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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Water Pollution Control and Abatement (Maryland) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control and Abatement (Maryland) Water Pollution Control and Abatement (Maryland) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local...

2

Water Pollution Control (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Indiana) Water Pollution Control (Indiana) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer Industrial Installer...

3

Water Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) Water Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State...

4

Water Pollution Control Act (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Act (Minnesota) Pollution Control Act (Minnesota) Water Pollution Control Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This Act gives the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency broad responsibility to establish pollution standards for state waters; monitor water conditions and sources of pollution; review construction, installation, and

5

Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute applies to a city, sanitary district, or other governmental subdivision or public corporation. The statute gives the Pollution Control Agency the authority to prepare and enforce a long-range plan pertaining to

6

Water pollution Control Permit Fee Schedules (West Virginia) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

pollution Control Permit Fee Schedules (West Virginia) pollution Control Permit Fee Schedules (West Virginia) Water pollution Control Permit Fee Schedules (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Fees Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule establishes schedules of permit application fees and annual permit fees for state water pollution control permits and national

7

Water Pollution Control Act (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Pollution Control Act (New Jersey) Water Pollution Control Act (New Jersey) Water Pollution Control Act (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This act states the rules and regulations to prevent and control pollution

8

Water Pollution Control (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Pollution Control (South Dakota) Water Pollution Control (South Dakota) Water Pollution Control (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to conserve the waters of the state and to protect, maintain, and improve their quality for water

9

Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection It is the policy of the state of Florida to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the air and waters of the state. This Act authorizes the Department of Environmental Protection to enact and implement regulations designed to control and abate activities which may contribute to air and

10

Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection A person may not construct, or cause to be constructed, a project that

11

Water Pollution Control Facilities, Tax exemption (Michigan) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Water Pollution Control Facilities, Tax exemption (Michigan) Water Pollution Control Facilities, Tax exemption (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Department of Treasury The Water Pollution Control Exemption, PA 451 of 1994, Part 37, as amended, affords a 100% property and sales tax exemption to facilities that are

12

The geopressured geothermal resources of Texas: regulatory controls over water pollution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are presented: an overview of the control framework, Federal pollution control of surface waters, state water pollution control in Texas, new Federal standards for underground injection control, and a summary assessment. (MHR)

Rogers, K.E.; Oberbeck, A.W.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Water Pollution Control Permit Regulations (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations outline the permits and permitting processes for point discharges to surface waters and outline the monitoring and reporting requirements.

14

Water Pollution Control Authority (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Authority (Alabama) Authority (Alabama) Water Pollution Control Authority (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Loan Program The Water Pollution Control Revolving Loan Fund, is maintained in perpetuity and operated by the department as agent for the authority for the purposes stated herein. Grants from the federal government or its agencies allotted to the state for capitalization of the revolving loan fund, state matching funds where required, and loan principal, interest, and penalties shall be deposited as required by the terms of the federal grant directly in the revolving loan fund. Money in the revolving loan fund

15

Water pollution  

SciTech Connect

Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

GRR/Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit GRR/Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit 14OREWaterPollutionControlFacilityPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR Division 45 Regulations Pertaining to NPDES and WPCF Permits Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14OREWaterPollutionControlFacilityPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) issues Water

17

Pollution Control Facilities (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For the purpose of this legislation, pollution control facilities are defined as any facilities designed for the elimination, mitigation or prevention of air or water pollution, including all...

18

A spatially-distributed cost-effectiveness analysis framework for controlling water pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the aim of comparing various agro-environmental measures to control pesticide pollution in surface waters, we propose a methodological framework for spatially-distributed cost-effectiveness analysis. We use the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) ... Keywords: Bio-economic modelling, Cost-effectiveness analysis, Integrated modelling, Pesticides, SWAT

Jean-Marie Lescot; Paul Bordenave; Kevin Petit; Odile Leccia

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Davenport Water Pollution Control Plant Biomass Facility | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

20

Air Pollution Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes the Department of Environmental Management and the Air Pollution Control Board, which are tasked with the prevention, abatement, and control of air pollution by all...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. The fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. This volume of the report contains the appendices: (A) abbreviations and definitions, glossary; (B) 4.5 MWe utility demonstrator power plant study information; (C) rejected heat utilization; (D) availability; (E) conceptual design specifications; (F) details of the economic analysis; (G) detailed description of the selected configuration; and (H) fuel cell power plant penetration analysis. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. The displacement of oil and coal resulting from the Bergen County Utilities Authority application was determined. A demonstration program based on the selected configuration was prepared to describe the scope of work, organization, schedules, and costs from preliminary design through actual tests and operation. The potential market for nationwide application of the concept was projected, along with the equivalent oil displacement resulting from estimated commercial application.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Bethlehem Steel announces plans to control coke oven air and water pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation and the Maryland Department of the Environment have announced an agreement under which Bethlehem will spend an estimated $92-million at its Sparrows Points, Md., plant for technologically-advanced controls to further reduce air and water pollution, mainly from the plant's coke ovens. The two major systems include one to treat by-product coke oven gas and chemicals, and another to upgrade existing pushing emission controls on two older coke oven batteries. One of the new systems will replace most of the existing equipment that cleans gas and treats chemicals created by the coking process at the plant's three coke oven batteries. Because this system has the potential to greatly reduce sulfur dioxide and other pollutants, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) in September announced that its installation qualified for funding as part of the nationwide Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Water pollution: EPA controls over ballast water at Trans-Alaska Pipeline Marine Terminal  

SciTech Connect

The Alyeska Pipeline Service Company at Valdez, Alaska, operates a water treatment plant at the terminal to treat ballast water, oily sea water that is carried in tankers to provide stability, before it is discharged into the bay. The Environmental Protection Agency is nearly 4 years late in issuing a new permit to Alyeska which regulates the types and amounts of pollution that can be discharged. Alyeska has been operating under an extension of its old permit whose conditions may be less stringent than the new permit will require. Prior to 1984, EPA monitored Alyeska's permit and identified instances of noncompliance with permit conditions, but its enforcement actions were limited to discussions and correspondence with Alyeska. In contrast, since 1984, EPA has begun taking enforcement actions as well as investigating allegations of other environmental problems. EPA should have acted sooner and until the new permit is issued, questions about the protection of marine life and water quality in Valdez Bay will remain unanswered.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Air Pollution Controls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Various statutes within the Wisconsin Legislative Documents relate to air pollution control. These statutes describe zoning, permitting, and emissions regulations for hazardous and non-hazardous...

26

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13...

27

Pollution Control Guidance for Geothermal Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the EPA regulatory approach toward geothermal energy development. The state of knowledge is described with respect to the constituents of geothermal effluents and emissions, including water, air, solid wastes, and noise. Pollutant effects are discussed. Pollution control technologies that may be applicable are described along with preliminary cost estimates for their application. Finally discharge and emission limitations are suggested that may serve as interim guidance for pollution control during early geothermal development.

Hartley, Robert P.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic File with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications are discussed, including drinking water purification, air and water pollution control, manufacture of industrial materials, materials recovery, waste treatment, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, cigarette filters, ventilation systems, medical filtration, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains a minimum of 125 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications are discussed, including drinking water purification, air and water pollution control, manufacture of industrial materials, materials recovery, waste treatment, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, cigarette filters, ventilation systems, medical filtration, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction allows businesses to deduct from their Alabama net worth the net amount invested in all devices, facilities, or structures, and all identifiable components or materials for use therein, that are located in Alabama and are acquired or constructed primarily for the control, reduction, or elimination of air, ground, or water pollution or radiological hazards where such pollution or

31

Noise Pollution Control (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Noise Pollution Control (Minnesota) Noise Pollution Control (Minnesota) Noise Pollution Control (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations These regulations set noise standards and direct municipalities to take reasonable measures to prevent the establishment of land use activities

32

Controlling Pollution (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Permits are required for new or existing stationary potential sources of pollution, including anaerobic lagoons. Permits may also be required for modifications that may increase emissions. These...

33

Activated-charcoal filters: water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. January 1970-July 1988 (citations from the US Patent data base). Report for January 1970-July 1988  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated-charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic gases and pollutants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, swimming pool filtration, waste conversion, automobile fuel and exhaust systems, and footwear deodorizing. (Contains 129 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pollution Control Agency Jump to: navigation, search Name Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Place St. Paul, Minnesota Zip 55155-4194 Product Focused on reducing and preventing...

35

Control, Prevention, and Abatement of Pollution of Surface Waters (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of North Dakota to protect, maintain, and improve the quality of the waters in the state, and to require necessary and reasonable treatment of sewage, industrial, or other wastes....

36

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the Patent Bibliographic database with exemplary claims. ) Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, waste conversion, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, swimming pool filtration, tobacco smoke filters, kitchen ventilators, medical filtration treatment, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ionizing wet scrubber for air pollution control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution control equipment manufacturers are continually developing sophisticated systems designed to dramatically reduce plant emissions. One such system, the ionizing wet scrubber (IWS), has demonstrated outstanding air pollution control characteristics while meeting the challenge of energy efficiency. The IWS system removes fine solid and liquid particulate down to 0.05 micron at high collection efficiencies and low energy comsumption. It also simultaneously removes noxious, corrosive and odor-bearing gases from flue gas streams as well as coarse particulate matter above 1 micron in diameter. Due to its simplified design and low pressure drop, operating energy costs of the IWS are only a fraction of those for alternative air pollution control equipment. Pressure drop through a single-stage IWS is only 0.5 to 1.5 in. Water (125 to 374 pa) column and is controlled primarily by pressure drop through the wet scrubber section. Total system energy usage is approximately 2.0-2.5 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min (0.7-0.9 kw/m/sup 3//min) for a single-stage IWS and 4.0-5.0 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min for a two-stage installation. These energy requirements represent a significant savings as opposed to other air pollution control systems such as Venturi scrubbers.

Sheppard, S.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Air Pollution Control Code (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Fuel Distributor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Air Pollution Control code is adopted pursuant to Subchapter 2 of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-4-101). ) By authority of the same State law, the Commission has also adopted Regulation 19, Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Regulation 19) and Regulation 26, Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Regulation 26)

39

Water Pollution Fee (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Pollution Fee (Michigan) Water Pollution Fee (Michigan) Water Pollution Fee (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Fees Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Groundwater Program regulates discharge to groundwater under Part 31, Water Resources Protection, of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451 and Part 22 Rules. Groundwater staff review

40

Pollutant Discharge Prevention and Control Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Protection is responsible for enacting regulations to prevent and mitigate the release of pollutants into the land and waters of the state. This legislation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pollution Control Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act declares the maintenance of reasonable standards of purity of air and water to be the public policy of the state. The Act authorizes the Department of Health and Environmental Control to...

42

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Eligibility Commercial...

43

Air Pollution Control (Indiana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

StateProvince Program Administrator Air Pollution Control Board, Indiana Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.in.govlegislativeiac...

44

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality This chapter enumerates primary and secondary ambient air quality standards and the significant deterioration increments. Significant deterioration refers to an increase in ambient air pollution above a baseline plus a specific increment allowed for one of three classes of areas. It is required for potential sources of air contaminants to register with the

45

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pollution Control Pollution Control Equipment Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Pollution Control Equipment Exemption Dedicated original equipment manufacturer natural gas vehicles and

46

Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) Alabama Air Pollution Control Act (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations This Act gives the Environmental Management Commission the authority to establish emission control requirements, by rule or regulation, as may be necessary to prevent, abate or control air pollution. Such requirements may be for the state as a whole or may vary from area to area, as may be appropriate, to facilitate accomplishment of the purposes of this chapter and in order to take account of varying local conditions. The Commission can prohibit the construction, installation, modification or

47

Multimedia Impacts of Air Pollutant Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With federal and state restrictions on air pollutant emissions growing more stringent, cross-media transfer may increase their concentration in solid waste and wastewater in complex chemical settings that make it difficult to predict pollutant behavior, both within the power plant and in the outside environment. Recent EPRI research addresses these complexities and helps to clarify impacts to solid waste and wastewater resulting from air pollution control operation. The ultimate goal of this ...

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Water Pollution (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Illinois) (Illinois) Water Pollution (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Illinois EPA This article states regulations for water quality standards, effluent standards, monitoring and reporting methods, sewer discharge criteria and information about permits. It is the purpose of these rules and regulations to designate the uses for which the various waters of the State shall be maintained and protected; to prescribe the water quality standards required to sustain the designated uses; to establish effluent standards to limit the contaminants discharged to the waters; and to prescribe additional

49

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

50

Air Pollution Control Rules (West Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The listed rules were enacted as directed by the Air Pollution Control Act. Together, these rules guide the monitoring, permitting and compliance enforcement of air quality in the state.

51

Pollution Control: Erosion and Sedimentation Control (Maine) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Erosion and Sedimentation Control (Maine) Erosion and Sedimentation Control (Maine) Pollution Control: Erosion and Sedimentation Control (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Proection A person who conducts, or causes to be conducted, an activity that involves

52

Water Efficient and Low Pollution Textile Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative and Emerging Technologies for an Energy Efficient Alternative and Emerging Technologies for an Energy Efficient Water Efficient and Low Pollution Textile Industry year month institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory address Berkeley abstract p Emerging energy efficiency greenhouse gas GHG and pollution mitigation technologies will be crucial for the textile industry as it responds to population and economic growth that is expected to spur a rapid increase in textile consumption over the coming decades and a corresponding increase in the industry textquoteright s absolute energy use and GHG and other pollutant emissions This report gives an overview of textile industry processes and compiles available information on the energy savings environmental and other benefits costs commercialization status and references for emerging technologies to reduce the industry

53

Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 5, 2013 ... B. Materials for the Environment: Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy Program Organizers: Fernand Marquis, Naval Postgraduate ...

54

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Air Pollution Control Air Pollution Control Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Air Pollution Control Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Air Pollution Control Program The Air Pollution Control Program assists state, local, and tribal agencies in planning, developing, establishing, improving, and maintaining adequate

55

Water pollution diagnosis with a multi-agent approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing high quality drinking water with no disruption is the main objective of every municipal water system. The paper presents the application of a multi-agent approach to water pollution diagnosis in a municipal water system. The main benefit of ... Keywords: artificial intelligence, environmental protection, multi-agent system, water pollution diagnosis

Constantin Nichita; Mihaela Oprea

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Air Pollution Control (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control (Michigan) Air Pollution Control (Michigan) Air Pollution Control (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality This rule requires an annual report from a commercial, industrial, or governmental source of emission of an air contaminant if, in the judgment of the Department, information on the quantity and composition of an air

57

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe possibilities for exemptions (i.e., for sources which have the potential to emit 50 tons but do not actually reach that level) and Reasonably Available Control

58

Strategies to Reduce Water Consumption in SO2 Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost-effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems to remove multiple pollutants and require significant process water. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have potential to reduce multiple pollutants simultaneou...

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Inefficient remediation of ground-water pollution  

SciTech Connect

The problem of trying to remove ground-water pollution by pumping and treating are pointed out. Various Superfund sites are discussed briefly. It is pointed out that many chemicals have been discarded in an undocumented manner, and their place in the groundwater is not known. Results of a remedial program to remove perchloroethylene at a concentration of 6132 parts per billion from groundwater in a site in New Jersey showed that with an average extraction rate of 300 gallons per minute from 1978 to 1984 contamination level was lowered below 100 parts per billion. However, after shutdown of pumping the level rose to 12,588 parts per billion in 1988. These results lead the author to propose that the practical solutions for water supplies may be treatment at the time it enters the system for use.

Abelson, P.H.

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

60

Agricultural nonpoint source pollution and economic incentive policies. Issues in the reauthorization of the Clean Water Act. Staff report  

SciTech Connect

The limited success of command-and-control policies for reducing nonpoint source (NPS) water pollution mandated under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) has prompted increased interest in economic incentive policies as an alternative control mechanism. No single policy, however, is likely to be effective in reducing all NPS pollution. Economic incentives may be effective in some cases, command-and-control practices in others.

Malik, A.S.; Larson, B.A.; Ribaudo, M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EO 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

088-Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards 088-Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards SOURCE: The provisions of Executive Order 12088 of October 13,1978, appear at 43 FR 47707, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 243, unless otherwise noted. By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and statutes of the United States of America, including Section 22 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2621), Section 313 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1323), Section 1447 of the Public Health Service Act, as amended by the Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300j-6), Section 118of the Clean Air Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 7418(b)), Section 4 of the Noise Control Act of 1972 (42 U.S.C. 4903), Section 6001 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6961), and Section 301 of Title 3 of the United

62

GRR/Section 14-MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System 14MTEGroundwaterPollutionControlSystemPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Water Quality Act (Montana Codes Annotated 75-5-101 et seq.) Administrative Rules of Montana 17.30.1001 et seq. Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTEGroundwaterPollutionControlSystemPermit (1).pdf 14MTEGroundwaterPollutionControlSystemPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

63

LEGAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ASPECTS OF REGULATING INTERMEDIA POLLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs of the water and land pollution generated by wastesand increased water and land pollution was optimal. It didan optimum use of land in pollution control. Amendments

Entman, R.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis of pollution controls for bridge painting. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Research was performed to evaluate pollution control measures for bridge painting. A field comparison was performed to evaluate the following techniques: abrasive blasting with low dusting abrasive; abrasive blasting with metallic abrasive; vacuum blasting with recyclable abrasive; vacuum blasting with slag abrasive; and power tool cleaning. Technical feasibility, productivity and cost were analyzed for the different techniques. Impact on air, water, sediment and soil was measured. A literature and information search was performed on surface preparation techniques for cleaning bridge steel and environmental impact from bridge cleaning activities. The results from the research were used to make recommendations to PennDOT on changes to their Guidelines for Environmental Pollution Controls for Bridge Painting Contracts.

Smith, L.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

WA_02_009_CONSOL_ENERGY_Multi_Pollutant_Emissions_Control-CL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

02009CONSOLENERGYMultiPollutantEmissionsControl-CL.pdf WA02009CONSOLENERGYMultiPollutantEmissionsControl-CL.pdf WA02009CONSOLENERGYMultiPollutantEmissionsCon...

66

Storm water pollution prevention plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final storm water regulation on November 16, 1990. The storm water regulation is included in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) regulations. An NPDES permit was issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and was effective on July 1, 1995. The permit requires that a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) be developed by December 28, 1995, and be fully implemented by July 1, 1996; this plan has been developed to fulfill that requirement. The outfalls and monitoring points described in this plan contain storm water discharges associated with industrial activities as defined in the NPDES regulations. For storm water discharges associated with industrial activity, including storm water discharges associated with construction activity, that are not specifically monitored or limited in this permit, Y-12 Plant personnel will meet conditions of the General Storm Water Rule 1200-4-10. This document presents the programs and physical controls that are in place to achieve the following objectives: ensure compliance with Section 1200-4-10-.04(5) of the TDEC Water Quality Control Regulations and Part 4 of the Y-12 Plant NPDES Permit (TN0002968); provide operating personnel with guidance relevant to storm water pollution prevention and control requirements for their facility and/or project; and prevent or reduce pollutant discharge to the environment, in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Tennessee Water Quality Control Act.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

68

Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative to demonstrate an innovative combination of air pollution control technologies that can cost-effectively reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, Hg, acid gases (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF), and particulate matter from smaller coal-fired electric generating units (EGUs). There are about 400 units in the United States with capacities of 50-300 MW that currently are not equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), flue gas desulfurization (FGD), or mercury control systems. Many of these units, which collectively represent more than 55 GW of installed capacity, are difficult to retrofit for deep emission reductions because of space constraints and unfavorable economies of scale, making them increasingly vulnerable to retirement or fuel switching in the face of progressively more stringent environmental regulations. The Greenidge Project sought to confirm the commercial readiness of an emissions control system that is specifically designed to meet the environmental compliance requirements of these smaller coal-fired EGUs by offering a combination of deep emission reductions, low capital costs, small space requirements, applicability to high-sulfur coals, mechanical simplicity, and operational flexibility. The multi-pollutant control system includes a NO{sub x}OUT CASCADE{reg_sign} hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct SCR system for NO{sub x} control and a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubbing system (with a new baghouse) for SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter control. Mercury removal is provided as a co-benefit of the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse, and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, if required. The multi-pollutant control system was installed and tested on the 107-MW{sub e}, 1953-vintage AES Greenidge Unit 4 by a team including CONSOL Energy Inc. as prime contractor, AES Greenidge LLC as host site owner, and Babcock Power Environmental Inc. as engineering, procurement, and construction contractor. About 44% of the funding for the project was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, and the remaining 56% was provided by AES Greenidge. Project goals included reducing high-load NO{sub x} emissions to {le} 0.10 lb/mmBtu; reducing SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF emissions by at least 95%; and reducing Hg emissions by at least 90% while the unit fired 2-4% sulfur eastern U.S. bituminous coal and co-fired up to 10% biomass. This report details the final results from the project. The multi-pollutant control system was constructed in 2006, with a total plant cost of $349/kW and a footprint of 0.4 acre - both substantially less than would have been required to retrofit AES Greenidge Unit 4 with a conventional SCR and wet scrubber. Start-up of the multi-pollutant control system was completed in March 2007, and the performance of the system was then evaluated over an approximately 18-month period of commercial operation. Guarantee tests conducted in March-June 2007 demonstrated attainment of all of the emission reduction goals listed above. Additional tests completed throughout the performance evaluation period showed 96% SO{sub 2} removal, 98% mercury removal (with no activated carbon injection), 95% SO{sub 3} removal, and 97% HCl removal during longer-term operation. Greater than 95% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was observed even when the unit fired high-sulfur coals containing up to 4.8 lb SO{sub 2}/mmBtu. Particulate matter emissions were reduced by more than 98% relative to the emission rate observed prior to installation of the technology. The performance of the hybrid SNCR/SCR system was affected by problems with large particle ash, ammonia slip, and nonideal combustion characteristics, and high-load NO{sub x} emissions averaged 0.14 lb/mmBtu during long-term operation. Nevertheless, the system has reduced the unit's overall NO{sub x} emiss

Daniel Connell

2008-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

69

Air Pollution Control (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Air Pollution Control (North Dakota) Air Pollution Control (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a statewide air pollution control program, to promulgate regulations related to air pollution control, grant necessary permits to

70

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources South Dakota's Air Pollution Control Program is intended to maintain air quality standards through monitoring the ambient air quality throughout the

71

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)...

72

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

73

NETL: PPII - Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interim Reports Benefits Presentation: Cost-Effective Multi-Pollutant Control for Smaller Coal-Fired Power Plants PDF-1.5MB (June 2007) Environmental Reports Greenidge...

74

Dry sorbent injection may serve as a key pollution control ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Dry sorbent injection (DSI) is a pollution control technology that may play a role in the United States' electric power sector's compliance with the Mercury and Air ...

75

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont) Eligibility Utility...

76

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility...

77

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most...

78

Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Improvement Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) CONTACTS Brad Tomer Director Offi ce of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov Wolfe Huber National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5747 wolfe.huber@netl.doe.gov PARTNER CONSOL Energy Inc. Pittsburgh, PA ADDITIONAL TEAM MEMBERS AES Greenidge, LLC Babcock Power Environmental, Inc. GREENIDGE MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL PROJECT Project Description This project demonstrated a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) hybrid in combination with low-NO X burners (LNBs) and a circulating fl uidized bed dry scrubber (CFBDS) system using recycled

79

Integrated Emissions Control - Process Review: Multi-Pollutant Control Technology Descriptions and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few air pollution control suppliers are developing processes that may reduce several pollutants simultaneously in a configuration that is lower in cost than the total cost of using existing devices for each pollutant. It would benefit the industry if an independent organization that is technically knowledgeable about all the components of such multi-pollutant controls evaluated the opportunities these processes offer.

2002-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Synthesis of Methods Used in Air-Water Multiphase Pollutant TMDLs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972 to regulate and protect the surface waters of the United States. This legislation empowered states to develop water quality standards and impose controls for waterbodies not in compliance with the standards. The mechanism to regulate point and nonpoint source loading is the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). TMDLs start with the end point of water quality to meet a waterbody’s designated uses, and then calculate the permissible loading of pollutants. That ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Process for control of pollutants generated during coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an improvement in the coal gasification process that effectively eliminates substantially all of the environmental pollutants contained in the producer gas. The raw producer gas is passed through a two-stage water scrubbing arrangement with the tars being condensed essentially water-free in the first stage and lower boiling condensables, including pollutant laden water, being removed in the second stage. The pollutant-laden water is introduced into an evaporator in which about 95 percent of the water is vaporized and introduced as steam into the gas producer. The condensed tars are combusted and the resulting products of combustion are admixed with the pollutant-containing water residue from the evaporator and introduced into the gas producer.

Frumerman, Robert (Pittsburgh, PA); Hooper, Harold M. (Sewickley, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Alabama Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider ADEM This rule states standards for emission inventory reporting requirements, ambient air quality standards, sampling and testing methods and guidelines for maintenance of equipment. It also states guidelines for air pollution

83

Multi-Pollutant Control Technology and Cost Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current emissions control systems used by the U.S. generating fleet typically reduce emission rates of only one pollutant. This requires installation in series of various combinations of emission control systems to remove multiple pollutants. Technologies for simultaneous removal of multiple pollutants are now moving toward commercialization. These integrated systems have the potential to require less capital investment and to offer lower operating costs than traditional technologies. This report investi...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

SD-GIS-based temporal-spatial simulation of water quality in sudden water pollution accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System dynamics (SD) is well suited for studying dynamic nonlinear complex systems. In this paper, SD is applied to a rapid-onset water pollution accident using a 1-D water quality model and a conceptual GIS-SD framework is constructed to simulate the ... Keywords: System dynamics, Temporal-spatial simulation, Water pollution accidents

Bo Zhang; Yu Qin; Mingxiang Huang; Qiang Sun; Shun Li; Liqiang Wang; Chaohui Yu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Economic Development and Pollution Control (Indiana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in processed materials that may cause pollution. The legislation specifically coal with CSS using coal from Indiana mines as preferable and eligible for financing through bonds...

86

Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Facilities with a potential to emit any one regulated air pollutant of a quantity greater than or equal to 100 tons per year, or any one hazardous air pollutant (HAP) greater than or equal to 10 tons per year, or any combination of hazardous air pollutants greater than 25 tons per year, must submit, in a form and manner prescribed by the director, a fee emission report that quantifies the actual emission data for particulate matter,

87

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded to demonstrate the ability to affect and optimize mercury speciation and multi-pollutant control using non-intrusive advanced sensor and optimization technologies. The intent was to demonstrate plant-wide optimization systems on a large coal fired steam electric power plant in order to minimize emissions, including mercury (Hg), while maximizing efficiency and maintaining saleable byproducts. Advanced solutions utilizing state-of-the-art sensors and neural network-based optimization and control technologies were proposed to maximize the removal of mercury vapor from the boiler flue gas thereby resulting in lower uncontrolled releases of mercury into the atmosphere. Budget Period 1 (Phase I) - Included the installation of sensors, software system design and establishment of the as-found baseline operating metrics for pre-project and post-project data comparison. Budget Period 2 (Phase II) - Software was installed, data communications links from the sensors were verified, and modifications required to integrate the software system to the DCS were performed. Budget Period 3 (Phase III) - Included the validation and demonstration of all control systems and software, and the comparison of the optimized test results with the targets established for the project site. This report represents the final technical report for the project, covering the entire award period and representing the final results compared to project goals. NeuCo shouldered 61% of the total project cost; while DOE shouldered the remaining 39%. The DOE requires repayment of its investment. This repayment will result from commercial sales of the products developed under the project. NRG's Limestone power plant (formerly owned by Texas Genco) contributed the host site, human resources, and engineering support to ensure the project's success.

Rob James; Virgil Joffrion; John McDermott; Steve Piche

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Control of agricultural nonpoint source pollution in Kranji Catchment, Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Singapore's Kranji Reservoir is highly sensitive to nutrient and bacterial pollution, both of which can be directly traced to agricultural runoff. Water quality samples were collected along the main drainage channel in the ...

Hoff, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Air Pollution Control Systems for Stack and Process Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strict environmental regulations at the federal and local levels require that industrial facilities control emissions of particulates, nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and hazardous air pollutants. To comply with regulations, industries must either modify the processes or fuels they use to limit the generation of air pollutants, or remove the pollutants from the process gas streams before release into the atmosphere. This report provides a comprehensive disc...

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

GRR/Section 18-HI-d - Variance from Pollution Control | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 18-HI-d - Variance from Pollution Control < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-HI-d - Variance from Pollution Control 18HID - VarianceFromPollutionControl (4).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Regulations & Policies Wastewater Systems Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18HID - VarianceFromPollutionControl (4).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

91

Effects of Air Pollution Control on Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban air pollution and climate are closely connected due to shared generating processes (e.g., combustion) for emissions of the driving gases and aerosols. They are also connected because the atmospheric lifecycles of ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

92

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

93

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Multi-Pollutant Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-Flow Wet Precipitation Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-Flow Wet Precipitation The primary objective of this work is to compare the performance of metallic collecting surfaces to the performance of membrane collecting surfaces in a wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP), in terms of their efficiency in removing fine particulates, acid aerosols, and mercury from an actual power plant flue gas stream. The relative durability and overall cost-effectiveness of the membrane collectors versus metallic collectors will also be evaluated. Due to the higher specific powers, superior corrosion resistance, and better wetting and cleaning qualities, the membrane-collecting surface is expected to perform better than the metallic surface. The second objective of the project will be to compare the overall fine particulate, acid aerosol, and mercury removal efficiency of the baseline flue gas treatment system on BMP Units 1 and 2 to the efficiencies obtained when the two wet ESP systems (metallic and membrane collectors) are added to the existing treatment system.

94

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations aim to prevent the release of fugitive dust by forbidding

95

Cost effective air pollution control for geothermal powerplants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air pollution control technology developed and demonstrated at The Geysers by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company includes two different, but equally effective methods to reduce the emissions of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal power plants. These technologies may be used in other geothermal areas as well. Cost saving modifications and adaptations needed to apply these technologies in other geothermal areas with different steam composition are described. Cost estimates are presented for some typical cases. If a surface condenser gives poor H/sub 2/S partitioning with ammonia rich steam, neutralizing the ammonia with SO/sub 2/ is a cost effective alternative to secondary abatement with hydrogen peroxide. Nickel is a cost effective alternative to FeHEDTA when an oxidation catalyst is added to the cooling water of a power plant equipped with a contact condenser. 13 ref., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Weres, O.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

NETL: PPII - Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project - Project Brief [PDF-330KB] Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project - Project Brief [PDF-330KB] CONSOL Energy, Inc., Torrey, Yates County, NY PROJECT FACT SHEET Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project [PDF-610KB] (Jan 2009) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project, Final Report [PDF-5MB] (Apr 2009) Appendices A - F [PDF-6.4MB] (Apr 2009) Appendix A: Project Schedule Appendix B: Engineering Drawings Appendix C: List of Major Equipment Appendix D: Project Log Appendix E: Flue Gas Sampling Schedules from Special Test Series Appendix F: Photographs of Flue Gas Sampling Locations Appendix G: Clean Air Engineering Testing Reports [PDF-107MB] (Apr 2009) Appendix H - H1: Field Sampling Data Sheets and Sampling Data Reduction Worksheets: Ammonia Tests [PDF-19.4MB] (Apr 2009)

97

Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by Concent Issued to Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Registration No. 70228 Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by Concent Issued to Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Registration No. 70228 Docket No. EO-05-01: This is a Consent Order issued under the authority of Va. Code § § 10.1-1307D and 10.1-1307.1, between the Board and Mirant Potomac River, LLC for the purpose of ensuring compliance with ambient air quality standards incorporated at 9 VAC Chapter 30 and Va, Code § 10.1-1307.3(3) requiring certain emissions modeling and analysis related to the Potomac River Power Station located in Alexandria, Virginia, Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by

98

Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) Air Pollution Control Facility, Tax Exemption (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Property Tax Incentive Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Treasury An application for a pollution control tax exemption certificate shall be filed with the state tax commission in a manner and in a form as prescribed

99

Fuzzy decision making on direction changes of water pollution monitoring underwater robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy decision making on trajectory direction changes of pollution monitoring robots is addressed in this paper. Measured pollution densities and the possible existence of obstacles are used as the two fundamental data. While pursuing water pollution ... Keywords: fuzzy decision making, obstacle recognition, trade-off, water pollution monitoring

Seung Y. Na; Daejung Shin; Jin Y. Kim; Seong-Joon Baek

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio) General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio) General Provisions on Air Pollution Control (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency outlines the air pollution rules to secure and maintain levels of air quality that are consistent with the protection of health and the prevention of injury to plant, animal life, and property in the state of Ohio, and to provide for the comfortable enjoyment of the natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Water heater control module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

Hammerstrom, Donald J

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

103

Air Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act (West Virginia) Act (West Virginia) Air Pollution Control Act (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection The purpose of this law is to provide for a coordinated statewide program of air pollution prevention, abatement and control; to facilitate cooperation across jurisdictional lines in dealing with problems of air

104

Hazardous Air Pollutant Controls Workshop Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop was held in response to a request during the February 2012 advisory meetings by members of the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Program 75, Integrated Environmental Controls, for a consolidated summary of control technologies that they could use to comply with the newly finalized Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS). The members asked that the summary be provided by June 2012, as many companies were facing control selection decision dates in the ...

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

105

1984 market trends for the air pollution control industry  

SciTech Connect

January 1984 forecasts by The McIlvaine Company project variable but promising worldwide industry trends for the coming year. The influence on the market of air pollution legislation (in particular, acid rain legislation), gauged by utility planning trends, is discussed in the context of a shifting world market. Specialties within the segmented air pollution control market are categorized by the ''market leader'' concept, with which the author identifies a number of top companies as ''world market leaders.''

McIlvaine, R.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Zoning as a control of pollution in a spatial environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the per unit land pollution tax. Some experimentation iscontributed by that land unit's pollution. Key Words:to include optimal pollution land taxes. Moreover, these and

Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Control Project Preliminary Public Design Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative to demonstrate an innovative combination of air pollution control technologies that can cost-effectively reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, Hg, acid gases (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF), and particulate matter from smaller coal-fired electrical generating units (EGUs). The multi-pollutant control system includes a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NOx emissions by {ge}60%, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF by {ge}95%. Mercury removal of {ge}90% is also targeted via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The technology is particularly well suited, because of its relatively low capital and maintenance costs and small space requirements, to meet the needs of coal-fired units with capacities of 50-300 MWe. There are about 440 such units in the United States that currently are not equipped with SCR, flue gas desulfurization (FGD), or mercury control systems. These smaller units are a valuable part of the nation's energy infrastructure, constituting about 60 GW of installed capacity. However, with the onset of the Clean Air Interstate Rule, Clean Air Mercury Rule, and various state environmental actions requiring deep reductions in emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury, the continued operation of these units increasingly depends upon the ability to identify viable air pollution control retrofit options for them. The large capital costs and sizable space requirements associated with conventional technologies such as SCR and wet FGD make these technologies unattractive for many smaller units. The Greenidge Project aims to confirm the commercial readiness of an emissions control system that is specifically designed to meet the environmental compliance requirements of these smaller coal-fired EGUs. The multi-pollutant control system is being installed and tested on the AES Greenidge Unit 4 (Boiler 6) by a team including CONSOL Energy Inc. as prime contractor, AES Greenidge LLC as host site owner, and Babcock Power Environmental Inc. as engineering, procurement, and construction contractor. All funding for the project is being provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, and by AES Greenidge. AES Greenidge Unit 4 is a 107 MW{sub e} (net), 1950s vintage, tangentially-fired, reheat unit that is representative of many of the 440 smaller coal-fired units identified above. Following design and construction, the multi-pollutant control system will be demonstrated over an approximately 20-month period while the unit fires 2-4% sulfur eastern U.S. bituminous coal and co-fires up to 10% biomass. This Preliminary Public Design Report is the first in a series of two reports describing the design of the multi-pollutant control facility that is being demonstrated at AES Greenidge. Its purpose is to consolidate for public use all available nonproprietary design information on the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project. As such, the report includes a discussion of the process concept, design objectives, design considerations, and uncertainties associated with the multi-pollutant control system and also summarizes the design of major process components and balance of plant considerations for the AES Greenidge Unit 4 installation. The Final Public Design Report, the second report in the series, will update this Preliminary Public Design Report to reflect the final, as-built design of the facility and to incorporate data on capital costs and projected operating costs.

Daniel P. Connell

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

108

Oxy-fuel combustion with integrated pollution control  

SciTech Connect

An oxygen fueled integrated pollutant removal and combustion system includes a combustion system and an integrated pollutant removal system. The combustion system includes a furnace having at least one burner that is configured to substantially prevent the introduction of air. An oxygen supply supplies oxygen at a predetermine purity greater than 21 percent and a carbon based fuel supply supplies a carbon based fuel. Oxygen and fuel are fed into the furnace in controlled proportion to each other and combustion is controlled to produce a flame temperature in excess of 3000 degrees F. and a flue gas stream containing CO2 and other gases. The flue gas stream is substantially void of non-fuel borne nitrogen containing combustion produced gaseous compounds. The integrated pollutant removal system includes at least one direct contact heat exchanger for bringing the flue gas into intimated contact with a cooling liquid to produce a pollutant-laden liquid stream and a stripped flue gas stream and at least one compressor for receiving and compressing the stripped flue gas stream.

Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL); Ochs, Thomas Lilburn (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy Ann (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul Chandler (Independence, OR)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee) Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) establishes the water pollution

110

Pollution Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Prevention Pollution Prevention Pollution Prevention Promoting green purchasing, reuse and recycling, and the conservation of fuel, energy, and water. April 17, 2012 Pollution prevention and control at LANL Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Our goal is to reduce or eliminate waste whenever possible. Promoting pollution prevention to achieve sustainability Our commitment to environmental stewardship and sustainability helps us accomplish our work in a manner that is socially responsible, economically sound, and protective of the environment. The goal of the Laboratory's pollution prevention efforts is to reduce or eliminate waste whenever possible. However, when waste elimination is not

111

Integrated Emissions Control - Process Review: Multi-Pollutant Process Cost Comparisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have the potential to reduce the emission rates for multiple pollutants simultaneously with the goal of identifying integrat...

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

Trading pollution for water quality : assessing the effects of market-based instruments in three basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since its passage in 1972, the majority of pollution reduction under the federal Clean Water Act has resulted from technology-based limits imposed on point source dischargers. However, most U.S. water bodies are unmonitored ...

Wallace, Katherine Hay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A framework for estimating pollutant export coefficients from long-term in-stream water quality monitoring data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling techniques for estimating pollutant loadings to water bodies range from simple export coefficient and regression models to more complex mechanistic models. All export coefficient models and many complex mechanistic models rely on pollutant export ... Keywords: BOD, CODMn, NO3-N, PO4-P, Point and non-point source pollutant loadings, Pollutant export coefficients, Water quality

S. Shrestha; F. Kazama; L. T. H. Newham

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Method oil shale pollutant sorption/NO.sub.x reburning multi-pollutant control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of decreasing pollutants produced in a combustion process. The method comprises combusting coal in a combustion chamber to produce at least one pollutant selected from the group consisting of a nitrogen-containing pollutant, sulfuric acid, sulfur trioxide, carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, chlorine, hydroiodic acid, iodine, hydrofluoric acid, fluorine, hydrobromic acid, bromine, phosphoric acid, phosphorous pentaoxide, elemental mercury, and mercuric chloride. Oil shale particles are introduced into the combustion chamber and are combusted to produce sorbent particulates and a reductant. The at least one pollutant is contacted with at least one of the sorbent particulates and the reductant to decrease an amount of the at least one pollutant in the combustion chamber. The reductant may chemically reduce the at least one pollutant to a benign species. The sorbent particulates may adsorb or absorb the at least one pollutant. A combustion chamber that produces decreased pollutants in a combustion process is also disclosed.

Boardman, Richard D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carrington, Robert A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Alternative policies for the control of air pollution in Poland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like other Central European countries, Poland faces the twin challenges of improving environmental quality while also promoting economic development. The study examines the cost of achieving alternative emission standards and the savings in abatement cost that might be achieved with policies that rely on economic incentives rather than with rigid command and control measures. A central element of the analysis is a dynamic model of least-cost energy supply in Poland that allows examination at a national level of the effects of different pollution standards and policies.

Bates, R.; Cofala, J.; Toman, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Technical Assistance Project for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared in response to a request for technical assistance from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy supported the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in its response to this request through the Technical Assistance Project. Discussion with the MPCA identified the following as the highest-priority questions: What is the effect of (1) size of Renewable Energy Reserve (RER) and (2) duration of allocation award on (a) NOx emissions in Minnesota and (b) retail electricity prices? What data is available on the response of wind energy development to financial incentives? This report addresses those questions.

Vimmerstedt, L.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Observed Increase of TTL Temperature and Water Vapor in Polluted Couds over Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols can affect cloud particle size and lifetime, which impacts precipitation, radiation and climate. Previous studies1-4 suggested that reduced ice cloud particle size and fall speed due to the influence of aerosols may increase evaporation of ice crystals and/or cloud radiative heating in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), leading to higher water vapor abundance in air entering the stratosphere. Observational substantiation of such processes is still lacking. Here, we analyze new observations from multiple NASA satellites to show the imprint of pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. We focus our analysis on the highly-polluted South and East Asia region during boreal summer. We find that "polluted" ice clouds have smaller ice effective radius than "clean" clouds. In the TTL, the polluted clouds are associated with warmer temperature and higher specific humidity than the clean clouds. The water vapor difference between the polluted and clean clouds cannot be explained by other meteorological factors, such as updraft and detrainment strength. Therefore, the observed higher water vapor entry value into the stratosphere in the polluted clouds than in the clean clouds is likely a manifestation of aerosol pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. Given the radiative and chemical importance of stratospheric water vapor, the increasing emission of aerosols over Asia may have profound impacts on stratospheric chemistry and global energy balance and water cycle.

Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, J.; Read, William G.; Massie, Steven T.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Colarco, Peter; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

NETL: News Release - Novel Pollution Control Technology Recognized  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 17, 2005 November 17, 2005 Novel Pollution Control Technology Recognized NETL-funded Technology Honored for Chemical Engineering Achievement PITTSBURGH, PA - Praxair Inc.'s Oxygen Enhanced Combustion (OEC) system for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) was recently recognized as one of five 2005 finalists for Chemical Engineering magazine's prestigious Kirkpatrick Award for Chemical Engineering Achievement. The system was developed under the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Innovations for Existing Plants program, which advances technologies to improve the environmental performance of America's existing coal-fired power plants. MORE INFO Read June 26, 2002 TechLine Chemical Engineering magazine, published by Chemical Week Associates, grants the Kirkpatrick Award biennially to honor the most outstanding

119

GRR/Section 15-HI-a - Air Pollution Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

15-HI-a - Air Pollution Control Permit 15-HI-a - Air Pollution Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-HI-a - Air Pollution Control Permit 15HIAAirPollutionControlPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401, et seq.) Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 60.1 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15HIAAirPollutionControlPermit (1).pdf 15HIAAirPollutionControlPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

120

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Revisions to guidelines for environmental pollution controls for bridge-painting contracts  

SciTech Connect

The recommended Guideline is issued as a supplement to the Final Report for Research Project 86-23 'Pollution Controls for Bridge Painting.' The objective of the research project was to evaluate various surface preparation methods for their effect on air, water, soil and sediment as well as their technical suitability for use on bridges. The methods evaluated were: open abrasive blasting with metallic abrasive, power tool cleaning, vacuum blasting with recyclable abrasive, vacuum blasting with slag abrasive, and open abrasive blasting with low dusting abrasive. Other surface preparation techniques were evaluated by analyzing information in the literature and discussing surface preparation with other highway agencies.

Smith, L.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Water Pollutant Discharge Act (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in violation of this Act, shall be liable to such governmental body for the actual costs incurred for the removal of such oil or other pollutants. Such governmental body...

123

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - Nox Budget Trading 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 41 - Nox Budget Trading Program (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations establish a budget trading program for nitrogen oxide emissions, setting NOx budget units for generators and an NOx Allowance Tracking System to account for emissions. These regulations apply to units that serve generators with a nameplate capacity greater than 15 MWe and sell any amount of electricity, as well as to units that have a maximum

124

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation & Cross-Media Transfer Speaker(s): David Olson Date: April 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

125

Water heater secondary control device  

SciTech Connect

A secondary control device for gas water heaters is described having a tank, cold water inlet, hot water outlet and a heater thermostat, the control device comprising: valve means for controlling the flow of gas from a source thereof to the heater thermostat, the valve means connected between the gas source and the heater thermostat; means attached to the outside of the cold water inlet for sensing the temperature of water in the cold water inlet and providing an electrical signal representative thereof, the signal generated by the temperature sensing means being connected to the valve means; means for opening the valve means for transmitting the gas to the heater thermostat when the signal is representative of the temperature of the cold water being less than a predetermined temperature; and means for closing the valve means for preventing transmission of the energy to the heater thermostat when the signal is representative of the temperature of the cold water being equal to or greater than the predetermined temperature.

Subherwal, B.R.

1987-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

126

NETL: CCPI - TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Control Devices - Multi-Pollutant Control Technologies Environmental Control Devices - Multi-Pollutant Control Technologies TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers - Project Brief [PDF-63KB] Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Marquette, Michigan PROJECT FACT SHEET TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers [PDF-761KB] (May 2011) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers Final Report [PDF-113MB] (Apr 2004 - Sept 2009) Quarterly Progress Reports January - March 2009 [PDF-970KB] (Apr 2009) October -December 2008 [PDF-3MB] (Jan 2009) July - September 2008 [PDF-630KB] (Oct 2008) April - June 2008 [PDF-1.5MB] (July 2008) January - March 2008 [PDF-610KB] (Apr 2008)

127

Water Treatment Strategies: Microorganism Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the fundamental concepts of microorganism control and a discussion about how these concepts can be applied for optimizing current prevention and mitigation strategies in nuclear power plant service water systems. A database has been established to facilitate development of treatment and operation strategies that meet the requirement for preventing microbiological problems while overcoming limitations with current water treatment technologies.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

128

POEM-PM: an emission model for secondary pollution control scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the POEM-PM (POllutant Emission Model for gas and Particulate Matter) emission model design. The model, providing actual and alternative emission scenarios, represents a decision support tool to evaluate emission control strategy ... Keywords: Air pollution control, Emission model, Emission model validation, Multiphase modelling system

Claudio Carnevale; Veronica Gabusi; Marialuisa Volta

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the supercritical water oxidation flow reactor  

SciTech Connect

This pollution prevention opportunity assessment was conducted to evaluate the operation of the supercritical water oxidation flow reactor, which is located in Building 906, Room 107. This assessment documents the processes, identifies the hazardous chemical waste streams generated by these processes, recommends possible ways to minimize waste, and serves as a reference for future assessments of the supercritical water oxidation reactor process.

Phillips, N.M.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (completed May 31, 2011)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (Completed May 31, 2010) Description NeuCo, Inc. (which acquired original participant Pegasus Technologies), a developer of power plant control and optimization technologies, demonstrated the capability to optimize mercury speciation and control of emissions from an existing power plant. This demonstration took place at an 890 megawatt (MW) utility boiler in Jewett,

131

Development of an oil-water pollution monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

Overboard discharge of bilge and ballast water is necessary, so oil-water separators have been researched extensively. The monitoring problem is to be able to determine the oil concentration continuously. An automatic monitor using carbon analyzer techniques is described. With only one calibration curve, the system can detect accurately the concentration of any type of oil in the water. (1 diagram, 2 graphs, 1 photo)

Tyler, B.; Gongaware, W.; Houlihan, T.M.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan For SWMUS and AOCs (Sites)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wells, tanks, and container storage areas. Waste water treatment system, and transfer stations report (LANL 1990). Contamination originated from septic tanks and lines, chemical storage areas

133

Innovative approaches in integrated assessment modelling of European air pollution control strategies - Implications of dealing with multi-pollutant multi-effect problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, crucial aspects of the implications and the complexity of interconnected multi-pollutant multi-effect assessments of both air pollution control strategies and the closely related reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be discussed. ... Keywords: Emission control, Integrated assessment, Optimisation

Stefan Reis; Steffen Nitter; Rainer Friedrich

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Grid Friendly™ Water Heater Controller - Available ...  

Summary. The Grid Friendly™ Water Heater Controller is a device that provides smart grid services from existing, installed electric water heaters.

135

Pollution control and environmental monitoring efforts at DOE's Coal-Fired Flow Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale demonstration of such technology is currently being carried out at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) in Tullahoma, Tennessee and at the Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The CFFF is dedicated to the evaluation of downstream (steam cycle) components and technology that may be considered for a full-scale MHD system. The objectives of the CFFF testing include the demonstration of various pollution control devices and techniques at a scale sufficient for future scale-up. The CFFF offers a unique test environment in which emissions control techniques can be developed and evaluated through emissions and environmental monitoring. Results thus far have demonstrated the ability of sulfur oxide (SO{sub x}), nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and particulate emissions well below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Regeneration of the potassium sulfate to produce sulfur-free compounds also has been demonstrated. The experimental program at the CFFF is now aimed at determining the optimum conditions for future commercial scale designs. Because of increased interests in Air Toxics, measurements of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), a potential greenhouse gas, priority pollutants (inorganic as well as organics), and chlorine-containing species (Cl{sub 2} and HCl) are also included in our ongoing efforts. Environmental monitoring activities are being pursued to develop an environmental impact assessment data base. These include the use of three ambient air sites to determine the impacts of gaseous and particulate emissions, five lake water sites to determine impacts due to process water discharges and seven sites to collect terrestrial data on possible soil contamination and tree growth. In this paper, we will summarize the status of our ongoing environmental program. 16 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Attig, R.C.; Crawford, L.W.; Lynch, T.P.; Sheth, A.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Water Quality Control (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control (Texas) Water Quality Control (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility StateProvincial Govt Industrial Construction...

137

The extent of chronic marine oil pollution in southeastern Newfoundland waters assessed through beached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of oil spills. In: Proceedings from the Oil Symposium on The Effects of Oil on Wildlife, Herndon female Harlequin Ducks in relation to history of contamination by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. JournalThe extent of chronic marine oil pollution in southeastern Newfoundland waters assessed through

Jones, Ian L.

138

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6 - Continuous Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Type Environmental Regulations Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous...

139

Control Technology - Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-Flow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Control Technologies - Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-Flow Wet Precipitation Up-Flow Wet Precipitation The primary objective of this work is to compare the performance of metallic collecting surfaces to the performance of membrane collecting surfaces in a wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP), in terms of their efficiency in removing fine particulates, acid aerosols, and mercury from an actual power plant flue gas stream. The relative durability and overall cost-effectiveness of the membrane collectors versus metallic collectors will also be evaluated. Due to the higher specific powers, superior corrosion resistance, and better wetting and cleaning qualities, the membrane-collecting surface is expected to perform better than the metallic surface. The second objective of the project will be to compare the overall fine particulate, acid aerosol, and mercury removal efficiency of the baseline flue gas treatment system on BMP Units 1 and 2 to the efficiencies obtained when the two wet ESP systems (metallic and membrane collectors) are added to the existing treatment system.

140

The economics of controlling stock pollutants: An efficient strategy for greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect

Optimal control theory is applied to develop an efficient strategy to control stock pollutants such as greenhouse gases and hazardous waste. The optimal strategy suggests that, at any time, the marginal costs of abatement should be equated with the present value of the marginal damage of timely unabated emission. The optimal strategy calls for increasingly tight abatement over time as the pollutant stock accumulates. The optimal policy applied to greenhouse gases suggest moderate abatement efforts, at present, with the potential for much greater future efforts. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

Falk, I. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Mendelsohn, R. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Assessing Air Pollution Control Options at the Hudson Station of Public Service Electric and Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a pilot-scale assessment of air pollutant emission control options at the Hudson Generating Station of Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G). Tests over a period of a year and a half evaluated the capabilities of a high air-to-cloth ratio pulse jet baghouse (COHPAC) in controlling particulates, acid gases, and mercury and a tubular electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in controlling mercury emissions.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fiscal interactions and the costs of controlling pollution from electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I quantify the costs of controlling SO{sub 2}, carbon, and NOx emissions from power generation, accounting for interactions between environmental policies and the broader fiscal system. I distinguish a dirty technology (coal) that satisfies baseload demand and a clean technology (gas) that is used at peak period, and I distinguish sectors with and without regulated prices. Estimated emissions control costs are substantially lower than in previous models of fiscal interactions that assume a single, constant-returns technology and competitive pricing. The results are reasonably robust to alternative scenarios, such as full price deregulation, and market power in the deregulated sector.

Parry, I.W.H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

THE IMPACT OF AIR POLLUTION CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN ON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Therefore, without cooling the flue gas, significant quantities of mercury will pass through the particulate, page 4824. Licata, A., et al, June 1994, "An Economic Alternative to Controlling Acid Gases, Mercury electrostatic precipitator combination. -Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction System to reduce nitrogen oxide

Columbia University

144

A Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO 2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants Edward S. Rubin (rubin@cmu.edu; 412-268-5897) Anand B. Rao (abr@andrew.cmu.edu; 412-268-5605) Michael B. Berkenpas (mikeb@cmu.edu; 412-268-1088) Carnegie Mellon University EPP Department, Baker Hall 128A Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract As part of DOE/NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program, we are developing an integrated, multi-pollutant modeling framework to evaluate the costs and performance of alternative carbon capture and sequestration technologies for fossil-fueled power plants. The model calculates emissions, costs, and efficiency on a systematic basis at the level of an individual plant or facility. Both new and existing facilities can be modeled, including coal-based or natural gas-based combustion or gasification systems using air or oxygen.

145

Flow-temperature-humidity control system operating manual. [Controlled atmospheres for industrial hygiene and air pollution studies  

SciTech Connect

A manual containing operating, maintenance, and troubleshooting procedures for the flow-temperature-humidity control system used at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to prepare test atmospheres for industrial hygiene and air pollution studies is presented. The system consists of two basic components: a commercially available temperature/humidity indicator unit and a specially built flow-temperature-humidity control module. Procedures are given for using the control system with a vapor generation system or with a trace-gas flowmeter to add vapor or a trace gas to the airstream after it leaves the control module.

Nelson, G.O.; Taylor, R.D.

1978-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Conference on alternatives for pollution control from coal-fired low emission sources, Plzen, Czech Republic. Plzen Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Conference on Alternatives for Pollution Control from Coal-Fired Emission Sources presented cost-effective approaches for pollution control of low emission sources (LES). It also identified policies and strategies for implementation of pollution control measures at the local level. Plzen, Czech Republic, was chosen as the conference site to show participants first hand the LES problems facing Eastern Europe today. Collectively, these Proceedings contain clear reports on: (a) methods for evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternative approaches to control pollution from small coal-fired boilers and furnaces; (b) cost-effective technologies for controlling pollution from coal-fired boilers and furnaces; (c) case studies of assessment of cost effective pollution control measures for selected cities in eastern Europe; and (d) approaches for actually implementing pollution control measures in cities in Eastern Europe. It is intended that the eastern/central European reader will find in these Proceedings useful measures that can be applied to control emissions and clean the air in his city or region. The conference was sponsored by the United States Agency for International Development (AID), the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and the Czech Ministry of Industry and Trade. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Farming and pollution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

does pollution affect farming? Replies: That depends on the type of pollution and the crop or form of livestock you are referring to. In terms of simple water pollution, if a...

148

Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Mult-Pollutant Control Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-megawatt (MW) Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/induct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. Testing was conducted through ports located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor to evaluate the performance of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system, as well as through ports located at the air heater outlet and baghouse outlet or stack to determine pollutant removal efficiencies across the Turbosorp{reg_sign} scrubber and baghouse. Data from the unit's stack continuous emission monitor (CEM) were also used for determining attainment of the performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions and SO{sub 2} removal efficiency.

Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...

150

Colorado Water Quality Control Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Quality Control Act Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Colorado Water Quality Control Act edit Details Activities (0) Areas...

151

NETL: News Release - Multi-Pollutant Control System for Small Coal-Based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Multi-Pollutant Control System for Small Coal-Based Power Plants Meets, Exceeds Goals New Retrofit Technology Achieves 98 Percent Mercury Removal, Reduces Capital Costs by 40 Percent WASHINGTON, D. C. - A U.S. Department of Energy project has successfully demonstrated the cost-effective removal of multiple pollutants from the emissions of an older 100-megawatt coal-fired power plant at AES Greenidge's facilities in Dresden, New York. The successful retrofit means the unit can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations while continuing operations another 20-30 years. MORE INFO Learn more about the Greenidge project In addition, wide commercial acceptance of the new system could contribute to significant reductions in national emissions and help extend the life of

152

The role of taxes and zoning in the effective control of pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the same land use and pollution to be the external effectsince different levels of pollution and land rents requireThe Ratio of Land Used by Industry if Pollution Only Flowed

Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Predicting the World's Next Water Pollution Disaster http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/12/101221-next-water-pollution-disasters-/[1/4/2011 10:48:50 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/12/101221-next-water-pollution-disasters-/[1/4/2011 10:48:50 AM] Home Animals Ancient World Energy Environment issues. When an estimated 184 million gallons (697 million liters) of industrial waste spilled about this $4 trick! How to look young for less than $4. Our editors & readers rate the latest deals

Rock, Chris

154

Water-dispersible soil particles and the transport of nonpoint-source pollutants in the lower Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport of nonpoint-source pollutants in surface runoff may be enhanced through sorption to mobile soil particles, a process known as particle-mediated transport. In order to predict the potential importance of this process, the major geochemical and mineralogical factors controlling particle dispersion and pollutant sorption must be identified. These factors were determined through characterization of water-dispersible clay (WDC) assumed to be an analog of natural mobile particles. WDC were obtained from three soils representative of the lower Rio Grande Valley by dispersion in water. WDC content of the three soils varied between 5 to 15%. WDC was proportional to clay content and inversely proportional to CaCO3 content. Relative to the bulk soils characteristics, WDC was enriched in organic matter (OM), CaCO3, and Fe oxides. The presence of amorphous coatings of OM, silica, and carbonates influenced the surface chemistry and dispersion of phyrosilicate minerals in WDC. Sequential extraction of WDC, using Na-acetate (pH=5), H202 and citrate-dithionate-bicarbonate extractants, generated particles of higher surface area (an increase from 63 to 1 18 and 127 m2/g, respectively), more negative electrophoretic mobility (an increase from-2.5 to-3.5 and-4.2 um/s/m/V, respectively), and higher critical coagulation concentration (an increase from 8 to 12 and 14 meq/L, respectively). An increase in particle dispersivity upon action of the extractants was visible on Transmission Electron Microscope micrographs. Batch sorption experiments were conducted using bulk soils samples and WDC (untreated, OM removed, OM and Fe oxides removed) reacting with Zn and Cu (model metals) and pyrene (model hydrophobic organic). Higher amounts of metals were sorbed by WDC than bulk soils, the maximum enrichment ratios were 1.45 and 3.3 for Cu and Zn, respectively. The removal of OM, Fe oxides and amorphous coatings rendered the WDC material less reactive towards Zn and Cu. Metal sorption was controlled by solution pH, cation exchange capacity of the mineral phases, and the OM content. Sorption of pyrene (Koc=24290) was controlled by organic matter and followed a linear isotherm.

Przepiora, Andrzej

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Pollution Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Prevention Pollution Prevention Goal 5: Pollution Prevention LANL is dedicated to finding ways to reduce waste, prevent pollution, and recycle waste that cannot be reduced. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Technical Area 21: Water was sprayed during the demolition of 24 Cold War-era buildings at TA-21 to protect air quality. Recycling metal from the buildings at Technical Area 21 saved LANL from generating more than 3300 cubic yards of waste. Skilled excavator operator Gilbert Pacheco extracts an extra 16 tons of recyclable metal at Technical Area 21. Energy efficient LED lights were installed in the Occupational Medicine facility to lower costs and improve lighting conditions.

156

Water dynamics in controlled pore silica glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water in porous silica glass is a suitable system for investigating the effect of confinement on translational diffusion. These systems are important because of their relevance in catalytic and separation processes. Two factors are to be considered in the case of confined water: (1) the effects of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces on interfacial water and (2) how the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network changes due to the volume of confinement. Here quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments at room temperature on water filled controlled pore glasses with radius of 15, 24 and 32 {angstrom}, are presented and analyzed using the random-jump diffusion model. Both the average residence time and the mean jump distance increase with decreasing pore radius.

Bordallo, H. N.; Herwig, K. W.; Dozier, W. D.; Drake, F.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy-efficient air pollution controls for fossil-fueled plants: Technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require most fossil-fuel fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate emissions. While emission-control equipment is available to help most of New York State`s 91 utility units in 31 power plants comply with the new regulations, technologies currently available consume energy, increase carbon dioxide emissions, reduce operating efficiency, and may produce large amounts of solid and/or semisolid byproducts that use additional energy for processing and disposal. This report discribes several pollution-control technologies that are more energy efficient compared to traditional technologies for controlling sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and particulates, that may have application in New York State. These technologies are either in commercial use, under development, or in the demonstration phase; This report also presents operating characteristics for these technologies and discusses solutions to dispose of pollution-control system byproducts. Estimated energy consumption for emission-control systems relative to a plant`s gross generating capacity is 3 to 5 for reducing up to 90% sulfur dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants. 0.5 to 2.5% for reducing nitrogen oxide emissions by up to 80% from all fossil-fuel fired plants; and 0.5 to 1.5 % for controlling particulate emissions from oil- and coal-fired plants. While fuel switching and/or cofiring with natural gas are options to reduce emissions, these techniques are not considered in this report; the discussion is limited to fossil-fueled steam-generating plants.

Sayer, J.H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. WE Energies has over 3,700 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the WE Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, WE Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury and other air pollutants, while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Combined Water-Fertilizer Management to Minimize Non-Point Water Pollution While Achieving High Crop Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLLUTION WHILE ACHIEVING HIGH CROP PRODUCTION JOHN ~ETEYand broccoli relationships and crop yield and nitrogen as amust anticipate Applica- crop nutrient and must be placed in

Letey, John; Jarrell, Wesley M

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Massachusetts Clean Waters Act (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act establishes a Division of Water Pollution Control within the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. The Division is responsible for establishing a program for the prevention...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) is a set of environmental regulations and permitting requirements that comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Georgia Water Quality Control Act is enforced by the Georgia

162

MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE-BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect

This is the first quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane--Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec.

James Reynolds

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

HIA and pollution prevention control: What they can learn from each other  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the implementation of the Pollution Prevention and Control (England and Wales) Regulations on 1st August 2000, health authorities (now Primary Care Trusts) became statutory consultees for permits issued to industry by the environmental regulators (the Environmental Agency, Local Authorities). The aims of this paper are to review the process of providing public health input in the light of its similarities to and differences from HIA and to identify the opportunities for both HIA and PPC to learn from each other's practice. We emphasise the challenges that are encountered by public health professionals who provide the public health input in the PPC. We use both our own experience of providing this input on behalf of health authorities and our expertise in HIA, environmental epidemiology and contaminated land.

Ahmad, Balsam [School of Population and Health Sciences, William Leech Building, Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Framlington Place, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: balsam.ahmad@necastle.ac.uk; Pless-Mulloli, Tanja [School of Population and Health Sciences, William Leech Building, Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Framlington Place, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Vizard, Catherine [School of Population and Health Sciences, William Leech Building, Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Framlington Place, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom)

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Louisiana Water Control Law (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control Law. This law states regulations for water quality control and states the powers and duties of the secretary of environmental quality. It provides information about...

165

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential

166

MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect

This is the Final Report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-flow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members conducted detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. The Membrane WESP was designed to be as similar as the metallic WESP in terms of collection area, air-flow, and electrical characteristics. Both units are two-field units. The membrane unit was installed during the 2nd and 3rd quarters of 2003. Testing of the metallic unit was performed to create a baseline since the Mansfield plant had installed selective catalytic reduction equipment for NOx control and a sodium bisulfate injection system for SO3 control during the spring of 2003. Tests results on the metallic WESP were consistent with previous testing for PM2.5, SO3 mist and mercury. Testing on the membrane WESP demonstrated no adverse impact and equivalent removal efficiencies as that of the metallic WESP. Testing on both units was performed at 8,000 acfm and 15,000 acfm. Summary results are shown.

James Reynolds

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

167

Rules and Regulations Pertaining to a User Fee System for Point Source Dischargers that Discharge Pollutants into the Waters of the State (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish a user fee system for point source dischargers that discharge pollutants into the surface waters of the State. The funds from such fees are used by the Department of...

168

Control technology appendices for pollution control technical manuals. Final report, June 1982-February 1983  

SciTech Connect

The document is one of six technical handbooks prepared by EPA to help government officials granting permits to build synfuels facilities, synfuels process developers, and other interested parties. They provide technical data on waste streams from synfuels facilities and technologies capable of controlling them. Process technologies covered in the manuals include coal gasification, coal liquefaction by direct and idirect processing, and the extraction of oil from shale. The manuals offer no regulatory guidance, allowing the industry flexibility in deciding how best to comply with environmental regulations.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Stream Pollution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stream Pollution Stream Pollution Nature Bulletin No. 401-A January 9, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation STREAM POLLUTION The pollution of surface waters in the United States is one of man's most shameful and dangerous crimes against himself. It is ruining one of the nation's basic resources by rendering water unfit for human consumption and unsuitable for many industrial or domestic uses. Pollution is particularly alarming near most big cities, but, emptied into rivers and creeks, other communities may feel its effect a hundred or more miles downstream. Even in remote or rural regions, it originates as wastes from mines, paper mills, canneries and creameries . A lot of the pleasure of living is taken away because our streams and lakes are fouled and spoiled for bathing, boating, fishing and other recreations. Further, the health hazard is very real. Unless such waters are boiled or chlorinated there is danger from typhoid, dysentery and many other diseases.

170

Deficiencies of Lighting Codes and Ordinances in Controlling Light Pollution from Parking Lot Lighting Installations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research was to identify the main causes of light pollution from parking lot electric lighting installations and highlight the deficiencies of… (more)

Royal, Emily

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation. - Graphical abstract: Advanced ozone membrane reactor synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone, membrane contactor for sorption and reaction and membrane separator for clean water production to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement in treatment performance compared to traditional ozone reactor. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reactor using membranes for ozone distributor, reaction contactor and water separator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Designed to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement over traditional reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrotalcite coatings capture and trap pollutants giving additional 30% TOC removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High surface area coating prevents polarization and improves membrane separation and life.

Chan, Wai Kit, E-mail: kekyeung@ust.hk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Joueet, Justine; Heng, Samuel; Yeung, King Lun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Schrotter, Jean-Christophe [Water Research Center of Veolia, Anjou Recherche, Chemin de la Digue, BP 76. 78603, Maisons Laffitte, Cedex (France)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open-Standard Wireless Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Open-Standard Wireless Controllers for Water Heaters Research Project on

173

Ensemble Precipitation and Water-Level Forecasts for Anticipatory Water-System Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for testing weather forecast products for applications in anticipatory water-system control. The applicability of the ensemble prediction system (EPS) of the ECMWF is tested for flood control in a regional water system in ...

Schalk Jan van Andel; Roland K. Price; Arnold H. Lobbrecht; Frans van Kruiningen; Robert Mureau

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Production And Artile Of Iron/Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Pellets To Retain And Destroy Water Pollutants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing a pollutant adsorption and degradation article, and such article, are provided. At least one adsorbent is mixed with at least one pollutant transforming agent to form a mixture. This mixture is compacted to form a porous, highly permeable article. If necessary, the article can be modified with surfactant either after the compacting step or by adding the surfactant to the mixture prior to the compacting step. In addition, if necessary, a binding agent can be added to the mixture prior to the compacting step.

BOWMAN, ROBERT S.; [et al

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

175

Water reservoir control under economic, social and environmental constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although great progress has been made in the last 40 years, efficient operation of water reservoir systems still remains a very active research area. The combination of multiple water uses, non-linearities in the model and in the objectives, strong uncertainties ... Keywords: Multiobjective optimisation, Multipurpose water reservoirs, Nonlinear control, Stochastic control, Uncertain dynamic systems

Andrea Castelletti; Francesca Pianosi; Rodolfo Soncini-Sessa

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Design and Application of Solar Water Heater Intelligent Control System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar water heater intelligent control system is made up of four modules which are data acquisition module, single-chip control module, the implementation and regulation module and human- machine interaction module. The problems of automatic detection ... Keywords: Solar Water Heater, Hardware Design, Detection and Control

Yu Gui Yin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

178

Characteristics of ashes from different locations at the MSW incinerator equipped with various air pollution control devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of ashes from different locations at a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) equipped with a water spray tower (WST) as a cooling system, and a spray dryer adsorber (SDA), a bag filter (BF) and a selective catalytic reactor (SCR) as air pollution control devices (APCD) was investigated to provide the basic data for further treatment of ashes. A commercial MSWI with a capacity of 100 tons per day was selected. Ash was sampled from different locations during the normal operation of the MSWI and was analyzed to obtain chemical composition, basicity, metal contents and leaching behavior of heavy metals. Basicity and pH of ash showed a broad range between 0.08-9.07 and 3.5-12.3, respectively. Some major inorganics in ash were identified and could affect the basicity. This could be one of the factors to determine further treatment means. Partitioning of hazardous heavy metals such as Pb, Cu, Cr, Hg and Cd was investigated. Large portions of Hg and Cd were emitted from the furnace while over 90% of Pb, Cu and Cr remained in bottom ash. However 54% of Hg was captured by WST and 41% by SDA/BF and 3.6% was emitted through the stack, while 81.5% of Cd was captured by SDA/BF. From the analysis data of various metal contents in ash and leach analysis, such capturing of metal was confirmed and some heavy metals found to be easily released from ash. Based on the overall characteristics of ash in different locations at the MSWI during the investigation, some considerations and suggestions for determining the appropriate treatment methods of ash were made as conclusions.

Song, Geum-Ju; Kim, Ki-Heon; Seo, Yong-Chil; Kim, Sam-Cwan

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Flour moisture control for maximum water addition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines flour moisture control and how this control can be an effective tool for cost minimization in a flour mill. Specifically, this thesis… (more)

Bontrager, Chad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is authorized to review and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

POLLUTION-CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS AND THEIR IMPACT ON AEROSOL NUCLEATION AND GROWTH IN EMISSIONS PLUMES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nucleation and growth of particles in coal-fired power-plant plumes can greatly contribute to particle concentrations near source regions. Pollution-control technologies have been added to coal-fired… (more)

Lonsdale, Chantelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Operations, Level III  

SciTech Connect

A Level III pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator to evaluate pollution prevention (P2) options for various waste streams: The main objective of this study was to identify and evaluate options to reduce the quantities of each waste stream generated by the TSCA Incinerator operations to realize significant environmental and/or economic benefits from P2. For each of the waste streams, P2 options were evaluated following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hierarchy to (1) reduce the quantity of waste generated, (2) recycle the waste, and/or (3) use alternate waste treatment or segregation methods. This report provides process descriptions, identification and evaluation of P2 options, and final recommendations.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Life-cycle-assessment of the historical development of air pollution control and energy recovery in waste incineration  

SciTech Connect

Incineration of municipal solid waste is a debated waste management technology. In some countries it is the main waste management option whereas in other countries it has been disregarded. The main discussion point on waste incineration is the release of air emissions from the combustion of the waste, but also the energy recovery efficiency has a large importance. The historical development of air pollution control in waste incineration was studied through life-cycle-assessment modelling of eight different air pollution control technologies. The results showed a drastic reduction in the release of air emissions and consequently a significant reduction in the potential environmental impacts of waste incineration. Improvements of a factor 0.85-174 were obtained in the different impact potentials as technology developed from no emission control at all, to the best available emission control technologies of today (2010). The importance of efficient energy recovery was studied through seven different combinations of heat and electricity recovery, which were modelled to substitute energy produced from either coal or natural gas. The best air pollution control technology was used at the incinerator. It was found that when substituting coal based energy production total net savings were obtained in both the standard and toxic impact categories. However, if the substituted energy production was based on natural gas, only the most efficient recovery options yielded net savings with respect to the standard impacts. With regards to the toxic impact categories, emissions from the waste incineration process were always larger than those from the avoided energy production based on natural gas. The results shows that the potential environmental impacts from air emissions have decreased drastically during the last 35 years and that these impacts can be partly or fully offset by recovering energy which otherwise should have been produced from fossil fuels like coal or natural gas.

Damgaard, Anders, E-mail: and@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, Christian [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Fruergaard, Thilde [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hulgaard, Tore [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Teknikerbyen 31, DK-2830 Virum (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Chilled Water and Hot Water Building Differential Pressure Setpoint Calculation - Chilled Water and Hot Water Pump Speed Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More and more variable frequency devices (VFD) are being installed on the chilled water and hot water pumps on the TAMU campus. Those pump speeds are varied to maintain chilled water or hot water building deferential pressure (DP) or return temperature or flow rate at their setpoints. The chilled water and hot water DP setpoint or return temperature setpoint or flow rate setpoint was a constant value or reset based on outside air temperature. In some buildings, the chilled water and hot water DP setpoints were reset based on flow rate, but in many instances those setpoint schedules were either too low to maintain enough building DP requirement or too high and consumed excess energy. The building DP reset schedule based on flow rate is studied and compared with the other pump speed control methods. Because the building DP setpoint based on flow rate method is achieved by tracking the load change, it saves energy than the other methods. In this paper its calculation procedure is generated and the example of the building DP calculation is given.

Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H., Jr.; Claridge, D.; Liu, C.; Deng, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The use and impact of intraplant trading in the iron and steel industry to reduce water pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economists have long proposed that market forces could be harnessed to achieve environmental goals more efficiently than regulations typically used. However, there have been few opportunities to test this concept in practice. The authors investigate the use and impact of one example of incentive-based environmental regulation. For more than ten years, the US Environmental Protection Agency has permitted iron and steel plants to distribute facility-wide water pollutant discharge limits among outfalls in whatever manner is determined by the plant to be least expensive. Although this intra-plant trading system is highly regulated to ensure environmental goals are achieved, it nonetheless serves as an excellent test case of the economic theory. At least ten iron and steel facilities have incorporated intra-plant trading in their discharge permits, with five trades still active. Estimates obtained from seven facilities indicate trading resulted in accumulated total savings compared to traditional technology-based limits of at least $122.7 million (1993 dollars), including capital and annual operation and maintenance costs. The net pollutant reductions permitted under trading range from less than one pound per day for most trades involving lead and zinc to several thousand pounds per day for some trades involving total suspended solids.

Kashmanian, R.M.; Podar, M.K.; Luttner, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Graff, R.G. [Tellus Inst., Boston, MA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

187

Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Facility Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location San Joaquin County, California Coordinates 37.9175935°, -121.1710389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9175935,"lon":-121.1710389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

188

Oxygen Control in PWR Makeup Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three fixed-bed processes can accelerate hydrazine-oxygen reactions in PWR makeup water and reduce oxygen levels to below 5 ppb. In this comparative-test project, activated carbon based systems offered the best combination of low cost, effectiveness, and commercial availability. A second process, employing palladium-coated anion resin, is also commercially available.

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

Observed Increase of TTL Temperature and Water Vapor in Polluted Clouds over Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite observations are analyzed to examine the correlations between aerosols and the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) temperature and water vapor. This study focuses on two regions, both of which are important pathways for the mass transport ...

Hui Su; Jonathan H. Jiang; Xiaohong Liu; Joyce E. Penner; William G. Read; Steven Massie; Mark R. Schoeberl; Peter Colarco; Nathaniel J. Livesey; Michelle L. Santee

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

TiO2-based photocatalytic process for purification of polluted water: bridging fundamentals to applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent years have witnessed a rapid accumulation of investigations on TiO2-based photocatalysis, which poses as a greatly promising advanced oxidation technology for water purification. As the ability of this advanced oxidation process is ...

Chuan Wang, Hong Liu, Yanzhen Qu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Controllers for solar domestic hot-water systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended as a resource for designers and installers of solar domestic hot water systems. It provides key functional control strategy and equipment alternatives and equipment descriptions adequate for writing effective DHW controller specifications. It also provides the installer with adequate technical background to understand the functional aspects of the controller. Included are specific instructions to install, check out, and troubleshoot the controller installation.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

California State Water Resources Control Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California State Water Resources Control Board California State Water Resources Control Board Name California State Water Resources Control Board Address 1001 I Street Place Sacramento, California Zip 95814 Phone number 916-341-5455 Website http://www.swrcb.ca.gov/ Coordinates 38.58181°, -121.492159° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.58181,"lon":-121.492159,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

193

LANSCE Drift Tube Linac Water Control System Refurbishment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are several refurbishment projects underway at the Los Alamos National Laboratory LANSCE linear accelerator. Systems involved are: RF, water cooling, networks, diagnostics, timing, controls, etc. The Drift Tube Linac (DTL) portion of the accelerator consists of four DTL tanks, each with three independent water control systems. The systems are about 40 years old, use outdated and non-replaceable equipment and NIM bin control modules, are beyond their design life and provide unstable temperature control. Insufficient instrumentation and documentation further complicate efforts at maintaining system performance. Detailed design of the replacement cooling systems is currently in progress. Previous design experience on the SNS accelerator water cooling systems will be leveraged, see the SNS DTL FDR. Plans call for replacement of water piping, manifolds, pumps, valves, mix tanks, instrumentation (flow, pressure and temperature) and control system hardware and software. This presentation will focus on the control system design with specific attention on planned use of the National Instruments Compact RIO platform with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control system (EPICS) software toolkit.

Marroquin, Pilar S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL-ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

Integrated process and apparatus for control of pollutants in coal-fired boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reducing SO.sub.x and NO.sub.x levels in flue gases generated by the combustion of coal in a boiler in which low NO.sub.x burners and air staging ports are utilized to inhibit the amount of NO.sub.x initially produced in the combustion of the coal, a selected concentration of urea is introduced downstream of the combustion zone after the temperature has been reduced to the range of 1300.degree. F. to 2000.degree. F., and a sodium-based reagent is introduced into the flue gas stream after further reducing the temperature of the stream to the range of 200.degree. F. to 900.degree. F. Under certain conditions, calcium injection may be employed along with humidification of the flue gas stream for selective reduction of the pollutants.

Hunt, Terry G. (Aurora, CO); Offen, George R. (Woodside, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Integrated process and apparatus for control of pollutants in coal-fired boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for reducing SO[sub x] and NO[sub x] levels in flue gases generated by the combustion of coal in a boiler in which low NO[sub x] burners and air staging ports are utilized to inhibit the amount of NO[sub x] initially produced in the combustion of the coal. A selected concentration of urea is introduced downstream of the combustion zone after the temperature has been reduced to the range of 1300 F to 2000 F, and a sodium-based reagent is introduced into the flue gas stream after further reducing the temperature of the stream to the range of 200 F to 900 F. Under certain conditions, calcium injection may be employed along with humidification of the flue gas stream for selective reduction of the pollutants. 7 figs.

Hunt, T.G.; Offen, G.R.

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with land and labor inputs and pollution emissions as a by-isolating the role of land use in pollution control we: i)land and the composite good, and disutility from the pollution

Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6- Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor...

199

Oklahoma Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Act (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Quality regulates facilities that discharge any pollutant into waters of the state. Permits must be acquired before the discharge of any pollutants into state waters...

200

Apparatus and method for controlling a heat pump water heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the operation of an add-on heat pump water heater unit is disclosed. A combination of a thermally conductive tube having a flattened portion and a thermostat mounted thereto is utilized to sense the temperature level of water in a tank to which the heater unit is connected. The tube and thermostat are additionally insulated from the ambient. A circulating pump is provided and connected to the water thermostat such that the pump is energized only when it is necessary to operate the heat energy adding unit.

Whitwell, R. J.; Schafer, J. P.

1984-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Commerce study looks at cost of pollution control for fossil-fuel power industry  

SciTech Connect

Environmental controls for fossil-fuel power plants consumed 1.3 percent of the national fuel used in 1974, with the largest demand going for sulfur dioxide emission control. Projections for power plant consumption to meet environmental standards range as high as eight percent in the 1980s. Less-energy-consuming systems include coal blending, tall stacks, and supplementary control systems; while high consumers are using coal washing operations in place of scrubbers, fuel transportation, conversion to acceptable fuels, waste heat disposal, and particulate controls. A summary table presents sulfur dioxide regulations in terms of their goals and their anticipated minimum and maximum fuel consumption. (DCK)

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

203

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium-based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e., mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

204

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium-based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e., mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste from a coal-fired power generation system.

Steven T. Derenne

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

205

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Major Stationary Sources and Major Modifications (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section of the air quality standards applies to all major sources and major modifications and outlines the required control technology to achieve the most stringent emission rate. Emission...

206

Energy technology characterizations handbook: environmental pollution and control factors. Third edition  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook deals with environmental characterization information for a range of energy-supply systems and provides supplementary information on environmental controls applicable to a select group of environmentally characterized energy systems. Environmental residuals, physical-resource requirements, and discussion of applicable standards are the principal information provided. The quantitative and qualitative data provided are useful for evaluating alternative policy and technical strategies and for assessing the environmental impact of facility siting, energy production, and environmental controls.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Photoelectrochemical water splitting and simultaneous photoelectrocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant on highly smooth and ordered TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays  

SciTech Connect

The photoelectrochemical water splitting and simultaneous photoelectrocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant were achieved on TiO{sub 2} nanotube electrodes with double purposes of environmental protection and renewable energy production under illumination of simulated solar light. The TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (TiO{sub 2} NTs) were fabricated by a two-step anodization method. The TiO{sub 2} NTs prepared in two-step anodization process (2-step TiO{sub 2} NTs) showed much better surface smoothness and tube orderliness than TiO{sub 2} NTs prepared in one-step anodization process (1-step TiO{sub 2} NTs). In the photoelectrochemical water splitting and simultaneous photoelectrocatalytic decomposition process, the 2-step TiO{sub 2} NTs electrode showed both highest photo-conversion efficiency of 1.25% and effective photodecomposition efficiency with existing of methylene blue (MB) as sacrificial agent and as pollutant target. Those results implied that the highly ordered nanostructures provided direct pathway and uniform electric field distribution for effective charges transfer, as well as superior capabilities of light harvesting. - Graphical Abstract: The photoelectrochemical water splitting for hydrogen generation and simultaneous photoelectrocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant (methylene blue) were achieved on TiO{sub 2} nanotube electrodes with double purposes of environmental protection and renewable energy production under illumination of simulated solar light. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were fabricated by a two-step anodization method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen generation and organic pollutant degradation were achieved on TiO{sub 2} NTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highest photoconversion efficiency of 1.25% was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing orderliness will increase photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} NTs.

Wu Hongjun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing 163318 (China); Institute of Basic Energy Science and Technology, George Washington University, VA 20147 (United States); Zhang Zhonghai, E-mail: zhonghaizhangwill@gmail.com [Institute of Basic Energy Science and Technology, George Washington University, VA 20147 (United States); Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

California Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control Board |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control Board Environmental Protection Agency Water Resources Control Board Place Sacramento, California Coordinates 38.5815719°, -121.4943996° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5815719,"lon":-121.4943996,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

209

GRR/Section 14-AK-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-AK-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution GRR/Section 14-AK-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-AK-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14AKANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14AKANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Alaska's Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Control Strategy is a statewide plan for protecting Alaska's natural resources from polluted runoff also

210

GRR/Section 14-HI-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-HI-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution GRR/Section 14-HI-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-HI-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14HIANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism Regulations & Policies Implementation Plan for Polluted Runoff Control (July 2000) Coastal Zone Management Act (CZARA) Clean Water Act Section 319 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14HIANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

211

Predictions of thermal comfort and pollutant distributions for a thermostatically-controlled, air-conditioned, partitioned room: Numerical results and enhanced graphical presentation  

SciTech Connect

An index of local thermal comfort and pollutant distributions have been computed with the TEMPEST computer code, in a transient simulation of an air-conditioned enclosure with an incomplete partition. This complex three-dimensional air conditioning problem included forced ventilation through inlet veins, flow through a partition, remote return air vents, and infiltration source, a pollutant source, and a thermostatically controlled air conditioning system. Five forced ventilation schemes that varied in vent areas and face velocities were simulated. Thermal comfort was modeled as a three-dimensional scalar field dependent on the fluid velocity and temperature fields; where humidity activity levels, and clothing were considered constants. Pollutants transport was incorporated through an additional constituent diffusion equation. Six distinct graphic techniques for the visualization of the three-dimensional data fields of air velocity, temperature, and comfort index were tested. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

White, M.D.; Eyler, L.L.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers (Completed September 30, 2009)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers (Completed September 30, 2009) Project Description Wisconsin Electric Power Company (We Energies) has designed, installed, operated, and evaluated the TOXECON process as an integrated mercury, particulate matter, SO 2 , and NO X emissions control system for application on coal-fired power generation systems. TOXECON is a process in which sorbents, including powdered activated

213

Environmental Compliance Guide. Guidance manual for Department of Energy compliance with the Clean Water Act: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)  

SciTech Connect

This manual provides general guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) officials for complying with Sect. 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 and amendments. Section 402 authorizes the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or states with EPA approved programs to issue National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for the direct discharge of waste from a point source into waters of the United States. Although the nature of a project dictates the exact information requirements, every project has similar information requirements on the environmental setting, type of discharge(s), characterization of effluent, and description of operations and wastewater treatment. Additional information requirements for projects with ocean discharges, thermal discharges, and cooling water intakes are discussed. Guidance is provided in this manual on general methods for collecting, analyzing, and presenting information for an NPDES permit application. The NPDES program interacts with many sections of the CWA; therefore, background material on pertinent areas such as effluent limitations, water quality standards, toxic substances, and nonpoint source pollutants is included in this manual. Modifications, variances, and extensions applicable to NPDES permits are also discussed.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Pollution adn Plant Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution adn Plant Growth Pollution adn Plant Growth Name: Virdina Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the effcts off water polltuion on plant growth? Are there any good websites where I can find current or on going research being done by other scientist? Replies: Dear Virdina, Possibly helpful: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/poll/e_poll.htm http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/wq/info/wq987.htm Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach This is a very complicated question, there are so many different types of water pollution and different species of plants react very differently. Good places to start are the U.S. environmental protection agency, the office of water is at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/ and there is a link to a kid's page from there: http://www.epa.gov/OST/KidsStuff/ You might also try state EPA's, Illinois is at:

215

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Several legislative acts are in place that could potentially impact water quality requirements and water use for fossil energy production as well as electricity generation. These acts regulate pollutant discharge and water intake directly and indirectly. Under regulations established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), these Acts serve to maintain and improve the Nation's water resources for uses including but not limited to agricultural, industrial, nutritional, and recreational purposes. The Clean Water Act - The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, more commonly known as the Clean Water Act, provides for the regulation of discharges to the nation's surface waters. To address pollution, the act specifies that the discharge of any pollutant by any person is unlawful except when in compliance with applicable permitting requirements. Initial emphasis was placed on "point source" pollutant discharge, but 1987 amendments authorized measures to address "non-point source" discharges, including stormwater runoff from industrial facilities. Permits are issued under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), which designates the highest level of water pollution or lowest acceptable standards for water discharges. NPDES permits are typically administered by the individual states. With EPA approval, the states may implement standards more stringent than federal water quality standards, but may not be less stringent. Certain sections of the Act are particularly applicable to water issues related to power generation. These include:

216

GRR/Section 14-CA-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-CA-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution GRR/Section 14-CA-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CA-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14-CA-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies [[California State Water Resources Control Board]] [[California Coastal Commission]] Regulations & Policies Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14-CA-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedures in California for dealing with

217

Brief paper: Fuzzy control of the activated sludge wastewater treatment process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activated sludge process is a commonly used method for treating sewage and waste waters. It is characterised by a lack of relevant instrumentation, control goals that are not always clearly stated, the use of qualitative information in decision making ... Keywords: Computer control, control system synthesis, controllers, fuzzy control, process control, water pollution, water resources

R. M. Tong; M. B. Beck; A. Latten

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Toxecon Retrofit for Mercury and Mulit-Pollutant Control on Three 90-MW Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project was based on a cooperative agreement between We Energies and the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to design, install, evaluate, and demonstrate the EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} air pollution control process. Project partners included Cummins & Barnard, ADA-ES, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The primary goal of this project was to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Michigan. Additional goals were to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter emissions; allow reuse and sale of fly ash; advance commercialization of the technology; demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use at power plants; and demonstrate recovery of mercury from the sorbent. Mercury was controlled by injection of activated carbon upstream of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse, which achieved more than 90% removal on average over a 44-month period. During a two-week test involving trona injection, SO{sub 2} emissions were reduced by 70%, although no coincident removal of NOx was achieved. The TOXECON{trademark} baghouse also provided enhanced particulate control, particularly during startup of the boilers. On this project, mercury CEMs were developed and tested in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific, resulting in a reliable CEM that could be used in the power plant environment and that could measure mercury as low as 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Sorbents were injected downstream of the primary particulate collection device, allowing for continued sale and beneficial use of captured fly ash. Two methods for recovering mercury using thermal desorption on the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture were successfully tested during this program. Two methods for using the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture in structural concrete were also successfully developed and tested. This project demonstrated a significant reduction in the rate of emissions from Presque Isle Units 7, 8, and 9, and substantial progress toward establishing the design criteria for one of the most promising mercury control retrofit technologies currently available. The Levelized Cost for 90% mercury removal at this site was calculated at $77,031 per pound of mercury removed with a capital cost of $63,189 per pound of mercury removed. Mercury removal at the Presque Isle Power Plant averages approximately 97 pounds per year.

Steven Derenne; Robin Stewart

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Ground water control for an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale. An open base of operation is excavated in the formation above the retort site, and an access drift is excavated to the bottom of the retort site. Formation is explosively expanded to form the fragmented mass between the access drift and an elevation spaced below the bottom of the base of operation, leaving a horizontal sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the top of the fragmented mass and the bottom of the base of operation. The sill pillar provides a safe base of operation above the fragmented mass from which to control retorting operations. A plurality of blasting holes used in explosively expanding the formation extend from the base of operation, through the sill pillar, and open into the top of the fragmented mass. Trenches are formed in the base of operation for collecting ground water which enters the base of operation prior to and during retorting operations, and collected ground water is withdrawn from the base of operation. Casings can be placed in the blasting holes and adapted for controlling gas flow through the fragmented mass during retorting operations. The casings extend above the floor of the base of operation to inhibit flow of ground water through the blasting holes into the fragmented mass, and other blasting holes not having such casings are sealed. After retorting is completed, the floor of the base of operation can be covered with a layer of concrete and/or the blasting holes can be sealed with concrete to inhibit leakage of ground water into treated oil shale particles in the fragmented mass.

Ridley, R.D.

1979-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

220

Technical Basis for Water Chemistry Control of IGSCC in Boiling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems – Water Reactors ... However, even the utilization of near theoretical conductivity water cannot prevent ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Organic analyses in water quality control programs - training manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lecture/laboratory manual dealing with the analysis of selected organic pollutants. Intended for use by those having little or no experience in the field, but having one year (or equivalent) of college organic chemistry, and having basic laboratory skills (volumetric glassware, titration assemblies, analytical and trip balances). Topics include dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, ammonia, nitrates, nitrites, carbon analysis, chemical oxygen demand, surfactants, oil and grease phenolics, gas chromatography, and polychlorinated biphenyls.

Feldmann, C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Pages that link to "California State Water Resources Control...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification ( links) GRRSection 6-CA-b - Construction Storm Water Program ( links) GRRSection 7-CA-d - CPCN for Small Power...

223

Natural circulation steam generator model for optimal steam generator water level control  

SciTech Connect

Several authors have cited the control of steam generator water level as an important problem in the operation of pressurized water reactor plants. In this paper problems associated with steam generator water level control are identified, and advantages of modern estimation and control theory in dealing with these problems are discussed. A new state variable steam generator model and preliminary verification results using data from the loss of fluid test (LOFT) plant are also presented.

Feeley, J.J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

225

Term project for Landscape Architecture 222, Prof. G. Mathias Kondolf, University of California, Berkeley, Spring 2009. Hard copy available at the Water Resources Center Archives, UC Berkeley.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water pollution, water conservation, habitat value, micro­water pollution, water conservation, habitat value, micro­water quality awareness, water conservation awareness, and

Diamond, Hayley; Gaffney, Andrea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Clean Water Action Plan: Restoring and protecting America`s waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On October 18, 1997, the 25th anniversary of the enactment of the Clean Water Act, the Vice President called for a renewed effort to restore and protect water quality. The Vice President asked that the Secretary of Agriculture and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working with other affected agencies, develop a Clean Water Action Plan that builds on clean water successes and addresses three major goals: (1) enhanced protection from public health threats posed by water pollution; (2) more effective control of polluted runoff; and (3) promotion of water quality protection on a watershed basis.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Co-Firing Oil Shale with Coal and Other Fuels for Improved Efficiency and Multi-Pollutant Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale is an abundant, undeveloped natural resource which has natural sorbent properties, and its ash has natural cementitious properties. Oil shale may be blended with coal, biomass, municipal wastes, waste tires, or other waste feedstock materials to provide the joint benefit of adding energy content while adsorbing and removing sulfur, halides, and volatile metal pollutants, and while also reducing nitrogen oxide pollutants. Oil shale depolymerization-pyrolysis-devolatilization and sorption scoping studies indicate oil shale particle sorption rates and sorption capacity can be comparable to limestone sorbents for capture of SO2 and SO3. Additionally, kerogen released from the shale was shown to have the potential to reduce NOx emissions through the well established “reburning” chemistry similar to natural gas, fuel oil, and micronized coal. Productive mercury adsorption is also possible by the oil shale particles as a result of residual fixed-carbon and other observed mercury capture sorbent properties. Sorption properties were found to be a function particle heating rate, peak particle temperature, residence time, and gas-phase stoichmetry. High surface area sorbents with high calcium reactivity and with some adsorbent fixed/activated carbon can be produced in the corresponding reaction zones that exist in a standard pulverized-coal or in a fluidized-bed combustor.

Robert A. Carrington; William C. Hecker; Reed Clayson

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pollution Prevention Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Prevention Awards Pollution Prevention Awards Pollution Prevention awards are presented each year for minimized waste, conserved resources, and other sustainable...

229

Water Outlet Control Mechanism for Fuel Cell System Operation ...  

Self-Regulating Water Separation System for Fuel Cells Innovators at NASA’s Johnson Space ... Solar Thermal; Startup ... The system uses the flow energy of the fuel ...

230

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

231

The Coordinated Control of a Central Air Conditioning System Based on Variable Chilled Water Temperature and Variable Chilled Water Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, regulation of water flow by means of pump frequency conversion is one of the major methods for power-saving in central air conditioning systems. In this article, optimization regulation for central air conditioning system on the basis of coordinative optimization control for variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow to obtain better power savings is put forward. According to typical meteorological year data, hourly air conditioning load of whole year for every typical room has been calculated with the transmission function method. In order to guarantee each typical room, the highest cooling load rate is used as an input parameter for optimization calculation. Based on the surface cooler check model, the smallest energy consumption of chiller and chiller water pump was taken as the objective function of the optimization model. The performance characteristics of a chiller, water pump, regulation valve and pipeline are taken into account, and the optimization chilled water temperature and chilled water flow were carried out. The case study for a commercial building in Guangzhou showed that the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is lower by 17% only with employment of variable water flow regulation by pump frequency conversion. In the case of optimization control with coordinative control of variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow, the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is reduced by 22% in presence of remarkable power saving effects. Increasing the chilled water temperature will reduce the dehumidified capability of the air cooler, and the indoor relative humidity will increase. The simulation showed that the adjustment optimized process meets the comfort of each typical room. The lower the cooling load rate is, the more obvious the effect of power-saving is. The highest power-saving rate appears in December, which is 36.7%. Meanwhile, the least rate appears in July, which is only 14.5%.

Liu, J.; Mai, Y.; Liu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Design and Application of the Water Temperature Control System for Large Aquaculture Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the traditional cooling methods such as ice cooling and natural convection cooling can not meet the special requirements of ornamental fish breeding, the way based on mechanical refrigeration, heat exchange system, water supply system and automatic ... Keywords: aquaculture pond for ornamental fish, water temperature automatic control, mechanical refrigeration, plate exchanger, water supply system

Chen Shuai; Zhong Ke; Cai Yingling

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Engineering quality control of solar-powered intelligent water-saving irrigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development tendency of the agricultural irrigation technology is Automatic water-saving irrigation, powered by solar energy and achieved control purposes by moisture content monitoring techniques and the variable irrigation technology. In this paper, ... Keywords: intelligent, quality control, solar power, water-saving irrigation

Liu Xiaochu; Wu Hualong; Ling Jingpeng; Tao Jianhua; Yao Li

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Long-range pollution transport during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign: a case study of a major Mexico City outflow event using free-floating altitude-controlled balloons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major objectives of the Megacities Initiative: Local And Global Research 3 Observations (MILAGRO 2006) campaign was to investigate the long-range transport of 4 Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) pollution outflow and its downwind impacts on air 5 quality and climate. Four aircraft (DOE G-1, NSF/NCAR C-130, NASA-J31, and NASA 6 DC-8) made extensive chemical, aerosol, and radiation measurements above MCMA and over 7 1000 km downwind in order to characterize the evolution of MCMA pollution as it aged and 8 dispersed over the central Mexican plateau and the Gulf of Mexico. As part of this effort, 9 free-floating Controlled-Meteorological (CMET) balloons, capable of changing altitude on 10 command via satellite, characterized the MCMA outflow by performing repeated soundings 11 during the transit. In this paper, we present an analysis based on the data from two CMET 12 balloons that were launched near Mexico City on the afternoon of 18 March 2006 and floated 13 downwind with the outflow for nearly 30 hours. Continuous profile measurements made by 14 the balloons show the evolving structure of the MCMA outflow in considerable detail: its 15 stability and stratification, interaction with other air masses, mixing episodes, and dispersion 16 into the regional background. Air parcel trajectories, computed directly from the balloon 17 wind profiles, show three different transport pathways for Mexico City outflow on 18-19 18 March: (a) high-altitude advection of the top of the MCMA mixed layer, (b) low-altitude flow 19 over the Sierra Madre Oriental followed by decoupling and isolated transport over the Gulf, 20 and (c) the same decoupling scenario with entrainment into a cleaner westerly jet below the 21 plateau. The C-130 intercepted the balloon-based trajectories three times on 19 March, once 22 along each transport pathway. In all three cases, distinct peaks in the urban tracer signature 23 and LIDAR backscatter imagery provided evidence for Mexico City air. The coherence of the 24 high-altitude outflow was well preserved after 25 hours whereas that lower in the atmosphere 25 was more widely dispersed over the same time period. Other C-130 intercepts, previously 26 thought to be from Mexico City, are shown to have likely originated elsewhere. These 27 findings address key questions about the long-range transport of Mexico City pollution and its 28 impact on the regional background. The particular intercepts identified should prove useful in 29 answering a wide range scientific questions pertaining to the transport, transformation, and 30 downwind impacts of megacity air pollution. 31 32

Voss, Paul B.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Flocke, Frank M.; Mao, Huitimg; Hartley, Tom; DeAmicis, Pam; Deonandan, Indira; Contrerars-Jimenez, G.; Martinez-Antonio, O.; Figueroa Estrada, M.; Greenberg, David; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Montzka, DeeDee; Crounse, J. D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Apel, Eric; Madronich, Sasha; de Foy, B.

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

235

Multi-Pollutant Emissions Control: Pilot Plant Study of Technologies for Reducing Hg, SO3, NOx and CO2 Emissions  

SciTech Connect

A slipstream pilot plant was built and operated to investigate technology to adsorb mercury (Hg) onto the existing particulate (i.e., fly ash) by cooling flue gas to 200-240 F with a Ljungstrom-type air heater or with water spray. The mercury on the fly ash was then captured in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). An alkaline material, magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}), is injected into flue gas upstream of the air heater to control sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), which prevents acid condensation and corrosion of the air heater and ductwork. The slipstream was taken from a bituminous coal-fired power plant. During this contract, Plant Design and Construction (Task 1), Start Up and Maintenance (Task 2), Baseline Testing (Task 3), Sorbent Testing (Task 4), Parametric Testing (Task 5), Humidification Tests (Task 6), Long-Term Testing (Task 7), and a Corrosion Study (Task 8) were completed. The Mercury Stability Study (Task 9), ESP Report (Task 11), Air Heater Report (Task 12) and Final Report (Task 14) were completed. These aspects of the project, as well as progress on Public Outreach (Task 15), are discussed in detail in this final report. Over 90% mercury removal was demonstrated by cooling the flue gas to 200-210 F at the ESP inlet; baseline conditions with 290 F flue gas gave about 26% removal. Mercury removal is sensitive to flue gas temperature and carbon content of fly ash. At 200-210 F, both elemental and oxidized mercury were effectively captured at the ESP. Mg(OH){sub 2} injection proved effective for removal of SO{sub 3} and eliminated rapid fouling of the air heater. The pilot ESP performed satisfactorily at low temperature conditions. Mercury volatility and leaching tests did not show any stability problems. No significant corrosion was detected at the air heater or on corrosion coupons at the ESP. The results justify larger-scale testing/demonstration of the technology. These conclusions are presented and discussed in two presentations given in July and September of 2005 and are included in Appendices E and F.

Michael L. Fenger; Richard A. Winschel

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: U.S. EPR™  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the AREVA US EPR design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary and Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. It is anticipated that the timely identification of any inconsistencies will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them before the first US EPR plant begins operation.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: APR1400  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP) APR1400 design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary (Volume 1) and Secondary (Volume 2) Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. The timely identification of any inconsistencies and technical gaps will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

238

Air Pollution (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.

239

Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

240

Modelling the sensitivity to various factors of shipborne pollutant discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the marine pollution attributable to ship actions is associated with the illicit discharge of oily residues or ballast water, in what is commonly termed operational pollution. In the particular case of ballast water, careless disposal can lead ... Keywords: Ebro delta, Moving sources, Numerical modelling, Shipborne pollution

Marc Mestres; Joan Pau Sierra; César Mösso; Agustín Sánchez-Arcilla

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radionuclide behavior in water saturated porous media: Diffusion and infiltration coupling of thermodynamically and kinetically controlled radionuclide water - mineral interactions  

SciTech Connect

A model is developed describing one dimensional radionuclide transport in porous media coupled with locally reversible radionuclide water-mineral exchange reactions and radioactive decay. Problems are considered in which radionuclide transport by diffusion and infiltration processes occur in cases where radionuclide water-solid interaction are kinetically and thermodynamically controlled. The limits of Sr-90 and Cs-137 migration are calculated over a wide range of the problem variables (infiltration velocity, distribution coefficients, and rate constants of water-mineral radionuclide exchange reactions).

Spasennykh, M.Yu. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Apps, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Control of nitrogen-16 in BWR (boiling water reactor) main steam lines under hydrogen water chemistry conditions: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary aim of this work was to attempt to identify methods to limit or control the N-16 main steam increases which occur as a result of plant operation under hydrogen water chemistry. The hydrogen water chemistry test data for 8 plants, N-13 chemistry measurements performed at three plants and N-16 main steam concentration measurements made at five plants were analyzed and correlations established. As a result of this study, potential chemical and physical control methods were identified. The test data compilations for the eight plants are included in this report. 6 figs.

Ruiz, C.P.; Lin, C.C.; Wong, T.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Technical Comments on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System — Proposed Regulations to Establish Requirements for Cooling Water Intake Structures at Existing Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) technical comments on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) June 11, 2012 Notice of Data Availability (NODA) Related to Impingement Mortality Control Requirements and its June 12, 2012 NODA Related to EPA’s Stated Preference Survey. These NODAs provide additional information to support EPA’s effort to develop a final Rule that implements the requirements of the Clean Water ...

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

REFLECTOR CONTROL OF A BOILING-WATER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A line connecting the reactor with a spent steam condenser contains a valve set to open when the pressure in the reactor exceeds a predetermined value and an orifice on the upstream side of the valve. Another line connects the reflector with this line between the orifice and the valve. An excess steam pressure causes the valve to open and the flow of steam through the line draws water out of the reflector. Provision is also made for adding water to the reflector when the steam pressure drops. (AEC)

Treshow, M.

1962-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

Anti-pollution boom  

SciTech Connect

Anti-pollution barrier comprises a buoyant air tube, a ballast water tube and a membrane. Sections of reduced diameter in the air tube provide weirs over which surface oil and water spill. An oil and water discharge tube is provided which may be inside or outside the water tube. If inside, then one end of the membrane is connected to the air tube and the other end to the ballast tube to form a gallery for reception of the overspill. If outside , then one end of the membrane is connected to the air tube and the other end to the discharge tube to form the gallery. Pumps may be provided in the discharge tube to remove overspill from the gallery.

Webb, M.G.

1980-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

Scoping Document: Water Quality Control Policy on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INTRODUCTION Background Annually, thermal electric power plants take in billions of gallons 8 One measure of the plant thermal efficiency used by the power industry is the Net Plant Heat Rate for Power Plant Cooling. March 2008 ii LIST OF PREPARERS The following staff of the State Water Resources

247

Design of Automation Control System for Water Chillers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy crisis led to the recognition that the energy conservation is important. The aim of performance test rig of a water chiller which is introduced in this paper is just for the energy saving. In order to get the better efficiency, a monitoring system ...

Yuhong Sun; Yuying Sun; Junmei Li; Xiaowei Yin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Tighten water-chemistry control after boiler layup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for internal deposition and corrosion can affect boiler reliability by reducing thermal efficiency, tube integrity, and the time between chemical cleanings. While chemical control specifications for normal operation have been developed by consensus of manufacturers and industry, their impact on shutdowns, layups, and startups is not always appreciated. The discussion of chemical-control options applies to boiler systems operating in the medium- and high-pressure ranges. Identification and correction of root causes underlying the chemistry problems encountered and application of the principles involved should result in shorter startup times, improved control over phosphate hideout, and reduced need for chemical cleaning. Each of these has a significant cost impact; together, they are the true measure of a successful chemistry-control program.

Brestel, L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Pressurized Water Reactor AgInCd Control Rod Lifetime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swelling of the lower end tip of AgInCd (AIC) absorber rods is one of the lifetime limiting phenomena for PWR control rods. Understanding the relationship between swelling and accumulated fluence is crucial to predicting the service life of these components. This report presents the initial results and analyses from a control rod absorber research program led by the EPRI Fuel Reliability Program, in close collaboration with Westinghouse Electric Company and AREVA NP. The goals of the program are to chara...

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

WATER QUALITY CONTROL POLICY ON THE USE OF COASTAL AND ESTUARINE WATERS FOR POWER PLANT COOLING Draft Final Substitute Environmental Document State Water Resources Control Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Water Board also contributed to this document’s preparation. The authors also wish to acknowledge previous contributions to this project by Ms. Sheila Vassey (State Water Board), Mr. Adam Laputz (currently

California Environmental; Protection Agency; Ms. Kim Ward; Mr. Michael Gjerde; Mr. Frank Roddy Of The

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the economizer outlet, upstream of the SCR reactor, and CAE measured flue gas NO{sub x} and CO concentrations at the sampling grids located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor. During the June 20-21 sampling period, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet. All ammonia measurements were performed using a modified version of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conditional Test Method (CTM) 027. The NO{sub x} and CO measurements were performed using U.S. EPA Methods 7E and 10, respectively.

Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air pollution from biomass combustion and acute respiratorycountries where biomass and kerosene combustion is common.to smoke from biomass fuel combustion increases the severity

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Aalborg Universitet Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aalborg Universitet Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil &, B. (2013). Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas, 2013 #12;Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production

Yang, Zhenyu

254

Distributed digital processing and closed loop computer control of wastewater treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of digital computer control to municipal wastewater treatment processes is steadily gaining popularity. Within the next few years this mode of control is expected to become a standard feature of larger wastewater treatment plants. The ... Keywords: Closed loop systems, PID control, computer application, computer control, digital control, direct digital control, ecology, feedback, feedforward, water pollution

Bipin Mishra

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing. Work plan  

SciTech Connect

The work plan for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's research on assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing is outlined. There are two tandem tasks in the program, a literature and information review and evaluation and an experimental effort. The experimental work will address environmental control technologies for retort and product water, contamination of ground water by abandoned in situ retorts, raw and spent shale leachates, fugitive emissions from background oil shale retorting, and aquifer bridging during or after shale oil extraction.

Wewerka, E.M.; Wagner, P.; Wanek, P.L.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Air Pollution Emissions and Abatement (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A person who controls the source of an emission must notify the Pollution Control Agency immediately of excessive or abnormal unpermitted emissions, and must take immediate or reasonable steps to...

257

Research on water level optimal control of boiler drum based on dual heuristic dynamic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler drum system is an important component of a thermal power plant or industrial production, and the water level is a critical parameter of boiler drum control system. Because of non-linear, strong coupling and large disturbance, it is difficult to ... Keywords: BP neural network, boiler drum level, dual heuristic dynamic programming, optimal control

Qingbao Huang; Shaojian Song; Xiaofeng Lin; Kui Peng

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

World Environmental and Water Resources Congress, ASCE/EWRI Omaha, Nebraska, May 21 26, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the long-term accumulation of pollutants and those caused by short-term (event-related) problems. Long-term. Selecting a design that is optimal in terms of pollutant control, receiving water impacts, and cost of the long-term rainfall record. Figure 1 is an example of observed rainfall and runoff observed at Milwaukee

Pitt, Robert E.

259

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up “polluted” groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - Every spring, about 2,500 fifth graders in

260

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up “polluted” groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - Every spring, about 2,500 fifth graders in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonpoint Source Pollution from Land Use Workshop. Novemberasked to investigate pollution from land use activities. Newland and water interactions and point and non-point sources of pollution

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Land Use and Water Quality on California's Central Coast: Nutrient Levels in Coastal Waterways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pollution originating from urban and agricul- tural landrefers to pollution that occurs when water runs over land or

Los Huertos, Marc; Gentry, Lowell; Shennan, Carol

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Refueling Simulation Strategy of a CANDU Reactor Based on Optimum Zone Controller Water Levels  

SciTech Connect

An optimum refueling simulation method was developed for application to a Canada deuterium uranium 713-MW(electric) (CANDU-6) reactor. The objective of the optimization was to maintain the operating range of the zone controller unit (ZCU) water level so that the reference zone power distribution is reproduced following the refueling operation. The zone controller level on the refueling operation was estimated by the generalized perturbation method, which provides sensitivities of the zone power to an individual refueling operation and the zone controller level. By constructing a system equation of the zone power, the zone controller level was obtained, which was used to find the most suitable combination of the refueling channels. The 250-full-power-day refueling simulations showed that the channel and bundle powers are well controlled below the license limits when the ZCU water level remains in the typical operating range.

Choi, Hangbok; Kim, Do Heon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Oklahoma Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (OPDES) Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (OPDES) Standards Oklahoma Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (OPDES) Standards (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (OPDES) Standards (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality This program of the Water Quality Division of the Department of Environmental Quality sets the point source, biosolids (sewage sludge), and stormwater permitting standards for discharges to the waters of the State

265

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Geothermal Systems in the Northwestern Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic Model of Geothermal Systems in the Northwestern Great Basin Abstract In the western Great Basin, the Walker Lane is a system of right-lateral strike-slip faults accommodating ~15-25% of relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Relatively high rates of recent (<10 Ma) west-northwest extension absorb northwestward declining dextral motion in the Walker Lane, diffusing that motion into the Basin-Range. Abundant geothermal fields cluster in several northeasttrending belts in the

267

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 9 - Air Pollution Control...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

268

Control system for electric water heater with heat pump external heat source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A control system for an electric water heater operatively associated with an external heat source, such as a heat pump. The water heater includes a water storage tank provided with an electric tank heating unit having a tank thermostat which closes in response to water temperature in the tank, allowing a flow of current through the tank heating unit so as to turn it on to heat the water, and which opens when the tank thermostat has been satisfied, interrupting the current flow so as to turn the tank heating unit off. The control system as responsive to the initial current surge through the tank heating unit when the tank thermostat closes to interrupt the current flow to the tank heating unit so as to maintain the heating unit off and to turn on the external heat source and maintain it on until the tank thermostat opens. The initial current surge cleans the contacts of the tank thermostat by burning off any insulating oxide residues which may have formed on them. The control system includes means responsive to abnormal conditions which would prevent the external heat source from heating water effectively for turning off the external heat source and turning on the tank heating unit and maintaining the external heat source off and the tank heating unit on until the tank thermostat is satisfied.

Shaffer Jr., J. E.; Picarello, J. F.

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

Urea for SCR-based NOx Control Systems and Potential Impacts to Ground Water Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key challenges facing manufacturers of diesel engines for light- and heavy-duty vehicles is the development of technologies for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides, In this regard, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems represent control technology that can potentially achieve the NOx removal efficiencies required to meet new U.S. EPA standards. SCR systems rely on a bleed stream of urea solution into exhaust gases prior to catalytic reduction. While urea's role in this emission control technology is beneficial, in that it supports reduced NOx emissions, it can also be an environmental threat to ground water quality. This would occur if it is accidentally released to soils because once in that environmental medium, urea is subsequently converted to nitrate--which is regulated under the U.S. EPA's primary drinking water standards. Unfortunately, nitrate contamination of ground waters is already a significant problem across the U.S. Historically, the primary sources of nitrate in ground waters have been septic tanks and fertilizer applications. The basic concern over nitrate contamination is the potential health effects associated with drinking water containing elevated levels of nitrate. Specifically, consumption of nitrate-contaminated water can cause a blood disorder in infants known as methemoglobinemia.

Layton, D.

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater  

SciTech Connect

The following document is the final report for DE-FC26-05NT42327: Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater. This work was carried out under a cooperative agreement from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with additional funding from Keltech, Inc. The objective of the project was to improve the temperature control performance of an electric tankless water heater (TWH). The reason for doing this is to minimize or eliminate one of the barriers to wider adoption of the TWH. TWH use less energy than typical (storage) water heaters because of the elimination of standby losses, so wider adoption will lead to reduced energy consumption. The project was carried out by Building Solutions, Inc. (BSI), a small business based in Omaha, Nebraska. BSI partnered with Keltech, Inc., a manufacturer of electric tankless water heaters based in Delton, Michigan. Additional work was carried out by the University of Nebraska and Mike Coward. A background study revealed several advantages and disadvantages to TWH. Besides using less energy than storage heaters, TWH provide an endless supply of hot water, have a longer life, use less floor space, can be used at point-of-use, and are suitable as boosters to enable alternative water heating technologies, such as solar or heat-pump water heaters. Their disadvantages are their higher cost, large instantaneous power requirement, and poor temperature control. A test method was developed to quantify performance under a representative range of disturbances to flow rate and inlet temperature. A device capable of conducting this test was designed and built. Some heaters currently on the market were tested, and were found to perform quite poorly. A new controller was designed using model predictive control (MPC). This control method required an accurate dynamic model to be created and required significant tuning to the controller before good control was achieved. The MPC design was then implemented on a prototype heater that was being developed simultaneously with the controller development. (The prototype's geometry and components are based on a currently marketed heater, but several improvements have been made.) The MPC's temperature control performance was a vast improvement over the existing controller. With a benchmark for superior control performance established, five additional control methods were tested. One problem with MPC control is that it was found to be extremely difficult to implement in a TWH, so that it is unlikely to be widely adopted by manufacturers. Therefore the five additional control methods were selected based on their simplicity; each could be implemented by a typical manufacturer. It was found that one of these methods performed as well as MPC, or even better under many circumstances. This method uses a Feedback-Compensated Feed-Forward algorithm that was developed for this project. Due to its simplicity and excellent performance this method was selected as the controller of choice. A final higher-capacity prototype heater that uses Feedback-Compensated Feed-Forward control was constructed. This prototype has many improvements over the currently marketed heaters: (1) excellent control; (2) a modular design that allows for different capacity heaters to be built easily; (3) built-in fault detection and diagnosis; (4) a secondary remote user-interface; and (5) a TRIAC switching algorithm that will minimize 'flicker factor'. The design and engineering of this prototype unit will allow it to be built without an increase in cost, compared with the currently marketed heater. A design rendering of the new product is shown below. It will be launched with a new marketing campaign by Keltech in early 2009.

David Yuill

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of water's unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature TH{\\approx}232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization - including the size and structure of critical nuclei - has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase upon moving into the supercooled region according to a power law that would diverge at Ts{\\approx}225 K,(1,2) so there may be a link between water's thermodynamic anomalies and the crystallization rate of ice. But probing this link is challenging because fast crystallization prevents experimental studies of the liquid below TH. And while atomistic studies have captured water crystallization(3), the computational costs involved have so far prevented an assessment of the rates and mechanism involved. Here we report coarse-grained molecular simulations with the mW water model(4) in the supercooled regime around TH, which reveal that a sharp increase in the fraction of four-coordinated molecules in supercooled liquid water explains its anomalous thermodynamics and also controls the rate and mechanism of ice formation. The simulations reveal that the crystallization rate of water reaches a maximum around 225 K, below which ice nuclei form faster than liquid water can equilibrate. This implies a lower limit of metastability of liquid water just below TH and well above its glass transition temperature Tg{\\approx}136 K. By providing a relationship between the structural transformation in liquid water, its anomalous thermodynamics and its crystallization rate, this work provides a microscopic foundation to the experimental finding that the thermodynamics of water determines the rates of homogeneous nucleation of ice.(5)

Emily B. Moore; Valeria Molinero

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

272

Environmental effects of energy production and utilization in the U. S. Volume 3. Techniques for controlling emissions  

SciTech Connect

Technological, social, economic and political techniques for controlling emission are summarized for environmental pollutants introduced into air, water and land resources. Chemical, radiological and physical factors are discussed. (PCS)

Newkirk, H.W. (comp.)

1976-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

273

Environmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climatically important trace gas fluxes on regional and global scales, yet the magnitude of the transfer-generated turbulence in a shallow tidal sea, Nature, 400, 251­254. Raymond, P. A., and J. J. Cole (2001), Gas exchangeEnvironmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems

Ho, David

274

A reverse osmosis treatment process for produced water: optimization, process control, and renewable energy application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fresh water resources in many of the world's oil producing regions, such as western Texas, are scarce, while produced water from oil wells is plentiful, though unfit for most applications due to high salinity and other contamination. Disposing of this water is a great expense to oil producers. This research seeks to advance a technology developed to treat produced water by reverse osmosis and other means to render it suitable for agricultural or industrial use, while simultaneously reducing disposal costs. Pilot testing of the process thus far has demonstrated the technology's capability to produce good-quality water, but process optimization and control were yet to be fully addressed and are focuses of this work. Also, the use of renewable resources (wind and solar) are analyzed as potential power sources for the process, and an overview of reverse osmosis membrane fouling is presented. A computer model of the process was created using a dynamic simulator, Aspen Dynamics, to determine energy consumption of various process design alternatives, and to test control strategies. By preserving the mechanical energy of the concentrate stream of the reverse osmosis membrane, process energy requirements can be reduced several fold from that of the current configuration. Process control schemes utilizing basic feedback control methods with proportional-integral (PI) controllers are proposed, with the feasibility of the strategy for the most complex process design verified by successful dynamic simulation. A macro-driven spreadsheet was created to allow for quick and easy cost comparisons of renewable energy sources in a variety of locations. Using this tool, wind and solar costs were compared for cities in regions throughout Texas. The renewable energy resource showing the greatest potential was wind power, with the analysis showing that in windy regions such as the Texas Panhandle, wind-generated power costs are approximately equal to those generated with diesel fuel.

Mareth, Brett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Application Study of the Pump Water Flow Station for Building Energy Consumption Monitoring and Control Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new building energy monitoring and pump speed control method. The pump speed is controlled to maintain the system resistance at an optimized value to approach the best pump efficiency and save pump power. The system resistance can be obtained by the pump head and the water flow rate calculated by the pump water-flow station (PWS), which was recently developed. The PWS measures the water flow rate using the pump head, pump speed, and pump performance curve. This method has been experimentally proved in real HVAC systems. A case study was demonstrated in this paper for application of this new method in a Continuous Commissioning (CC) practice. The case study shows that the PWS can control the pump speed to maintain the optimized system operating point. It can also measure the water flow rate and monitor energy consumption continuously with low installation and almost no maintenance cost. The results show that the new technology can save pump power and increase pump efficiency significantly.

Liu, G.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Paying to pollute  

SciTech Connect

A levy on pollution is described in which the proceeds go to pollution abatement. This approach may complement application of strict emission standards, and is favored in a number of European countries. (CAJ)

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Coal-water slurry spray characteristics of an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been complete to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from a electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions 50% (by mass) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}, the break-up time was 0. 30 ms. An empirical correlation for both spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as the time and locations of the measurement. The time-averaged cone angle for the base case conditions was 13.6{degree}. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.

Caton, J.A.; Payne, S.E.; Terracina, D.P.; Kihm, K.D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

279

Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of pressurized water reactor steam-generator water-level control, designed for use within physically distributed testing environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A hardware-in-the-loop model was developed to represent digital sensing and control of steam generator water-level. The model was created with an intention to serve as… (more)

Brink, Michael Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

NETL: CCPI - TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2004) Environmental Reports TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control, Environmental Assessment PDF-847KB (Sept 2003) PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS Concrete...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Assembly fixture for cross-shaped control rods of boiling water nuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assembly fixture is disclosed for cross-shaped control rods of boiling-water nuclear reactors with an upper core grid mesh for holding a core cell formed of four fuel assemblies having a gap therebetween and means disposed beneath the reactor core for driving the control rods in the gap, including a frame having corners formed therein, the frame being substantially the size of a core cell and being disposable on the core grid, templates diagonally oppositely disposed on the frame and extending into the core cell for lateral guidance of the control rods, stops for the control rods disposed on the templates, and a carrying handle having a first portion thereof being pivotable at one of the corners of the frame and a second portion thereof being locked to an opposite corner of the frame in a disassembled condition and swung out of the locked condition in an assembled condition.

Lippert, H.J.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

282

THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMPOSITE CONTROL RODS FOR WATER-COOLED POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The phrase "composite control rod" is used to describe a hafnium-tipped titanium-boron control component with a titanium cladding. Blades for such cortrol rods were successfully prepared in cooperation with the Battelle Memorial Institute by a picture-frame rolling technique. The rolling packs, which are machined from type 304 stainless steel, contain slntered titanium boron and wrought hafnium core materials in a commercially pure titanium envelope. Such packs are evacuated, sealod off, and rolled at 16O0 F with a total reduction of 3/1 using 20% reduction per roll setting. Postfabrication treatments include mechanical removal of the stainless steel envelope, flat annealing, machining, and stress relief annealing. Data on the mechanical properties, corrosion performance, thermal cycling resistance, and irradiation damage resistance of composite control rod components are presented. This information strongly indicates that composite control rods will perform satisfactorily in water-coolod reactors. (aut)h

Ray, W.E.

1957-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of a Procedure for the Predictive Control Strategy of a Chilled Water Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage systems store the thermal energy produced by the chiller plant in periods of off-peak electrical demand or when cheaper electricity is available. The stored thermal energy is then withdrawn from the reservoir to satisfy cooling load during peak demand periods. This paper discusses the development of a simplified predictive control strategy for a 7000 ton-hour chilled water storage system serving a hospital. Control strategies are developed for both on-peak and off-peak months to minimize demand charges. By optimizing the operation of the building air handling units (AHUs), chilled water pumps, chiller plant and the thermal storage system, the storage tank is better charged while chiller run time is reduced. Both on-peak and off-peak electrical demands are expected to be reduced significantly.

Wei, G.; Sakuri, Y.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Visualizing microbial pollution in Santa Monica Bay with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and through field-testing a rapid, robust, field-portable water detection sensing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hic Information Systems (GIS) and Through Field - testing aEngineering, UCLA Introduction: GIS and rapid detection:water quality characterizi ng GIS is a powerful mapping tool

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

File:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Quality Control Act.pdf Water Quality Control Act.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Colorado Water Quality Control Act.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 413 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 69 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 14:23, 14 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 14:23, 14 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 69 pages (413 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs)

286

BWR (boiling-water reactor) radiation control: In-plant demonstration at Vermont Yankee: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of the RP1934 program, which was established by EPRI in 1981 to demonstrate the adequacy of BRAC program (RP819) principles for BWR radiation control at Vermont Yankee, are presented. Evaluations were performed of the effectiveness of optimization of purification system performance, control of feedwater dissolved oxygen concentrations, minimization of corrosion product and ionic transport, and improved startup, shutdown, and layup practices. The impact on shutdown radiation levels of these corrective actions was assessed based on extensive primary system radiation survey and component gamma scan data. Implementation of the BRAC recommendations was found to be insufficient to reduce the rate of activity buildup on out-of-core surfaces at Vermont Yankee, and additional corrective actions were found necessary. Specifically, replacement of cobalt-bearing materials in the control rod drive pins and rollers and feedwater regulating valves was pursued as was installation of electropolished 316 stainless steel during a recirculation piping replacement program. Aggressive programs to further reduce copper concentrations in the reactor water by improving condensate demineralizer efficiency and to minimize organic ingress to the power cycle by reducing organic concentrations in recycled radwaste also were undertaken. Evaluations of the impact on activity buildup of several pretreatment processes including prefilming in moist air, preexposure to high temperature water containing zinc, and electropolishing also were performed in a test loop installed in the reactor water cleanup system. A significant beneficial impact of electropolishing was shown to be present for periods up to 6000 hours.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Asbestos and silicate pollution (excluding workplace pollution). March 1987-December 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for March 1987-December 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the occurrence and effects of asbestos and silicate pollution outside of the workplace. Topics include increased cancer risk associated with asbestos pollution, and the hazards of silica-dust inhalation and silicate effects on water resources. Included are pollutant sources, and sampling techniques and test results of analyses of indoor air samples, drinking water, and ground water for these pollutants. Asbestos and silicate pollution in the workplace and asbestos-removal technology are considered in other bibliographies. (This updated bibliography contains 78 citations, 11 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Comparison of Control System Performance for Fossil-Fuel Fired Power Plants Using Emission Measurement Data from the Utility Industr y Information Collection Request for Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On On May 3, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 60 and 63: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-FuelFired Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam-Generating Units). The intent of this rulemaking is to set Maximum Achiev...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

289

ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

WILLIAMS, J.C.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Long-Term Benthic Macroinvertebrate Community Monitoring to Assess Pollution Abatement Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

The benthic macroinvertebrate community of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in East Tennessee was monitored for 18 years to evaluate the effectiveness of a water pollution control program implemented at a major United States (U.S.) Department of Energy facility. Several actions were implemented to reduce and control releases of pollutants into the headwaters of the stream. Four of the most significant actions were implemented during different time periods, which allowed assessment of each action. Macroinvertebrate samples were collected annually in April from three locations in EFPC (EFK24, EFK23, and EFK14) and two nearby reference streams from 1986 through 2003. Significant improvements occurred in the macroinvertebrate community at the headwater sites (EFK24 and EFK23) after implementation of each action, while changes detected 9 km further downstream (EFK14) could not be clearly attributed to any of the actions. Because the stream was impacted at its origin, invertebrate recolonization was primarily limited to aerial immigration, thus, recovery has been slow. As recovery progressed, abundances of small pollution-tolerant taxa (e.g., Orthocladiinae chironomids) decreased and longer lived taxa colonized (e.g., hydropsychid caddisflies, riffle beetles, Baetis). While assessments lasting three to four years may be long enough to detect a response to new pollution controls at highly impacted locations, more time may be needed to understand the full effects. Studies on the effectiveness of pollution controls can be improved if impacted and reference sites are selected to maximize spatial and temporal trending, and if a multidisciplinary approach is used to broadly assess environmental responses (e.g., water quality trends, invertebrate and fish community assessments, toxicity testing, etc.).

Smith, John G [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Christensen, Sigurd W [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Water Chemistry Control System for Recovery of Damaged and Degraded Spent Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the government of Serbia have led the project cosponsored by the U.S, Russia, European Commission, and others to repackage and repatriate approximately 8000 spent fuel elements from the RA reactor fuel storage basins at the VIN?A Institute of Nuclear Sciences to Russia for reprocessing. The repackaging and transportation activities were implemented by a Russian consortium which includes the Sosny Company, Tekhsnabeksport (TENEX) and Mayak Production Association. High activity of the water of the fuel storage basin posed serious risk and challenges to the fuel removal from storage containers and repackaging for transportation. The risk centered on personnel exposure, even above the basin water, due to the high water activity levels caused by Cs-137 leached from fuel elements with failed cladding. A team of engineers from the U.S. DOE-NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Vinca Institute, and the IAEA performed the design, development, and deployment of a compact underwater water chemistry control system (WCCS) to remove the Cs-137 from the basin water and enable personnel safety above the basin water for repackaging operations. Key elements of the WCCS system included filters, multiple columns containing an inorganic sorbent, submersible pumps and flow meters. All system components were designed to be remotely serviceable and replaceable. The system was assembled and successfully deployed at the Vinca basin to support the fuel removal and repackaging activities. Following the successful operations, the Cs-137 is now safely contained and consolidated on the zeolite sorbent used in the columns of the WCCS, and the fuel has been removed from the basins. This paper reviews the functional requirements, design, and deployment of the WCCS.

Sindelar, R.; Fisher, D.; Thomas, J.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

State Water Permit Regulation (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permit Regulation (Arkansas) Permit Regulation (Arkansas) State Water Permit Regulation (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality It is the purpose of this regulation to adopt standards applicable to the storage, discharge, or disposal of any waste which, if unregulated, will cause pollution of waters of the state or result in wastes being placed in a location where it is likely to cause pollution of the waters of the state. These standards are intended to protect public health and the environment, and prevent, control, or abate pollution. The State Water Permit Regulation is implemented to adopt standards applicable to the storage, discharge, or disposal of any waste that, if

293

Economic Development and Pollutants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper is to investigate the correlation of economic development and pollutants in Brazil from 1960 to 2008. This investigation is… (more)

Törnros, Sara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Air Pollution Project: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages SubjectContent Area: ScienceChemistry, Environment - Air Pollution Target Audience: High school chemistry...

295

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Control of Chilled Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loop chilled water pumps, condenser water pumps, and coolingsuch as 55°F, and lower condenser water temperatures such assizing ? Cooling tower and condenser optimization ? Variable

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

297

and Pollutant Safeguarding Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), integrates experimental and modeling research in order to understand the dispersion of airborne pollutants dispersion, indoor/outdoor air exchange, and building protection. Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group V V V experimental data (right), for tracer gas concentration at breathing height in a model atrium, demonstrating

298

Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Inst. of Resource Ecology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Galperin, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quality control of chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples must meet certain levels of accuracy and reliability to be useful for identifying geochemical processes in hydrothermal systems. Quality control is largely a concern for the analytical laboratory, but the geochemist or reservoir engineer using the chemical data must also be concerned with analytical quality. To test accuracy and reliability of analyses available from laboratories, splits of seven water samples were sent to four stable-isotope laboratories, and splits of five water samples were sent to four chemical laboratories. The analyses of each sample were compared among laboratories, and the differences in analyses were evaluated using criteria developed for this comparison. Isotopic compositions were considered reliable if they deviated from mean values by less than 2{per_thousand}, for hydrogen and by less than 0.15{per_thousand}, for oxygen. Concentrations of each chemical component were considered reliable if they differed from mean values by less than 10%. Chemical analyses were examined for internal consistency by calculating the error in ionic charge balance and the error between ionic charge and electrical conductivity. To be considered internally consistent, chemical analyses must have less than 5% error in charge balance and less than 10% error in conductivity balance. Three isotope laboratories gave consistent compositions of all samples. No chemical laboratory gave consistent analyses of all samples. Recommendations are made that provide the user of isotopic and chemical data with the ability to better evaluate the quality of analyses.

Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Pollution on the Federal Lands II: Water Pollution Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CWA for determining the quantities of oil and of hazardousthan reportable quantities of oil or a hazardous substance,for oil discharged in harmful quantities as apply to any

Glicksman, Robert L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Agency/Company /Organization: BOC foundation, U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: sei-international.org/rapidc/gapforum/html/emissions-manual.php Cost: Free Related Tools Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory World Induced Technical Change Hybrid (WITCH) Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A manual that provides formulation of methods and assessment of good

302

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable emissions standards and...

303

A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

non-point source pollution from land use activities, whichdiffuse pollution sources from land use activities (agland use Coyote Dam Abstractions for agricultural water use; industrial and urban pollution

Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Airflow and Pollutant Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational fluid dynamics flow diagram Computational fluid dynamics flow diagram Airflow and Pollutant Transport Research on airflow and pollutant transport integrates experimental and modeling research in order to understand the dispersion of airborne pollutants in buildings. The work applies to reducing health risks (for example, in the event of a toxic release in an occupied space), as well as to improving energy efficiency and occupant comfort. Investigators also conduct research to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment, and studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential

305

Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Results of the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment investigated the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered reactor accident. This experiment, which was carried out in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories, was performed under the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program. The DF-4 test is described herein and results from the experiment are presented. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B{sub 4}C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. Hydrogen generation was found to continue throughout the experiment, diminishing slightly following the relocation of molten oxidizing zircaloy to the lower extreme of the test bundle. A large blockage which was formed from this material continued to oxidize while steam was being fed into the the test bundle. The results of this test have provided information on the initial stages of core melt progression in BWR geometry involving the heatup and cladding oxidation stages of a severe accident and terminating at the point of melting and relocation of the metallic core components. The information is useful in modeling melt progression in BWR core geometry, and provides engineering insight into the key phenomena controlling these processes. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Tennessee Pollution Prevention Partnership | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

status, the Y-12 team developed and completed a five-project plan to help prevent pollution of air, land and water, while reducing waste and conserving natural resources....

308

Use of fish brain acetylcholinesterase to monitor pollution by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

of exposed fish. He suggested that this technique be used to monitor pollution in natural waters (4,5). Recovery to normal ipresent address: U. S. Army Corp of ...

309

Use of microalgae to remove pollutants from power plant discharges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for removing pollutants dissolved in the aqueous discharge of a plant, such as a power plant, from a body of water having known hydraulogy and physicochemical characteristics, the method comprising (a) modifying the hydraulic system of the body of water including use of physical barriers to define a zone in a portion of the body of water which zone includes the discharge point and where the water has a range of physicochemical characteristics; (b) selecting a large and preferably filamentous, planktonically growing strain of algae adapted to absorb the particular pollutants and genetically dominating algae at the physicochemical characteristics of the zone; (c) establishing a colony of the selected algal strain in the zone; (d) harvesting a portion of the colony; and (e) reinnoculating the zone near the discharge point with a fraction of the harvested portion. The fraction used for reinnoculation can be adjusted to balance the rate of pollutant removal to the rate of pollutant discharge.

Wilde, Edward W. (1833 Pisgah Rd., North Augusta, SC 29841); Benemann, John R. (2741 O' Harte, San Pablo, CA 94806); Weissman, Joseph C. (2086 N. Porpoise Pt. La., Vero Beach, FL 32963); Tillett, David M. (911-3 Coquina La., Vero Beach, FL 32963)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Role of Air Pollution in Decreasing Trends of Orographic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Role of Air Pollution in Decreasing Trends of Orographic Precipitation and Respective Water Resources Speaker(s): Daniel Rosenfeld Date: September 16, 2005 - 12:00pm Location:...

311

Best Practices for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Control of Chilled Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for cleanrooms and their adjacent spaces. Chillers 39% Cooling Towers 7% Pumps 17% MUAH + RCU Fans 9% Hot Water;chilled water pumps, secondary loop chilled water pumps, condenser water pumps, and cooling towers for water-cooled chillers. While nominal energy efficiency ratings of individual component influence

312

Spatial Water Balance in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water availability is critical to the economy in the state of Texas. Numerous reservoirs and conveyance structures have been constructed across the State to meet the water supply needs of farmers, municipalities, industries, and power generating facilities. Despite this extensive water management system, water supply remains a concern because of increasing populations and uncertainties about climate stability. The rainfall map of Texas shown in Figure 1.1 clearly shows that water management is a spatial problem. The State as a whole receives about 711 mm year-1 of rainfall, while the area of the State east of the 100th meridian receives 890 mm year-1 and the area west of the 100th meridian receives only 457 mm year-1. In addition to water supply concerns, the assessment of non-point source pollution is another important issue that is largely dependent on the spatial distribution of runoff. Although, the focus of this report is not to address water supply or pollution issues directly, an improved understanding of the spatial water balance - the partitioning of precipitation between evaporation, runoff, and groundwater recharge at different points in space - will directly benefit those who wish to assess water resource availability and non-point source pollution potential across the State. The goal of this study was to gain an improved understanding of the stocks of water in different components (air, soil, water bodies) of the hydrologic cycle and the fluxes between these components. A basic approach for determining stocks and fluxes involves the calculation of a water balance. A water balance, applied to a particular control volume, is an application of the law of conservation of mass which states that matter cannot be created or destroyed. To achieve a balance, the rate of change of storage of water within the control volume must be equal to the difference between its rates of inflow and outflow across the control surface. In this study, three independent water balance models were constructed to model different components of the hydrologic cycle - an atmospheric water balance, a soil-water balance, and a surface water balance. These models were constructed using a geographic information system (GIS). A GIS provides a framework for storing and manipulating spatial data and facilitates modeling on control volumes of various sizes and shapes. In all three cases, the choice of modeling unit was driven by the resolution and characteristics of the input data. The control volumes for the atmospheric, soil, and surface water balance models respectively are (1) an imaginary column confined horizontally by the boundary of Texas and extending to the 300 mb pressure level, (2) 0.5° cells with a depth equal to the plant-extractable water capacity of the soil, and (3) 166 gaged watersheds of differing sizes and shapes. Neither the atmospheric nor the surface water balance involve any simulation of physical processes and are simply mass balances based on empirical data. The soil-water balance does attempt to simulate evaporation from the soil through the use of a soil-moisture extraction function. Both the atmospheric and soil-water balance models are time-varying models, while the surface water balance model is steady-state and uses an empirical relationship to estimate mean annual runoff and evaporation in ungaged areas. One advantage of making three independent water balance calculations is that checks for consistency can be made among the three models. For example, all three models yield an estimate of actual evapotranspiration which is a difficult quantity to estimate, particularly at the regional scale. Previous studies at the scale of Texas have estimated only evaporation from open water surfaces and potential evapotranspiration from the land surface (TDWR, 1983; Dugas and Ainsworth, 1983).

Reed, Seann; Maidment, David; Patoux, Jerome

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

53 (2008) APPLICATIONS OF MATHEMATICS No. 5, 409432 MODELLING BIOREMEDIATION OF POLLUTED SOILS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a porous medium contaminated with some pollutant. The biomass grows feeding on the pollutant and affecting species in presence of a growing biomass feeding on the pollutant. In turn, the growing bacterial with a well-known bacterium. The biomass may distribute in water as suspension (free biomass) or attached

Primicerio, Mario

314

2-D Numerical Multimedia Environmental Analysis System (NMEAS) for pollution and risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All pollution issues involve potential impacts on the surrounding interconnected air, water, and soil (i.e., multimedia) environment. Effectively addressing a wide range of multimedia pollution problems is of crucial importance to major socioeconomic ... Keywords: Air emission, Environmental multimedia modeling, Fate of contaminants, Leachate, Numerical analysis, Pollution, Risk assessment, Spill of contaminants

Jing Yuan; Maria Elektorowicz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Simulating the Effect of Reducing the Non-point Source Pollution by Buffer Zone with SWMM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buffer was lately found efficient in reducing and storing non-point source pollution to improve the water quality of both surface runoff and drain outflows. While the importance of reducing the non-point source pollution is gaining recognition in contemporary ... Keywords: SWMM, buffer zone, ecological barriers, non-point source pollution

Li Bo, Shao Dong-guo, Song Min, Liu Yu-long

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Marine Casualty and Pollution Database -Facility Pollution for 2002 - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Pollution for 2002 - 2010 Facility Pollution for 2002 - 2010 Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Marine Casualty and Pollution Database -Facility Pollution for 2002 - 2010 Dataset Summary Description The Marine Casualty and Pollution Data files provide details about marine casualty and pollution incidents investigated by Coast Guard Offices throughout the United States. The database can be used to analyze marine accidents and pollution incidents by a variety of factors including vessel or facility type, injuries, fatalities, pollutant details, location, and date. The data collection period began in 1982 for marine casualties and 1973 for polluting incidents, and is ongoing. Documentation includes entity and attribute descriptions along with suggested solutions to general marine pollution, vessel casualty, and personnel injury and death questions.

317

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Control of Chilled Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MUAH + RCU Fans Pumps Cooling Towers Figure 1. Benchmarkedcondenser water pumps, and cooling towers for water-cooledRight sizing ? Cooling tower and condenser optimization ?

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Pollution of the environment  

SciTech Connect

This article is a general, theoretical overview of the problem of pollution as it will develop around the megalopolis societal structure of this country during the next two decades.

Revelle, R.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) Agency/Company /Organization: ICLEI Sector: Climate Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, - Anaerobic Digestion, Ground Source Heat Pumps, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, Wind, Transportation, Forestry, People and Policy, Water Conservation, Offsets and Certificates, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Guide/manual User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.icleiusa.org/action-center/tools/cappa-decision-support-tool/

320

Exploiting Bacterial Swarms for Optimal Coverage of Dynamic Pollutant Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with no clear gradient boundaries. Index Terms--Coverage Controller, Environmental Monitor- ing, Flocking. I. INTRODUCTION Accidentally released hazardous pollutant in the environ- ment could cost a lot of human lives especially if the pollutant is invisible. This is because humans would not have a point of reference upon

Hu, Huosheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Pacific Gas and Electric Company’s Comments on the State Water Resources Control Board’s Proposed Policy Water Quality Control Policy on the Use of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) supports the protection of California’s marine resources through development of a consistent statewide policy implementing Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act. As we have previously stated, we support efforts to transition away from once through cooling and have clearly demonstrated that support through the

Estuarine Waters; Power Plant Cooling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Point Source Discharges to Surface Waters (North Carolina) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Point Source Discharges to Surface Waters (North Carolina) Point Source Discharges to Surface Waters (North Carolina) Point Source Discharges to Surface Waters (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources This rule requires permits for control of sources of water pollution by providing the requirements and procedures for application and issuance of state National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for a discharge from an outlet, point source, or disposal system discharging to the surface waters of the state, and for the construction, entering a contract for construction, and operation of treatment works with such a

324

Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

preventing water pollution from motor vehicles would be muchgroundwater pollution; motor-vehicle transportation;the environmental costs of motor vehicle transportation in

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Auto-Calibration and Control Strategy Determination for a Variable-Speed Heat Pump Water Heater Using Optimization  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces applications of the GenOpt optimizer coupled with a vapor compression system model for auto-calibration and control strategy determination towards the development of a variable-speed ground-source heat pump water heating unit. The GenOpt optimizer can be linked with any simulation program using input and output text files. It effectively facilitates optimization runs. Using our GenOpt wrapper program, we can flexibly define objectives for optimizations, targets, and constraints. Those functionalities enable running extensive optimization cases for model calibration, configuration design and control strategy determination. In addition, we describe a methodology to improve prediction accuracy using functional calibration curves. Using the calibrated model, we investigated control strategies of the ground-source heat pump water heater, considering multiple control objectives, covering the entire operation range.

Shen, Bo [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water from Green River Oil Shale, 11 Chem. Ind. 1, 485 (Effluents from In-Situ Oil Shale Processing," in ProceedingsControl Technology for Oil Shale Retort Water," August 1978.

Fox, J.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Control of Mode and Intermediate Water Mass Properties in Drake Passage by the Amundsen Sea Low  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the physical properties of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the Drake Passage region is examined on time scales down to intraseasonal, within the 1969–2009 period. Both SAMW and AAIW ...

Sally E. Close; Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; Elaine L. McDonagh; Brian A. King; Martin Biuw; Lars Boehme

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Ceramic filter manufacturing in Northern Ghana : water storage and quality control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, Pure Home Water (PHW), a Ghana based non-profit organization working to provide affordable and safe drinking water to people in the Northern Region of Ghana, began the construction of a ceramic pot filter (CPF) ...

Kleiman, Shanti Lisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Mathematical modeling of chemical oil-soluble transport for water control in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High water-cut is a long-standing problem in the upstream petroleum industry. Typically one-fourth of the produced fluids from oil wells worldwide are hydrocarbons and the remaining is water. Self-selective in-situ gel formation is a new potential technology ... Keywords: Gelation, Numerical modeling, Porous media, Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate or tetramethoxysilane (TMOS), Water cut

H. Valiollahi; Z. Ziabakhsh; P. L. J. Zitha

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

On Factors Controlling AirWater Gas Exchange in a Large Tidal River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Estuarine Research Federation 2011 Abstract Air­water gas exchange is an important process in aquatic Introduction In rivers and estuaries, knowledge of air­water gas exchange is important for evaluating how floating domes. The opportunistic gas method relies on gases in the water that either occurred naturally (e

Ho, David

332

Pollution Prevention and NEPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Council on Environmental Quality AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of the President ACTION: Information only--Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act SUMMARY: This memorandum provides guidance to the federal agencies on incorporating pollution prevention principles, techniques, and mechanisms into their planning and decisionmaking processes and evaluating and reporting those efforts in documents prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lucinda Low Swartz, Deputy General Counsel, Council on Environmental Quality, 722 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20503. Telephone: 202/395-5754.

333

Status of Multi-Pollutant Process Development: LoTOx/BOC, GSA/FLS, Pahlmanite Cost Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent control of power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost-effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have the potential to reduce the emission rates for multiple pollutants simultaneously, with the goal of identifying integrate...

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Towards an Emissions Trading Scheme for Air Pollutants in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions trading schemes have great potential to lower pollution while minimizing compliance costs for firms in many areas now subject to traditional command-and-control regulation. This paper connects experience with ...

Duflo, Esther

335

Pollution in the home  

SciTech Connect

This paper dealt with two programs sponsored by the EPA. These programs were indoor air pollution research and radon research. The author discussed the major thrust of each program, the appropriations provided by congress, and the need to accelerate each programs' pace.

Dowd, R.M.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Information Handbook, DOE/EH-0077, Washington,s emission-factor handbook does not give emission factorsHandbook, Environmental Pollution and Control Factors, Third Edition, DOE/

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Synergies and conflicts in multimedia pollution control related to utility compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most analyses of utility strategies for meeting Title IV requirements in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 have focused on factors relating directly to utilities` sulfur dioxide control costs; however, there are a number of additional environmental requirements that utilities must meet at the same time they comply with the acid rain program. To illuminate the potential synergies and conflicts that these other regulatory mandates may have in connection with the acid rain program, it is necessary to conduct a thorough, simultaneous examination of the various programs. This report (1) reviews the environmental mandates that utilities must plant to meet in the next decade concurrently with those of the acid rain program, (2) evaluates the technologies that utilities may select to meet these requirements, (3) reviews the impacts of public utility regulation on the acid rain program, and (4) analyzes the interactions among the various programs for potential synergies and conflicts. Generally, this report finds that the lack of coordination among current and future regulatory programs may result in higher compliance costs than necessary. Failure to take advantage of cost-effective synergies and incremental compliance planning will increase control costs and reduce environmental benefits.

Bailey, K.A.; Loeb, A.P.; Formento, J.W.; South, D.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

OPTIMIZED CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR A TYPICAL WATER LOOP HEAT PUMP SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water Loop Heat Pump (WLHP) System has been widely utilized in the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) industry for several decades. There is no… (more)

Lian, Xu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in the marginal seas of Siberia: implications for the fate and removal of pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides have been widely used to trace the sources and fate of radioactive pollutants in the marine environment. In this study, particle-reactive radionuclides such as ... Ph and 214 Th have been employed for scavenging studies. The inventories of Pu and radiocesium and activity ratios of Pu (such as 238PU/239,24OPu) have been utilized to determine the sources and transport of anthropogenic pollutants. Water soluble tracers such as Ra isotopes and radiocesium have been used to determine the water mass movements as well as residence time of water masses. This will help to define the processes related to estuarine mixing over the continental shelf which control radioactive and other pollutants entering surface waters of the Arctic Ocean. 21OPb and 214 Th concentrations were measured in a suite of water samples (dissolved and particulate phases) from the marginal seas of the Russian Arctic (Pechora, Kara, Laptev, and East Siberian Seas) in order to better understand scavenging within the water column. To elucidate the sources of Pu and 131CS to the study area, Pu and "'Cs concentrations and 238PU/239,240puactivity ratios were measured in water samples. Concentrations of Ra isotopes were also determined for the estimation of the residence time of river water entering the Kara Sea. The model-derived scavenging parameters for 114 Th and "OPb clearly indicate particle concentrations, influenced by resuspension, ice melt, and continental runoff, primarily control the removal of these nuclides. Concentrations and inventories of Pu and "'Cs as well the activity ratio of "IpU/219,l4OpU suggest two main sources of Pu and "'Cs to the waters over the Siberian shelf. an oceanic source, likely from Sellafield and La Hague nuclear reprocessing plants, and a riverine source emanating from estuarine sediments . 21lpU/219,24OPu activity ratios suggest all of the Pu entering into shelf waters by way of Siberian rivers is from Global Fallout. The Pu concentrations are also primarily controlled by the particle concentrations in the water column. River water residence times for the surface and subsurface waters of the Kara Sea were estimated, using2l'Ra/22'Ra activity ratios, to be on the order of one year and 30 years, respectively.

Schwantes, Jon Michael

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Synergies and conflicts in multimedia pollution control related to utility compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

SciTech Connect

Most analyses of the alternative strategies used by utilities to comply with Title IV requirements have focused on factors directly related to controlling sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions. However, utilities must meet a number of additional environmental requirements at the same tune they comply with the acid rain program. To illuminate the potential synergies and conflicts that might exist between the other regulatory mandates and the acid rain program, a thorough examination of all the various programs and their interrelationships must be conducted. This paper reviews the environmental mandates that utilities will have to plan to meet in the next decade concurrently with the acid rain program, and it analyzes the interactions among the various programs to identify potential synergies and conflicts.

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Pollution control technical manual: modified 'in situ' oil shale retorting combined with Lurgi surface retorting. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The oil shale PCTM for Modified In Situ Oil Shale Retorting combined with Lurgi Surface Retorting addresses the application of this combination of technologies to the development of oil shale resources in the western United States. This manual describes the combined plant using Lurgi surface retorting technology (developed by Lurgi Kohle and Mineralotechnik GmbH, West Germany) and the Modified In Situ process (developed by Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.) proposed by Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. and Tenneco Shale Oil Company for use in the development of their Federal oil shale lease Tract C-b in western Colorado. Since details regarding waste streams and control technologies for the Lurgi process are presented in a separate PCTM, this document focuses principally on the Modified In Situ process.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

5 CCR 1001-5 Colorado Stationary Source Permitting and Air Pollution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 Colorado Stationary Source Permitting and Air Pollution Control Emission Notice Requirements Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: 5...

344

Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control are applicable to any stationary source that has the potential to emit any federally regulated air pollutant. The purpose and intent of Regulation 19, as amended, is to provide a clear delineation of those

345

Resource Recovery of Coal Bed Methane Formation Water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the excavation of natural gas, petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted brine water, termed production water, is drawn from the coal bed methane formations (CBMF) along with the… (more)

Bishop, Catherine Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Microbiology of thermally polluted environments. Technical progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1974  

SciTech Connect

Thermal pollution is discussed with regard to sources of manmade thermal water; thermal consequences of thermal pollution; and thermal effects on water quality. Natural habitats receiving thermal additions are discussed with regard to geothermal habitats and geothermal modification of normal aquatic ecosystems. Ecological observations on geothermal habitats include upper temperature limits for various taxonomic groups and consequences of species restriction by temperature. General ecological consequences of thermal polution are discussed with regard to differences between thermal effects on cold and warm water habitats; adaptation to the thermal environment; effect of temperature on gruwth rate; temperatare and water quality; and bacterial indicators of thermal pollution. (HLW)

Brock, T.D.

1974-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Water Reactor Chemical Volume and Control System and Steam Generator Blowdown Resins and Filters Sourcebook: 2013 Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of ion exchange practices within the industry for the removal of soluble and insoluble contaminants and filtration practices for the removal of insoluble contaminants is important for providing insight into beneficial practices as well as conditions to avoid. This report includes information on system descriptions, system operating practices, resins, and filters used in pressurized water reactor (PWR) chemical volume and control, makeup purification, and steam generator blowdown ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

Light Reflection from Water Waves: Suitable Setup for a Polarimetric Investigation under Controlled Laboratory Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reflection of sunlight from a wavy water surface, often referred to as sun glint, is a well-known phenomenon that presents challenges but also hitherto untapped opportunities in remote sensing based on satellite imagery. Despite being ...

Matteo Ottaviani; Knut Stamnes; Jeff Koskulics; Hans Eide; Steven R. Long; Wenying Su; Warren Wiscombe

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Application of Ion Concentration Polarization to Water Desalination and Active Control of Analytes in Paper.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on the development of two new applications using ion concentration polarization (ICP): an out-of-plane microfluidic approach for water desalination and a method… (more)

Pei, Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Automated Quality Control Procedure for the "Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground" Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow water equivalent (SWE) has been measured daily by the United States National Weather Service since 1952, whenever snow depth is 2 in. (5 cm) or greater. These data are used to develop design snow loads for buildings, for hydrological ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin; Daniel S. Wilks; Megan McKay; Richard P. Cember

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Ozone, Air Pollution, and Respiratory Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the outdoor air pollutants regulated by the Clean Air Act of 1970 (and recently revised in 1990), ozone has been the one pollutant most difficult to control within the federal standards. The known human health effects are all on the respiratory system. At concentrations of ozone which occur during summer air-pollution episodes in many urban metropolitan areas of the United States, a portion of the healthy population is likely to experience symptoms and reversible effects on lung function, particularly if exercising heavily outdoors. More prolonged increase in airway responsiveness and the presence of inflammatory cells and mediators in the airway lining fluid may also result from these naturally occurring exposures. Serial exposures to peak levels of ozone on several consecutive days are more characteristic of pollution episodes in the Northeast United States and may be associated with recurrent symptoms. No "high-risk " or more sensitive group has been found, in contrast to the case of sulfur dioxide, to which asthmatics are more susceptible than normals. The occurrence of multiple exposure episodes within a single year over many years in some areas of California has led to studies looking for chronic effects of ozone exposure on the lung. To date, no conclusive studies have been reported, although further work is under way. Much of what we know about the effects of this gas on the lung are based on controlled exposures to pure gas within an environmental exposure laboratory. Interactions between substances which commonly co-occur in air-pollution episodes are also under investigation.

William S

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system for a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with quartz windows. High speed movies, detailed data for fuel line pressures and needle lift signals were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base case conditions (50% by mass) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m'), the break-up time was 0.30 msec. An empirical correlation for both spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity was developed. For the base case conditions, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Results of this research and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry.

Payne, Stephen Ellis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Anti-pollution equipment  

SciTech Connect

A barrier for the containment and recovery of oil spilled on water comprises a first buoyant air chamber, a ballast water chamber, an oil and water discharge tube and a second buoyant air chamber. The first air chamber has a plurality of sections of reduced diameter, which together with the ballast water chamber define a series of weirs for oil and water to pass into gallery formed by the ballast water chamber, the oil and water discharge tube and the second air chamber. Pumps may be provided in the oil and water discharge tube to remove oil from the gallery. The second air chamber provides buoyancy to maintain the optimum configuration of the weirs.

Webb, M.G.

1982-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

354

Multi-Pollutant Legislation and Regulations (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The 108th Congress proposed and debated a variety of bills addressing pollution control at electric power plants but did not pass any of them into law. In addition, the EPA currently is preparing two regulationsa proposed Clean Air Interstate Rule (pCAIR) and a Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR)to address emissions from coal-fired power plants. Several States also have taken legislative actions to limit pollutants from power plants in their jurisdictions. This section discusses three Congressional air pollution bills and the EPAs pCAIR and CAMR regulations.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

GRR/Section 14-CO-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution CO-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CO-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14COANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14COANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Nonpoint source pollution comes from many diffuse sources. Generally, nonpoint source pollution is caused by rainfall or snowmelt moving over and

356

GRR/Section 14-UT-b - Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-b - Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System GRR/Section 14-UT-b - Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-b - Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System 14UTBUtahPollutantDischargeEliminationSystemPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Quality Utah Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies R317-2-3 Antidegradation Policy R317-8 Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (UPDES) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTBUtahPollutantDischargeEliminationSystemPermit.pdf 14UTBUtahPollutantDischargeEliminationSystemPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

357

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Moisture and combustion products  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, moisture and combustion pollutants, are examined. A companion paper examines volatile organic compounds and radon. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. Moisture control puts significant restrictions on a ventilation system. The system should function continuously (averaged over days) and distribute ventilation throughout the habitable space. Combustion sources require task ventilation that functions reliably.

Hadlich, D.E.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

359

Controlling Accumulation of Fermentation Inhibitors in Biorefinery Recycle Water Using Microbial Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Background Microbial fuel cells (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cells are electrical devices that treat water using microorganisms and convert soluble organic matter into electricity and hydrogen, respectively. Emerging cellulosic biorefineries are expected to use large amounts of water during production of ethanol. Pretreatment of cellulosic biomass results in production of fermentation inhibitors which accumulate in process water and make the water recycle process difficult. Use of MFCs to remove the inhibitory sugar and lignin degradation products from recycle water is investigated in this study. Results Use of an MFC to reduce the levels of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, vanillic acid, 4- hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxyacetophenone while simultaneously producing electricity is demonstrated here. An integrated MFC design approach was used which resulted in high power densities for the MFC, reaching up to 3700mW/m2 (356W/m3 net anode volume) and a coulombic efficiency of 69%. The exoelectrogenic microbial consortium enriched in the anode was characterized using a 16S rRNA clone library method. A unique exoelectrogenic microbial consortium dominated by -Proteobacteria (50%), along with -Proteobacteria (28%), -Proteobacteria (14%), -Proteobacteria (6%) and others was identified. The consortium demonstrated broad substrate specificity, ability to handle high inhibitor concentrations (5 to 20mM) with near complete removal, while maintaining long-term stability with respect to power production. Conclusions Use of MFCs for removing fermentation inhibitors has implications for: 1) enabling higher ethanol yields at high biomass loading in cellulosic ethanol biorefineries, 2) improved water recycle and 3) electricity production up to 25% of total biorefinery power needs.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Leak, David [Imperial College, London; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Andras, Calin [Imperial College, London

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Guidance on Applying Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PA ( PA ( I S I MI 1413 EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 722 JACKSON PLACE, N.W. WASHINGTON, D.C. 20006 November 17, 1980 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF AGENCIES SUBJECT: Guidance on Applying Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act To Federal Projects Which Involve the Discharge of Dredged or Fill Materials into Waters of the U . S . , Including Wetlands I. Introduct ion This memorandum establishes procedures for coordinating agency views and formulating Administration policy prior to requesting Congressional action on projects that may be subject to Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act (Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended). The memorandum is also in further- ance of Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Stand-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Water injection into a Low-Permeability Rock - 2: Control Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part 1, we have demonstrated the inevitable growth of the fluid injection hydrofractures in low-permeability rocks. Thus, a smart controller that manages fluid injection in the presence of hydrofracture extension is highly desirable. Such a controller will be an essential part of automated waterflood project surveillance and control. Here we design an optimal injection controller using methods of optimal control theory. The controller inputs are the history of the injection pressure and the cumulative injection, along with the fracture size. The output parameter is the injection pressure and the control objective is the injection rate. We demonstrate that the optimal injection pressure depends not only on the instantaneous measurements, but it is determined by the whole history of the injection and of the fracture area growth. We show the controller robustness when the inputs are delayed and noisy and when the fracture undergoes abrupt extensions. Finally, we propose a procedure that allows estimation of the hydrofracture size at no additional cost.

Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

EUROPEAN COMMISSION Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-intensive or faster fiber carbonization processes, such as microwave or plasma processing. In addition to improved: Hydrogen production system based on centralized biomass gasification technology producing hydrogen

Columbia University

363

The application of the ISO 11064 for deep water platform control centre design: benefits and limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an ergonomic intervention in the design of the control centre of two floating production storage vessels. It also discusses the application of ISO 11064 standard used throughout this intervention. The results show that the specifications ...

Francisco Duarte; José Marçal Jackson Filho; Francisco de Paula Antunes Lima; Nora de Castro Maia

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Innovation in Storm Water and Oil Spill Control Techniques for Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities must comply with a wide range of state and federal regulatory policies. One regulation of particular concern to electric utilities in the United States is the Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) Rule (40 CFR Part 112). This regulation, administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), requires some facilities that produce, store, or use oil to implement oil spill control measures. Explosive failure of secondary electrical equipment such as small transforme...

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

365

Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Climate Policies Environmental Regulations Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Air Quality Control Act (AQCA) is a set of environmental regulations, permitting requirements, and air quality standards that control the amount of pollutants emitted and who emits them. The AQCA

366

Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Effectiveness of a participatory modeling effort to identify and advance community water resource goals in St. Albans, Vermont  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural resource managers face complex challenges in addressing non-point source water pollution. A participatory modeling approach was applied in the St. Albans Bay watershed to identify the most effective phosphorus control options to achieve the load ... Keywords: Lake Champlain, Natural resource planning, Participatory modeling, Social dynamics, Watershed model

Erica J. Brown Gaddis; Hilary Harp Falk; Clare Ginger; Alexey Voinov

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO[sub x] concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO{sub x} concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Silvicultural Activities in Relation to Water Quality in Texas: An Assesment of Potential Problems and Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern forests are expected to supply a large portion of the Nation's future timber requirement. Projected demands on southern forests continue to exceed allowable cut. As an outgrowth of this demand, intensive management of pine forests enabled the South to produce 45 percent of the Nation's timber harvest in 1970 (USDA, Forest Service, 1973). The Southern Forest Resource Analysis Committee (1969) stated that, if projected timber needs of the year 2000 are to be met, at least ten million acres of bare or poorly stocked land must be planted with pine by 1985 and another twenty million acres converted from low-grade hardwoods to pine. The challenge facing forestry in the South is how to meet this increased demand and maintain an acceptable forest environment in the face of increased taxes, rising labor and equipment costs and predicted petroleum shortages. Undisturbed forests are generally recognized as primary sources of high quality water. Although the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 (Public Law No. 92-500) make pollution from forest practices increasingly more important, the effects of these practices on water quality are not known for East Texas. The quality of streamflow from forested watersheds fluctuates constantly in response to natural stress, and can be influenced greatly by man's activities. Forest management practices can potentially influence the following water quality parameters: (1) sediment, (2) nutrients, (3) temperature, (4) dissolved oxygen/organic matter, and (5) introduced chemicals. It must be realized from the onset that sediment due to geologic erosion is a natural component of fresh water streams and that high concentrations may have occurred naturally for short periods due to perturbations in the ecosystem such as wildfires. Sediment is not necessarily a pollutant and only becomes one when it can be demonstrated that it is exceeding natural levels and is interfering with the beneficial use of water. A certain amount of sediment and nutrients are needed in Gulf Bays and Estuaries to maintain their productivity (Mathewson and Minter, 1976; Diener, 1964; Ketchum, 1967). Texas does not have a stream water quality standard for sediment and due to the complexities involved will probably not develop one. Thus, sediment as used in this report, becomes important: (1) as a carrier of plant nutrients and forest chemicals, and (2) in that practices which reduce sediment loss will usually reduce nutrient, organic matter and introduced chemical losses and prevent water temperature increases, as well. This report is the result of an interagency contract between Texas Department of Water Resources, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Texas Water Resources Institute to: (1) develop an overview of commercial forests and forestry operations in Texas, (2) identify, describe and characterize control strategies for nonpoint sources of pollution from silvicultural activities, and (3) develop and demonstrate a methodology for selecting control strategies in given problem situations. The following topics are covered: (1) an overview of forestry in East Texas, (2) silvicultural practices and nonpoint sources of pollution, (3) control strategies, (4) methodology for the selection of control strategies, (5) institutional aspects of controlling silvicultural nonpoint source pollution, (6) ongoing research and research needs, and (7) hydrology of East Texas. It is important to recognize that this report does not specify that nonpoint pollution from forestlands in East Texas is a problem. Likewise, the report does not set pollution control goals or criteria that should be met by a control plan, since this is the responsibility of the State. In areas where a potential nonpoint pollution problem exists; the suggested control strategies should be useful in selecting control measures that are appropriate to the special conditions imposed by differences in climate, soil, topography, and forest practice.

Blackburn, W. H.; Hickman, C. A.; deSteiguer, J. E.; Jackson, B. D.; Blume, T. A.; DeHaven, M. G.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Technical Evaluation of Emerging Integrated Environmental Control Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems to remove multiple pollutants. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have the potential to reduce multiple pollutants simultaneously with the goal of developing in...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

Hybrid regional air pollution models  

SciTech Connect

This discussion deals with a family of air quality models for predicting and analyzing the fine particulate loading in the atmosphere, for assessing the extent and degree of visibility impairment, and for determining the potential of pollutants for increasing the acidity of soils and water. The major horizontal scales of interest are from 400km to 2000km; and the time scales may vary from several hours, to days, weeks, and a few months or years, depending on the EPA regulations being addressed. First the role air quality models play in the general family of atmospheric simulation models is described. Then, the characteristics of a well-designed, comprehensive air quality model are discussed. Following this, the specific objectives of this workshop are outlined, and their modeling implications are summarized. There are significant modeling differences produced by the choice of the coordinate system, whether it be the fixed Eulerian system, the moving Lagrangian system, or some hybrid of the two. These three systems are briefly discussed, and a list of hybrid models that are currently in use are given. Finally, the PNL regional transport model is outlined and a number of research needs are listed.

Drake, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Development, calibration and evaluation of two mathematical models for pollutant transport in a small river  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present research has two main objectives (1) to build two models for concentration prediction in a stream subject to a pollutant release and (2) to investigate options for estimating the parameters of the models. The models rely on the fundamental ... Keywords: Advection-dispersion equation, Dispersion coefficient estimation, Murray Burn, Pollutant transport modelling, River water quality, Tracer experiments, Velocity estimation

Elisabeta-Cristina Ani; Steve Wallis; Andrzej Kraslawski; Paul Serban Agachi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Abatement of Air Pollution: Distributed Generators (Connecticut) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distributed Generators (Connecticut) Distributed Generators (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Distributed Generators (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

376

Feasibility and Importance of an Automatic Controller for Solar Hot Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Being a developing country, Bangladesh has a very poor condition in terms of generating electricity. Alongside, natural resources like fuel and coal are in limited amount and will not be able to sustain forever. As a result, sustainable energy is starting ... Keywords: automatic, solar, heater, controller, microcontroller, relay, LCD, valve

M. R. Hasan; A. Rahman; A. Azad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Multipollutant Emission Control Technology Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency is charged by Congress with protecting the nation's land, air, and water resources. Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. To meet this mandate, EPA's research program is providing data and technical support for solving environmental problems today and building a science knowledge base necessary to manage our ecological resources wisely, understand how pollutants affect our health, and prevent or reduce environmental risks in the future. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory is the agency’s center for investigation of technological and management approaches for reducing risks from threats to human health and the environment. The focus of the laboratory's research program is on methods for the prevention and control of pollution to air, land, water, and subsurface resources, protection of water quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites and groundwater; and prevention and control of indoor air pollution. The goal of this research effort is to catalyze development and implementation of innovative, cost-effective environmental technologies; develop scientific and engineering information needed by EPA to support regulatory and policy decisions; and provide technical support and information transfer to ensure effective implementation of environmental regulations and strategies. This publication has been produced as part of the laboratory's strategic long-term research plan. It is published and made available by EPA's Office of Research and Development to assist the user community and to link researchers with their clients.

For Coal-fired Power Plants Foreword; Sally Gutierrez Director

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Control strategies for mitigation of oil-shale-related-water quality concerns  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive study of in situ retorting at the Logan Wash has indicated the importance of developing baseline information including raw shale characterization, the elucidation of mineralogical and chemical controls on trace element mobilities from shales subjected to in situ processing, and the research necessary to identify strategies for control of recognized environmental impacts. It is impossible to assess the magnitude of trace element releases to be expected from a commercial in situ facility once banks of retorts or the entire facility is abandoned and dewatering of the area is concluded. However, laboratory-scale studies can indeed identify the relative environmental acceptability of spent shale materials generated by in situ processing. In this research, an attempt was made to relate mineralogy and leaching behavior of field-generated materials with leachate composition and solution chemical processes. The interaction of these factors will ultimately affect the impact of in situ processing on surface and groundwater quality.

Peterson, E.J.; Wagner, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Use of microalgae to remove pollutants from power plant discharges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system are described for removing pollutants dissolved in the aqueous discharge of a plant, such as a power plant, from a body of water having known hydraulic and physicochemical characteristics, the method comprising (a) modifying the hydraulic system of the body of water including use of physical barriers to define a zone in a portion of the body of water which zone includes the discharge point and where the water has a range of physicochemical characteristics; (b) selecting a large and preferably filamentous, planktonically growing strain of algae adapted to absorb the particular pollutants and genetically dominating algae at the physicochemical characteristics of the zone; (c) establishing a colony of the selected algal strain in the zone; (d) harvesting a portion of the colony; and (e) reinoculating the zone near the discharge point with a fraction of the harvested portion. The fraction used for reinoculation can be adjusted to balance the rate of pollutant removal to the rate of pollutant discharge. 4 figures.

Wilde, E.W.; Benemann, J.R.; Weissman, J.C.; Tillett, D.M.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Guidance on Incorporating EPA's Pollution Prevention Strategy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review Process The guidance discusses the Environmental Protection Agency's definition of pollution prevention; how to incorporate pollution prevention into the EPA...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Integrated Approach to Mercury Control This project will demonstrate a novel multi-pollutant control technology for coal-fired power plants that can reduce...

382

Integrated Emissions Control -- Process Review Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of multi-pollutant control processes previously evaluated in EPRI report 1006876, "Integrated Emissions Control -- Process Review."

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Regulations for the Rhode Island Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations aim to protect surface water from pollutant discharges. They describe allowable discharges in the state that are subject to permits, discharges which may be made without permits,...

384

GRR/Section 14-MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14MTANonpointSourcePollution (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Watershed Coordination Council United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTANonpointSourcePollution (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution is the state's single largest source of

385

GRR/Section 14-UT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution UT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14UTANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In Utah, nonpoint source pollution is now handled though the watershed approach. "Adding a watershed approach has been a logical step in the

386

Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri) Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri) Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources The public policy of the state of Missouri is to conserve the waters of the state and to protect, maintain, and improve their quality for public water supplies and for domestic, agricultural, industrial, recreational and other legitimate beneficial uses and for the propagation of wildlife, fish and aquatic life, as well as to provide for the prevention, abatement, and control of new or existing water pollution. No waste may be discharged into

387

GRR/Section 14-TX-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-TX-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution GRR/Section 14-TX-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-TX-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14TXANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act CWA §319(b) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14TXANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Texas Nonpoint Source Management Program (Management Program) is required under the Clean Water Act(CWA), specifically CWA §319(b). The

388

Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Underground Injection Control Code (UIC code) is adopted pursuant to the provisions of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-5-11). It is the purpose of this UIC Code to adopt underground injection control (UIC) regulations necessary to qualify the State of Arkansas to retain authorization for its Underground Injection Control Program pursuant to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as amended; 42 USC 300f et seq. In order

389

Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Prevention Pollution Prevention Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention Sustainable Acquisition Electronics Stewardship Recycling Reuse Outreach Awards News About Pollution Prevention 13,051 lbs of Carpet Sent for Reuse Forklift carrying carpet on pallet Sandia Awarded for Electronics Stewardship Electronics Stewardship Award Zero Waste Lunch Goes Beyond Recycling Zero Waste Station No More Green Waste in the Landfill Dup truck dumping green waste Recycling Lead Acid Batteries Responsibly Lead Acid Batteries 39,000 Pounds of Ceiling Tiles Recycled Ceiling tile shipment for recycling Sustainable Acquisition Icon Sustainable Acquisition Greening the supply chain Electronics Stewardship Icon Electronics Stewardship Managing the full life-cycle Outreach Icon Outreach Teaming with our community Recycling Icon

390

Toxic Pollution Prevention Act (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the purpose of this Act to reduce the disposal and release of toxic substances which may have adverse and serious health and environmental effects, to promote toxic pollution prevention as...

391

Fairness in the Air: California's Air Pollution Hearing Boards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landfill gas control or processing facility, sewage treatment works, or water delivery operation,operation of the gas gathering and control systems at the landfill."

Manaster, Kenneth A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Analysis of the environmental control technology for oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

The environmental control technology proposed in the various oil shale projects which are under development are examined. The technologies for control of air pollution, water pollution, and for the disposal, stabilization, and vegetation of the processed shale were thoroughly investigated. Although some difficulties may be encountered in any of these undertakings, it seems clear that the air and water pollution problems can be solved to meet any applicable standard. There are no published national standards against which to judge the stabilization and vegetation of the processed shale. However, based on the goal of producing an environmentally and aesthetically acceptable finished processed shale pile, it seems probable that this can be accomplished. It is concluded that the environmental control technology is available to meet all current legal requirements. This was not the case before Colorado changed their applicable Air Pollution regulations in August of 1977; the previous ones for the oil shale region were sufficiently stringent to have caused a problem for the current stage of oil shale development. Similarly, the federal air-quality, non-deterioration regulations could be interpreted in the future in ways which would be difficult for the oil shale industry to comply with. The Utah water-quality, non-deterioration regulations could also be a problem. Thus, the only specific regulations which may be a problem are the non-deterioration parts of air and water quality regulations. The unresolved areas of environmental concern with oil shale processing are mostly for the problems not covered by existing environmental law, e.g., trace metals, polynuclear organics, ground water-quality changes, etc. These may be problems, but no evidence is yet available that these problems will prevent the successful commercialization of oil shale production.

de Nevers, N.; Eckhoff, D.; Swanson, S.; Glenne, B.; Wagner, F.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Synchronized droplet size measurements for coal-water-slurry (CWS) diesel sprays of an electronically-controlled fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique was used to measure the spray diameters (Sauter mean diameter, SMD) assuming the Rosin-Rammler two parameter model. In order to ensure an accurate synchronization of the measurement with the intermittent sprays, a new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. Injection pressures ranging from 28 to 110 MPa, two different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2 ad 0.4 mm, and four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm from the nozzle orifice were studied. Measurements were made for pressurized (2.0 MPa in gauge) and for ambient chamber conditions. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. A correlation of the Sauter mean diameter with the injection conditions was determined. The results were also compared with previous SMD correlations that were available only for diesel fuel sprays.

Kihm, K.D.; Terracina, D.P.; Payne, S.E.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Zone based indoor mobile air pollution monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollution is one of the main problems that humans are suffering from. Moreover air pollution is one of the hardest to escape. Although human spend most of their time indoor, most of the previous pollution monitoring studies focused on outdoor air monitoring. ... Keywords: indoor pollution, mobile sensing, nfc

Noura Alhakbani, Eiman Kanjo

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment: Foundation of pollution prevention for waste management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to promote the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) technique as a fundamental of pollution prevention for waste management. All key elements of an effective PPOA program are presented. These key elements include impacts of environmental laws on pollution prevention, PPOA concepts and overview, waste minimization opportunities assessment, reporting and monitoring waste minimization progress, and PPOA program implementation. As environmental laws evolve the focus is shifting from end-of-pipe pollution control to front-end source reduction. Waste minimization was mistakenly interpreted to mean the reduction of hazardous waste after generation in the past. The Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has clearly defined its requirement on resource reduction. Waste reduction can be viewed as a criterion to assess all industrial processes and operations. The fundamental approach of PPOA focuses on a mass balance concept. This concept deals with tracking of chemicals from the point of purchase, through storage, utilization in the process, and waste generation at the end of process. In other words, PPOA is a technique to analyze this input/output process. By applying PPOA techniques, the framework of applicable compliance requirements to the current operation process is established. Furthermore, documentation of PPOA itself can meet as documentation requirements for environmental compliance. In general, the PPOA process consists of two phases. The first phase involves input and output process description and waste characterization. The second phase is an opportunities assessment for waste minimization from input/output waste characterization. These two phases are explained in detail in the paper.

Damewood, R.W.

1994-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Pollution Prevention at Brookhaven - Environmental Protection Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Prevention Pollution Prevention at Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL Pollution Prevention Program Description Pollution Prevention Regulations and Policies Cost Savings from Pollution Prevention & Recycling Initiatives Recycling Program Information BNL Recycles by the TON...recycling statistics BNL Energy Challenge Executive Order 13514 and Site Sustainability Plans Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance Pollution Prevention Funding Opportunities P2 Proposal Form Pollution Prevention Awards Program DOE, BNL, and external Buying "Green" Products Information on Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Other P2 Resources/Databases Other P2 websites of interest How Do I Manage This Waste Stream? How-to advice on long list of common wastes

397

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on AddThis.com... Pollutants and Health Pollutants emitted from burning conventional and alternative fuels fall into two categories: Criteria and Non-Criteria pollutants. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

398

GRR/Section 6-CA-b - Construction Storm Water Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-CA-b - Construction Storm Water Program 6-CA-b - Construction Storm Water Program < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-CA-b - Construction Storm Water Program 06CABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California State Water Resources Control Board Regulations & Policies 40 CFR 122.2: Definitions Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06CABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Construction activities requiring a Construction Storm Water General Permit must submit a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan and a Construction

399

Applying Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act to Federal Projects Which  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applying Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act to Federal Projects Applying Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act to Federal Projects Which Involve the Discharge of Dredged or Fill Materials into Waters of the U.S., Including Wetlands Applying Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act to Federal Projects Which Involve the Discharge of Dredged or Fill Materials into Waters of the U.S., Including Wetlands This Council on Environmental Quality memorandum establishes procedures for coordinating agency views and formulating Administration policy prior to requesting Congressional action on projects that may be subject to Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act (Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended). Guidance on Applying Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act To Federal Projects Which Involve the Discharge of Dredged or Fill Materials into

400

Resource conservation and pollution prevention through process optimization at Sandia National Laboratories` Steam Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Plant at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) supplies on average 680,000 kg/day (1.5 x 10{sup 6} lb/day) of saturated steam for space heating and laboratory processes for SNL/NM, Technical Area 1, the eastern portion of Kirtland Air Force Base, the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Office, and the KAFB Coronado Club. The primary fuel is natural gas (740 mscf/yr); the secondary fuel in the event of a natural gas interruption is diesel fuel. Two storage tanks provide a diesel fuel reserve of 1.5 million gallons. The Steam Plant has been in continuous operation since 1949, and some of the boilers are past their design life. Each of the boilers is controlled through a central Digital Control System (DCS). The DCS design is based on the stoichiometric equation, where the O{sub 2} stack concentration and load rate are set points and the combustion air and gas flow are adjusted based on the equation. The DCS was installed and programmed in 1992, but has not been updated since. Long range studies are being conducted to determine the fate of the steam plant, but implementation of any of these options is at least 5 years in the future. Because it is a major source of air emissions, water and chemical use, and waste water at SNL/NM, the steam plant pursued immediate solutions to reduce costs and pollutant releases, while still providing uninterrupted, quality service to its customers. This paper will summarize the ongoing efforts to conserve water, and reduce air and wastewater discharges at the SNL/NM Steam Plant. These improvements were identified through a Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment, an Emissions Reduction Study.

Evans, C.; Chavez, C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Environmental Evaluation on Atmosphere Radioactive Pollution of Uranium Mine Shaft Ventilation Exhausts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on calculation and evaluation on atmosphere radioactive pollution of uranium mine well ventilation exhaust gas is presented in this paper. Neutral atmosphere conditions were taken into consideration. Nuclear industry standards on safety protection ... Keywords: atmosphere pollution, radiation protection, environmental evaluation, control methods

Dong Xie; Zehua Liu; Jun Xiong; Jianxiang Liu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Supercomputers: Super-polluters?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and controlling operating cost, energy efficiency has been anew levels of energy efficiency and first- cost savings.and Energy Efficiency Survey. ” ranges of environmental conditions setby ASHRAE represents a low cost

Mills, Evan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Deemed Savings Estimates for Legacy Air Conditioning and WaterHeating Direct Load Control Programs in PJM Region  

SciTech Connect

During 2005 and 2006, the PJM Interconnection (PJM) Load Analysis Subcommittee (LAS) examined ways to reduce the costs and improve the effectiveness of its existing measurement and verification (M&V) protocols for Direct Load Control (DLC) programs. The current M&V protocol requires that a PURPA-compliant Load Research study be conducted every five years for each Load-Serving Entity (LSE). The current M&V protocol is expensive to implement and administer particularly for mature load control programs, some of which are marginally cost-effective. There was growing evidence that some LSEs were mothballing or dropping their DLC programs in lieu of incurring the expense associated with the M&V. This project had several objectives: (1) examine the potential for developing deemed savings estimates acceptable to PJM for legacy air conditioning and water heating DLC programs, and (2) explore the development of a collaborative, regional, consensus-based approach for conducting monitoring and verification of load reductions for emerging load management technologies for customers that do not have interval metering capability.

Goldman, Charles

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Economically consistent long-term scenarios for air pollutant emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutant emissions such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone precursors substantially influence climate. While future century-scale scenarios for these emissions have become more realistic through the inclusion of emission controls, they still potentially lack consistency between surface pollutant concentrations and regional levels of affluence. We demonstrate a methodology combining use of an integrated assessment model and a three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model, whereby a reference scenario is constructed by requiring consistent surface pollutant levels as a function of regional income over the 21st century. By adjusting air pollutant emission control parameters, we improve agreement between modeled PM2.5 and economic income among world regions through time; agreement for ozone is also improved but is more difficult to achieve because of the strong influence of upwind world regions. The scenario examined here was used as the basis for one of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. This analysis methodology could also be used to examine the consistency of other pollutant emission scenarios.

Smith, Steven J.; West, Jason; Kyle, G. Page

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

405

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince Program Administrator Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management Primary Website http:www.dem.ri.govpubsregsregsair...

406

Idaho National Laboratory Site Pollution Prevention Plan  

SciTech Connect

It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship will be integrated into DOE operations as a good business practice to reduce environmental hazards, protect environmental resources, avoid pollution control costs, and improve operational efficiency and mission sustainability. In furtherance of this policy, DOE established five strategic, performance-based Pollution Prevention (P2) and Sustainable Environmental Stewardship goals and included them as an attachment to DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program. These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of Pollution Prevention into each site's Environmental Management System (EMS). This document presents a P2 and Sustainability Program and corresponding plan pursuant to DOE Order 450.1 and DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This plan is also required by the state of Idaho, pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) partial permit. The objective of this document is to describe the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site P2 and Sustainability Program. The purpose of the program is to decrease the environmental footprint of the INL Site while providing enhanced support of its mission. The success of the program is dependent on financial and management support. The signatures on the previous page indicate INL, ICP, and AMWTP Contractor management support and dedication to the program. P2 requirements have been integrated into working procedures to ensure an effective EMS as part of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). This plan focuses on programmatic functions which include environmentally preferable procurement, sustainable design, P2 and Sustainability awareness, waste generation and reduction, source reduction and recycling, energy management, and pollution prevention opportunity assessments. The INL Site P2 and Sustainability Program is administratively managed by the INL Site P2 Coordinator. Development and maintenance of this overall INL Site plan is ultimately the responsibility of DOE-ID. This plan is applicable to all INL Site contractors except those at the Naval Reactors Facility.

E. D. Sellers

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Idaho National Laboratory Site Pollution Prevention Plan  

SciTech Connect

It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship will be integrated into DOE operations as a good business practice to reduce environmental hazards, protect environmental resources, avoid pollution control costs, and improve operational efficiency and mission sustainability. In furtherance of this policy, DOE established five strategic, performance-based Pollution Prevention (P2) and Sustainable Environmental Stewardship goals and included them as an attachment to DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program. These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of Pollution Prevention into each site's Environmental Management System (EMS). This document presents a P2 and Sustainability Program and corresponding plan pursuant to DOE Order 450.1 and DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This plan is also required by the state of Idaho, pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) partial permit. The objective of this document is to describe the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site P2 and Sustainability Program. The purpose of the program is to decrease the environmental footprint of the INL Site while providing enhanced support of its mission. The success of the program is dependent on financial and management support. The signatures on the previous page indicate INL, ICP, and AMWTP Contractor management support and dedication to the program. P2 requirements have been integrated into working procedures to ensure an effective EMS as part of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). This plan focuses on programmatic functions which include environmentally preferable procurement, sustainable design, P2 and Sustainability awareness, waste generation and reduction, source reduction and recycling, energy management, and pollution prevention opportunity assessments. The INL Site P2 and Sustainability Program is administratively managed by the INL Site P2 Coordinator. Development and maintenance of this overall INL Site plan is ultimately the responsibility of DOE-ID. This plan is applicable to all INL Site contractors except those at the Naval Reactors Facility.

E. D. Sellers

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. The project team demonstrates the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Most water consumption in coal-fired power plants occurs due to evaporative water losses. For example, a 500-megawatt (MW) power plant will loose approximately 5,000 - 6,000 gallons per minute (gpm) to evaporation and 500 gpm in the wet FGD system. Installation of regenerative reheat on FGD systems is expected to reduce water consumption to one half of water consumption using conventional FGD technology. Electrostatic Precipitator Researchers are conducting pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assessing the resulting impact on air pollution control (APC) systems. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc. as the prime contractor, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern Company, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). The team is conducting an analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs. The tests are intended to determine the impact of operation at cooler flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate removal (see Figure 1), SO3 removal, and Hg removal. Additionally, tests are conducted to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger.

409

Risk Assessment of Toxic Pollutants From Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities operating coal-fired power plants must weigh the cost of controlling toxic releases against the risk of adverse human health effects. An EPRI-developed analytic framework offers guidance for such assessments, outlining mathematical modeling procedures for tracking pollutants in the environment and for estimating potential health risks to nearby populations.

1987-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 9- Air Pollution Control Permits (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe permitting procedures and requirements for minor and major sources of emissions.

411

Assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing. Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory's research on assessment and control of water contamination associated with oil shale operations is directed toward the identification of potential water contamination problems and the evaluation of alternative control strategies for controlling contaminants released into the surface and underground water systems from oil-shale-related sources. Laboratory assessment activities have focused on the mineralogy, trace element concentrations in solids, and leaching characteristics of raw and spent shales from field operations and laboratory-generated spent shales. This report details the chemical, mineralogic, and solution behavior of major, minor, and trace elements in a variety of shale materials (spent shales from Occidental retort 3E at Logan Wash, raw shale from the Colony mine, and laboratory heat-treated shales generated from Colony mine raw shale). Control technology research activities have focused on the definition of control technology requirements based on assessment activities and the laboratory evaluation of alternative control strategies for mitigation of identified problems. Based on results obtained with Logan Wash materials, it appears that the overall impact of in situ processing on groundwater quality (leaching and aquifer bridging) may be less significant than previously believed. Most elements leached from MIS spent shales are already elevated in most groundwaters. Analysis indicates that solubility controls by major cations and anions will aid in mitigating water quality impacts. The exceptions include the trace elements vanadium, lead, and selenium. With respect to in situ retort leaching, process control and multistaged counterflow leaching are evaluated as alternative control strategies for mitigation of quality impacts. The results of these analyses are presented in this report.

Peterson, E.J.; Henicksman, A.V.; Fox, J.P.; O' Rourke, J.A.; Wagner, P.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Safe river water: A ubiquitous and collaborative water quality monitoring solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water quality is vital to human life and economy. However, one sixth of the world's population suffers from lack of safe drinking and domestic water. Aiming to improve the capability of predicting and responding to river pollution disasters, this project ...

Bin Hu; Bo Hu; JiZheng Wan; Huilan Nie; Chongzhi Zhai

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

Hazen, T.C.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

414

Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved technology is needed for use in properly managing large agricultural watersheds. Proper watershed management means selecting land uses that are appropriate for each subarea, using erosion control measures where necessary, and applying fertilizers at rates that maximize agricultural production without polluting the environment. Watershed runoff and industrial and municipal effluents pollute streams and reservoirs. Point source pollution (industries and municipalities) can be monitored. Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers, and climatic variables. Routing models are needed to determine the quality of water as it flows from nonpoint sources through streams and valleys to rivers and large reservoirs. Models are also needed to determine optimal strategies for planning land use, conservation practices, and fertilizer application to maximize agricultural production subject to water quality constraints. Three of the most important agricultural pollutants are suspended sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen. Robinson [1971] pointed out that sediment is the greatest pollutant of water in terms of volume. Sediment also transports other pollutants, like phosphorus and nitrogen. These two elements are principally involved in lake eutrophication. Frequently algae blooms develop in nutrient-laden water and cause it to have an off-taste and an unpleasant odor. The odor of decaying plants becomes offensive; fish are killed because of reduced dissolved oxygen in the water, and recreation is deterred. The objective of this research was to develop models for use in managing large agricultural watersheds to obtain maximum agricultural production and to maintain water quality standards. The models were designed to: 1. Simulate daily runoff, and sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen yields from small watersheds (areas land owners and operators) for planning land use, fertilizer application, and conservation practices on subwatersheds. 4. Determine the optimal strategy for each subwatershed to maximize agricultural production for the entire watershed subject to water quality constraints. Generally, water-quality models are developed by adding chemical modeling components to existing runoff and sediment models because runoff and sediment provide transportation for chemicals. Several conceptual models for predicting chemical yields from small watersheds have been presented [Crawford and Donigian, 1973; Donigian and Crawford, 1976; Frere, et al., 1975; Hagin and Amberger, 1974; Kling, 1974; Johnson and Straub, 1971]. However, these models are not applicable to large watersheds because they have no routing mechanism. For this reason, runoff, sediment, and nutrient models were refined and developed here for application to large watersheds. Probably, the most widely used and accepted model for predicting runoff volume is the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number system [U.S. Soil Conservation Service, 1972]. The SCS model was modified by adding a soil-moisture-index accounting procedure [Williams and Laseur, 1976]. The modified water yield model is considerably more accurate than the original SCS model. On a watershed near Riesel, Texas, the modified model explained 95% of the variation in monthly runoff as compared with 65% for the original model. The water-yield model was refined here by replacing the climatic index (lake evaporation) with daily consumptive water use for individual crops.

Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Long-Term Data Reveal Patterns and Controls on Stream Water Chemistry in a Forested Stream: Walker Branch, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

We present 20 years of weekly stream water chemistry, hydrology, and climate data for the Walker Branch watershed in eastern Tennessee, USA. Since 1989, the watershed has experienced a similar to 1.08 degrees C increase in mean annual temperature, a similar to 20% decline in precipitation, and a similar to 30% increase in forest evapotranspiration rates. As a result, stream runoff has declined by similar to 34%. We evaluate long-term trends in stream water concentrations and fluxes for nine solutes and use wet deposition data to calculate approximate watershed input-output budgets. Dissolved constituents were classified as geochemical solutes (Ca2+, Mg2+, and SO42-) or nutrients (NH4+, NO3-, soluble reactive phosphorus [SRP], total soluble nitrogen [TSN], total soluble phosphorus [TSP], and dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). Geochemical solutes are predominantly controlled by discharge, and the long-term changes in catchment hydrology have led to significant trends in the concentrations and fluxes of these solutes. Further, the trends in geochemical solute concentrations indicate shifting soil flowpath contributions to streamflow generation through time, with deep groundwater having a greater proportional contribution in recent years. Despite dramatic changes in watershed runoff, there were no trends in inorganic nutrient concentrations (NH4+, NO3-, and SRP). While most nutrients entering the watershed are retained, stream fluxes of nutrient solutes have declined significantly as a result of decreasing runoff. Nutrient concentrations in the stream exhibit large seasonality controlled by in-stream biological uptake. Stream benthic communities are sensitive to hydrologic disturbance, and changes in the frequency or intensity of storm events through time can affect nutrient fluxes. Stream NO3- concentrations are also sensitive to drought, with concentrations decreasing (increasing) if conditions during the three years prior to the time of sampling were drier (wetter) than the long-term mean. Future changes in the incidence of storm events, as well as the number and duration of droughts, have the potential to significantly alter watershed nutrient losses. Our analysis indicates that changing climates can differentially affect watershed element cycles either through changes in biogeochemical process rates or through changes in catchment hydrology. Furthermore, climate change can include both long-term trending in mean climate variables, as well as changes in the frequency and intensity of storms and droughts, with each of these types of change having distinct effects on the biological and geochemical processes governing different solutes.

Lutz, Brian D [Duke University; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Bernhardt, Emily [Duke University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Air pollution and lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiological evidence proves conclusively that lung cancer correlates with air pollution. However, data on lung cancer death rates and smoking show that mankind accepts the risk of long-term and low-level exposure to carcinogens. As a rule, immediate benefits are sought and remote hazards ignored. Fear of atmospheric contamination by radioactive fallout seems to be the main factor for awareness of air pollution. Experimental works help us to understand physics of particle deposition in the lungs (inertial impactation, sedimentation, Brownian movement), shed light on carcinogenesis (eg, bay region theory in case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and surface charge changes regarding asbestos), show that atmospheric particulates accepted as harmless may act as co-carcinogens (eg, iron and benzo(a)pyrene) and stress the importance of in vitro research (bacterial mutation tests, organ cultures, sister chromatid exchange system) to screen pollutants for their malignant potential and study their pathogenesis.

Boehm, G.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental Protection Agency guidance was prepared to assist NEPA/309 reviewers in incorporating pollution prevention into each step of the environmental review process, including scoping, mitigation, monitoring, and enforcement. POLLUTION PREVENTION - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REDUCTION CHECKLISTS FOR NEPA/309 REVIEWERS JANUARY 1995

418

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental Protection Agency guidance was prepared to assist NEPA/309 reviewers in incorporating pollution prevention into each step of the environmental review process, including scoping, mitigation, monitoring, and enforcement. POLLUTION PREVENTION - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REDUCTION CHECKLISTS FOR NEPA/309 REVIEWERS JANUARY 1995

419

Environmental Control (Delaware) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control (Delaware) Control (Delaware) Environmental Control (Delaware) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Nonprofit Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Delaware Program Type Environmental Regulations This act has various provisions set for the local governments for greenhouse gas trading initiatives, solid waste recycling and water protection. The act also includes the Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program with a detailed account of fees to be paid for air pollution sources. The act establishes the collection of CO2 allowances, with 65 percent of

420

Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees receive Pollution Prevention awards Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention awards Nearly 400 employees on 47 teams received Pollution...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Receive Pollution Prevention Awards Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention Awards Nearly 400 employees on 47 teams received Pollution...

422

Storm water runoff for the Y-12 Plant and selected parking lots  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of storm water runoff from the Y-12 Plant and selected employee vehicle parking lots to various industry data is provided in this document. This work is an outgrowth of and part of the continuing Non-Point Source Pollution Elimination Project that was initiated in the late 1980s. This project seeks to identify area pollution sources and remediate these areas through the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process as managed by the Environmental Restoration Organization staff. This work is also driven by the Clean Water Act Section 402(p) which, in part, deals with establishing a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for storm water discharges. Storm water data from events occurring in 1988 through 1991 were analyzed in two reports: Feasibility Study for the Best Management Practices to Control Area Source Pollution Derived from Parking Lots at the DOE Y-12 Plant, September 1992, and Feasibility Study of Best Management Practices for Non-Point Source Pollution Control at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, February 1993. These data consisted of analysis of outfalls discharging to upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) within the confines of the Y-12 Plant (see Appendixes D and E). These reports identified the major characteristics of concern as copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nitrate (as nitrogen), zinc, biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), fecal coliform, and aluminum. Specific sources of these contaminants were not identifiable because flows upstream of outfalls were not sampled. In general, many of these contaminants were a concern in many outfalls. Therefore, separate sampling exercises were executed to assist in identifying (or eliminating) specific suspected sources as areas of concern.

Collins, E.T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

GRR/Section 14-ID-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-ID-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution GRR/Section 14-ID-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-ID-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14IDANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Idaho Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14IDANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (IDEQ) developed Idaho's

424

Control of degradation of spent LWR (light-water reactor) fuel during dry storage in an inert atmosphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dry storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gas (referred to as inerted dry storage or IDS) is being developed as an alternative to water pool storage of spent fuel. The objectives of the activities described in this report are to identify potential Zircaloy degradation mechanisms and evaluate their applicability to cladding breach during IDS, develop models of the dominant Zircaloy degradation mechanisms, and recommend cladding temperature limits during IDS to control Zircaloy degradation. The principal potential Zircaloy cladding breach mechanisms during IDS have been identified as creep rupture, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and delayed hydride cracking (DHC). Creep rupture is concluded to be the primary cladding breach mechanism during IDS. Deformation and fracture maps based on creep rupture were developed for Zircaloy. These maps were then used as the basis for developing spent fuel cladding temperature limits that would prevent cladding breach during a 40-year IDS period. The probability of cladding breach for spent fuel stored at the temperature limit is less than 0.5% per spent fuel rod. 52 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Cunningham, M.E.; Simonen, E.P.; Allemann, R.T.; Levy, I.S.; Hazelton, R.F.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Background pollution forecast over bulgaria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both, the current level of air pollution studies and social needs in the country, are in a stage mature enough for creating Bulgarian Chemical Weather Forecasting and Information System The system is foreseen to provide in real time forecast of the spatial/temporal ...

D. Syrakov; K. Ganev; M. Prodanova; N. Miloshev; G. Jordanov; E. Katragkou; D. Melas; A. Poupkou; K. Markakis

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

POLLUTION PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by intentional addition of silica and lime. Fluxes such as calcium fluoride may be added to make the slag more Systems ..................................4-9 4.7.5 Off-site Recycle by Reuse as a Construction Material separate from those of pollution prevention assessment.) Reclamation - Denotes internal reuse of materials

Shor, Leslie McCabe

427

Catalysts for Destruction of Air Pollutants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Destruction of Air Pollutants Catalysts for Destruction of Air Pollutants U.S. industries and the U.S. Department of Energy must manage a variety of off-gas wastes consisting of...

428

Quantifying Precipitation Suppression Due to Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban air pollution and industrial air pollution have been shown qualitatively to suppress rain and snow. Here, precipitation losses over topographical barriers downwind of major coastal urban areas in California and in the land of Israel that ...

Amir Givati; Daniel Rosenfeld

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Pollution markets with imperfectly observed emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study the advantages of pollution permit markets over traditional standard regulations when the regulator has incomplete information on firms? emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in large ...

Montero, Juan-Pablo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Pollutant Transport and Diffusion in Katabatic Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of pollutant transport and diffusion of a passive contaminant in a two-dimensional katabatic flow over a simple slope are examined using a primitive equation hydrodynamic model. It is shown that pollutants released above the ...

Carmen J. Nappo; K. Shankar Rao; Jerold A. Herwehe

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Regional emissions of air pollutants in China.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the China-MAP program, sponsored by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, regional inventories of air pollutants emitted in China are being characterized, in order that the atmospheric chemistry over China can be more fully understood and the resulting ambient concentrations in Chinese cities and the deposition levels to Chinese ecosystems be determined with better confidence. In addition, the contributions of greenhouse gases from China and of acidic aerosols that counteract global warming are being quantified. This paper presents preliminary estimates of the emissions of some of the major air pollutants in China: sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and black carbon (C). Emissions are estimated for each of the 27 regions of China included in the RAINS-Asia simulation model and are subsequently distributed to a 1{degree} x 1{degree} grid using appropriate disaggregation factors. Emissions from all sectors of the Chinese economy are considered, including the combustion of biofuels in rural homes. Emissions from larger power plants are calculated individually and allocated to the grid accordingly. Data for the period 1990-1995 are being developed, as well as projections for the future under alternative assumptions about economic growth and environmental control.

Streets, D. G.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hazardous waste management and pollution prevention  

SciTech Connect

The management of hazardous wastes is one of the most critical environmental issues that faces many developing countries. It is one of the areas where institutional control and treatment and disposal technology has not kept pace with economic development. This paper reviews the development of hazardous waste management methods over the past decades, and provides the information on the status and trends of hazardous waste management strategy in selected western nations. Several issues pertinent to hazardous waste management will be reviewed, including: (1) definition of hazard; (2) why are we concerned with hazardous wastes; (3) aspects of hazardous waste management system; and (4) prioritization of hazardous waste management options. Due to regulatory and economic pressure on hazardous waste management, pollution prevention has become a very important environmental strategy in many developed countries. In many developed countries, industry is increasingly considering such alternative approaches, and finding many opportunities for their cost effective implementation. This paper provides a review of the status and trends of pollution prevention in selected western nations.

Chiu, Shen-yann.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hazardous waste management and pollution prevention  

SciTech Connect

The management of hazardous wastes is one of the most critical environmental issues that faces many developing countries. It is one of the areas where institutional control and treatment and disposal technology has not kept pace with economic development. This paper reviews the development of hazardous waste management methods over the past decades, and provides the information on the status and trends of hazardous waste management strategy in selected western nations. Several issues pertinent to hazardous waste management will be reviewed, including: (1) definition of hazard; (2) why are we concerned with hazardous wastes; (3) aspects of hazardous waste management system; and (4) prioritization of hazardous waste management options. Due to regulatory and economic pressure on hazardous waste management, pollution prevention has become a very important environmental strategy in many developed countries. In many developed countries, industry is increasingly considering such alternative approaches, and finding many opportunities for their cost effective implementation. This paper provides a review of the status and trends of pollution prevention in selected western nations.

Chiu, Shen-yann

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention: Reuse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contribution Programs Volunteer Programs Education Programs Environmental Responsibility Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention History Diversity Locations Missions...

435

Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention: Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contribution Programs Volunteer Programs Education Programs Environmental Responsibility Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention History Diversity Locations Missions...

436

Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention: Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contribution Programs Volunteer Programs Education Programs Environmental Responsibility Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention History Diversity Locations Missions...

437

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for Coal Storage Area Stabilization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of this project is to stabilize the abandoned coal storage area and redirect the storm water runoff from sanitary sewer system to the storm drain system. Currently, the existing storm water runoff is directed to a perimeter concrete drainage swale and collected in a containment basin. The collected water is then pumped to a treatment facility and after treatment, is discharged to the Y-12 sanitary sewer system. The existing drainage swale and collection basin along with silt fencing will be used during aggregate placement and grading to provide erosion and sediment control. Inlet protection will also be installed around existing structures during the storm water diversion construction. This project scope will include the installation of a non-woven geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base (paving optional) to stabilize the site. The geotextile specifications are provided on the vendor cut sheets in Appendix B. The installation of a storm water collection/retention area will also be installed on the southern side of the site in accordance with EPA Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act. The total area to be disturbed is approximately 2.5 acres. The order of activities for this Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) will be: (1) post notice of coverage (NOC) in a prominent display near entrance of the site; (2) install rain gauge on site or contact Y-12 Plant Shift Superintendent daily for Met tower rain gauge readings; (3) install stabilized construction exit on site; (4) install silt fencing along perimeter as indicated on the attached site plan; (5) regrade site; (6) install geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base; (7) install catch basin inlet protection where required; (8) excavate and lower existing catch basin tops, re-grade and asphalt to drain; and (9) when all disturbed areas are re-stabilized, remove silt fencing and any other temporary erosion control.

Project and Design Engineering

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - New York State Education Department Coal-fired power plants within North America need an effective, economical, and non-polluting technique for managing infestations of zebra mussels within their facilities, particularly in cooling water intake systems. Unfortunately, due to a lack of options, many facilities have relied on the use of broad-spectrum, chemical biocides for control of these freshwater, macro-fouling mussels. Biocide treatments, such as continuous chlorination for three weeks, are widely regarded as environmentally unacceptable. Chlorine, for example, can combine with organic compounds in water resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes, dioxins, and other potentially carcinogenic substances. Because of this, there is growing concern within the power generation industry that such broad-spectrum biocides will be banned by individual states and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This would result in a crisis situation for the electric utility industry. Even if such an outright ban does not occur, the reduction in the use of such biocides is generally viewed by coal-fired and other power generating industries as environmentally prudent and desirable.

439

Pollution solutions in Wonderland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) calculates coal-fired boiler fine-dust emissions at 100,000 tons per year (tpy). However, the actual amount is well in excess of 700,000 tpy. It is as if EPA calculated the national average gas mileage by using auto dealers' miles-per-gallon claims for new subcompact cars, but ignored the 20-year-old cars still on the road. Most utilities already are worried about the long-term cost of air toxics. In fact, utilities are worried so much that this year they placed little notes in their annual reports about the potential longer-term liability of toxics control. This fear, would encourage many utilities to reduce their particulate emissions now. The largest plants would find scrubbers the most economical method for capturing sulfur and reducing particulate. Operators of smaller plants, those burning coal with a modest sulfur content and facilities that will be retired soon will find that the price of SO[sub 2] allowances has been driven down greatly by CAA's new voluntary option. As a result, these facilities can install particulate equipment and buy SO[sub 2] allowances cheaply without having to switch fuels.

McIlvaine, R.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Small Business Pollution Prevention Assistance Account Loan Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business Pollution Prevention Assistance Account Loan Program Small Business Pollution Prevention Assistance Account Loan Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water pollution control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Calibration Facilities Ecosystem Management Team Environmental Justice Environmental...

442

Environmentally Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two primary objectives of this USDOE-NETL contract were successfully achieved during the project: (1) to accelerate research on the development of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A) as a biocontrol agent for zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis)--two invasive freshwater bivalve species that are infesting water pipes in power plants; and (2) to identify a private-sector company that would move forward to commercialize Pf-CL145A as a substitute for the current polluting use of biocide chemicals for control of these dreissenid mussels in power plant pipes.

Daniel Molloy

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

443

Status of Integrated Emission Control Process Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost-effective approaches to reducing these pollutants.

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

Boiler Tune-ups: Improve efficiency, reduce pollution, and save money!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tune-ups: Tune-ups: Improve efficiency, reduce pollution, and save money! ____________________________________________________ Did you know . . . * Inefficient industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers waste money and pollute? * There are over 1.5 million ICI boilers in the United States? * Boilers burning coal, oil, biomass, and other solid fuels and liquid are a major source of toxic air pollution? * New federal Clean Air Act rules require certain boilers to get regular tune-ups? * Keeping your boilers tuned-up can reduce hazardous air pollution? Energy Management, Tune-ups and Energy Assessment Reducing the amount of fuel used by boilers is one of the most cost effective ways to control hazardous air pollution. Tuning-up a boiler optimizes the air-fuel mixture for the operating range of the boiler

445

Pollution and the price of power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyses the un-priced environmental harm caused by generating electricity from fossil fuels in the ECAR control region south of the Great Lakes in 2004 and again in 2015 when the recent Clean Air Interstate Rule will have its full effect. Using existing damage values, we estimate wholesale electricity under-pricing for coal-fired plants at about $40 per MWh in 2004, almost as much again as the $45/MWh actual price. Averaging across all fuels, the price of electricity was more than $30/MWh too low. The under-pricing will still be $18/MWh for coal plants and $15 for all generation sources in 2015, a decade after CAIR was adopted. Recognizing this environmental price now could reduce pollution levels, increase energy conservation and lead to wiser choices of new generation technology.

Dewees, D.N. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Economics

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Pollution prevention program plan 1996  

SciTech Connect

This plan serves as the principal crosscutting guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Operations Office, laboratory, and contractor management to fully implement pollution prevention programs within the DOE complex between now and 2000. To firmly demonstrate DOE`s commitment to pollution prevention, the Secretary of Energy has established goals, to be achieved by December 31, 1999, that will aggressively reduce DOE`s routine generation of radioactive, mixed, and hazardous wastes, and total releases and offsite transfers of toxic chemicals. The Secretary also has established sanitary waste reduction, recycling, and affirmative procurement goals. Site progress in meeting these goals will be reported annually to the Secretary in the Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, using 1993 as the baseline year. Implementation of this plan will represent a major step toward reducing the environmental risks and costs associated with DOE operations.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Pollution Prevention Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Prevention Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Federal Activities POLLUTION PREVENTION - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REDUCTION CHECKLISTS FOR NEPA/309 REVIEWERS JANUARY 1995 Prepared by SCIENCE APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION 7600-A LEESBURG PIKE FALLS CHURCH, VA 22043 EPA CONTRACT NO. 68-W2-0026 EPA WORK ASSIGNMENT NO. 33-II SAIC PROJECT NO. 01-1030-07-1605-000 Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 What Is Pollution Prevention? 1.2 Why Practice Pollution Prevention? 2.0 INCORPORATING POLLUTION PREVENTION INTO NEPA 3.0 POLLUTION PREVENTION/ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REDUCTION CHECKLISTS FOR NEPA REVIEWERS q Checklist for Energy Management file:///D|/40369.010_EPA%20NEPA%20CD/Old/HTML/Pollprev.htm (1 of 10) [9/11/2002 2:19:58 PM]

448

Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants  

SciTech Connect

The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Considerations in the Design of Treatment Best Management Practices (BMPs) to Improve Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document has been reviewed in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency=s peer and administrative review policies and approved for publiction. Mention of trade names, commercial products, or design procedures does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. ii Foreword The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged by Congress with protecting the Nation’s land, air, and water resources. Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the Agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. To meet this mandate, EPA’s research program is providing data and technical support for solving environmental problems today and building a science knowledge base necessary to manage our ecological resources wisely, understand how pollutants affect our health, and prevent or reduce environmental risks in the future. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) is the Agency’s center for investigation of technological and management approaches for preventing and reducing risks from pollution that threaten human health and the environment. The focus of the Laboratory’s research program is on methods and their cost-effectiveness for prevention and control of pollution to air, land, water, and subsurface resources; protection of water quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; prevention and control of indoor air pollution; and restoration of ecosystems. NRMRL collaborates with both public and private sector partners to foster technologies that reduce the cost of compliance and to anticipate emerging problems. NRMRL’s research provides solutions to environmental problems by: developing and promoting technologies that protect and improve the environment; advancing

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

PIXE pollution studies across Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We collected vegetation and soil samples from various locations along a route covering Eastern and Western Europe. We measured the level of elemental pollution in different places uniformly spread across the continent to determine which of them may have common sources. To achieve these objectives, samples were collected along the main roads from Romania to Portugal and analyzed using in-air PEE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission).

Innegraeve, O.; Blanchet, X.; Muntele, C. I.; Muntele, I. C.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Popa-Simil, L. (Liviu); Voiculescu, D.; Racolta, P. M.; Ila, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the “Main Canal” with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -13.65.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the “Main Canal” with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -13.65.