic meter of the desalinated water. The performance of the hybrid wind/solar powered RO system has been analyzed under Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, weather data for a typical year. The performance has been evaluated under a constant RO load of 1kW for 12h/day and 24h/day. The simulation results revealed that the optimum system that powers a 1-kW RO system for 12h/day that yields a minimum levelized cost of energy comprises 2 wind turbines, 40 \\{PVs\\} modules and 6 batteries and the levelized cost of energy of such system is found to be 0.624$/kWh. On the other hand, for a load of 1-kW for 24h/day, the optimum system consists of 6 wind turbines, 66 \\{PVs\\} modules and 16 batteries with a minimum levelized cost of energy 0.672$/kWh. Depending on the salinity of the raw water, the energy consumption for desalination ranges between 8 and 20kWh/m3. This means that the cost of using the proposed optimum hybrid wind/solar system for water desalination will range between $3.693/m3 and $3. 812/m3 which is less than the range reported in the literature.

Esmail M.A. Mokheimer; Ahmet Z. Sahin; Abdullah Al-Sharafi; Ahmad I. Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Autothermal Reforming of Glycerol with Supercritical Water for Maximum Power through a Turbine Plus a Fuel Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An autothermal reforming of glycerol process using supercritical water was proposed to produce maximum power by means of a turbine, from the huge pressure energy of product gas just at the outlet of the reformer, and a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is fed by a hydrogen-rich stream. ... Supercritical water (SCW) has many advantageous properties and is extremely reactive,(5-8) and it may allow for the performance of a catalyst-free process, because of its relevant thermophysical properties, such as a high capability to solubilize gaseous organic molecules and high reactivity, among others. ... This research is supported by the Science and Technology Ministry of Spain under Research Project ENE2009-13755, as a Project of Fundamental Research inside the framework of the National Plan of Scientific Research, Development and Technological Innovation 20082011. ...

F. J. Gutirrez Ortiz; P. Ollero; A. Serrera; S. Galera

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

382

Investigation of thermal stability of fluorinol-85 and 2-methylpyridine/water as Rankine Cycle Power Systems working fluids  

SciTech Connect

Results of the experimental investigation to date, indicate that Fluorinol-85 could be utilized in Organic Rankine Cycle Power Systems (ORCPS) to a maximum cycle temperature of 550/sup 0/F without any discernable decomposition over an extended period of time. However, at 575/sup 0/F, Fluorinol-85 could possibly decompose between 1 and 3% per year depending upon system design considerations. 2-methyl-pyridine/water could have possibly less than a 2% annual decomposition rate at 600/sup 0/F maximum cycle temperature.

Jain, M.L.; Demirgian, J.; Hillis, D.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the eighth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Analyses were performed to determine the effects of coal product moisture on unit performance. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level affects parameters such as boiler efficiency, power required to drive the fluidizing air fan, other station service power needed for fans and pulverizers, net unit heat rate, thermal energy rejected by the cooling tower, and stack emissions.

Nenad Sarunac; Edward Levy

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments  

SciTech Connect

In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

Jose Reyes

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

Removal of Radionuclides from Waste Water at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant: Desalination and Adsorption Methods - 13126  

SciTech Connect

Waste water containing high levels of radionuclides due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, has been treated by the adsorption removal and reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination to allow water re-use for cooling the reactors. Radionuclides in the waste water are collected in the adsorbent medium and the RO concentrate (RO brine) in the water treatment system currently operated at the Fukushima Daiichi site. In this paper, we have studied the behavior of radionuclides in the presently applied RO desalination system and the removal of radionuclides in possible additional adsorption systems for the Fukushima Daiichi waste water treatment. Regarding the RO desalination system, decontamination factors (DFs) of the elements present in the waste water were obtained by lab-scale testing using an RO unit and simulated waste water with non-radioactive elements. The results of the lab-scale testing using representative elements showed that the DF for each element depended on its hydrated ionic radius: the larger the hydrated ionic radius of the element, the higher its DF is. Thus, the DF of each element in the waste water could be estimated based on its hydrated ionic radius. For the adsorption system to remove radionuclides more effectively, we studied adsorption behavior of typical elements, such as radioactive cesium and strontium, by various kinds of adsorbents using batch and column testing. We used batch testing to measure distribution coefficients (K{sub d}s) for cesium and strontium onto adsorbents under different brine concentrations that simulated waste water conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi site. For cesium adsorbents, K{sub d}s with different dependency on the brine concentration were observed based on the mechanism of cesium adsorption. As for strontium, K{sub d}s decreased as the brine concentration increased for any adsorbents which adsorbed strontium by intercalation and by ion exchange. The adsorbent titanium oxide had higher K{sub d}s and it was used for the column testing to obtain breakthrough curves under various conditions of pH and brine concentration. The breakthrough point had a dependency on pH and the brine concentration. We found that when the pH was higher or the brine concentration was lower, the longer it took to reach the breakthrough point. The inhibition of strontium adsorption by alkali earth metals would be diminished for conditions of higher pH and lower brine concentration. (authors)

Kani, Yuko; Kamosida, Mamoru; Watanabe, Daisuke [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1221 (Japan)] [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1221 (Japan); Asano, Takashi; Tamata, Shin [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan)] [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

Ken Mortensen

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Ocean conditions and Columbia River salmon Testimony provided for the House Subcommittee on Power and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean conditions and Columbia River salmon Testimony provided for the House Subcommittee on Power Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans/School of Marine Affairs Climate Impacts Group Box controlling salmon marine survival in the Pacific Northwest, several ocean-climate events have been linked

Mantua, Nathan

388

Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluates water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria.

389

http://www.dailytexanonline.com/news/2013/11/12/powers-committee-plan-to-reduce-ut-water-and-energy-consumption-by-20-percent-by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on November 13, 2013 at 12:33 am By Julia Brouillette UT Facilities Services' Energy and Water Conservation to sustainability. "The more communication we have with the public, the more we're going to see people changehttp://www.dailytexanonline.com/news/2013/11/12/powers-committee-plan-to-reduce-ut-water-and-energy

John, Lizy Kurian

390

Development of a standard for calculation and measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in water-moderated power reactors  

SciTech Connect

The contents of ANS 19.11, the standard for ``Calculation and Measurement of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity in Water-Moderated Power Reactors,`` are described. The standard addresses the calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) both at standby conditions and at power. In addition, it describes several methods for the measurement of the at-power MTC and assesses their relative advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it specifies a minimum set of documentation requirements for compliance with the standard.

Mosteller, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hall, R.A. [Virginia Power, Glen Allen, VA (United States). Innsbrook Technical Center; Apperson, C.E. Jr. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States); Lancaster, D.B. [TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., Vienna, VA (United States); Young, E.H. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States); Gavin, P.H. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); Robertson, S.T. [Framatome/COGEMA Fuels, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is incorporated that recovers the waste heat proceeding biomass gasification. Under the ideal assumptions applied exercise to design a solar supercritical water gasification (SCWG) reactor. A formative reactor concept the waste heat (steam) of a downstream Fischer- Tropsch process. An intermediate heat exchange unit

392

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Main Report and Appendix A: Evaluates water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects.

394

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants: ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005343  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seyed Dastgheib seyed Dastgheib Principal Investigator Illinois State Geological Survey 615 E. Peabody Drive Champaign, Illinois 61820-6235 217-265-6274 dastgheib@isgs.uius.edu Reuse of PRoduced WateR fRom co 2 enhanced oil RecoveRy, coal-Bed methane, and mine Pool WateR By coal-Based PoWeR Plants: PRomis /PRoject no. : de-nt0005343 Background Coal-fired power plants are the second largest users of freshwater in the United States. In Illinois, the thermoelectric power sector accounts for approximately 84 percent of the estimated 14 billion gallons per day of freshwater withdrawals and one-third of the state's 1 billion gallons per day of freshwater consumption. Illinois electric power generation capacity is projected to expand 30 percent by 2030, increasing water consumption by

395

SPL-based Proton Driver for a nu-Factory at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conceptual design and feasibility studies for a nu-Factory Proton Driver based on the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) have been com- pleted. In the proposed scenario, the 4 MW proton beam (H- beam) is acceler- ated with the upgraded High Power (HP)-SPL to 5 GeV, stored in an accumu- lator ring and nally transported to a compressor ring, where bunch rotation takes place, in order to achieve the specic time structure. We here summa- rize the choices in terms of lattice, magnet technology and RF manipulations in the two rings. The possible critical issues, such as heating of the foil for the charge-exchange injection, space-charge problems in the compressor and beam stability in the accumulator ring, have been addressed and are shown not to be show-stoppers. The analysis focuses on the baseline scenario, consider- ing 6 bunches in the accumulator, and preliminary studies are discussed for the option of 3 or a single bunch per burst.

Benedetto, E; Garoby, R; Meddahi, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the twelfth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report and results are shown for a drying system utilizing a combination of waste heat from the condenser and thermal energy extracted from boiler flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Ursla Levy; John Sale; Nenad Sarunac

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Search for {ital B}{r_arrow}l{bar {nu}}{sub l}  

SciTech Connect

We search for the decays {ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}l{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub l} in a sample of 2.2{times}10{sup 6} charged {ital B} decays using the CLEO detector. We see no evidence for a signal in any channel and set upper limits on the branching fractions of {ital B}({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}){lt}2.2{times}10{sup {minus}3}, {ital B}({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{mu}{sup {minus}}{nu}2;m{sub {mu}}){lt}2.1{times}10{sup {minus}5}, and {ital B}({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}){lt}1.5{times}10{sup {minus}5} at the 90% confidence level.

Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Stone, S.; Xing, X.; Zhu, G.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Lingel, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; (CLEO Co..

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Improved QCD Form Factor Constraints and Lambda_b --> Lambda_c l nu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct model-independent parametrizations of the individual QCD form factors relevant to Lambda_b --> Lambda_c l nu decays. These results follow from dispersion relations and analyticity, and incorporate an improvement in the technique that reduces the number of necessary parameters. To describe most form factors with 5%--10% accuracy over the entire kinematic range, three parameters are necessary, one of which is its normalization at zero recoil. We also apply the improvement to meson decays, and find, using the heavy quark form factor normalization, that almost every B --> D l nu and B --> D^* l nu form factor is well-described by a single-variable parametrization. B --> pi l nu requires a total of only 3 to 5 parameters, depending on the desired accuracy.

C. Glenn Boyd; Richard F. Lebed

1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

399

Wind for Schools Project Curriculum Brief (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Introduction Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report recommends expanding educa- tion to ensure a trained workforce to meet the projected growth of the wind industry and deployment. Although a few U.S. higher education institu- tions offer wind technology education programs, most are found in community and technical colleges, resulting in a shortage of programs preparing highly skilled graduates for wind industry careers. Further, the United States lags behind Europe (which has more gradu- ate programs in wind technology design and manufacturing) and is in danger of relinquishing the economic benefits of domestic production of wind turbines and related components and services to European countries. DOE's Wind Powering America initia-

400

On the exponential power law for low frequency attenuation in shallow water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reviews of measured shallow-water sound transmission over sandy-silty bottoms show the intrinsic attenuation for low frequencies (energy downwards out of the waveguide is considered. Since the intrinsic attenuation and the apparent attenuation due to shear wave conversion are small the observed attenuation can have a different frequency dependence. If the removal of energy from the field due to shear wave conversion is comparable to the intrinsic attenuation at the lower frequencies but less than the intrinsic attenuation at the higher frequencies; the inferred frequency dependence can be less than quadratic. Inversions with fluid sediments account for this effect by the site-specific factors that accounts for the loss of energy from the compressible field due shear wave conversion.

William M. Carey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration for Ways to Reduce Operating Costs for Small Producers Project: 08123-10 April 30, 2012 Loy Sneary, President Robin Dahlheim, Sales Gulf Coast Green Energy 1801 7th St, Ste 230 Bay City, TX 77414 RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Gulf Coast Green Energy as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO

402

Summary and bibliography of safety-related events at boiling-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1980  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a bibliography that contains 100-word abstracts of event reports submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at boiling-water-reactor nuclear power plants in 1980. The 1547 abstracts included on microfiche in this bibliography describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies that were experienced at the facilities. These abstracts are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Full-size keyword and permuted-title indexes to facilitate location of individual abstracts are provided following the text. Tables that summarize the information contained in the bibliography are also provided. The information in the tables includes a listing of the equipment items involved in the reported events and the associated number of reports for each item. Similar information is given for the various kinds of instrumentation and systems, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction).

McCormack, K.E.; Gallaher, R.B.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Summary and bibliography of safety-related events at pressurized-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1979  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the data contained in reports submitted by licensees to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning safety-related operational events that occurred at pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants in 1979. A bibliography containing 100-word abstracts of the event reports is included. The 2064 abstracts included in the bibliography describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies experienced at the facilities. They are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Keyword and permuted-title indexes are provided to facilitate location of the abstracts of interest. Tables summarizing the information contained in the bibliography are also presented and discussed. Information listed in the tables includes instrument failures, equipment failures, system failures, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction). Some of the more interesting events that occurred during the year are reviewed in detail. 33 refs.

Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Solar powered induction motor-driven water pump operating on a desert well, simulation and field tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A photovoltaic-powered water pumping system, employing an induction motor pump, capable of supplying a daily average of 50m3 at 37-m head has been developed. The system was installed on a desert well in Jordan, where: the average solar radiation amount to 5.5kWh/m3/day, to provide the Bedouins living in the well area with drinking water. A mathematical model to enable testing the system performance by computer simulation was developed. This model allows the representation of motor torque in function of speed (and slip) at different supply frequencies, as well as the flow rate and efficiency of the system in function of supply frequency and pumping head. Prior to its installation on the desert well, the system performance, in accordance with frequency and head, was thoroughly tested in the laboratory. As illustrated in this paper, simulation and laboratory testing results are well matched. At constant pumping head, the flow rate is proportional to the supply frequency of the motor. At constant flow rate, the pumping head is proportional to the supply frequency squared only in the range below the peak efficiency of the pump. For higher flow rate values, a special algorithm based on the experimental results could be developed. Higher system efficiency is achievable at higher frequency. It is advisable to operate the motor pump at the nominal frequency, flow rate and head corresponding to maximum efficiency. Long-term field testing of the system shows that it is reliable and has an overall efficiency exceeding 3%, which is comparable to the highest efficiencies reported elsewhere for solar powered pumps.

Abdel-Karim Daud; Marwan M. Mahmoud

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A MELCOR Application to Two Light Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant Core Melt Scenarios with Assumed Cavity Flooding Action  

SciTech Connect

The MELCOR 1.8.4 code Bottom Head package has been applied to simulate two reactor cavity flooding scenarios for when the corium material relocates to the lower-plenum region in postulated severe accidents. The applications were preceded by a review of two main physical models, which highly impacted the results. A model comparison to available bibliography models was done, which allowed some code modifications on selected default assumptions to be undertaken. First, the corium convective heat transfer to the wall when it becomes liquid was modified, and second, the default nucleate boiling regime curve in a submerged hemisphere was replaced by a new curve (and, to a much lesser extent, the critical heat flux curve was slightly varied).The applications were devoted to two prototypical light water reactor nuclear power plants, a 2700-MW(thermal) pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a 1381-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR). The main conclusions of the cavity flooding simulations were that the PWR lower-head survivability is extended although it is clearly not guaranteed, while in the BWR sequence the corium seems to be successfully arrested in the lower plenum.Three applications of the CFX 4.4 computational fluid dynamics code were carried out in the context of the BWR scenario to support the first modification of the aforementioned two scenarios for MELCOR.Finally, in the same BWR context, a statistic predictor of selected output parameters as a function of input parameters is presented, which provides reasonable results when compared to MELCOR full calculations in much shorter CPU processing times.

Martin-Fuertes, Francisco; Martin-Valdepenas, Juan Manuel; Mira, Jose; Sanchez, Maria Jesus [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Enhanced K(L) ---> Pi0 Nu Anti-Nu From Direct CP Violation in B ---> K Pi With Four Generations  

SciTech Connect

Recent CP violation results in B decays suggest that Z penguins may have large weak phase. This can be realized by the four generation (standard) model. Concurrently, B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B{sub s} mixing allow for sizable V*{sub t's}V{sub t'b} only if it is nearly imaginary. Such large effects in b {leftrightarrow} s transitions would affect s {leftrightarrow} d transitions, as kaon constraints would demand V{sub t'd} {ne} 0. Using {Lambda}(Z {yields} b{bar b}) to bound |V{sub t'b}|, they infer sizable |V{sub t's}| {le} |V{sub t'b}| {le} |V{sub us}|. Imposing {var_epsilon}{sub K}, K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} and {var_epsilon}'/{var_epsilon} constraints, they find V*{sub t'd} V{sub t's} {approx} few x 10{sup -4} with large phase, enhancing K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {nu}{bar {nu}} to 5 x 10{sup -10} or even higher. Interestingly, {Delta}m{sub B{sub d}} and sin 2{Phi}{sub B{sub d}} are not much affected, as |V*{sub t'd} V{sub t'b} << |V*{sub td} V{sub tb}| {approx} 0.01.

Hou, Wei-Shu; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Nagashima, Makiko; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Soddu, Andrea; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Weizmann Inst.

2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants: Evaluation of the combined cost of makeup water treatment and increased condenser fouling  

SciTech Connect

A methodology is presented to calculate the total combined cost (TCC) of water sourcing, water treatment and condenser fouling in the recirculating cooling systems of thermoelectric power plants. The methodology is employed to evaluate the economic viability of using treated municipal wastewater (MWW) to replace the use of freshwater as makeup water to power plant cooling systems. Cost analyses are presented for a reference power plant and five different tertiary treatment scenarios to reduce the scaling tendencies of MWW. Results indicate that a 550 MW sub-critical coal fired power plant with a makeup water requirement of 29.3 ML/day has a TCC of $3.0 - 3.2 million/yr associated with the use of treated MWW for cooling. (All costs USD 2009). This translates to a freshwater conservation cost of $0.29/kL, which is considerably lower than that of dry air cooling technology, $1.5/kL, as well as the 2020 conservation cost target set by the U.S. Department of Energy, $0.74/kL. Results also show that if the available price of freshwater exceeds that of secondarytreated MWW by more than $0.13-0.14/kL, it can be economically advantageous to purchase secondary MWW and treat it for utilization in the recirculating cooling system of a thermoelectric power plant.

Walker, Michael E.; Theregowda, Ranjani B.; Safari, Iman; Abbasian, Javad; Arastoopour, Hamid; Dzombak, David A.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Miller, David C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The impacts of solar water heating in low-income households on the distribution utilitys active, reactive and apparent power demands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Brazilian low-income households, water-heating requirements are typically met by electrical showerheads. On average, 73.1% of all residential units in the country are equipped with these resistance-heating devices, with nominal powers ranging from 3 to 8kW. This situation imposes a considerable burden on the electricity utility companies, since electrical showerheads typically represent the highest load but the lowest utilization (load factor) in a residential consumer unit. Furthermore, typical utilization times coincide with, and contribute to, the electrical power demand peaks in Brazil, rendering these low-cost, high-power electrical devices a high-cost consumer for the electrical system to cater for. For low-income residential consumers, electricity tariffs are subsidized, and utilities must therefore make a considerable investment in infrastructure for a limited return. In this paper we analyze the impacts of solar water heating in low-income households on the distribution utility active, reactive and apparent power demands. We have monitored a statistically representative group of low-income residences equipped with a compact domestic solar water heater in Florianopolis Brazil for 1year. We show that in comparison with identical residential units using electrical showerheads, with the adoption of solar water heating the reductions in the active, reactive and apparent power demands on the distribution utility were 49%, 29% and 49% respectively.

Helena F. Naspolini; Ricardo Rther

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance- Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants all Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIMIZING COOLING TOWER PERFORMANCE REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS, CHEMICAL PLANTS, AND POWER PLANTS ALL HAVE A RESOURCE QUIETLY AWAITING EXPLOITATION - COLD WATER!! ROBERT BURGER President Burger and Associates, Inc. Dallas, Texas Cooling... towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system...

Burger, R.

411

Can we remove iodine-131 from tap water in Japan by boiling? Experimental testing in response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iodine-131 concentrations in tap water higher than 100BqL?1 were reported by several local governments in Japan following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Some individuals in the emergency-response community recommended the boiling of tap water to remove iodine-131. However, the tap water boiling tests in this study showed no iodine-131 loss from the tap water with either short-term boiling (110min) or prolonged boiling (up to 30min) resulting in up to 3-fold volume reductions. In this situation, boiling was shown to be not effective in removing iodine-131 from tap water; indeed even higher concentrations may result from the liquid-volume reduction accompanying this process.

K. Tagami; S. Uchida

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Summary and bibliography of safety-related events at boiling-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1979  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a bibliography that contains 100-word abstracts of event reports submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at boiling-water-reactor nuclear power plants in 1979. The 1345 abstracts included on microfiche in this bibliography describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies that were experienced at the facilities. These abstracts are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Keyword and permuted-title indexes to facilitate location of individual abstracts are provided in full size following the text. Tables that summarize the information contained in the bibliography are also provided. The information in the tables includes a listing of the equipment items involved in the reported events and the associated number of reports for each item. Similar information is given for the various kinds of instrumentation and systems, causes of the failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction). Some of the more interesting events that occurred during the year are reviewed in detail. 32 refs.

Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Search for associated Higgs boson production WH -> WWW*-> l(+/-)nu l('+/-)nu(')+X in p(p)over-bar collisions at root S=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for associated Higgs boson production in the process p (p) over bar -> WH -> WWW*-> l(+/-)nu l('+/-)nu(')+X in final states containing two like-sign isolated electrons or muons (e(+/-)e(+/-), e(+/-)mu(+/-), or mu...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

415

Water Power News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden">

The Department of Energy is currently inviting...

416

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exceptions include: traffic signals, exit signs, kitchen equipment, network power management, power strips, showerheads, clothes washers, water heaters and ag stock...

417

Transcript: NU-BAYU: Are You Aware You're Uploading?, September 15, Mary: Hello, my name is Mary, and I am a member of the NUIT Communications team. I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transcript: NU-BAYU: Are You Aware You're Uploading?, September 15, 2008 Mary: Hello, my name for joining us, Julian. Julian: Hello Mary. Mary: So, can you tell us what is NU-BAYU? Julian: NU

Shull, Kenneth R.

418

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Defining the Proton Topology of the Zr6Based Metal-Organic Framework NU-1000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,16-19 heavy metal capture,20,21 sensing,12 ionic conductivity,22 toxic industrial chemical capture,23Defining the Proton Topology of the Zr6Based Metal-Organic Framework NU-1000 Nora Planas,, Joseph E of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Metal

420

X-ray technology behind NASA's black-hole hunter (NuSTAR)  

SciTech Connect

Livermore Lab astrophysicist Bill Craig describes his team's role in developing X-ray imaging technology for the NASA Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission. The black-hole-hunting spacecraft bagged its first 10 supermassive black holes this week

Craig, Bill

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NuFact'01 March 24-30, 2001 F. Sergiampietri LANNDD 1 F. Sergiampietri  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carlsbad (NM) #12;NuFact'01 ­ March 24-30, 2001 F. Sergiampietri LANNDD 6 LANNDD at the WIPP site at Carlsbad (NM) 655 m SALT STORAGE PILES SALT HANDLING SHAFT AIR INTAKE SHAFT EXHAUST SHAFT LANNDD 70 k

McDonald, Kirk

422

The NU Transportation Center Icarus Society presents.... "Airline Capacity Discipline: Where and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NU Transportation Center Icarus Society presents.... "Airline Capacity Discipline: Where and to What Extent? Aaron J. Gellman Professor of Transportation Northwestern University Transportation Center and Kellogg School of Management Thursday Nov. 29, 2012 3:00 pm Location: Transportation Center Chambers Hall

Bustamante, Fabián E.

423

&n'u Edirors: Richard R. Fay and Arthur N. Popper Whitlow w.l. Au  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&n'u Edirors: Richard R. Fay and Arthur N. Popper Whitlow w.l. Au Marine Mammal Research Program Hawaii Inslitule of Marine Biology Un..iv~rsity of Hawa'i Kailua, HI 96734, USA Richard R. Fay Parmly it wearing a cumbersome gown, in high heels, and backwards. Just as Ginger kept pace with Fred

424

Production and Separation of T = 1/2 Nuclides for {beta}--{nu} angular correlation measurements  

SciTech Connect

The SPIRAL facility at GANIL, which uses the so-called ISOL method to produce radioactive ion beams, is being upgraded to extend its production capabilities to the metallic beams of neutron deficient isotopes. We discuss here the potentialities offered by this upgrade for the measurement of the {beta}--{nu} angular correlation in the {beta}--decay of mirror nuclides.

Delahaye, P.; Bajeat, O.; Saint Laurent, M. G.; Thomas, J. C.; Traykov, E. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN Cedex 05 (France); Couratin, C. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN Cedex 05 (France); LPC Caen, 6 bd Marechal Juin, 14050 CAEN Cedex (France); Lienard, E.; Ban, G.; Durand, D.; Flechard, X. [LPC Caen, 6 bd Marechal Juin, 14050 CAEN Cedex (France); Naviliat-Cuncic, O. [NSCL, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Stora, T. [ISOLDE, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Collaboration: GANISOL Group

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Statement Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power, Committee...

426

Thermodynamic modelling of three-stage combined cycle power systems utilising ammonia-water mixture as a working fluid in bottoming cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, two three-stage combined power cycles with ammonia-water mixture in bottoming cycle are introduced; one with variable ammonia fraction and the other with constant ammonia fraction. Energy and exergy analyses are carried out and optimal parameters of the proposed cycles are compared with the conventional power cycles. The second law efficiency of three-stage cycles with variable and constant ammonia fraction are 4.71% and 5.15% higher than steam-gas combined power cycle, respectively. Exergy flow diagram for each cycle is presented and exergy destruction of all components is investigated. Results quantitatively highlight the thermodynamic advantages of the proposed cycles in comparison with the conventional cycles. Three-stage cycle with constant ammonia fraction has the best performance in comparison with the others.

Amin Momeni; Hossein Shokouhmand

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A large liquid argon time projection chamber for long-baseline, off-axis neutrino oscillation physics with the NuMI beam  

SciTech Connect

Results from neutrino oscillation experiments in the last ten years have revolutionized the field of neutrino physics. While the overall oscillation picture for three neutrinos is now well established and precision measurements of the oscillation parameters are underway, crucial issues remain. In particular, the hierarchy of the neutrino masses, the structure of the neutrino mixing matrix, and, above all, CP violation in the neutrino sector are the primary experimental challenges in upcoming years. A program that utilizes the newly commissioned NuMI neutrino beamline, and its planned upgrades, together with a high-performance, large-mass detector will be in an excellent position to provide decisive answers to these key neutrino physics questions. A Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) [2], which combines fine-grained tracking, total absorption calorimetry, and scalability, is well matched for this physics program. The few-millimeter-scale spatial granularity of a LArTPC combined with dE/dx measurements make it a powerful detector for neutrino oscillation physics. Scans of simulated event samples, both directed and blind, have shown that electron identification in {nu}{sub e} charged current interactions can be maintained at an efficiency of 80%. Backgrounds for {nu}{sub e} appearance searches from neutral current events with a {pi}{sup 0} are reduced well below the {approx} 0.5-1.0% {nu}{sub e} contamination of the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam [3]. While the ICARUS collaboration has pioneered this technology and shown its feasibility with successful operation of the T600 (600-ton) LArTPC [4], a detector for off-axis, long-baseline neutrino physics must be many times more massive to compensate for the low event rates. We have a baseline concept [5] based on the ICARUS wire plane structure and commercial methods of argon purification and housed in an industrial liquefied-natural-gas tank. Fifteen to fifty kton liquid argon capacity tanks have been considered. A very preliminary cost estimate for a 50-kton detector is $100M (unloaded) [6]. Continuing R&D will emphasize those issues pertaining to implementation of this very large scale liquid argon detector concept. Key hardware issues are achievement and maintenance of argon purity in the environment of an industrial tank, the assembly of very large electrode planes, and the signal quality obtained from readout electrodes with very long wires. Key data processing issues include an initial focus on rejection of cosmic rays for a surface experiment. Efforts are underway at Fermilab and a small number of universities in the US and Canada to address these issues with the goal of embarking on the construction of industrial-scale prototypes within one year. One such prototype could be deployed in the MiniBooNE beamline or in the NuMI surface building where neutrino interactions could be observed. These efforts are complementary to efforts around the world that include US participation, such as the construction of a LArTPC for the 2-km detector location at T2K [7]. The 2005 APS neutrino study [1] recommendations recognize that ''The development of new technologies will be essential for further advances in neutrino physics''. In a recent talk to EPP2010, Fermilab director P. Oddone, discussing the Fermilab program, states on his slides: ''We want to start a long term R&D program towards massive totally active liquid Argon detectors for extensions of NOvA''. [8]. As such, we are poised to enlarge our R&D efforts to realize the promise of a large liquid argon detector for neutrino physics.

Finley, D.; Jensen, D.; Jostlein, H.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; /Fermilab; Bromberg, C.; /Michigan State U.; Lu, C.; McDonald, T.; /Princeton U.; Gallagher,; Mann, A.; Schneps, J.; /Tufts U.; Cline, D.; Sergiampietri, F.; Wang, H.; /UCLA; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B.T.; /Yale U.; Menary, S.; /York U., Canada

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The culture of marine fish and their use as biological monitors of water quality in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Map showing location of power plant snd research facilities. 12 Diagram showing research facilities. Ponds numbered 1 through 25 from west to east. Daily hydrological data for the intake canal (Janu- ary 23, 1973 ? March 5, 1974... pond was approximately 0. 1 ha in surface area, 82. 3 m long, TS 00 SS 20 COOI INC IAXE 29 ~ 5 INTAKE AREA RESEARCH I CILITIES DISCHAROE CANAL POWER PLANT CEOAR RATOU TRINITY SAY ~ 0 0% M 0 0 OO . ~, OO 0 0 +I 0 Oll CLI 0 HLI 08 ~ '0...

Linder, Donald Ray

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect

The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; /Brunel U.; Coney, L.; /UC, Riverside; Pascoli, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Measurement of the {ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}l{sup +}{nu} and {ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}l{sup +}{nu} branching ratios  

SciTech Connect

Using the CLEO II detector we measure {ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{phi}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}) =1.24{plus_minus}0.12{plus_minus}0.15, {ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B} ({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{phi}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})=0.43{plus_minus}0.11{plus_minus}0.07, and {ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B} ({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})=0.35{plus_minus}0.09{plus_minus}0.07. We find the ratio of vector to pseudoscalar final states, {ital B}{bold (}{ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{phi}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B} ({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}({eta}+{eta}{prime}){ital e}{sup +}{nu}{bold )}=0.60{plus_minus}0.06{plus_minus}0.06, which is similar to the ratio found in nonstrange {ital D} decays. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; O`Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Wappler, F.; Crawford, G.; Duboscq, J.E.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Gibbons, L.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Coan, T.E.; Dominick, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Stone, S.; Xing, X.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Marka, S.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; (CLEO Collaborat..

1995-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

432

NuSAG Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Members of DOE/NSF Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group Members of DOE/NSF Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group (NuSAG) Subpanel High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Charges/Reports Members of DOE/NSF Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group (NuSAG) Subpanel Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Eugene Beier (University of Pennsylvania and Co-Chair) Peter Meyers (Princeton University and Co-Chair) Leslie Camilleri (European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN) Boris Kayser (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) Edward Kearns (Boston University) William Louis (Los Alamos National Laboratory) Naomi Makins (University of Illinois) Tsuyoshi Nakaya (Kyoto University) Guy Savard (Argonne National Laboratory)

433

From a {nu} factory to {mu} super + mu super {minus} Colliders  

SciTech Connect

An important feature of a {mu}-storage ring {nu}-source is that it can be extended to the possibility of a future high-energy muon collider. The neutrino source provides a useful physics device that initiates key technologies required for future {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup {minus}} Colliders, but with much less demanding parameter requirements. These technologies include high-intensity {mu}-production, {mu}-capture, {mu}-cooling, {mu}-acceleration and multiturn {mu} storage rings. {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders require a similar number of muons, but they require that the muons be cooled to a much smaller phase space and formed into a small number of bunches, and both positive and negative bunches must be simultaneously captured. These differences are discussed, and the extension of the {nu}-source to {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup {minus}} collider specifications is described.

David Neuffer

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

434

Observation of the decay Xi0 ---> Sigma+ mu- anti-nu(mu)  

SciTech Connect

The {Xi}{sup 0} muon semi-leptonic decay has been observed for the first time with nine identified events using the KTeV beam line and detector at Fermilab. The decay is normalized to the {Xi}{sup 0} beta decay mode and yields a value for the ratio of decay rates {Lambda}({Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}})/{Lambda}({Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}e{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub e}) of (1.8{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7}(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -2} at the 68% confidence level. This is in agreement with the SU(3) flavor symmetric quark model.

Alavi-Harati, A.; Alexopoulos, T.; Arenton, M.; Barbosa, R.F.; Barker, A.R.; Barrio, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Bown, C.; Bright, S.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Cox, B.; Erwin, A.R.; Escobar, C.O.; Ford, R.; Glazov, A.; Golossanov, A.; /Arizona U. /UCLA /UC, San Diego /Campinas State U. /Chicago U.,

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Report to the Western Water Policy Review Advisory Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 The Bonneville Power Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 (1) Water

Selker, John

436

Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Energy and environmental impacts  

SciTech Connect

Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of the total steam electric generating capacity in the United States operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. No evidence exists that Section 316(a) variances have caused any widespread environmental problems. Conversion from once-through cooling to cooling towers would result in a loss of plant output of 14.7-23.7 billion kilowatt-hours. The cost to make up the lost energy is estimated at $12.8-$23.7 billion (in 1992 dollars). Conversion to cooling towers would increase emission of pollutants to the atmosphere and water loss through evaporation. The second report describes alternatives available to plants that currently operate under the variance and estimates the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Little justification has been found for removing the 316(a) variance from the CWA.

Veil, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Folga, S.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Model Independent Measurement of Form Factors in the Decay D^+ --> K^- pi^+ e^+ nu_e  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present model independent measurements of the helicity basis form factors in the decay D+ -> K- pi+ e+ nu_e obtained from about 2800 decays reconstructed from a 281 pb^{-1} data sample collected at the psi(3770) center-of-mass energy with the CLEO-c detector. We confirm the existence of a previously observed spin-zero K- pi+ component interfering with the K*0bar amplitude. We see no evidence for additional d- or f-wave contributions.

M. R. Shepherd; CLEO Collaboration

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

438

BNL -(j8736 cA!?-326-NuFact-OIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BNL - (j8736 cA!?-326-NuFact-OIC . The Primary Target Facility for a Neutrino Factory Based on Muon, BNL, Upton, NY 11973, USA Y. Fukui, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA C.D. Johnson, H. Ravn, CERN, N.V. Mokhov, FNAL, Batavia, IL 60510, USA M.A. Green, L.L. Reginato, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA A

Harilal, S. S.

439

Tau longitudinal polarization in B -> D tau nu and its role in the search for charged Higgs boson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the longitudinal polarization of the tau lepton in B -> D tau nu decay. After discussing possible sensitivities of tau decay modes to the tau polarization, we examine the effect of charged Higgs boson on the tau polarization in B -> D tau nu. We find a relation between the decay rate and the tau polarization, and clarify the role of the tau polarization measurement in the search for the charged Higgs boson.

Minoru Tanaka; Ryoutaro Watanabe

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

440

Promoter Decommissioning by the NuRD Chromatin Remodeling Complex Triggers Synaptic Connectivity in the Mammalian Brain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Precise control of gene expression plays fundamental roles in brain development, but the roles of chromatin regulators in neuronal connectivity have remained poorly understood. We report that depletion of the NuRD complex by invivo \\{RNAi\\} and conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 profoundly impairs the establishment of granule neuron parallel fiber/Purkinje cell synapses in the rodent cerebellar cortex invivo. By interfacing genome-wide sequencing of transcripts and ChIP-seq analyses, we uncover a network of repressed genes and distinct histone modifications at target gene promoters that are developmentally regulated by the NuRD complex in the cerebellum invivo. Finally, in a targeted invivo \\{RNAi\\} screen of NuRD target genes, we identify a program of NuRD-repressed genes that operate as critical regulators of presynaptic differentiation in the cerebellar cortex. Our findings define NuRD-dependent promoter decommissioning as a developmentally regulated programming mechanism that drives synaptic connectivity in the mammalian brain.

Tomoko Yamada; Yue Yang; Martin Hemberg; Toshimi Yoshida; HaYoung Cho; J.Patrick Murphy; Diasynou Fioravante; WadeG. Regehr; StevenP. Gygi; Katia Georgopoulos; Azad Bonni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A first approach study on the desalination of sea water using heat transformers powered by solar ponds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In many emerging countries over the past few years some phenomena, such as a better welfare state, industrial growth and a development in agriculture, led to a significant increasing of the demand concerning fresh water. In order to face this ever-growing demand, one of the possible solutions to counterbalance the lack of water resources, is the desalination of sea water. For this specific goal solar energy, as a resource, is the process which has more reliance since it allows a low-cost production of desalted water (without using any valuable energy resources such as fossil fuels) and in a complete respect of the environment. This first study has the purpose to analyze from an energetic perspective whether it is possible or not to reach process temperatures over 100C, through the use of solar ponds and heat transformers, in order to produce desalinated water. The final aim of this work is to quantify the surface of solar ponds needed to a production (expressed in cubic meters) of desalinated water. An absorption heat transformer is a thermal machine that while extracting heat from a source (at an available temperature) is able to ennoble a portion of the heat collected/obtained, making it available at higher temperatures. This process occurs at the expenses of the remaining portion of heat whose temperature degrades by lowering its values. The portion of heat will be then transferred to a thermal well. Hence an absorption heat transformer can use the solar energy stored in solar ponds as an energy source at an average temperature. Process temperatures which are higher than 100C for a whole year can take place only under certain chained conditions such as: source temperature with steady values during the entire season obtainable through solar ponds; condensation process occurring at sufficiently low temperatures through the use of sea water; exertion of heat transformers. The heat which is usually available at these temperatures could be used for common thermal processes during the desalination of seawater. In this work we want to demonstrate that it is possible, energetically speaking, to produce desalinated water by exploiting the solar energy stored in solar ponds and the technology of absorption heat transformers. We can notice how for every m3 of desalinated water produced in one day we need ponds with an area ranging between 1000 and 4000m2, this depends on the amount of heat flux drawn. The analysis we carried out represents a first attempt to face this kind of problem. In future studies we will examine both technical and economic feasibility.

F. Salata; M. Coppi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2002, 4th Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR. The Generation IV Roadmap effort has identified the thermal spectrum SCWR (followed by the fast spectrum SCWR) as one of the advanced concepts that should be developed for future use. Therefore, the work in this NERI project is addressing both types of SCWRs.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

In search for sustainable globally cost-effective energy efficient building solar system Heat recovery assisted building integrated PV powered heat pump for air-conditioning, water heating and water saving  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Obtained as a research result of conducted project, this paper presents an innovative, energy efficient multipurpose system for a sustainable globally cost-effective building's solar energy use and developed methodology for its dynamic analysis and optimization. The initial research and development goal was to create a cost-effective technical solution for replacing fossil fuel and electricity with solar energy for water heating for different purposes (for pools, sanitary water, washing) in one SPA. After successful realization of the initial goal, the study was proceeded and as a result, the created advanced system has been enriched with AC performance. The study success was based on understanding and combined measurements and by BPS made predictions of AC loads and solar radiation dynamics as well as on the determination of the synergetic relations between all relevant quantities. Further, by the performed BPS dynamic simulations for geographically spread buildings locations, it has been shown that the final result of the conducted scientific engineering R&D work has been the created system of confirmed prestigious to the sustainability relevant performance globally cost-effective building integrated photovoltaic powered heat pump (HP), assisted by waste water heat recovery, for solar AC, water heating and saving.

Marija S. Todorovic; Jeong Tai Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Organic Rankine-Cycle Power Systems Working Fluids Study: Topical report No. 3, 2-methylpyridine/water  

SciTech Connect

A mixture of 35 mole percent (mol %) 2-methylpyridine and 65 mol % water was tested at 575, 625, and 675/degree/F in a dynamic loop. Samples of the degraded fluid were chemically analyzed to determine the identities of major degradation products and the quantity of degradation. Computed degradation rates were found to be higher than those for Fluorinol 85 or toluene. For this reason (and other reasons, related to fluid handling), other fluids are recommended as the first choice for service in organic Rankine-cycle systems in preference to 2-methylpyridine/water. 7 refs., 39 figs., 39 tabs.

Cole, R.L.; Demirgian, J.C.; Allen, J.W.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Output power characteristics of the neutral xenon long laser  

SciTech Connect

Lasers which oscillate within inhomogeneously broadened gain media exhibit spectral hole burning and concomitant reduction in output power compared with equivalent homogeneously-broadened laser gain media. By increasing the cavity length, it may be possible to demonstrate at least a partial transition from an inhomogeneous laser cavity mode spectrum to a homogeneous spectrum. There are a number of high gain laser lines which are inhomogeneously-broadened transitions in electric discharges of neutral xenon. In neutral xenon lasers, as in the cases of many other gas lasers, the inhomogeneous spectral broadening mechanism arises from Doppler shifts, {Delta}{nu}{sub D}, of individual atoms in thermal motion within the electric discharge comprising the laser gain medium. Optical transitions corresponding to these noble gas atoms have natural linewidths, {Delta}{nu}{sub n}{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub D}. Simulations of the output power characteristics of the xenon laser were carried out as a function of laser cavity parameters, including the cavity length, L. These calculations showed that when the intracavity mode spacing frequency, c/2L{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub n}, the inhomogeneously broadened xenon mode spectrum converted to a homogeneously broadened oscillation spectrum with an increase in output power. These simulations are compared with experimental results obtained for the long laser oscillation characteristics of the (5d[5/2]{degree}{sub 2}{r_arrow}6p[3/2]{sub 1}) transition corresponding to the strong, high-gain 3.508 {mu} line in xenon.

Linford, G.J. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States). Space and Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

An environment friendly and efficient lignite-fired power generation process based on a boiler with an open pulverizing system and the recovery of water from mill-exhaust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper advances a novel lignite-fired power generation process based on a OPSB (boiler with an open pulverizing system) and the recovery of water from mill-exhaust after the comprehensive analysis of the open pulverizing system used for high-moisture coals and heat/water recovery from boiler exhaust. Then, the thermal calculation method that applies to OPSB is presented based on heat and mass balance analyses of the boiler. Finally, an efficient unit applying the OPSB process is compared with a conventional 600MW lignite-fired power unit, and the performance of the efficient unit is calculated and discussed in detail. The results show that the efficient unit not only yields a notable increase in the boiler's (2.6%) and the power plant's (1.3%) thermal efficiency but also provides a remarkable advantage in water recovery due to the mass of water vapor concentrated in mill-exhaust. In the efficient unit, the volume fraction of water vapor in mill-exhaust reaches 34%, the water reclaimed from mill-exhaust is so much that a lignite-fired power plant with zero water consumption can be expected, while the pollutant emissions can be reduced in proportion to the increase in boiler thermal efficiency.

Youfu Ma; Yichao Yuan; Jing Jin; Hua Zhang; Xiaohong Hu; Dengyu Shi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Demineralization of Saline Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...application to saline-water conversion of the electrodialysis process than...Webster well water would danmage the electrodialysis memiibrane...stack. In the electrodialysis process, power...thus potable water, meeting health...

W. S. Gillam; J. W. McCutchan

1961-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

448

Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/MBR system to remove carboxylates and BTEX from produced water in a field trial. Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide a better understanding of each component of the SMZ/VPB and SMZ/MBR process. Laboratory VPB studies were designed to address the issue of influent variability and periodic operation (see DE-FC26-02NT15461). These experiments examined multiple influent loading cycles and variable concentration loadings that simulate air sparging as the regeneration option for the SMZ system. Two pilot studies were conducted at a produced water processing facility near Farmington, New Mexico. The first field test evaluated SMZ adsorption, SMZ regeneration, VPB buffering, and VPB performance, and the second test focused on MBR and SMZ/MBR operation. The design of the field studies were based on the results from the previous field tests and laboratory studies. Both of the biological treatment systems were capable of removing the BTEX constituents in the laboratory and in the field over a range of operating conditions. For the VPB, separation of the BTEX constituents from the saline aqueous phase yielded high removal efficiencies. However, carboxylates remained in the aqueous phase and were not removed in the combined VPB/SMZ system. In contrast, the MBR was capable of directly treating the saline produced water and simultaneously removing the BTEX and carboxylate constituents. The major limitation of the MBR system is the potential for membrane fouling, particularly when the system is treating produced water under field conditions. The combined process was able to effectively pretreat water for reverse osmosis treatment and subsequent downstream reuse options including utilization in power generation facilities. The specific conclusions that can be drawn from this study are summarized.

Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Measurement of the Cotton Mouton effect of water vapour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report on a measurement of the Cotton Mouton effect of water vapour. Measurement performed at room temperature ($T=301$ K) with a wavelength of 1064 nm gave the value $\\Delta n_u = (6.67 \\pm 0.45) \\cdot 10^{-15}$ for the unit magnetic birefringence (1 T magnetic field and atmospheric pressure).

Della Valle, F; Gastaldi, U; Messineo, G; Milotti, E; Pengo, R; Piemontese, L; Ruoso, G; Zavattini, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet). Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development potential from wind power installations has beendevelopment potential of wind power projects, however,is whether new investment in wind power projects stimulates

Brown, Jason P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water...

452

FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON  

SciTech Connect

Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

TVA chooses nuclear power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TVA chooses nuclear power ... In giving the nod to a nuclear (over a coal) power generating station 10 days ago, TVA probably gave nuclear power its biggest boost to date. ... The $247 million nuclear power planta dual boiling-water reactor unit with a total capacity of 2.2 million kw(e).will ...

1966-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

454

More Power from Below  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MWe). Most new geothermal power plants brought...electric generation. Geothermal water at temperatures...used for bathing, heating, and greenhouses...Large-scale district heating projects have operated...are heated with geothermal water. Temperatures...

Joseph N. Moore; Stuart F. Simmons

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

455

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: LADWP Smart Grid Regional Demonstration Project - Mukhlesur Bhuiyan, City of Los Angeles Dept. of Water & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Review Meeting Peer Review Meeting San Diego, CA Los Angeles Department of Water and Power - Smart Grid Regional Demonstration Program Mukhles Bhuiyan Program Director June 8, 2012 December 2008 Smart Grid Regional Demonstration Program Objective Life-cycle Funding ($K) FY10/11 - FY15/16 $60,280K Match Grant Technical Scope *Integrate Electric Vehicles into the LADWP grid *Demonstrate integrated Demand Response operation and technology. *Develop a comprehensive portfolio of Customer Behavior studies *Demonstrate next generation of Cyber Security *Using test bed sites to deploy and demonstrate an integrated communication, demand response, and electric vehicle infrastructure, protected by the next generation cyber security. *All this will be done in conjunction with consumer behavior studies identifying methods to

456

Design Concept for nu-STORM: An Initial Very Low-Energy Neutrino Factory  

SciTech Connect

We present a design concept for a {nu} source from a STORage ring for Muons ({nu}STORM). In this initial design a high-intensity proton beam produces {approx}5 GeV pions that provide muons that are captured using 'stochastic injection' within a 3.6 GeV racetrack storage ring. In 'stochastic injection', the {approx}5 GeV pion beam is transported from the target into the storage ring, dispersion-matched into a long straight section. (Circulating and injection orbits are separated by momentum.) Decays within that straight section provide muons that are within the {approx}3.6 GeV/c ring momentum acceptance and are stored for the muon lifetime of {approx}1000 turns. Muon (and pion) decays in the long straight sections provide neutrino beams of precisely known flux and flavor that can be used for precision measurements of electron and muon neutrino interactions, and neutrino oscillations or disappearance at L/E = {approx}1m/MeV. The facility is described, and variations are discussed.

Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.; Roberts, T.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Measurement of the branching fraction B(tau- --> K0 pi- nu) using the BaBar detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction B(tau- --> K0 pi- nu) is made using 384.6 fb-1 of e+e- collision data provided by the PEP-II collider, operating primarily at sqrt(s)=10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BaBar detector. From this we measure: B(tau- --> K0 pi- nu) = (0.840 +/- 0.004 (stat) +/- 0.023 (syst)) %. This result is the most precise measurement to date and is consistent with the world average.

B. Aubert

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Organic Rankine-cycle power systems working fluids study: Topical report No. 1: Fluorinol 85. [85 mole % trofluoroethanol in water  

SciTech Connect

An investigation to experimentally determine the thermal stability limits and degradation rates of Fluorinol 85 as a function of maximum cycle temperatures was initiated in 1982. Following the design and construction of a dynamic test loop capable of simulating the thermodynamic conditions of possible prototypical organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) power systems, several test runs were completed. The Fluorinol 85 test loop was operated for about 3800 h, covering a temperature range of 525-600/sup 0/F. Both liquid and noncondensable vapor (gas) samples were drawn periodically and analyzed using capillary column gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry. Results indicate that Fluorinol 85 would not decompose significantly over an extended period of time, up to a maximum cycle temperature of 550/sup 0/F. However, 506-h data at 575/sup 0/F show initiation of significant degradation. The 770-h data at 600/sup 0/F, using a fresh charge of Fluorinol 85, indicate an annual degradation rate of more than 17.2%. The most significant degradation product observed is hydrofluoric acid, which could cause severe corrosion in an ORC system. Devices to remove the hydrofluoric acid and prevent extreme temperature excursions are necessary for any ORC system using Fluorinol 85 as a working fluid.

Jain, M.L.; Demirgian, J.C.; Cole, R.L.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

SOLAR SEA-WATER DESALINATION AND THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMICAL FEASIBILITY OF SOLAR POND POWERED DISTILLATION PLANTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Desalination is an important and interesting application for the use of solar radiation as a source of undepletable energy. After almost a decade of research and development including the installation and testing of various smaller pilot systems, our solar desalination technology - among others - is now becoming available on a commercial level. The paper discusses the evolution of the technology both of the desalination-and the collector-subsystems as a result of the technical and economical constraints associated with the utilization of solar energy, a highly fluctuating energy source of low surface density. Performance data is presented in particular for the coupling of a selfregulating MSF unit with a solar pond energy collection and storage system, both inhouse developments. The performance and layout data was obtained from computer simulation and experimental results with a small sized solar pond and desalination subsystem in Switzerland. The economy assessment, which is presented for Middle East climate conditions, clearly demonstrates that solar desalination already becomes competitive for medium sized installations at remote locations. Potential further cost reductions particularly through upscaling may well lead to the use of desalinated water for agricultural applications one day.

M. Posnansky

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants ProMIS/Project No.:DE-NT0005647  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology Improvement to AIr2AIr® technology to reduce Fresh-WAter evAporAtIve coolIng loss At coAl-BAsed thermoelectrIc poWer plAnts promIs/project no. :de-nt0005647 Background The production of electricity requires a reliable, abundant, and predictable source of freshwater - a resource that is limited in many parts of the United States and throughout the world. The process of thermoelectric generation from fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas is water intensive. According to the 2000 U.S. Geological Survey, thermoelectric-power withdrawals accounted for 48 percent of total water use, 39 percent of total freshwater withdrawals (136 billion gallons per day) for all categories, and 52 percent of fresh surface water withdrawals. As a growing economy drives the need for more electricity, demands on freshwater

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water power nu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electronics Come of Age: A Taxonomy for Miscellaneous and Low Power Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water softener Power External power supply Power strip Power supply Surge protector Timer Uninterruptible power supply Transportation Auto engine heater Car,

Nordman, Bruce; Sanchez, Marla C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The B->pi l nu and Bs->K l nu form factors and |Vub| from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the form factors for B->pi l nu & Bs->K l nu decay in lattice QCD. We use the (2+1)-flavor RBC-UKQCD gauge field-ensembles generated with the domain-wall fermion and Iwasaki gauge actions. For the b quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation. We analyze data at 2 lattice spacings a~0.11, 0.086 fm with pion masses as light as M_pi~290 MeV. We extrapolate our numerical results to the physical light-quark masses and to the continuum and interpolate in the pion/kaon energy using SU(2) "hard-pion" chiral perturbation theory. We provide complete systematic error budgets for the vector & scalar form factors f+(q^2) & f0(q2) for B->pi l nu & Bs ->K l nu at 3 momenta that span the q^2 range accessible in our numerical simulations. Next we extrapolate these results to q^2 = 0 using a model-independent z-parameterization based on analyticity & unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q^2) & f0(q^2) as the z coefficients and matr...

Flynn, J M; Kawanai, T; Lehner, C; Soni, A; Van de Water, R S; Witzel, O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Search for the disappearance of muon antineutrinos in the NuMI neutrino beam  

SciTech Connect

We report constraints on antineutrino oscillation parameters that were obtained by using the two MINOS detectors to measure the 7% muon antineutrino component of the NuMI neutrino beam. In the Far Detector, we select 130 events in the charged-current muon antineutrino sample, compared to a prediction of 136.4{+-}11.7(stat){sub -8.9}{sup +10.2}(syst) events under the assumption |{Delta}m{sup 2}|=2.32x10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, sin{sup 2}(2{theta})=1.0. Assuming no oscillations occur at the Near Detector baseline, a fit to the two-flavor oscillation approximation constrains |{Delta}m{sup 2}|<3.37x10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} at the 90% confidence level with sin{sup 2}(2{theta})=1.0.

Adamson, P.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Hatcher, R.; Hylen, J.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Koizumi, G.; Kreymer, A.; Lucas, P.; Moore, C. D.; Pahlka, R.; Plunkett, R. K.; Rebel, B.; Sharma, R.; Torretta, D.; Zwaska, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

An Experimental Enquiry concerning the Natural Powers of Water and Wind to Turn Mills, and Other Machines, Depending on a Circular Motion. By Mr. J. Smeaton, F. R. S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1759-1760 research-article An Experimental Enquiry concerning the Natural Powers of Water and Wind to Turn Mills, and Other Machines, Depending on a Circular Motion. By Mr. J. Smeaton, F. R. S. J. Smeaton The Royal Society is collaborating...

1759-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Integrated Policy and Planning for Water and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

....................................................................... 24 II.1.3. Water Consumption by Hydroelectric Power Plants................................ 25 II.1

Delaware, University of

466

Preliminary studies on the heat exchanger option for S-CO{sub 2} power conversion cycle coupled to water cooled SMR  

SciTech Connect

For more than a half century, the steam Rankine cycle had been the major power conversion cycle for a nuclear power plant. However, as the interest on the next generation reactors grows, a variety of alternative power conversion systems have been studied. Among them, the S-CO{sub 2} cycle (Supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle) is considered as a promising candidate due to several benefits such as 1) Relatively high thermal efficiency at relatively low turbine inlet temperature, 2) High efficiency with simple lay-out 3) Compactness of turbo-machineries. 4) Compactness of total cycle combined with PCHE (Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger). According to the conventional classification of heat exchangers (HE), there are three kind of HE, 1) Tubular HEs, 2) Plate-type HEs, 3) Extended surface HEs. So far, the researcher has mostly assumed PCHE type HE for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle due to its compactness with reasonably low pressure drop. However, PCHE is currently one of the most expensive components in the cycle, which can have a negative effect on the economics of the cycle. Therefore, an alternative for the HE should be seriously investigated. By comparing the operating condition (pressure and temperature) there are three kind of HE in the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, 1) IHX (Intermediate Heat exchanger) 2) Recuperator and 3) Pre-cooler. In each heat exchanger, hot side and cold side coolants are different, i.e. reactor coolant to S-CO{sub 2} (IHX), S-CO{sub 2} to S-CO{sub 2}(Recuperator), S-CO{sub 2} to water (Pre-cooler). By considering all the attributes mentioned above, all existing types of heat exchangers are compared to find a possible alternative to PCHE. The comparing factors are 1) Size(volume), 2) Cost. Plate fin type HEs are considered to be the most competitive heat exchanger regarding the size and the cost after some improvements on the design limit are made. (authors)

Ahn, Y.; Lee, J. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. I. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa Univ. of Science, Technology and Research (KUSTAR), P.O.Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia is also supporting work with Argonne National Laboratory in conventional hydropower optimization. Highlights: Sandia will receive more than 9 million over three years...

468

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

knowledge and providing design tools for deploying the first generation of wave and tidal energy converter arrays, Sandia is developing a fast-running current energy...

469

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an open source wave energy converter (WEC) simulation tool. The code is developed in MATLABSIMULINK using the multi-body dynamics solver SimMechanics. WEC-Sim has the ability to...

470

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) on "Subsea Modeling of an Innovative Wave Energy Array Using OrcaFlex Software," in which we supported developing and modeling...

471

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is a partnered effort to develop marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team...

472

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNL-SWAN Beta Code Development: Frequency-Dependent Wave-Energy Converter Module On June 26, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable...

473

ARM Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Water Vapor IOP The SGP CART site will host the third ARM water vapor IOP on September 18-October 8, 2000. The CART site is home to a powerful array of instruments capable of...

474

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal production facilities are those with power towers,tower where water or molten salt is flowing to absorb the solar

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Some conclusive considerations on the comparison of the ICARUS nu_mu to nu_e oscillation search with the MiniBooNE low-energy event excess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A sensitive search for anomalous LSND-like nu_mu to nu_e oscillations has been performed by the ICARUS Collaboration exposing the T600 LAr-TPC to the CERN to Gran Sasso (CNGS) neutrino beam. The result is compatible with the absence of additional anomalous contributions giving a limit to oscillation probability of 3.4E-3 and 7.6E-3 at 90% and 99% confidence levels respectively showing a tension between these new limits and the low-energy event excess (200 energy excess has been performed, including the energy resolution as obtained from the official MiniBooNE data release. As a result the previously reported tension is confirmed at 90% C.L., suggesting an unexplained nature or an otherwise instrumental effect for the MiniBooNE low energy event excess

Antonello, M; Benetti, P; Boffelli, F; Bubak, A; Calligarich, E; Centro, S; Cesana, A; Cieslik, K; Cline, D B; Cocco, A G; Dabrowska, A; Dermenev, A; Falcone, A; Farnese, C; Fav