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Sample records for water pacific ocean

  1. Recent Bottom Water Warming in the Pacific Ocean* GREGORY C. JOHNSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Recent Bottom Water Warming in the Pacific Ocean* GREGORY C. JOHNSON NOAA/Pacific Marine) ABSTRACT Decadal changes of abyssal temperature in the Pacific Ocean are analyzed using high-quality, full the source of bottom water for the Pacific Ocean, which enters the main deep basins of this ocean southeast

  2. Central South Pacific thermocline water circulation from a high-resolution ocean model validated against satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Central South Pacific thermocline water circulation from a high-resolution ocean model validated. Introduction [2] Most South Pacific Ocean studies have been focused on its western or eastern part, leaving 12 January 2009; accepted 28 January 2009; published 13 May 2009. [1] The oceanic circulation

  3. Bomb-test 90Sr in Pacific and Indian Ocean surface water as recorded by banded corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toggweiler, JR; Trumbore, S

    1985-01-01

    the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. 8,Bomb tritium in the Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. 80,of tritium in the Pacific Ocean, J. Phys. Oceanogr. II, 3,

  4. Photoproduction of carbonyl sulfide in south Pacific Ocean waters as a function of irradiation wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, P.S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); [Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States); Johnson, J.E. [Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States)] [Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Seattle, WA (United States); [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Andrews, S.S.; Zafiriou, O.C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, MA (United States)] [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, MA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) photoproduction rates were measured at selected wavelengths of ultraviolet light between 297 and 405 nm in sea water samples from the southern Pacific Ocean. Near-surface and column production rate spectra for natural sunlit waters were calculated using sea-surface sunlight data measured near the austral summer solstice. These plots show that photoproduction rates are at a maximum at 313 nm in tropical waters and at 336 nm in Antarctic waters. Tropical surface and column rates were found to be 68 pM/day and 360 nmol/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, and Antarctic surface and column rates were found to be 101 pM/day and 620 nmol/m{sup 2}/day, respectively. A high degree of variability was observed between photoproduction rates from different ocean regions, with coastal rates being the highest, suggesting that natural environmental variability is an important factor. Photoproduction rates at 297 nm were found to be constant at individual locations with increasing irradiation time. Relative photoproduction rates from this work are compared to previously measured rates from coastal sea water. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  6. Methane oxidation in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean water column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of methane in distilled water and seawater, J. Chem. Eng.Paci?c (ETP) OceanWater column MO x strongly mitigatesD. M. Lavoie (1983), Upper water column methane geochemistry

  7. Impact of mesoscale eddies on water transport between the Pacific Ocean and the Bering Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prants, S V; Budyansky, M V; Uleysky, M Yu

    2013-01-01

    Sea surface height anomalies observed by satellites in 1993--2012 are combined with simulation and observations by surface drifters and Argo floats to study water flow pattern in the Near Strait (NS) connected the Pacific Ocean with the Bering Sea. Daily Lagrangian latitudinal maps, computed with the AVISO surface velocity field, and calculation of the transport across the strait show that the flow through the NS is highly variable and controlled by mesoscale and submesoscale eddies in the area. On the seasonal scale, the flux through the western part of the NR is negatively correlated with the flux through its eastern part ($r=-0.93$). On the interannual time scale, a significant positive correlation ($r=0.72$) is diagnosed between the NS transport and the wind stress in winter. Increased southward component of the wind stress decreases the northward water transport through the strait. Positive wind stress curl over the strait area in winter--spring generates the cyclonic circulation and thereby enhances the...

  8. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  9. Methane oxidation in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean water column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    PACK ET AL. EASTERN PACIFIC METHANE OXIDATIONA method for measuring methane oxidation rates using low-levels of C-labeled methane and accelerator mass

  10. Ocean Observatories Initiative: Pacific Northwest The Endurance Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Ocean Observatories Initiative: Pacific Northwest The Endurance Array The processes that shape. The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) will build a 25­30 year laboratory on the seafloor, in the water column, and at the ocean surface. It will make available novel platforms for oceanographic discovery

  11. Late Quaternary variability of sedimentary nitrogen isotopes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Late Quaternary variability of sedimentary nitrogen isotopes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean), Late Quaternary variability of sedimentary nitrogen isotopes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean) in the water columns of the Arabian Sea (AS) and the eastern North and South Pacific oceans (ENP; ESP) holds

  12. The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three decades Pacific Ocean, off an island in Palau. They analysed the ratio of nitrogen and carbon isotopes.1029/2010GL044867 (2010) OceanOgraphy Cold water rising in the Pacific DrUg DeVeLOpMenT Worm surgery on a chip

  13. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  14. Decadal Variability in the Formation of the North Pacific Subtropical Mode Water: Oceanic versus Atmospheric Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    , during which time high regional eddy variability infuses high-PV KE water into the recirculation gyre

  15. Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean C. L. Sabine,1 R. A. Feely,2 R. M. Key,3 J] This work presents an estimate of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean based on measurements from the WOCE tracers; 9355 Information Related to Geographic Region: Pacific Ocean; KEYWORDS: Pacific Ocean

  16. From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic composition and rare earth element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic composition, and S. Cravatte (2013), From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic waters (112 samples) in the Southern Tropical Pacific. The relatively detailed picture of these tracer

  17. Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2009-01-01

    over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

  18. A synthesis of marine predator migrations, distribution, species overlap, and use of Pacific Ocean Exclusive Economic Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Autumn-Lynn

    2012-01-01

    North Pacific Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .month in the North Pacific Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . .tracked in the Pacific Ocean during 2002-2009. Adapted from

  19. Assessment of the amount of cesium-137 released into the Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Assessment of the amount of cesium-137 released into the Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima accident into the Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima accident and analysis of its dispersion in Japanese coastal waters, J into the ocean from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) after the accident in March 2011 and to gain

  20. Eddy correlation measurements of the air/sea flux of dimethylsulfide over the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01

    radon over the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Atmos. Chem. , 6,in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (1982 to 1996): Evidence ofover the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Atmos. Chem. , Bates,

  1. Intermediate-depth circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans measured by autonomous floats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Russ E

    2005-01-01

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomousthe tropical and South Pacific Ocean and 228 were deployed

  2. Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean WEALTH FROM OCEANS FLAGSHIP Jock of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY3 | Thunnus tonggol Thunnus obesus Thunnus albacares Thunnus of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY4 | Species SCA DR SIA SFA Thunnus alalunga + + + 0 Thunnus albacares + + + 0

  3. HEAT STORAGE AND ADVECTION IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    HEAT STORAGE AND ADVECTION IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE maintaining the seasonal heat storage in the 0 to 250 meter surface layer of the North Pacific Ocean. Approximately 140,000 bathy- thermograph observations taken in the Pacific Ocean from 10° South latitude to 70

  4. Scholarly Paper Coupled Instability in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Scholarly Paper Coupled Instability in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Hua Chen Advisor: Raghu's a cycle or an event depends on the mean state of equatorial Pacific Ocean, which is influenced by mean problem in the equatorial Pacific ocean. The control run with a coupling coefficient 0.4 and relatively

  5. DEEP MAXIMA OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHLOROPHYLL IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEEP MAXIMA OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHLOROPHYLL IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN E. L. VENRICK, J. A. MCGOWAN, AND A Pacific Ocean show that during most of the year the maximum concentrations of chlorophyll occur below in the world's oceans. There are several thousands of these measurements in the Pacific. Most

  6. Biogeochemical and hydrographic controls on chromophoric dissolved organic matter distribution in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    in the Pacific Ocean Chantal M. Swan a,Ã, David A. Siegel a,b , Norman B. Nelson a , Craig A. Carlson c , Elora Available online 19 September 2009 Keywords: CDOM AOU Pacific Water masses Hydrography Bio-optical a b s t r a c t Recent in situ observations of chromophoric dissolved organic material (CDOM) in the Pacific

  7. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  8. Lead Isotopic Variations of the Pacific and Implications for Paleogene Water Mass Composition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subt, Cristina

    2013-11-13

    meridional temperature gradients. Nd isotopes indicate high-latitude convection in the Pacific Ocean during this interval, with deep waters mixing in the tropical Pacific. Here we investigate the evolution of the Pb isotopic composition of water masses...

  9. TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific

  10. Extrapolating Oceanic Age Distributions: Lessons from the Pacific Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extrapolating Oceanic Age Distributions: Lessons from the Pacific Region David B. Rowley Department plate reconstructions. An area equal in size to the Pacific Basin oceanic lithosphere must-mail: rowley@geosci.uchicago.edu) A B S T R A C T Extrapolation of the age distribution of oceanic lithosphere

  11. Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, Kathleen

    Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

  12. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01

    atmosphere over the eastern Pacific Ocean in summer, volumeover the eastern North Pacific Ocean: Spatial distribution,winds over the eastern North Pacific Ocean in spring and

  13. Examining Management Issues for Incidentally Caught Species in Highly Migratory Species Fisheries in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Valerie Ann

    2014-01-01

    dynamics in the central Pacific Ocean, 1952- 1998. II. Afishing for tunas in the Pacific Ocean. Ecology and Societywestern and central north Pacific Ocean. ISC. 2013a. Stock

  14. On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Joseph L

    2009-01-01

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

  15. Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01

    Experiment (WOCE), vol. 2, Pacific Ocean DRAFT, edited by M.over the equatorial Pacific Ocean during SAGA 3, J. Geophys.the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean during PEM- Tropics A

  16. Tropical Pacific nutrient dynamics in the modern and pleistocene ocean : insights from the nitrogen isotope system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafter, Patrick Anthony

    2009-01-01

    eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean during the past 3 M.Y. ,in the western tropical Pacific Ocean in the Holocene epoch,eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 3, 271–

  17. Boundary scavenging in the Pacific Ocean: a comparison of 10Be and 231Pa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, RF; Lao, Y; Broecker, WS; Trumbore, SE; Hofmann, HJ; Wolfli, W

    1990-01-01

    sedi- ments of the Pacific Ocean, Geochim. Cosmochim. Actadust input to the North Pacific Ocean during the past 30,000rates within the Pacific Ocean, in: Dynamic Processes in the

  18. Asian anthropogenic lead contamination in the North Pacific Ocean as evidenced by stable lead isotopic compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurbrick, Cheryl Marie

    2014-01-01

    and North Central Pacific Ocean. Deep Sea Res. Part II Top.Lead Within the Northwest Pacific Ocean Evidenced by Leadventilation flux of the Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 106(

  19. CURRENT SKIPJACK OCEANOGRAPHY CRUISES IN EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT SKIPJACK OCEANOGRAPHY CRUISES IN EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN F. Williams A series of skipjack oceanography cruises is planned for two offshore areas in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean October 23 and arrived in Honolulu November 29; and the David Starr Jordan (Fishery-Oceanography C en t e

  20. Input of 129 I into the western Pacific Ocean resulting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    Input of 129 I into the western Pacific Ocean resulting from the Fukushima nuclear event S. J characterization of the input of 129 I into the Pacific Ocean resulting from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident at the Fuku- shima Daiichi nuclear power plant that caused the release of radioactive elements

  1. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean regions, Mon. WeatherIndian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean, J. Ocean Univ. China,KIM ET AL. : PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N.

  2. MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF PACIFIC OCEAN PERCH, SEBASTES ALUTUS, OFF WESTERN NORTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF PACIFIC OCEAN PERCH, SEBASTES ALUTUS, OFF WESTERN NORTH AMERICA JAY C. QUAST' ABSTRACT Pacific ocean perch. Sebastes alufus, vary in body form over the eastern Pacific Ocean be phenotypic. Pacific ocean perch, Sebastes alutus, a commer- cially important rockfish IScorpaenidae

  3. Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Working Group 3) · Trophic ecology · Chemical indicators · Bioenergetics · Niche separation · Climate indicators Bioenergetics Niche separation Climate change 7 | Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean Trophic ecology Chemical indicators Bioenergetics Niche separation

  4. ''A ground water resources study of a Pacific Ocean atoll - Tarawa, Gilbert Islands,'' by J. W. Lloyd, J. C. Miles, G. R. Chessmand, and S. F. Bugg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatcraft, S.W.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-10-01

    Several inherent problems in the methodology employed in the ground water resource study of Tarawa Atoll (Lloyd, et al., 1981) are described. Studies of Enewetak Atoll have provided data that require a significantly different conceptual model of the atoll hydrogeology system. Comparison of well, lagoon, and ocean tidal observations with a mathematical model that assumes horizontal tidal propagation indicates that the observed results are more consistent with a system that is controlled by vertical coupling between the unconsolidated surface aquifer and an underlying aquifer of more permeable limestone. This indicates that most fresh water recharged to the aquifer migrates downward and mixes with the sea water in a deeper aquifer providing easy exchange with the ocean. Lloyd, et al., do not take tidal mixing or vertical transport into account and it therefore seems likely that fresh water inventories are significantly overestimated. Failure to include these significant loss terms in the island water budget may also account for calculated heads above ground level. (JMT)

  5. Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow March 2006; published 19 July 2006. [1] An evaluation of Pacific and Atlantic Ocean sea surface by an interdecadal-temporal evaluation for the Pacific (Atlantic) Ocean based on the phase of the Pacific Decadal

  6. Subseasonal Variability of the Southeast Pacific Stratus Cloud Deck* International Pacific Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Pacific Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa of Meteorology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii in the stratus cloud deck is closely related to variations in surface wind velocity, water vapor, sea level

  7. Closure of the global overturning circulation through the Indian, Pacific and Southern Oceans: schematics and transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    internal diapycnal transformation in the deep Indian and Pacific Oceans. All three northern-source Deep and Pacific Oceans; only 0.1 PW is gained at the surface in the Southern Ocean. Thus, while an adiabatic model full participation of the diffusive Indian and Pacific Oceans, with a basin-averaged diffusivity

  8. Journal of Oceanography, Vol. 60, pp. 163 to 188, 2004 Pacific Ocean,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiu, Peng

    163 Journal of Oceanography, Vol. 60, pp. 163 to 188, 2004 Keywords: Pacific Ocean, decadal. Decadal-Scale Climate and Ecosystem Interactions in the North Pacific Ocean ARTHUR J. MILLER 1 *, FEI CHAI variations in the Pacific Ocean wield a strong influence on the oceanic ecosystem. Two dominant patterns

  9. Impacts of Pacific and Indian Ocean Coupling on Wintertime Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation: A Basin-Coupling CGCM Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Shu-Ping; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2010-01-01

    the central Indian and Pacific oceans. We notice from FigureIP) Run, (c) the Pacific Ocean (PO) Run, and (d) the Indiantropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. Journal of Climate 10:

  10. Radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope compositions of organic compound classes in sediments from the NE Pacific and Southern Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, XC; Druffel, ERM

    2001-01-01

    in the deep Northeast Pacific Ocean. Geophys. Res. Lett. 23,sediment of the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Geochim. Cosmochim.in the eastern North Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 103,

  11. An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luoa) for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model. Ensembles of data are compiled from transient solutions computed from the discrete equation system derived by FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity

  12. Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE´veloppement, LEGOS, Toulouse, France WILLIAM S. KESSLER National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Argo float data in the tropical Pacific Ocean during January 2003­August 2011 are analyzed to obtain

  13. North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem E. Di Lorenzo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change E. Di Lorenzo,1 N Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L08607, doi:10 to explain physical and biological fluctuations in the Northeast Pacific Ocean [Lynn et al., 1998; Lavaniegos

  14. 1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation 3 A. Sen Gupta,1 A), 29 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean equatorial 30 circulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, LXXXXX, doi:10.1029/ 31 2012GL051447. 32 1. Introduction 33 [2] The equatorial Pacific Ocean

  15. Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean-Schubert convection to a slab ocean model (SOM) improves the simulation of eastern Pacific convection during and ocean make eastern Pacific low-level circulation anomalies more complex in the SOM simulation than

  16. Interactions between the Indonesian Throughflow and circulations in the Indian and Pacific Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Tommy

    Interactions between the Indonesian Throughflow and circulations in the Indian and Pacific Oceans with the Indonesian Throughflow (IT), particularly concerning subsurface currents in the Pacific Ocean, are studied model (LOM), both confined to the Indo-Pacific basin; and a global, ocean general circulation model

  17. Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2] Eddy diffusivity of the surface velocity field in the tropical Pacific Ocean was estimated using diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2. Results, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C10), 3154, doi:10

  18. MODEL OF THE .MIGRATION OF ALBACORE IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODEL OF THE .MIGRATION OF ALBACORE IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN .By TAMIO OTSU and RICHARD N. UCHIDA of the migration of albacore in the North Pacific Ocean has been developed. This model is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a single population of albacore in the North Pacific Ocean. . The model depicts

  19. A deeper respired carbon pool in the glacial equatorial Pacific Ocean L.I. Bradtmiller a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    A deeper respired carbon pool in the glacial equatorial Pacific Ocean L.I. Bradtmiller a, , R in paleoceanography. We present evidence from ten equatorial Pacific Ocean sediment cores to show that the deep Pacific Ocean likely stored more carbon during the last glacial period than the Holocene

  20. Ocean mixed layer processes in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation in coupled general circulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Ocean mixed layer processes in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation in coupled general circulation to be larger for CGCMs with a larger ocean heat transport in the region. Keywords Pacific Decadal Oscillation Á. 1994a, b; Zhanget al. 1996), ocean-atmosphere interactions over the North Pacific (e.g., Latif

  1. Effects of correcting salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Leeuwen, Peter Jan

    Effects of correcting salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model in a tropical Pacific ocean model run for the period 1993­1997. Salinity and temperature corrections salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C12), 8001

  2. Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: I. Along-channel Water Level Variations, Pacific Ocean to Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay, D. A.; Leffler, K.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.

    2014-06-07

    This two-part paper provides comprehensive time and frequency domain analyses and models of along-channel water level variations in the 234km-long Lower Columbia River and Estuary (LCRE) and documents the response of floodplain wetlands thereto. In Part I, power spectra, continuous wavelet transforms, and harmonic analyses are used to understand the influences of tides, river flow, upwelling and downwelling, and hydropower operations ("power-peaking") on the water level regime. Estuarine water levels are influenced primarily by astronomical tides and coastal processes, and secondarily by river flow. The importance of coastal and tidal influences decreases in the landward direction, and water levels are increasingly controlled by river flow variations at periods from ?1day to years. Water level records are only slightly non-stationary near the ocean, but become increasingly irregular upriver. Although astronomically forced tidal constituents decrease above the estuary, tidal fortnightly and overtide variations increase for 80-200km landward, both relative to major tidal constituents and in absolute terms.

  3. Evolution of Tidal Amplitudes in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    amplitudes may impact ocean mixing, nutrient supply, primary production, fisher- ies, and coastal erosion [Flick et al., 2003]. To understand the causes of the evolution of coastal tides, it is necessary) and semidiurnal (M2) constituents in the Eastern Pacific from Chile to Alaska (33ºS to 60ºN latitude). The only

  4. Quaternary Science Reviews 20 (2001) 15611576 Millennial scale climate variability of the northeast Pacific Ocean and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    of the northeast Pacific Ocean and northwest North America based on radiolaria and pollen N.G. Pisiasa, *, A in the Northeast Pacific and the northwestern United States. 2. Study region 2.1. Ocean climate and biota.C. Mixa , L. Heusserb a College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 Ocean

  5. 137Cs(90Sr) and Pu isotopes in the Pacific Ocean sources & trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T.F., Millies-Lacrox, J.C. [Service Mixte de Securite Radologique, Mondhery (France); Hong, G.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan (Korea)

    1996-11-01

    The main source of artificial radioactivity in the world`s oceans can be attributed to worldwide fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Measurements of selected artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean were first conducted in the 1960`s where it was observed that fallout radioactivity had penetrated the deep ocean. Extensive studies carried out during the 1973-74 GEOSECS provided the first comprehensive data on the lateral and vertical distributions of {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes in the Pacific on a basin wide scale. Estimates of radionuclide inventories in excess of amounts predicted to be delivered by global fallout alone were attributed to close-in fallout and tropospheric inputs from early U.S. tests conducted on Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Equatorial Pacific. In general, levels of fallout radionuclides (including {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes) in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean have decreased considerably over the past 4 decades and are now much more homogeneously distributed. Resuspension and the subsequent deposition of fallout radionuclides from previously deposited debris on land has become an important source term for the surface ocean. This can be clearly seen in measurements of fallout radionuclides in mineral aerosols over the Korean Peninsula (Yellow dust events). Radionuclides may also be transported from land to sea in river runoff-these transport mechanisms are more important in the Pacific Ocean where large quantities of river water and suspended sands/fluvial sediments reach the coastal zone. Another unique source of artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean is derived from the slow resolubilization and transport of radionuclides deposited in contaminated lagoon and slope sediments near U.S. and French test sites. Although there is a small but significant flux of artificial radionuclides depositing on the sea floor, > 80% of the total 239, {sup 240}Pu inventory and > 95% of the total {sup 137}Cs inventory remains in the water column. Studies conducted through the 1980`s appear to be consistent with earlier findings and indicate that radionuclide inventories in mid-northern latitudes are at least a factor of two above those expected from global fallout alone. The long term persistence of close-in and/or stratospheric fallout from nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands still appears to be the only plausible explanation for this anomaly.

  6. Radiocarbon in particulate matter from the eastern sub-arctic Pacific Ocean; evidence of a source of terrestrial carbon to the deep sea.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druffel, Ellen R M; Honju, Susumu; Griffin, Sheila; Wong, C S

    1986-01-01

    in the sub-Arctic Pacific Ocean: Inter- natl North PacificSalmon of the North Pacific Ocean-Part II-Review of theproduced carbon-14 by the Pacific Ocean: Ph D dissert, Univ

  7. Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean;Abstract Processes which control the upper ocean thermohaline structure in the western equa- torial Pacific forcing data have indicated that the thick isothermal layer in the western equatorial Pacific is found

  8. Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

  9. Status Assessment of Laysan and Black-Footed Albatrosses, North Pacific Ocean, 19232005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    of Laysan and black-footed albatrosses. Photograph taken by Eric VanderWerf, Pacific Rim Conservation. #12Status Assessment of Laysan and Black-Footed Albatrosses, North Pacific Ocean, 1923­2005 Scientific;Status Assessment of Laysan and Black-Footed Albatrosses, North Pacific Ocean, 1923­2005 By Javier A

  10. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine in the Philippine Sea during 2009­2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also

  11. INTEGRITY OF SCHOOLS OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, IN THE EASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRITY OF SCHOOLS OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, IN THE EASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN Pacific yellowfin [(Thunnus albacares)] and the Pac.ific-wide skipjack [(KatS'Uwonus pelamis

  12. THE EARLY LIFE HISTORY OF SKIPJACK TUNA, Katsuwonus pelamis, IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE EARLY LIFE HISTORY OF SKIPJACK TUNA, Katsuwonus pelamis, IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN HOWARD O. YOSHIDA, Katsuwonus pelamis, were landed in the eastern Pacific (Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commis- sion, 1970

  13. Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean color and composition of phytoplankton communities in the North Atlantic, Equatorial Pacific and South Pacific.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean color and composition of phytoplankton communities in the North Atlantic, Equatorial Pacific and South Pacific. By : Yves Dandonneaua , Pierre-Yves Deschampsb ­ Picoplankton ­ Seasonal variations ­ Variability ­ Oceanic provinces ) Contact : Yves DANDONNEAU LODYC

  14. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift variability of Pacific Ocean upper ocean heat content is examined for the 1948-1998 period using gridded-wide phenomenon affecting the thermal structure from 60 S to 70 N. EOF analysis of the Pacific Ocean heat content

  15. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, An EddyResolving Ocean Model for the Pacific1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    for the Pacific1 Ocean: Part 1: Deep Convection and Its Relation to2 SST Anomalies3 A. B. Kara, E. J. Metzger, H­latitudes) HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM),10 configured for the Pacific Ocean (north of 20 S) is used to satellite­based products over the Pacific22 Ocean. HYCOM simulation with no assimilation of any SST gives

  16. Reconciling disparate 20th Century Indo-Pacific ocean temperature5 trends in the instrumental record6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Matthew

    1 2 3 4 Reconciling disparate 20th Century Indo-Pacific ocean temperature5 trends in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean are consistent across26 the 4 datasets, it is uncertain whether theories for the response of the tropical Pacific Ocean to an1 increase in greenhouse gases. Assuming

  17. Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

  18. Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean Data and a PARADIGM Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, James S.

    Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean compare 34 locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with respect to key upper ocean ecological by SeaWiFS mean chlorophyll: low chlorophyll ocean gyres, comparatively high chlorophyll ocean margin

  19. Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Businger, Steven

    Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment 1 Steven Businger and Selen Yildiz SOEST at University of Hawaii at Manoa This research is supported by ONR Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment 2 Hurricane Force (HF) Wind Fields

  20. Decadal variability of the Pacific subtropical cells and their influence on the southeast Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    Click Here for Full Article Decadal variability of the Pacific subtropical cells records reveal that a strengthening of the Pacific subtropical cells (STCs) since the early1990's has), Decadal variability of the Pacific subtropical cells and their influence on the southeast Indian Ocean

  1. The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

  2. Biophysical responses near equatorial islands in the Western Pacific Ocean during El Nio/La Nia transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Biophysical responses near equatorial islands in the Western Pacific Ocean during El Niño/La Niña 2013. [1] The biological response in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean during El Niño/La Niña responses near equatorial islands in the Western Pacific Ocean during El Niño/La Niña transitions, Geophys

  3. Proper orthogonal decomposition approach and error estimation of mixed finite element methods for the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navon, Michael

    for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luo a , Jiang Zhu b , Ruiwen Wang b , I.M. Navon c Available online 8 May 2007 Abstract In this paper, the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model and the insufficient knowledge of air­sea exchange processes. The tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

  4. Large fluctuations of dissolved oxygen in the Indian and Pacific oceans during Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations caused by variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Large fluctuations of dissolved oxygen in the Indian and Pacific oceans during Dansgaard glacial Indian and Pacific oceans sediments document millennial-scale fluctuations of subsurface dissolved Hemisphere of the Indian and Pacific oceans, consistent with the paleoclimate records. Cold periods

  5. Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean M. Jochum Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary model of the tropical Pacific ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability caused by internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the Pacific cold tongue internal variability

  6. Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard a,d,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard of the overturning circulation. Volumetrically the Pacific Ocean dominates the world ocean (it is three times larger of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, USA c Department of Geosciences, Princeton

  7. Population structure of Manta birostris (Chondrichthyes:Mobulidae) from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Timothy Brian

    2002-01-01

    Sequence variation was examined in the circumtropical and highly vagile manta ray, Manta birostris, from the western and eastern Pacific oceans and the Gulf of Mexico to investigate the systematics and population structure of Manta. The entire...

  8. Dissolved organic carbon export with North Pacific Intermediate Water formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    Dissolved organic carbon export with North Pacific Intermediate Water formation Dennis A. Hansell 2002. [1] An evaluation of DOC export with the formation of North Pacific Intermediate Water east of Japan. The new intermediate water, formed at a rate of 2­5 Sv, exports DOC at 13 ± 6 Tg DOC yr

  9. OligoceneMiocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific Ocean: Evidence from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    investigated parts of the southwest Pacific Ocean. It is a region of remnant volcanic arcs, plateaus and basins of the study area in the SW Pacific Ocean, showing geographic names and dredge locations from ChurkinOligocene­Miocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific

  10. Relating spatial and temporal scales of climate and ocean variability to survival of Pacific Northwest Chinook salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relating spatial and temporal scales of climate and ocean variability to survival of Pacific Oregon St, Suite 200, Portland, OR 97232, U.S.A. 2 Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-5020, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest Chinook, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, have

  11. Striped Marlin, Tetrapturus audax, Migration Patterns and Rates in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as Determined by a Cooperative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Striped Marlin, Tetrapturus audax, Migration Patterns and Rates in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, tagged and recaptured in the northeast Pacific Ocean during 1957-81 are reported by time period. Billfish tagging by marine anglers in the Pacific began in the middle 1950's when tagging equipment

  12. Impact of Tropical Cyclones on the Heat Budget of the South Pacific Ocean S. JULLIEN,* C. E. MENKES,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Tropical Cyclones on the Heat Budget of the South Pacific Ocean S. JULLIEN,* C. E. MENKES cyclones (TCs) in the South Pacific convergence zone through a complete ocean heat budget. The TC impact, in final form 4 May 2012) ABSTRACT The present study investigates the integrated ocean response to tropical

  13. Movements and behaviors of swordfish in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans examined using pop-up satellite archival tags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Movements and behaviors of swordfish in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans examined using pop depths were signifi- cantly correlated with light penetration as measured by the diffuse attenuation words: Atlantic Ocean, deep sound scattering layer, diel migration, Pacific Ocean, satellite tags

  14. David Welch is the president of Kintama Research Services Ltd., and chief architect of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    . During the next decade he was responsible for studying the ocean biology of Pacific salmon, and providedDavid Welch is the president of Kintama Research Services Ltd., and chief architect of the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking project (POST), which has formed the basis for the global Ocean Tracking Network

  15. Sinking fluxes of minor and trace elements in the North Pacific Ocean measured during the VERTIGO program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinking fluxes of minor and trace elements in the North Pacific Ocean measured during the VERTIGO depths in the oceanic mesopelagic zone and at two biogeochemically contrasting sites (N. Central Pacific in the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) program, we collected and analyzed sinking particles using sediment traps at three

  16. Modal analysis of the range evolution of broadband wavefields in the North Pacific Ocean: Low mode numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Modal analysis of the range evolution of broadband wavefields in the North Pacific Ocean: Low mode North Pacific Ocean are reported here. Transient wavefields in the 50­90 Hz band that were recorded numbers Ilya A. Udovydchenkova) Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic

  17. East Pacific ocean eddies and their relationship to subseasonal variability in Central American wind jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    flank of the wind jet and strengthens as it propagates offshore in the following two to three weeks Papagayo, ocean eddy formation is not well correlated with local wind jet variability. In both the GulfsEast Pacific ocean eddies and their relationship to subseasonal variability in Central American

  18. Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT): Summary As the largest ocean, the Pacific is intricately linked to major changes in the global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT): Summary As the largest ocean, the Pacific is intricately and objectives, together with the estimated age for the oceanic crust on which the sedimentary section rests be deployed for the upper ~200 m. Table 1: Proposed Site details Penetration (m) Site-specific Objectives

  19. ENSO regimes and the late 1970's climate shift: The role of synoptic weather and South Pacific ocean spiciness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Kane, Terence J.; Matear, Richard J.; Chamberlain, Matthew A.; Oke, Peter R.

    2014-08-15

    South Pacific subtropical density compensated temperature and salinity (spiciness) anomalies are known to be associated with decadal equatorial variability, however, the mechanisms by which such disturbances are generated, advect and the degree to which they modulate the equatorial thermocline remains controversial. During the late 1970's a climate regime transition preceded a period of strong and sustained El Nino events. Using an ocean general circulation model forced by the constituent mechanical and thermodynamic components of the reanalysed atmosphere we show that the late 1970's transition coincided with the arrival of a large-scale, subsurface cold and fresh water anomaly in the central tropical Pacific. An ocean reanalysis for the period 1990–2007 that assimilates subsurface Argo, XBT and CTD data, reveals that disturbances occur due to the subduction of negative surface salinity anomalies from near 30° S, 100° W which are advected along the ?=25–26 kgm{sup ?3} isopycnal surfaces. These anomalies take, on average, seven years to reach the central equatorial Pacific where they may substantially perturb the thermocline before the remnants ultimately ventilate in the region of the western Pacific warm pool. Positive (warm–salty) disturbances, known to occur due to late winter diapycnal mixing and isopycnal outcropping, arise due to both subduction of subtropical mode waters and subsurface injection. On reaching the equatorial band (10° S–0° S) these disturbances tend to deepen the thermocline reducing the model's ENSO. In contrast the emergence of negative (cold–fresh) disturbances at the equator are associated with a shoaling of the thermocline and El Nino events. Process studies are used to show that the generation and advection of anomalous density compensated thermocline disturbances critically depend on stochastic forcing of the intrinsic ocean by weather. We further show that in the absence of the inter-annual component of the atmosphere forcing Central Pacific El Nino events are manifest.

  20. The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

  1. Stylistic control of ocean water simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Root, Christopher Wayne

    2009-05-15

    This thesis presents a new method for controlling the look of an ocean water simulation for the purpose of creating cartoon-styled fluid animations. Two popular techniques to simulate fluid, a statistical height field ...

  2. A study of lightning activity over the warm pool western Pacific Ocean (TOGA-COARE region) for 1993 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rios, Luis Alberto

    1995-01-01

    The warm pool western Pacific Ocean is an area of the equatorial tropics characterized by strong and frequent convection, and vigorous lightning activity. However, it has been noted by various researchers that the vast oceanic expanses experience...

  3. Variability of the Indo-Pacific Ocean exchanges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    The ECCO–GODAE global estimate of the ocean circulation 1992–2007 is analyzed in the region of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), including the Southern Ocean flow south of Australia. General characteristics are an intense ...

  4. Tidal constituent database. West Coast of the United States and Eastern North pacific ocean. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This technical note describes a database of tidal elevation boundary condition information generated in support of the `Long-Term Fate of Dredged Material Disposed in Open Water` research of the Dredging Research Program (DRP), being conducted at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. The database, described in detail by Hench and others (1994), allows the user to manually generate time series of tidal elevations or to use a program to access the full database to generate time series of both tidal elevations and currents for any location along the West Coast of the United States and Eastern North Pacific Ocean, extending from Seal Cape on Unimak Island, Alaska, in the North to Punta Parada, Peru, in the South. The land boundary includes the Pacific shorelines of Alaska, Canada, mainland United States, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Columbia, and Northern Peru. Although the capability to generate these time series was developed to provide input to the Long-Term Fate and Stability Model (LTFATE), the generated time series can be used for any application requiring tidal forcing data.

  5. Temporal variability of Î? 14 C, δ 13 C, and C/N in sinking particulate organic matter at a deep time series station in the northeast Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Jeomshik; Druffel, Ellen R. M; Griffin, Sheila; Smith, Kenneth L; Baldwin, Roberta J; Bauer, James E

    2004-01-01

    in the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 101,slope to the abyssal NE Pacific Ocean, Deep Sea Res. , Partin the eastern North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 103,

  6. 232 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 30, NO. 1, JANUARY 2005 North East Pacific Time-Integrated Undersea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    232 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 30, NO. 1, JANUARY 2005 North East Pacific TimeGinnis, and Phil Lancaster Abstract--The objective of the North East Pacific Time-In- tegrated Undersea Networked elec- tronics, transient analysis, underwater cables. I. INTRODUCTION THE vast oceans of the world have

  7. Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

    2006-09-26

    Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

  8. Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo

    2013-03-29

    Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate • 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and • their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: • TODAM and FLESCOT’s theories and mathematical formulations • TODAM and FLESCOT model structures • Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications • Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. • Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including • PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities • Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics • Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment • EMSL tour • Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

  9. Radiocarbon in dissolved organic carbon of the South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druffel, ERM; Griffin, S

    2015-01-01

    G. Ostlund (1983), Abyssal water C distribution and the agenorthward transport of deep waters, indicating that the deepof Lower Circumpolar Deep Water. This presents a conundrum

  10. Oceanic Control of Northeast Pacific Hurricane Activity at Interannual Timescales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-10-16

    Despite the strong dependence of the Power Dissipation Index (PDI), which is a measure of the intensity of Tropical Cyclone (TC) activity, on tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), the variations in PDI are not completely explained by SST. Here we show, using an analysis of a string of observational data sets, that the variability of the thermocline depth (TD) in the east Pacific exerts a significant degree of control on the variability of PDI in that region. On average, a deep thermocline with a larger reservoir of heat favors TC intensification by reducing SST cooling while a shallow thermocline with a smaller heat reservoir promotes enhanced SST cooling that contributes to TC decay. At interannual time scales, the variability of basin-mean TD accounts for nearly 30% of the variability in the PDI during the TC season. Also, about 20% of the interannual variability in the east Pacific basin-mean TD is due to the El Niño and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a dominant climate signal in this region. This study suggests that a better understanding of the factors governing the interannual variability of the TD conditions in the east Pacific and how they may change over time, may lead to an improved projection of future east Pacific TC activity.

  11. PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) Database: A Data Synthesis Resource (NDP-92, ORNL/CDIAC-159)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Suzuki, T.; Ishii, M.; Aoyama, M. R; Christian, J. R.; Enyo, K.; Kawano, T.; Key, R. M.; Kosugi, N.; Kozyr, A.; Miller, L. A.; Murata, A.; Nakano, T.; Ono, T.; Saino, T.; Sasaki, K.; Sasano, D; Takatani, Y.; Wakita, M.; Sabine, C.

    PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) was an international collaborative project for synthesis of data on ocean interior carbon and its related parameters in the Pacific Ocean. The North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES), Section on Carbon and Climate (S-CC) supported the project. Hydrographic/hydrochemical datasets have been merged from a total of 272 cruises, including those from cruises conducted between the late 1980s and 2000 but not included in GLODAP, as well as CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography datasets from the 2000s. Adjustments were calculated to account for analytical offsets in dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients (nitrate and nitrite, phosphate, and silicic acid) for each cruise as a result of the secondary quality control procedure, based on crossover analysis using data from deep layers (Tanhua et al., 2010). A total of 59 adjusted datasets from Line P off the west coast of Canada were also merged. Finally, the authors have produced the adjusted PACIFICA database that consists of datasets from a total of 306 cruises that also includes 34 datasets from WOCE Hydrographic Program cruises in the Pacific Ocean conducted in the 1990s. The PACIFICA database is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP-92) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the primary PACIFICA data site at pacifica.pices.jp. The NDP consists of the original cruise data files, adjusted data product, and the documentation.

  12. Data Report: Oligocene Paleoceanography of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean: Planktonic and Benthic Foraminifer Stable Isotope Results from Site 1218 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Bridget, S.; P??like, Heiko

    2005-01-01

    .) Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results Volume 199 17. DATA REPORT: OLIGOCENE PALEOCEANOGRAPHY OF THE EQUATORIAL PACIFIC OCEAN: PLANKTONIC AND BENTHIC FORAMINIFER STABLE ISOTOPE RESULTS FROM SITE 1218 1 Bridget S. Wade 2,3 and Heiko... Hemisphere. Previous work has suggested that the volume of the Antarctic ice sheet 1 Wade, B.S., and P?like, H., 2005. Data report: Oligocene paleoceanography of the equatorial Pacific Ocean: planktonic and benthic foraminifer stable isotope results from...

  13. How ocean color can steer Pacific tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Because ocean color alters the absorption of sunlight, it can produce changes in sea surface temperatures with further impacts on atmospheric circulation. These changes can project onto fields previously recognized to alter ...

  14. Mid-Cretaceous Palynoflora from Central Mid-Pacific Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiung, Shih-Yi

    2012-10-19

    Albian (late Early Cretaceous) pollen and spores were used to reconstruct the floral history of Allison Guyot in the Albian period, to better understand pollen and spore distributions on mid-oceanic islands, to investigate ...

  15. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal; Siegel et al., 1995] have demonstrated that the penetration of EVIS in the upper layer of the ocean plays

  16. Ionospheric equatorial anomaly formation over Pacific and Atlantic oceans measured by NASA TOPEX satellite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewell, V.R.; Vladimer, J.A.; Lee, M.C. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering Dept.; Doherty, P.H.; Decker, D.T. [Boston Coll., Newton, MA (United States). Inst. for Science Research; Anderson, D.N.; Klobuchar, J.A. [Phillips Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (United States). Ionospheric Effects Branch

    1996-12-31

    Previous ionospheric observations have measured Total Electron Content (TEC) values at fixed land based locations. These observations suggest the existence of longitudinal variations in TEC values. Complementing ground data, the current NASA TOPEX mission is providing TEC data collected over oceans as a function of latitude, longitude and time starting from September 1992. With this broad data base, the authors show a more complete picture of the longitudinal dependence between the Atlantic and Pacific ocean regions and relate this dependence to plasma drifts. Periods during June and December solstice, and March and September equinox in the years 1992, through 1995, are picked to study the low-latitude regions spanning the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. TEC isodensity contours are presented by latitude versus longitude at common local time. They correlate these contours with results from the Phillips Laboratory ionospheric model.

  17. Low-frequency variability of the North Pacific Ocean: The roles of boundary-and wind-driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Low-frequency variability of the North Pacific Ocean: The roles of boundary- and wind in determining the low-frequency large-scale variability of the ocean interior through Rossby waves generated. The variability in the ocean interior is primarily driven by wind with only a minor influence from the boundary

  18. Observations and transport theory analysis of low frequency, acoustic mode propagation in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean Tarun K. Chandrayadulaa) and John A. Colosi Naval Postgraduate School order mode statistics as a function of range and source depth are presented from the Long Range Ocean of ocean acoustics research for decades. Fluctuation statistics are crucial to achieve more coherent sig

  19. North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koracin, Darko; Cerovecki, Ivana; Vellore, Ramesh; Mejia, John; Hatchett, Benjamin; McCord, Travis; McLean, Julie; Dorman, Clive

    2013-04-11

    Executive summary The main objective of the study was to investigate atmospheric and ocean interaction processes in the western Pacific and, in particular, effects of significant ocean heat loss in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions on the lower and upper atmosphere. It is yet to be determined how significant are these processes are on climate scales. The understanding of these processes led us also to development of the methodology of coupling the Weather and Research Forecasting model with the Parallel Ocean Program model for western Pacific regional weather and climate simulations. We tested NCAR-developed research software Coupler 7 for coupling of the WRF and POP models and assessed its usability for regional-scale applications. We completed test simulations using the Coupler 7 framework, but implemented a standard WRF model code with options for both one- and two-way mode coupling. This type of coupling will allow us to seamlessly incorporate new WRF updates and versions in the future. We also performed a long-term WRF simulation (15 years) covering the entire North Pacific as well as high-resolution simulations of a case study which included extreme ocean heat losses in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions. Since the extreme ocean heat loss occurs during winter cold air outbreaks (CAO), we simulated and analyzed a case study of a severe CAO event in January 2000 in detail. We found that the ocean heat loss induced by CAOs is amplified by additional advection from mesocyclones forming on the southern part of the Japan Sea. Large scale synoptic patterns with anomalously strong anticyclone over Siberia and Mongolia, deep Aleutian Low, and the Pacific subtropical ridge are a crucial setup for the CAO. It was found that the onset of the CAO is related to the breaking of atmospheric Rossby waves and vertical transport of vorticity that facilitates meridional advection. The study also indicates that intrinsic parameterization of the surface fluxes within the WRF model needs more evaluation and analysis.

  20. Multilateralism and International Ocean-Resources Law: Chapter 8. Ocean Policy Toward Russia & the Pacific Fisheries: The U.S. & Western Countries’ Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaczynski, Vladimir M.

    2003-01-01

    2002), Suckered at Sakhalin, The North Pacific Digest,change of the Russian ocean Sakhalin development strategies,David Gordon, Suckered at Sakhalin, T HE N ORTH P ACIFIC D

  1. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    sub- tropical North Pacific Ocean. Aquatic Microbial Ecologytropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and contributes sub-

  2. Information Infrastructure for Publishing and Integrating Water Resource Data from Pacific Rim Universities in Support of Hydrologic Modeling and Integrated Water Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaslavsky, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    Water Resource Data from Pacific Rim Universities in Supportbeen building capacity of Pacific Rim University partners inof the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU). The

  3. Computing dynamic height from temperature profiles north of 30N in the Pacific Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Anthony

    1978-01-01

    fronts and their relation to the wind and energy flux fields. J. Geophys. Res. , 5, 557 ? 571. Sverdrup, H, U. , M. W. Johnson, and R. H. Fleming, 1942: The Oceans Their Phys7cs, Chemistry and General Biology. Prentice Hall. Stommel, H. S. , 1947... HEIGHT FROM TEMPERATURE PROFILES NORTH OP 30"N IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN A Thesis by ANTHONY O' BRIEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fullfillment of the requirement for the degree of 1fASTER OF SCIENCF. May 1978...

  4. Global Climate network evolves with North Atlantic Oscillation phases: Coupling to Southern Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guez, Oded; Berezin, Yehiel; Wang, Yang; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    We construct a network from climate records of atmospheric temperature at surface level, at different geographical sites in the globe, using reanalysis data from years 1948-2010. We find that the network correlates with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both locally in the north Atlantic, and through coupling to the southern Pacific Ocean. The existence of tele-connection links between those areas and their stability over time allows us to suggest a possible physical explanation for this phenomenon.

  5. Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean Sedimentation: Investigating Constant Flux Proxies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ajay 1980-

    2012-12-03

    of dissolved 230Th concentrations (7.9-16.5 fg/kg) than that within Panama Basin waters (5.7-7.1 fg/kg). There is a progressive decrease, suggesting advection, in average dissolved deep-water (>1000 m) 230Th concentrations from the southernmost sites...

  6. Deep water properties, velocities, and dynamics over ocean trenches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Deep water properties, velocities, and dynamics over ocean trenches by Gregory C. Johnson1 ABSTRACT Observations of water properties and deep currents over several trenches in the Paci c Ocean central basins and modeled owing away from an eastern deep-water source (Warren, 1982) and toward an eastern deep-water sink

  7. Week 4, Rain in my Brain On top of the Harbor Cone, Otago Peninsula, Pacific Ocean in the distance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    Week 4, Rain in my Brain On top of the Harbor Cone, Otago Peninsula, Pacific Ocean in the distance of the ocean or of this beautiful city from on-high and it all comes back that we're here, a dream come true

  8. Western Pacific Regional Summary Western Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of the Pacific-wide (western-central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is active in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview

  9. DECEMBER 1999 3073J O H N S O N A N D M C P H A D E N Interior Pycnocline Flow from the Subtropical to the Equatorial Pacific Ocean*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    to the Equatorial Pacific Ocean* GREGORY C. JOHNSON AND MICHAEL J. MCPHADEN NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental and Southern Hemispheres of the Pacific Ocean. In the North Pacific the pycnocline shoals and strengthens dra in the pycnocline of the central North Pacific. This study delineates this pathway and estimates an upper bound

  10. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator Southeastern...

  11. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Elliot E. Mainzer, Administrator, Bonneville...

  12. Ocean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN AND WHIT G. ANDERSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    shortwave penetration in the high-latitude Southern Ocean causes an increase in the formation of mode waterOcean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN Jersey (Manuscript received 11 October 2007, in final form 17 July 2008) ABSTRACT Ocean water clarity

  13. Petrophysical properties of the root zone of sheeted dikes in the ocean crust: A case study from Hole ODP/IODP 1256D, Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Program) Site 1256 is located on the Cocos Plate in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean, in a 15 Ma oldPetrophysical properties of the root zone of sheeted dikes in the ocean crust: A case study from Hole ODP/IODP 1256D, Eastern Equatorial Pacific Marie Violay , Philippe A. Pezard, Benoît Ildefonse

  14. Using Satellite Ocean Color Data to Derive an Empirical Model for the Penetration Depth of Solar Radiation (Hp) in the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, .Dake

    the climate through the penetration depth of solar radiation in the upper ocean (Hp), a primary parameter on penetrative solar radiation in the tropical Pacific, demonstrating the dynamical implication of remotely in which incident solar radiation is absorbed in the mixed layer and the verti- cal penetration down

  15. Late Cretaceous through Paleogene Reconstruction of Pacific Deep-Water Circulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Jessica

    2012-07-16

    A growing body of Nd isotope data derived from fish debris and Fe-Mn crusts suggests that the Pacific was characterized by deep-water mass formation in both the North and South Pacific during the Early Paleogene. However, the South Pacific source...

  16. Western Pacific Regional Summary Western Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported in 2007. Currently (WCPFC) is active in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview of the WCPFC and IATTC

  17. Western Pacific Regional Summary Western Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported in 2007. Currently, there are no catch share in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview of the WCPFC and IATTC migrate across international

  18. Plastic particles in coastal pelagic ecosystems of the Northeast Pacific ocean Miriam J. Doyle a,*, William Watson b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plastic particles in coastal pelagic ecosystems of the Northeast Pacific ocean Miriam J. Doyle a 2010 Accepted 11 October 2010 Keywords: Plastic particles Fragments Fibers Pellets Pelagic ecosystems the distribution, abundance and characteristics of plastic particles in plankton samples collected routinely

  19. and new production rates from several locations in the coastal and open Pacific Ocean. They also demonstrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    and new production rates from several locations in the coastal and open Pacific Ocean. They also approximated the large-scale rate of new production. In 1967, Richard Dugdale and John Goering had defined new production as the fraction of the overall net primary production that was supported by external, or "new

  20. 5.12 Ocean-Derived Aerosol and Its Climate Impacts PK Quinn and TS Bates, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5.12 Ocean-Derived Aerosol and Its Climate Impacts PK Quinn and TS Bates, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA, USA Published by Elsevier Ltd. 5.12.1 Introduction 317 5.12.2 Ocean-Derived Aerosol Production Mechanisms 317 5.12.3 Radiative Effects of Ocean-Derived Aerosol 319 5.12.3.1 Aerosol

  1. Variation of surface currents and effects on dispersion in the Tropical Pacific Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Doyle Jackson

    1980-01-01

    annual scale, the ITCZ is very well defined east of 170 'W and o occurs at around 8 N. West of 170 the light variable winds 0 o of the doldrums separate the two systems. The position of the ITCZ varies seasonally following the sun toward the summer... (Tabata, 197 5) North Ecuatorial Countercurrent The North Ecuatorial Countercurrent flows eastward against the wind between 4'N laf. and 10'N lat. across the entire Pacific transporting warm water from west to east. The flow is in approximate...

  2. Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    aquaculture; Pacific Northwest #12;v Dedication Tomymother,Ann.Throughlifeyouhaveshownmewhat realstrengthis.......................................................................................................................... iv Dedication...............

  3. Information Infrastructure for Publishing and Integrating Water Resource Data from Pacific Rim Universities in Support of Hydrologic Modeling and Integrated Water Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaslavsky, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    Publishing and Integrating Water Resource Data from PacificModeling and Integrated Water Resource Management Finalin publishing and analyzing local water data, configuring a

  4. Physical Mechanisms for the Maintenance of GCM-Simulated Madden-Julian Oscillation over the Indian Ocean and Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Liping; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2011-05-05

    The kinetic energy budget is conducted to analyze the physical processes responsible for the improved Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) simulated by the Iowa State University general circulation models (ISUGCM). The modified deep convection scheme that includes the revised convection closure, convection trigger condition and convective momentum transport (CMT) enhances the equatorial (10oS-10oN) MJO-related perturbation kinetic energy (PKE) in the upper troposphere and leads to more robust and coherent eastward propagating MJO signal. In the MJO source region-the Indian Ocean (45oE-120oE), the upper-tropospheric MJO PKE is maintained by the vertical convergence of wave energy flux and the barotropic conversion through the horizontal shear of mean flow. In the convectively active region-the western Pacific (120oE-180o), the upper-tropospheric MJO PKE is supported by the convergence of horizontal and vertical wave energy fluxes. Over the central-eastern Pacific (180o-120oW), where convection is suppressed, the upper-tropospheric MJO PKE is mainly due to the horizontal convergence of wave energy flux. The deep convection trigger condition produces stronger convective heating which enhances the perturbation available potential energy (PAPE) production and the upward wave energy fluxes, and leads to the increased MJO PKE over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific. The trigger condition also enhances the MJO PKE over the central-eastern Pacific through the increased convergence of meridional wave energy flux from the subtropical latitudes of both hemispheres. The revised convection closure affects the response of mean zonal wind shear to the convective heating over the Indian Ocean and leads to the enhanced upper-tropospheric MJO PKE through the barotropic conversion. The stronger eastward wave energy flux due to the increase of convective heating over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific by the revised closure is favorable to the eastward propagation of MJO and the convergence of horizontal wave energy flux over the central-eastern Pacific. The convection-induced momentum tendency tends to decelerate the upper-tropospheric wind which results in a negative work to the PKE budget in the upper troposphere. However, the convection momentum tendency accelerates the westerly wind below 800 hPa over the western Pacific, which is partially responsible for the improved MJO simulation.

  5. Character of the diatom assemblage spanning a depositional transition in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean at 6.6 Ma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookshire, Brian Neville, Jr.

    2005-02-17

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2003 Major Subject: Oceanography CHARACTER OF THE DIATOM ASSEMBLAGE SPANNING A DEPOSITIONAL TRANSITION IN THE EASTERN EQUATORIAL PACIFIC OCEAN AT 6.6 Ma A Thesis... by BRIAN NEVILLE BROOKSHIRE JR. Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by...

  6. SWOT: The Surface Water & Ocean Topography Satellite Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center School of Earth Sciences The Ohio State University Funded By: Funded By: #12;with many-Boundary Issues: ex: Tigris & Euphrates Disputes Slide courtesy Frank Schwartz n Water Usage: n 98.5% water energy of the ocean. For example, the cross-stream scale of the Gulf Stream is 100 km, which is not fully

  7. Atmosphere and Ocean: Water (drought topic begins at slide 26)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water: the `vapor pressure' exerted by H2O molecules increases exponenEally with temperature ( it boils when that vapor pressure equals the ambient pressure: Humans & Nature 23 May 2012 GFD Lab: www.ocean.washington.edu/research/gfd #12;water vapor

  8. PACIFIC COAST SALMON pacific Coast Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and central North Pacific Ocean. These species are only vulnerable to shore-based Photo above: Male coho in the Pacific Ocean, Puget Sound, and in freshwater rivers on their spawning migrations. All recreational. In the Pacific Ocean all harvest is by trolling; in Puget Sound, gillnets and purse seines are used in addition

  9. Natural Radiocarbon Distribution in the Deep Ocean Katsumi MATSUMOTO1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsumoto, Katsumi

    , World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), ocean ventilation, North Atlantic Deep Water, Antarctic Bottom Water, Circumpolar Deep Water, Pacific Deep Water, thermohaline circulation 1. INTRODUCTION Deep in the subtropical North Atlantic, revealed that much of the deep water is cold, and warm water is confined to a thin

  10. North Pacific carbon cycle response to climate variability on seasonal to decadal timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    in the subarctic North Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.of the tropical Pacific Ocean: I. Seasonal and interannualthe subtropical North Pacific Ocean, Nature, 424, 754 – 757.

  11. Strengthening of the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent in the SODA Reanalysis: Mechanisms, Ocean Dynamics, and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnauskas, Kristopher B.

    Several recent studies utilizing global climate models predict that the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) will strengthen over the twenty-first century. Here, historical changes in the tropical Pacific are investigated ...

  12. Increased reservoir ages and poorly ventilated deep waters inferred in the glacial Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuente, Maria de la; Skinner, Luke; Calvo, Eva; Pelejero, Carles; Cacho, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    % with% other% B@P% records% from% the% northern@% and% southern% high% latitude% Pacific% Ocean% (SWP19,21;% SEP24;% NEP22).% All% of% these% studies%indicate%slightly%higher%B@P%age%offsets%during%the%last%glacial%period%(?200@600%yr...

  13. Ship Observations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean along the Coast of South America S. P. DE SZOEKE, C. W. FAIRALL, AND SERGIO PEZOA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    of upwelling, surface fluxes, and transport, which in turn depend on the wind and solar forcing at the ocean surface. Southeasterly winds blow parallel to the coast in the Southern Hemisphere, causing offshore EkmanShip Observations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean along the Coast of South America S. P. DE SZOEKE, C

  14. Interannual variability of the Pacific water boundary current in the Beaufort Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brugler, Eric T

    2013-01-01

    Between 2002 and 2011 a single mooring was maintained in the core of the Pacific Water boundary current in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea near 152° W. Using velocity and hydrographic data from six year-long deployments during ...

  15. MEASUREMENTS OF PAST 14C LEVELS AND 13C/12C RATIOS IN THE SURFACE WATERS OF THE WORLD'S SUBPOLAR OCEANS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T A

    2010-04-22

    Under this project we have developed methods that allow the reconstruction of past {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean by measuring the {sup 14}C contents of archived salmon scales. The overall goal of this research was to reduce of the uncertainty in the uptake of fossil CO{sub 2} by the oceans and thereby improve the quantification of the global carbon cycle and to elucidate the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs), with their three dimensional global spatial coverage and temporal modeling capabilities, provide the best route to accurately calculating the total uptake of CO{sub 2} by the oceans and, hence, to achieving the desired reduction in uncertainty. {sup 14}C has played, and continues to play, a central role in the validation of the OGCMs calculations, particularly with respect to those model components which govern the uptake of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and the transport of this carbon within the oceans. Under this project, we have developed time-series records of the {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of three areas of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean. As the previously available data on the time-history of oceanic surface water {sup 14}C levels are very limited, these time-series records provide significant new {sup 14}C data to constrain and validate the OGCMs.

  16. INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    environmental change and Asia-Pacific climate. The Asia-Pacific Data-Research Center (APDRC): To provide-Australian Monsoon System 14 Impacts of Global Environmental Change 21 Asia-Pacific Data-Research Center 27 Center 1 The Year's Highlights 3 Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 4 Regional-Ocean Influences 10 Asian

  17. INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    environmental change and Asia-Pacific climate. The Asia-Pacific Data-Research Center (APDRC): To provide Research Center 1 2 The Year's Highlights 3 Research Accomplishments Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 4 Regional-Ocean Influences 15 Asian-Australian Monsoon System 19 Impacts of Global Environmental Change 29 Asia-Pacific Data

  18. International Pacific Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    environmental change and Asia-Pacific climate. The Asia-Pacific Data-Research Center (APDRC): To provide-Australian Monsoon System 19 Impacts of Global Environmental Change 36 Asia-Pacific Data-Research Center 45 Center i Foreword ii iv Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 1 Regional-Ocean Influences 13 Asian

  19. Regional Summary Western Pacific Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5 million pounds) of the Pacific-wide (western-central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean coordinated management between countries with fishing interests in the Pacific Ocean. The annual bigeye tuna

  20. Effects of El Nin~o Southern Oscillation and Pacific Interdecadal Oscillation on Water Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramírez, Jorge A.

    .e., snow or rain . The latter may play a vital role in determining the available water for a given yearEffects of El Nin~o Southern Oscillation and Pacific Interdecadal Oscillation on Water Supply ENSO to assess impacts on seasonal water supply in the Columbia River Basin and to test for statistical

  1. The Golden Gate Textile Barrier: Preserving California Bay of San Francisco from a Rising North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richart B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

    2007-02-04

    Climate change in California may require construction of a barrier separating the Pacific Ocean from San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento River-San Joaquin River Delta simply because Southern California is remarkably dependent on freshwater exported from the Delta. We offer a new kind of salt barrier, a macroproject built of impermeable textile materials stretched across the Golden Gate beneath the famous bridge. We anticipate it might eventually substitute for a recently proposed San Francisco In-Stream Tidal Power Plant harnessing a 1.7 m tide at the Bay entrance if future climate conditions Statewide is conducive. First-glance physics underpin our macroproject.

  2. The Golden Gate Textile Barrier: Preserving California Bay of San Francisco from a Rising North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathcart, R B; Bolonkin, Alexander A.; Cathcart, Richart B.

    2007-01-01

    Climate change in California may require construction of a barrier separating the Pacific Ocean from San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento River-San Joaquin River Delta simply because Southern California is remarkably dependent on freshwater exported from the Delta. We offer a new kind of salt barrier, a macroproject built of impermeable textile materials stretched across the Golden Gate beneath the famous bridge. We anticipate it might eventually substitute for a recently proposed San Francisco In-Stream Tidal Power Plant harnessing a 1.7 m tide at the Bay entrance if future climate conditions Statewide is conducive. First-glance physics underpin our macroproject.

  3. A model of the ocean migration of Pacific salmon Chloe Bracis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    advection by ocean currents with fish swimming behavior to model trajectories of salmon. The behavior rules are based on possible responses to components of the earth's magnetic field, and the ocean currents the high seas to the Columbia River, including the effects of interannual variability in ocean currents

  4. A Spatial Deconvolution of Molecular Signals in Oceanic Dissolved Organic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis B

    2008-01-01

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,central equatorial Pacific Ocean, 1992: Daily and finescale

  5. A spatial deconvolution of molecular signals in oceanic dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis Blake

    2008-01-01

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D;

  6. Module for the Ocean Environment Prepared for the NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Regional Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................ 11 3.4 North Pacific Ocean ............................................................................................................................ 19 4.1.3. North Pacific Ocean ............................................................................................................................ 25 4.2.3. North Pacific Ocean

  7. Comparison of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water formation rates in the South Pacific between NCAR-CCSM4 and observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Fine, Rana A.; Kamenkovich, Igor; Sloyan, Bernadette M.

    2014-01-28

    Average formation rates for Subantarctic Mode (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW) in the South Pacific are calculated from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model version 4 (NCAR-CCSM4), using chlorofluorocarbon inventories. CFC-12 inventories and formation rates are compared to ocean observations. CCSM4 accurately simulates the southeast Pacific as the main formation region for SAMW and AAIW. CCSM4 formation rates for SAMW are 3.4 Sv, about half of the observational rate. Shallow mixed layers and a thinner SAMW in CCSM4 are responsible for lower formation rates. A formation rate of 8.1 Sv for AAIW in CCSM4 is higher than observations. Higher inventories in CCSM4 in the southwest and central Pacific, and higher surface concentrations are the main reasons for higher formation rates of AAIW. This comparison of model and observations is useful for understanding the uptake and transport of other gases, e.g., CO2 by the model.

  8. Water and Environmental Research Institute of the Western Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information transfer programs under a variety of federal and local funding sources, but the Institute sources and associated projects carried out by the Institute during the 2013-2014 reporting period: DIRECTWater and Environmental Research Institute of the Western Pacific Annual Technical Report FY 2013

  9. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance: Best Management Practice Case Studies #4 and #5 - Water Efficient Landscape and Irrigation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practices #4 and #5 Case Study: Overview of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory grounds maintenance program and results.

  10. Passive microwave observations of mesoscale convective systems over the tropical Pacific Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Gary Rae

    1994-01-01

    the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) aboard the NASA ER2 during the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled-Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE). The AMPR measures linearly polarized radiation at 10.7, 19.35, 37. 1, and 85...

  11. Comparison of the Carbon System Parameters at the Global CO2 Survey Crossover Locations in the North and South Pacific Ocean, 1990-1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feely, Richard A [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Lamb, Marilyn F. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Greeley, Dana J. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Wanninkhof, Rik [NOAA, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

    1999-10-01

    As a collaborative program to measure global ocean carbon inventories and provide estimates of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (C02) uptake by the oceans. the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy have sponsored the collection of ocean carbon measurements as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study cruises. The cruises discussed here occurred in the North and South Pacific from 1990 through 1996. The carbon parameters from these 30 crossover locations have been compared to ensure that a consistent global data set emerges from the survey cruises. !'he results indicate that for dissolved inorganic carbon. fugacity of C02• and pH. the a~:,rreements at most crossover locations are well within the design specifications for the global CO) survey: whereas. in the case of total alkaliniry. the agreement between crossover locations is not as close.

  12. A Review of the Systematics of Angel Sharks Emphasizing the Species of the Eastern Pacific Region with a Modified Set of Morphometrics for Order Squatiniformes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alioto, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    occurring in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Ayers compared hisoccurring in the eastern Pacific Ocean. It remains possibleof the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Squatiniformes are very

  13. Talley, L.D. 2013. Closure of the global overturning circulation through the Indian, Pacific, and Southern Oceans: Schematics and transports. Oceanography 26(1):8097,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    , Pacific, and Southern Oceans: Schematics and transports. Oceanography 26(1):80­97, http://dx.doi.org/10 in Oceanography, Volume 26, Number 1, a quarterly journal of e Oceanography Society. Copyright 2013 by e Oceanography Society. All rights reserved. USAGE Permission is granted to copy this article for use in teaching

  14. Causes of Ocean Surface temperature Changes in Atlantic and Pacific Topical Cyclogenesis Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Causes of Ocean Surface Temperature Changes in Atlantic andt in understanding the causes of such changes. B. D. Santerto study the possible causes of SST changes in Atlantic and

  15. Tropical Ocean Climate Study (TOCS) and Japan-United States Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) on the R/V KAIYO, 25 Jan to 2 March 1997, to the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean BNL component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

    1997-04-11

    The Japanese U.S. Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) cruise on the R/V KAIYO in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean was a collaborative effort with participants from the Japanese Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL. This report is a summary of the instruments, measurements, and initial analysis of the BNL portion of the cruise only. It includes a brief description of the instrument system, calibration procedures, problems and resolutions, data collection, processing and data file descriptions. This is a working document, which is meant to provide both a good description of the work and as much information as possible in one place for future analysis.

  16. Bio-optical properties of oceanic waters: A reappraisal Andre Morel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Bio-optical properties of oceanic waters: A reappraisal Andre´ Morel Laboratoire de Physique et, California Abstract. The apparent optical properties (AOPs) of oceanic case 1 waters were previously analyzed describing the trophic conditions of water bodies. From these empirical relationships a bio-optical model

  17. Diversity of deep-water cetaceans in relation to temperature: implications for ocean warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    LETTER Diversity of deep-water cetaceans in relation to temperature: implications for ocean warming anthropogenic change. Here we analyse a large, long-term data set of sightings of deep-water cetaceans from that deep-water oceanic communities that dominate > 60% of the planetÕs surface may reorganize in response

  18. PACIFIC HIGHLY MIGR ATORY PEL AGIC FISHERIES pacific highly migratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Pacific Ocean, from the tropics to temperate latitudes. Many of these fishes routinely travel great highly migratory species throughout the Pacific Ocean. Some of the fleets are capable of operating across the Pacific as well as in other oceans during a single fishing season. These fleets use larger purse

  19. Neogene overflow of Northern Component Water at the Greenland-Scotland Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samworth, Richard

    EQ, UK [1] In the North Atlantic Ocean, flow of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), and of its ancient the three major deep water masses (i.e., Northern Component Water, Southern Ocean Water, and Pacific OceanNeogene overflow of Northern Component Water at the Greenland-Scotland Ridge H. R. Poore Department

  20. Eocene circulation of the Southern Ocean: Was Antarctica kept warm by subtropical waters?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Döös, Kristofer

    climate model simulations. We find that the EAC did not penetrate to high latitudes and ocean heatEocene circulation of the Southern Ocean: Was Antarctica kept warm by subtropical waters? Matthew suddenly grew and ocean productivity patterns changed. Previous studies conjectured that poleward

  1. Soliton Turbulence in Shallow Water Ocean Surface Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Andrea; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-01-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of $soliton$ $turbulence$ in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a $dense$ $soliton$ $gas$, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation, a $completely$ $integrable$ $soliton$ $system$: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic/quasiperiodic boundary conditions the $ergodic$ $solutions$ of KdV are exactly solvable by $finite$ $gap$ $theory$ (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as $\\sim\\omega^{-1}$. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter $densely$ $packed$ $soliton$ $wave$ $trains$ from the data. We apply ...

  2. Causes of Ocean Surface temperature Changes in Atlantic andPacific Topical Cyclogenesis Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santer, B.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.; Gleckler, P.J.; Bonfils, C.; Wehner, M.F.; AchutaRao, K.; Barnett, T.P.; Boyle, J.S.; Bruggemann, W.; Fiorino, M.; Gillett, N.; Hansen, J.E.; Jones, P.D.; Klein, S.A.; Meehl,G.A.; Raper, S.C.B.; Reynolds, R.W.; Stott, P.A.; Taylor, K.E.; Washington, W.M.

    2006-01-31

    Previous research has identified links between changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and hurricane intensity. We use climate models to study the possible causes of SST changes in Atlantic and Pacific tropical cyclogenesis regions. The observed SST increases in these regions range from 0.32 to 0.67 C over the 20th century. The 22 climate models examined here suggest that century-timescale SST changes of this magnitude cannot be explained solely by unforced variability of the climate system, even under conservative assumptions regarding the magnitude of this variability. Model simulations that include external forcing by combined anthropogenic and natural factors are generally capable of replicating observed SST changes in both tropical cyclogenesis regions.

  3. Comparison of reduced-order, sequential and variational data assimilation methods in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Céline; Verron, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of two reduced-order, sequential and variational data assimilation methods: the SEEK filter and the R-4D-Var. A hybridization of the two, combining the variational framework and the sequential evolution of covariance matrices, is also preliminarily investigated and assessed in the same experimental conditions. The comparison is performed using the twin-experiment approach on a model of the Tropical Pacific domain. The assimilated data are simulated temperature profiles at the locations of the TAO/TRITON array moorings. It is shown that, in a quasi-linear regime, both methods produce similarly good results. However the hybrid approach provides slightly better results and thus appears as potentially fruitful. In a more non-linear regime, when Tropical Instability Waves develop, the global nature of the variational approach helps control model dynamics better than the sequential approach of the SEEK filter. This aspect is probably enhanced by the context of the experiments in tha...

  4. Regional Summary Western Pacific Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported in 2009. Currently (WCPFC) is active in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview of the WCPFC and IATTC

  5. Allochthonous inputs of riverine picocyanobacteria to coastal waters in the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    strains along this gradient showed that the cyanobacterial sequences were divided into eight operational, includ- ing geothermal and sulphide-rich anoxic waters, as well as nutrient-poor open ocean waters

  6. How is the ocean filled? Geoffrey Gebbie1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    hydrographic property to distinguish between North Atlantic Deep Water and Ant- arctic Bottom Water, finding of the deep Pacific than North Atlantic Deep Water. Another answer might be obtained if more water masses were heat, freshwater, and gases with the atmosphere, but once water sinks into the ocean interior

  7. Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The company is working to develop a system to produce electricity using temperature differences in the ocean.

  8. NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake W ashington Ship Canal NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St. NE Boat St. 15th Ave NE 15thAveNE UniversityWayNE BrooklynAveNE NE Pacific St. MontlakeBlvdNE MontlakeBlvdNE Pacific Place NE University Burke-Gilman Trail METRO NW A CD D EF F GHI H J RR BB CC EE AA Rotunda Cafe Ocean Sciences Hitchcock

  9. Effects of climate change on Pacific Northwest water-related resources: Summary of preliminary findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Sands, R.D.; Vail, L.W.; Chatters, J.C.; Neitzel, D.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Case Study is a multi-agency analysis of atmospheric/climatic change impacts on the Pacific Northwest (which includes Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and portions of the Columbia River Basin in Western Montana). The purpose of the case study, which began in fiscal year 1991, was to develop and test analytical tools, as well as to develop an assessment of the effects of climate change on climate-sensitive natural resources of the Pacific Northwest and economic sectors dependent on them. The overall study, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency, was a broad-based, reconnaissance-level study to identify potential climate impacts on agriculture, coastal resources, forest resources, and irrigation in the Pacific Northwest. DOE participated in the reconnaissance study, with responsibility for hydroelectric and water supply issues. While this report briefly discusses a broader array of water issues, attention is mainly focused on three aspects of the water study: (1) the effects of the region`s higher temperatures on the demand for electric power (which in turn puts additional demand on hydroelectric resources of the region); (2) the effects of higher temperatures and changes, both in precipitation amounts and seasonality, on river flows and hydroelectric supply; and (3) the effect of higher temperatures and changed precipitation amounts and seasonality on salmonid resources -- particularly the rearing conditions in tributaries of the Columbia River Basin. Because the meaning of regional climate forecasts is still quite uncertain, most of the preliminary findings are based on sensitivity analyses and historical analog climate scenarios.

  10. UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Ocean Science & Technology Kuykendall Annex Information Technology Center Krauss Hall Holmes HallStairs Pond UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute Exit Dole Street Offices Multipurpose

  11. Surface and free tropospheric sources of methanesulfonic acid over the tropical Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Wang, Yuhang; Gray, Burton A.; Gu, Dasa; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, Chris; Bandy, Alan R.

    2014-07-28

    The production of sulfate aerosols through marine sulfur chemistry is critical to the climate system. However, not all sulfur compounds have been studied in detail. One such compound is methanesulfonic acid (MSA). In this study, we use a one-dimensional chemical transport model to analyze observed vertical profiles of gas-phase MSA during the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE). The observed sharp decrease in MSA from the surface to 600m implies a surface source of 4.0×107 molecules/cm2/s. Evidence suggests that this source is photolytically enhanced. We also find that the observed large increase of MSA from the boundary layer into the lower free troposphere (1000-2000m) results mainly from the degassing of MSA from dehydrated aerosols. We estimate a source of 1.2×107 molecules/cm2/s through this pathway. This source of soluble MSA potentially provides an important precursor for new particle formation in the free troposphere over tropics, affecting the climate system through aerosol-cloud interactions.

  12. Asian anthropogenic lead contamination in the North Pacific Ocean as evidenced by stable lead isotopic compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurbrick, Cheryl Marie

    2014-01-01

    analyses 3.7 dissolved Pb in offshore profiles dissolved Pb2). This cruise began offshore of Japan and had stations inand subsurface waters offshore, where the Kuroshio and

  13. Part IV: Other International Arrangement of Interest Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Oceans and Fisheries Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and economic cooperation among economies around the Pacific Rim. APEC members account for over 90% of globalPart IV: Other International Arrangement of Interest 166 Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC

  14. Reconstruction of Early Paleogene North Pacific Deep-Water Circulation using the Neodymium Isotopic Composition of Fossil Fish Debris 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hague, Ashley Melissa

    2012-10-19

    Seamount sites. The Emperor Seamount chain likely played a major role in the flow of the North Pacific deep-water mass as it acted as a physical barrier to flow at deep-water sites compared to shallow depths (albeit still deep-water). ?Nd values indicate...

  15. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  16. Subantarctic Mode Water formation : air-sea fluxes and cross-frontal exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holte, James

    2010-01-01

    Front in the southeast Pacific Ocean, with mean profilesCO2 in the Pacific ocean. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 16.in the tropical Pacific Ocean. J. Geophysical Research-

  17. JOUtNALOFGEOPHYSICALRESEARCH VOLUME55, NO.9 SEPTEMBER1950 Natural Radiocarbon in the Atlantic Ocean I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean I WALLACES.BROECKER,ROBERTGERARD,MAURICEEw·, ANDBRUCEC. I-IEEZEN Lamont Geological Observatory may well represent a wedge of young water penetrating the older North Atlantic deep water. Bottom of water along the surface of the Atlantic Ocean,with a return flow at depth. The Atlantic and Pacific

  18. Pressurized oceans and the eruption of liquid water on Europa and Enceladus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    expansion of water as it freezes from the top increases pressure in the water confined below the ice. We the pressure in water trapped below the ice, we present in Figure 1 the results of a straightforward demonPressurized oceans and the eruption of liquid water on Europa and Enceladus M. Manga1 and C

  19. 100 kW CC-OTEC Plant and Deep Ocean water Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    100 kW CC-OTEC Plant and Deep Ocean water Applications in Kumejima, Okinawa, Japan Katsuya Furugen in Kumejima (Okinawa) Okinawa Prefectural Deep Sea Water Research Center, since 2000 OTEC Demonstration. / 1st Power Generation Test Succeeded Surface Water: 23.5 oC, 330t/h Deep Water: 9.3 oC, 250t/h Power

  20. Biological and physical regulation of the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas Smith

    2013-01-01

    2 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 412: 635-38in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Marine Chemistry 16:and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean. Global Biogeochemical

  1. flow beneath the East Pacific Rise. Nature 402, 282285 (1999). 14. Grove, T. L., Kinzler, R. J. & Bryan, W. B. in Mantle Flow and Melt Generation at Mid-Ocean Ridges (eds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01

    flow beneath the East Pacific Rise. Nature 402, 282­285 (1999). 14. Grove, T. L., Kinzler, R. J. & Bryan, W. B. in Mantle Flow and Melt Generation at Mid-Ocean Ridges (eds Morgan, J. P., Blackman, D. K. Dick, H. J. B. in Magmatism in the Ocean Basins (eds Sounders, A. D. & Norry, M. J.) 71­105 (Geol. Soc

  2. Comparison of Moist Static Energy and Budget between the GCM-Simulated Madden–Julian Oscillation and Observations over the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Liping

    2013-07-01

    The moist static energy (MSE) anomalies and MSE budget associated with the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) simulated in the Iowa State University General Circulation Model (ISUGCM) over the Indian and Pacific Oceans are compared with observations. Different phase relationships between MJO 850-hPa zonal wind, precipitation, and surface latent heat flux are simulated over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, which are greatly influenced by the convection closure, trigger conditions, and convective momentum transport (CMT). The moist static energy builds up from the lower troposphere 15–20 days before the peak of MJO precipitation, and reaches the maximum in the middle troposphere (500–600 hPa) near the peak of MJO precipitation. The gradual lower-tropospheric heating and moistening and the upward transport of moist static energy are important aspects of MJO events, which are documented in observational studies but poorly simulated in most GCMs. The trigger conditions for deep convection, obtained from the year-long cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, contribute to the striking difference between ISUGCM simulations with the original and modified convection schemes and play the major role in the improved MJO simulation in ISUGCM. Additionally, the budget analysis with the ISUGCM simulations shows the increase in MJO MSE is in phase with the horizontal advection of MSE over the western Pacific, while out of phase with the horizontal advection of MSE over the Indian Ocean. However, the NCEP analysis shows that the tendency of MJO MSE is in phase with the horizontal advection of MSE over both oceans.

  3. A very oligotrophic zone observed from space in the equatorial Pacific warm pool1 Marie-Hlne Radenaca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    penetration of nutrient-rich water due to the following processes. 1/ The34 equatorial oligotrophic warm pool tropical Pacific, and especially the eastern part of the warm pool,51 is one of the world ocean regions

  4. Energy and Water Conservation Assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Stephanie R.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-05-31

    This report summarizes the results of an energy and water conservation assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The assessment was performed in October 2013 by engineers from the PNNL Building Performance Team with the support of the dedicated RPL staff and several Facilities and Operations (F&O) department engineers. The assessment was completed for the Facilities and Operations (F&O) department at PNNL in support of the requirements within Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007.

  5. Abundance and ecological implications of microplastic debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Miriam Chanita

    2012-01-01

    of the central North Pacific ocean. Nature 241:271–271. doi:waste distributions in Pacific Ocean. Nature 247:30–32. doi:of the central North Pacific ocean. Nature 241:271–271. doi:

  6. Mechanisms controlling dissolved iron distribution in the North Pacific: A model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    latitude sites in the Pacific?Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 96 (of the equatorial Pacific Ocean, Nature, 371(6493), 123–129,and western North Pacific Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 33,

  7. Diurnal cycle of the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the east Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bain, C. L; Magnusdottir, G.; Smyth, P.; Stern, H.

    2010-01-01

    fall over the tropical Pacific ocean during August 1979,the tropical Pacific and Atlantic oceans, J. Clim. , 17,systems over the west Pacific Ocean had two peaks, one at

  8. The contributions of atmosphere and ocean to North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water volume anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The formation of Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) in the western North Atlantic has been attributed to both are the subject of a study, the CLIvar MOde Water Dynamics Experiment (CLIMODE), which includes a large fieldThe contributions of atmosphere and ocean to North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water volume anomalies

  9. Evolution of the Deep and Bottom Waters of the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean, during 19952005*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    Evolution of the Deep and Bottom Waters of the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean, during 1995. The volume of deep waters with potential temperature less than 0°C decreased during 1995­2005, though. These changes are best explained by interannual variations in the deep waters exiting the Weddell Sea

  10. Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 681705 Modification and pathways of Southern Ocean Deep Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 681­705 Modification and pathways of Southern Ocean Deep Waters of the deep water masses flowing through the region, and to quantify changes in their properties as they cross and pathways of deep water masses in the Scotia Sea had remained poorly documented despite their global

  11. Larger foraminifer biostratigraphy of PEACE boreholes, Enewetak Atoll, Western Pacific Ocean. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, T.G.; Margerum, R.

    1991-01-01

    Larger foraminiferal assemblages, including Lepidocyclina orientalis, Miogypsina thecideaeformis, Miogypsinoides dehaartii, etc., and a smaller foraminifer, Austrotrillina striata, are used to correlate upper Oligocene and lower Miocene strata in the Pacific Atoll Exploration Program (PEACE) boreholes at Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, western Pacific Ocean, with the Te and Tf zones of the previously established Tertiary Far East Letter Zonation. Correlation using these two benthic groups is critical because calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifers are absent in the lower Miocene strata. Biostratigraphic data from these boreholes delineate a thick (greater than 700 feet) sequence of upper Oligocene and lower Miocene strata corresponding to lower and upper Te zone. These strata document a major period of carbonate accumulation at Enewetak during the Late Oligocene and early Miocene (26 to 18 million years ago).

  12. Regional Summary Pacific Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bocaccio, Pacific ocean perch, cowcod, and darkblotched and widow rockfish are currently in rebuildingRegional Summary Pacific Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  13. Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Marcel

    Estimation of light penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal penetration, and horizontal and vertical visibility in oceanic and coastal waters from surface reflectance, J. The algorithms are found to be valid both in coastal and oceanic waters, and largely insensitive to regional

  14. Variability in North Pacific intermediate and deep water ventilation during Heinrich events in two coupled climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikamoto, Megumi O.

    ventilation and ocean biogeochemical properties to northern North Atlantic glacial freshwater perturbations the last glacial period (Dansgaard et al., 1993). Some of the associated warm­cold transitions discharge caused by melting icebergs reduces the surface water density in the North Atlantic Ocean, thereby

  15. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01

    and C. D. Winant (1995), Buoy observations of the atmosphereQuikSCAT/SeaWinds using ocean buoy data, J. Atmos. Oceanicfield evaluation of NDBC moored buoy winds, J. Atmos. Ocean.

  16. Introduction The Pacific hake (Merluccius produc-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biologi- cal Station, Nanaimo, BC V9T 6N7. Rebecca E. Thomas and Oceans Canada. ABSTRACT--Pacific hake, Merluccius productus, the most abundant groundfish coast, we hypothesize that the annual move- ments of Pacific hake are more responsive to climate-ocean

  17. Modeling Water and Sediment Quality in the Coastal Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stolzenbach, Keith D.; McWilliams, James C.

    2008-01-01

    ecosystem, oceanography, pollution, sediment, stratification193 Modeling Water and Sediment Quality in the Coastal Oceana model of water and sediment quality capable of forecasting

  18. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    are there trop- ical warm pools? , J. Clim. , 18, 5294–5331,P. J. Webster (1999), Warm pool SST variability in relationin the western Pacific warm pool, Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. ,

  19. ORNL/CDIAC-152 GLOBAL OCEAN SURFACE WATER PARTIAL PRESSURE OF CO2 DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/CDIAC-152 NDP-088r GLOBAL OCEAN SURFACE WATER PARTIAL PRESSURE OF CO2 DATABASE: MEASUREMENTS .....................................................................................................................................9 #12;#12;v LIST OF FIGURES 1 Location of LDEO master database of sea surface pCO2 observations. .............................................2 LIST OF TABLES 1 List of data contributors to the global surface water pCO2 LDEO database

  20. Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation traditional deep water formation via entrainment of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-active species collected for oxygen, total carbon, alkalinity, nutrients, and CFCs. The alkalinity and total carbon data

  1. STOCK COMPOSITION, GROWTH, MORTALITY, AND AVAILABILITY OF PACIFIC SAURY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RA, OF THE NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN STEVEN E. HUGHES) ABSTRACT Recent international interest in the Pacific saury (C%/ahi" "£lira) resource of the north- eastern Pacific Ocean prompted studies to determine the stock, in the northeastern Pacific Ocean was begun by our laboratory. This study was a direct result of a tenfold decrease

  2. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N. A. , D. E. Parker, E.Temperature data set (HadISST) [Rayner et al. , 2003], which

  3. Ocean Response to Wind Variations, Warm Water Volume, and Simple Models of ENSO in the Low-Frequency Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Response to Wind Variations, Warm Water Volume, and Simple Models of ENSO in the Low the smallness of the ratio «k 5 Tk/T to expand solutions of the ocean shallow-water equations into power series- izontal redistribution of warm surface water along the equator: during an El Nin~o, weakened zonal winds

  4. A retrospective study of ecosystem effects of the 1976/77 regime shift in the eastern Pacific warm pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilchis, L. Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    tuna in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Inter-Amer. Trop. Tunatuna in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Inter-Amer. Trop. TunaT.P. , 2001. On the Pacific Ocean regime shift. Geophysical

  5. A retrospective study of ecosystem effects of the 1976/77 regime shift in the eastern Pacific warm pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilchis, L. Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    influences surface currents and oceanic upwelling. WithCurrent in the Tropical Pacific Ocean. Journal of Ocean University of Oingdao (Oceanic

  6. A critical evaluation of the upper ocean heat budget in the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis data for the south central equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu H.; Lin W.; Liu, X.; Zhang, M.

    2011-08-26

    Coupled ocean-atmospheric models suffer from the common bias of a spurious rain belt south of the central equatorial Pacific throughout the year. Observational constraints on key processes responsible for this bias are scarce. The recently available reanalysis from a coupled model system for the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data is a potential benchmark for climate models in this region. Its suitability for model evaluation and validation, however, needs to be established. This paper examines the mixed layer heat budget and the ocean surface currents - key factors for the sea surface temperature control in the double Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone in the central Pacific - from 5{sup o}S to 10{sup o}S and 170{sup o}E to 150{sup o}W. Two independent approaches are used. The first approach is through comparison of CFSR data with collocated station observations from field experiments; the second is through the residual analysis of the heat budget of the mixed layer. We show that the CFSR overestimates the net surface flux in this region by 23 W m{sup -2}. The overestimated net surface flux is mainly due to an even larger overestimation of shortwave radiation by 44 W m{sup -2}, which is compensated by a surface latent heat flux overestimated by 14 W m{sup -2}. However, the quality of surface currents and the associated oceanic heat transport in CFSR are not compromised by the surface flux biases, and they agree with the best available estimates. The uncertainties of the observational data from field experiments are also briefly discussed in the present study.

  7. On the spreading of Weddell Sea deep water in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locarnini, Ricardo A

    1991-01-01

    that this WSDW, flowing northeastward through the Georgia Passage, might supply part of the coldest bottom water that enters the Argentine Basin through the Falkland Ridge Gap. 23 THE SCOTIA SEA AND THE WEDDELL SEA DEEP WATER OUTFLOW The occurrence...ON THE SPREADING OF WEDDELL SEA DEEP WATER IN THE SOUTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN A Thesis by RICARDO ALEJANDRO LOCARNINI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  8. Impacts of the Indian Ocean on the ENSO cycle Jin-Yi Yu, Carlos R. Mechoso, James C. McWilliams, and Akio Arakawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jin-Yi

    , the ocean model domain includes only the tropical Pacific Ocean (the Pacific Run). In the other experiment, the ocean model domain includes both the Indian and tropical Pacific Oceans (the Indo-Pacific Run Oceans tends to be more realistic than that including the tropical Pacific Ocean only. In particular

  9. Sedimentary and mineral dust sources of dissolved iron to the world ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J. K; Braucher, O.

    2008-01-01

    of the tropi- cal Pacific Ocean II. Iron biogeochemistry,in the Northeast Pacific Ocean Gyre: Aerosols, iron, and theF. M. M. : The equatorial Pacific Ocean: Grazer-controlled

  10. The West Pacific diversity hotspot as a source or sink for new species? Population genetic insights from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    and Central-West Pacific, Hawaii and the Central-West Pacific, and Indian Ocean and the Central-West Pacific-Australian Archipelago (IAA), at the junction of the Indian and Pacific oceans, and declines to both the east Ocean (Briggs 1999). Pleistocene isola- tion of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, driven by +100 m changes

  11. The persistence of oceans on Earth-like planets: insights from the deep-water cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a series of models for the deep water cycle on super-Earths experiencing plate tectonics. The deep water cycle can be modeled through parameterized convection models coupled with a volatile recycling model. The convection of the silicate mantle is linked to the volatile cycle through the water-dependent viscosity. Important differences in surface water content are found for different parameterizations of convection. Surface oceans are smaller and more persistent for single layer convection, rather than convection by boundary layer instability. Smaller planets have initially larger oceans but also return that water to the mantle more rapidly than larger planets. Super-Earths may therefore be less habitable in their early years than smaller planets, but their habitability (assuming stable surface conditions), will persist much longer.

  12. Data report: Oligocene paleoceanography of the equatorial Pacific Ocean: planktonic and benthic stable isotope results from Site 1218 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Bridget S.; P??like, Heiko

    2005-01-01

    To document the evolution of the early cryosphere, stable isotope analyses were conducted on the planktonic and benthic foraminifers from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1218. We generated two parallel 54- m-long records ...

  13. Mechanisms for the Interannual Variability of SST in the East Pacific Warm Pool KRISTOPHER B. KARNAUSKAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnauskas, Kristopher

    with the western and equatorial Pacific Ocean, relatively little is known about the east Pacific warm pool (EPWP model (OGCM) of the tropical Pacific Ocean and various atmospheric and oceanic observations are used correlation between SST in the EPWP and eastern equatorial Pacific is therefore explained not by ocean

  14. Evolution of the Deep and Bottom Waters of the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean, during 19952005*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Evolution of the Deep and Bottom Waters of the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean, during 1995 the eastern Scotia Sea occupied in 1995, 1999, and 2005 reveals significant variability in the deep and bottom 1995 and 1999 reversed through to 2005, reflecting changes seen earlier upstream in the Weddell Sea

  15. On the kurtosis of ocean waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedele, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit Janssen's (2003) formulation for the dynamic excess kurtosis of weakly nonlinear gravity waves in deep water. For narrowband directional spectra, the formulation is expressed as a sixfold integral that depends upon the Benjamin-Feir index and the parameter $R=\

  16. Georgia-Pacific Palatka Plant Uses Thermal Pinch Analysis and Evaluates Water Reduction in Plant-Wide Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-12-01

    This OIT BestPractices Case Study describes the methods and results used in a plant-wide assessment at a Georgia-Pacific paper mill in Palatka, FL. Assessment personnel recommended several projects, which, if implemented, have the potential to save the plant more than 729,000 MMBtu per year and $2.9 million per year. In addition, the plant could reduce water use by 2,100 gallons per minute.

  17. Low-frequency western Pacific Ocean sea level and circulation changes due to the connectivity of the Philippine Archipelago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    of the Philippine Archipelago Wei Zhuang,1 Bo Qiu,2 and Yan Du1 Received 26 August 2013; revised 18 November 2013 changes associated with the oceanic connectivity around the Philippine Archipelago are studied using-driven baroclinic Rossby waves impinge on the eastern Philippine coast and excite coastal Kelvin waves, conveying

  18. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  19. ECOSYSTEM INDICATORS AND TRENDS USED BY FOCI NORTH PACIFIC REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of atmospheric forcing and physical oceanographic response of the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea Pacific whick is taken as an indicator of a change in the PDO. Ocean temperatures throughout the North temperature variability. The PDO is a long- lived, El Niño-like pattern of North Pacific Ocean climate

  20. International Pacific Research Center October 1997March 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    International Pacific Research Center October 1997­March 2000 School of Ocean and Earth Science #12;International Pacific Research Center October 1997­March 2000 School of Ocean and Earth Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Research Activities and Results Theme 1: Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate Overview

  1. Dept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Only Indian and Pacific Ocean GlobalEEZ100km from shorelineAtlantic OceanIndo-Pacific #12;OTEC MODELINGDept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology of deep layers, Increase in THC strength 1) Global 2) EEZ 3)100km from Shoreline 4) Only Atlantic Ocean 5

  2. Multi-scale modeling of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model: from tide flats to estuaries and coastal waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2010-11-19

    Water circulation in Puget Sound, a large complex estuary system in the Pacific Northwest coastal ocean of the United States, is governed by multiple spatially and temporally varying forcings from tides, atmosphere (wind, heating/cooling, precipitation/evaporation, pressure), and river inflows. In addition, the hydrodynamic response is affected strongly by geomorphic features, such as fjord-like bathymetry and complex shoreline features, resulting in many distinguishing characteristics in its main and sub-basins. To better understand the details of circulation features in Puget Sound and to assist with proposed nearshore restoration actions for improving water quality and the ecological health of Puget Sound, a high-resolution (around 50 m in estuaries and tide flats) hydrodynamic model for the entire Puget Sound was needed. Here, a threedimensional circulation model of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model is presented. The model was constructed with sufficient resolution in the nearshore region to address the complex coastline, multi-tidal channels, and tide flats. Model open boundaries were extended to the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the northern end of the Strait of Georgia to account for the influences of ocean water intrusion from the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Fraser River plume from the Strait of Georgia, respectively. Comparisons of model results, observed data, and associated error statistics for tidal elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity indicate that the model is capable of simulating the general circulation patterns on the scale of a large estuarine system as well as detailed hydrodynamics in the nearshore tide flats. Tidal characteristics, temperature/salinity stratification, mean circulation, and river plumes in estuaries with tide flats are discussed.

  3. GROWTH OF PACIFIC SAUR~ COWLABlS SAlRA, IN THE NORTHEASTERN AND NORTHWESTERN PACIFIC OCEANI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the northeastern and northwestern Pacific Ocean was studied using otolith growth increments. We found that growth, Cololabis saira (Brevoort), is distributed throughout the North Pacific Ocean and is one of the most the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Details of sampling and methods of reading otoliths are summarized in Table 1

  4. Sensitivity of water mass transformation and heat transport to subgridscale mixing in coarse-resolution ocean models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    colleagues suggests that without this heat transport the globe would freeze over, [Winton, 2003Sensitivity of water mass transformation and heat transport to subgridscale mixing in coarse of subgridscale mixing on ocean heat transport in coarse- resolution ocean models of the type used in coupled

  5. Drake passage and central american seaway controls on the distribution of the oceanic carbon reservoir

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fyke, Jeremy G.; D'Orgeville, Marc; Weaver, Andrew J.

    2015-05-01

    A coupled carbon/climate model is used to explore the impact of Drake Passage opening and Central American Seaway closure on the distribution of carbon in the global oceans. We find that gateway evolution likely played an important role in setting the modern day distribution of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), which is currently characterized by relatively low concentrations in the Atlantic ocean, and high concentrations in the Southern, Indian, and Pacific oceans. In agreement with previous studies, we find a closed Drake Passage in the presence of an open Central American Seaway results in suppressed Atlantic meridional overturning and enhancedmore »southern hemispheric deep convection. Opening of the Drake Passage triggers Antarctic Circumpolar Current flow and a weak Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Subsequent Central American Seaway closure reinforces the AMOC while also stagnating equatorial Pacific subsurface waters. These gateway-derived oceanographic changes are reflected in large shifts to the global distribution of DIC. An initially closed Drake Passage results in high DIC concentrations in the Atlantic and Arctic oceans, and lower DIC concentrations in the Pacific/Indian/Southern oceans. Opening Drake Passage reverses this gradient by lowering mid-depth Atlantic and Arctic DIC concentrations and raising deep Pacific/Indian/Southern Ocean DIC concentrations. Central American Seaway closure further reinforces this trend through additional Atlantic mid-depth DIC decreases, as well as Pacific mid-depth DIC concentration increases, with the net effect being a transition to a modern distribution of oceanic DIC.« less

  6. Late Cenomanian – Early Turonian Reconstruction of Intermediate and Deep-Water Circulation in the Proto-Indian Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilghman, David S

    2013-09-24

    with widespread burial of organic carbon (Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 - OAE2). Several factors likely promoted organic carbon burial including increased nutrient input, diminished seafloor oxygen levels, density stratification, enhanced upwelling, and sluggish deep-water...

  7. Primary production in the eastern tropical Pacific: A review J. Timothy Pennington a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington, J. Timothy

    , Peru Abstract The eastern tropical Pacific includes 28 million km2 of ocean between 23.5°N phytoplankton growth (and nitrogen fixation) over large portions of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific Pacific. Seasonal cycles are weak over much of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific, although several

  8. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27[degree]C, but never 31[degree]C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  9. The Combined Effect of Ocean Acidification and Euthrophication on water pH and Aragonite Saturation State in the Northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Tigreros, Fenix

    2013-04-10

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing the rate at which anthropogenic CO2 is accumulating in the ocean, and thereby acidifying ocean water. However, accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 is not the only process affecting...

  10. Habitat and Nursery Grounds of Pacific Rockfish, Sebastes spp., in Rocky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ocean perch, Sebastes alutus, and most other rockfishes, Sebastes spp., in the North Pacific Ocean of southeastern Alaska were important nursery grounds for Pacific ocean perch. These rough areas extend off- shore Pacific ocean perch, have been trawled nearshore in coastal bays and fiords of southeastern Alaska over

  11. Localization of Deep Water Formation: Role of Atmospheric Moisture Transport and Geometrical Constraints on Ocean Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    A series of coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice aquaplanet experiments is described in which topological constraints on ocean circulation are introduced to study the role of ocean circulation on the mean climate of the coupled ...

  12. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE sections P17S and P16S) during the tunes-2-expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-12-31

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), discrete partial pressure of TCO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}), and total alkalinity (TALK), during the Research Vessel (R/V) Thomas Washington TUNES Leg 2 Expedition in the central South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on July 16, 1991, and returned to Papeete on August 25, 1991. WOCE Meridional Sections P17S along 135{degrees} W and P16S along 150{degrees} W were completed during the 40-day expedition. A total of 97 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P17S and P16S included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature and depth sensor; bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate; CFC-12; CFC- 11; TCO{sub 2}; TALK; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 20{degrees}C. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in 1000 seawater samples was determined with a coulometric analysis system, the pCO{sub 2} in 940 water samples was determined with an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system, while the TALK concentration in 139 samples was determined on shore at the laboratory of C. Goyet of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with an alkalinity titration system. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements for the Certified Reference Material (Batch {number_sign}6) were made and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 {plus_minus} 1.5 {mu}mol/kg. This mean value agrees within a standard deviation of the 2304.6 {plus_minus} 1.6 {mu}mol/kg (N=9) value determined with the manometer of C. D. Keeling at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). Replicate samples from 11 Niskin bottles at 4 stations were also collected for later shore-based reference analyses of TCO{sub 2} and TALK by vacuum extraction and manometry in the laboratory of C. D. Keeling of SIO.

  13. UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall Keller Hall Physical Science Building Pacific Ocean Science & Technology Kuykendall AnnexStairs Pond UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute Exit M¯anoa Innovation Center and Kau Auxiliary Services Pacific Biomedical Warehouse Agricultural Science Shops Campus Security n Landscaping

  14. UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall Keller Hall Physical Science Building Pacific Ocean Science & Technology Kuykendall Annex44 44 Stairs Pond UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute Exit M¯anoa Innovation Center and Kau Auxiliary Services Pacific Biomedical Warehouse Agricultural Science Shops Campus Security n Landscaping

  15. An Atlantic-Pacific ventilation seesaw across the last deglaciation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, E.; Skinner, L. C.; Tisserand, A.; Dokken, T.; Timmermann, A.; Menviel, L.; Friedrich, T.

    2015-06-03

    picked and graphitized in the Godwin Labora- ry at the University of Cambridge using a standard hydrogen/iron talyst reduction method (Vogel et al., 1984). For some samples was necessary to combine benthic foraminifera from two adja- nt samples... . Radiocarbon age anomaly at intermediate water depth in the Pacific Ocean during the last deglaciation. Paleoceanography 24 (2223). Stott, L., Timmermann, A., 2011. Hypothesized link between glacial/interglacial at- mospheric CO2 cycles and storage...

  16. Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : . Computer models show skill in forecasting tropical Pacific Ocean temperatures one to two years in advance for Pacific Ocean observations that are the foundation of skillful ENSO forecasts: Moored buoys Drifting buoysaaaaaa Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific . Has a periodicity of 2­7 years

  17. Resources for research Palaeoclimate research in the Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    currents flowing into the Coral Sea in the western Pacific. ··· Seismometers on the ocean floor OceanResources for research Palaeoclimate research in the Pacific #12;··· Scientific equipment: pooled Caledonian lagoon and the western Pacific, including the Santo biodiversity survey in Vanuatu. ··· Clinical

  18. DOI 10.1007/s00382-015-2668-0 Why the South Pacific Convergence Zone is diagonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    tropical Pacific Ocean during austral sum- mer (Fig. 1a). The SPCZ is oriented diagonally, stretch- ing northwest­southeast from New Guinea to the central, subtropical Pacific Ocean (Vincent 1994, the majority of precipi- tation over the Pacific Ocean is concentrated in the South Pacific Convergence Zone

  19. International Pacific Research CenterInternational Pacific Research Center April 2000 March 2001 ReportApril 2000 March 2001 Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Research Activities and Accomplishments Theme 1: Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate OverviewInternational Pacific Research CenterInternational Pacific Research Center April 2000 ­ March 2001 ReportApril 2000 ­ March 2001 Report School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawai

  20. Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra................................................................................................... 3-9 3.4.3 Water Development ......................................................................... 3-11 3.4.6 Water Quality

  1. Diurnal cycle of the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the east Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bain, C. L; Magnusdottir, G.; Smyth, P.; Stern, H.

    2010-01-01

    over the oceanic warm pool, Mon. Weather Rev. , 121, 1398–the tropical Pacific warm pool, Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. ,

  2. Reconstruction of stratified steady water waves from pressure readings on the ocean bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Robin Ming

    2015-01-01

    Consider a two-dimensional stratified solitary wave propagating through a body of water that is bounded below by an impermeable ocean bed. In this work, we study how such a wave can be reconstructed from data consisting of the wave speed, upstream and downstream density profile, and the trace of the pressure on the bed. First, we prove that this data uniquely determines the wave, both in the (real) analytic and Sobolev regimes. Second, for waves that consist of multiple layers of constant density immiscible fluids, we provide an exact formula describing each of the interfaces in terms of the data. Finally, for continuously stratified fluids, we detail a reconstruction scheme based on approximation by layer-wise constant density flows.

  3. Reconstruction of stratified steady water waves from pressure readings on the ocean bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robin Ming Chen; Samuel Walsh

    2015-02-26

    Consider a two-dimensional stratified solitary wave propagating through a body of water that is bounded below by an impermeable ocean bed. In this work, we study how such a wave can be reconstructed from data consisting of the wave speed, upstream and downstream density profile, and the trace of the pressure on the bed. First, we prove that this data uniquely determines the wave, both in the (real) analytic and Sobolev regimes. Second, for waves that consist of multiple layers of constant density immiscible fluids, we provide an exact formula describing each of the interfaces in terms of the data. Finally, for continuously stratified fluids, we detail a reconstruction scheme based on approximation by layer-wise constant density flows.

  4. A Passive Probe for Subsurface Oceans and Liquid Water in Jupiter's Icy Moons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Maiwald, Frank; Heggy, Essam; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    We describe an interferometric reflectometer method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3,000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the Jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the ice shell thickness along with its dielectric properties. The interferometric reflectometer provides a simple solution to sub-Jovian radio sounding of ice shells that is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements better suited to measurements in the anti-Jovian hemisphere that shadows Jupiter's strong decametric emission. The passive nature of this technique also serves as risk reduction in case of radar transmi...

  5. Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orien-talis), a highly migratory species, is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the temperate zone of the northern Pacific Ocean (Yamanaka, 1982; Bayliff, 1994) in con- trast to T. thynnus, which inhabits the Atlantic Ocean (Collette, 1999). Current knowledge on the migration of Pacific in the northwest Pacific Ocean in an area from the Philippines past Taiwan to Okinawa from April to June, and small

  6. Terrigenous dissolved organic matter in the Arctic Ocean and its transport to surface and deep waters of the North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louchouarn, Patrick

    lignin phenols in polar surface waters are 7-fold to 16-fold higher than those in the Atlantic phenols provide some evidence of photochemical transformations of terrigenous DOM, but it appears the Arctic Ocean by microbial degradation is less clear and warrants further study. Physical transport

  7. Dynamically and Observationally Constrained Estimates of Water-Mass Distributions and Ages in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Lumpkin, R. , and K. Speer, 2007: Global ocean meridionalStammer 2004; Lumpkin and Speer 2007), but, in an advective–

  8. Basin-Wavelength Equatorial Deep Jet Signals Across Three Oceans1 Madeleine K. Youngs2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    of intermediate and deep water masses in the Atlantic. Brandt et al. (2011, 2012) argue38 that as wellBasin-Wavelength Equatorial Deep Jet Signals Across Three Oceans1 Madeleine K. Youngs2 NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle WA and Environmental Science and Engineering, California

  9. Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX). Design document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Earth`s climate has varied significantly in the past, yet climate records reveal that in the tropics, sea surface temperatures seem to have been remarkably stable, varying by less than a few degrees Celsius over geologic time. Today, the large warm pool of the western Pacific shows similar characteristics. Its surface temperature always exceeds 27{degree}C, but never 31{degree}C. Heightened interest in this observation has been stimulated by questions of global climate change and the exploration of stabilizing climate feedback processes. Efforts to understand the observed weak sensitivity of tropical sea surface temperatures to climate forcing has led to a number of competing ideas about the nature of this apparent thermostat. Although there remains disagreement on the processes that regulate tropical sea surface temperature, most agree that further progress in resolving these differences requires comprehensive field observations of three-dimensional water vapor concentrations, solar and infrared radiative fluxes, surface fluxes of heat and water vapor, and cloud microphysical properties. This document describes the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) plan to collect such observations over the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during March of 1993.

  10. An investigation of the relationships between rainfall in northeast Brazil and sea surface temperatures of the equatorial regions of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochrane, Marvin Arthur

    1977-01-01

    N RA INFALL IiN NORTHEAST DPA: IL AND SLiA SUR!'ACE TEMPLRATUiRIiS Ol' THE EQUATORIAL RFU!ONS JF THE PACIFIC AND ATl. ANTIC OCFANS A Thesrs by iKKRVTN ARTHUR COCHRAiNE Approved as to style and coiitent by: (Cha i r;iian o F !;e mnittce) (i.... TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT Page ACKNOWI, EDGI'. MFNTS I. IST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURLS 1V V11 , V11 1 1. INTRODUCTION a. General b. Ol&jcctivcs 2. LITEIIATURL' REVIEW a. Iforf. beast Brazi I rainfall ? equatorial Pacific SST b . Ilortheast...

  11. Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office What are the key documents? Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource pdf here Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

  12. GPS meteorology: An investigation of ocean-based precipitable water estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Businger, Steven

    PW is that reflected solar radiation from the ocean surface is required, making the measurements% globally [Li et al., 2003], therefore, an alternative method of ocean PW estimation is needed. Microwave instruments, such as the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager, Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder

  13. Bomb-test 90Sr in Pacific and Indian Ocean surface water as recorded by banded corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toggweiler, JR; Trumbore, S

    1985-01-01

    from the U.S. tests at Eniwetok and Bikini atolls duringby U.S. nuclear tests at Eniwetok and Bikini atolls in theU.S. nuclear detonations at Eniwetok and Bikini were small,

  14. URL: http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/deepearthhasoceansworthofwater10diamondreveals1.2569564 Deep Earth has oceans' worth of water,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    .2569564 Deep Earth has oceans' worth of water, $10 diamond reveals University of Alberta researchers find of water stored deep inside the Earth. The diamond formed in the "transition zone" around 410 to 660 is representative of that part of the deep Earth, the amount of water there could be "about the same as the mass

  15. LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ENGINEERING PRELIMINARY REPORT NO. 3 EAST PACIFIC RISE 1992 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT East Pacific Rise Dr. Rodey Batiza Co 96822 Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling

  16. Methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in the surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Steve

    production or chlorophyll-a levels in the surface Atlantic Ocean. However, we did find a novel monoxide and formaldehyde [Millet et al., 2008]. Acetone and acetalde- hyde are both recognized precursors

  17. Ocean Sci., 6, 775787, 2010 www.ocean-sci.net/6/775/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Pacific Ocean F. M. Bingham1, G. R. Foltz2, and M. J. McPhaden3 1Center for Marine Science, Univ. of North salinity (SLS) is examined in the Pacific Ocean between 40 S and 60 N using a variety of data sourcesOcean Sci., 6, 775­787, 2010 www.ocean-sci.net/6/775/2010/ doi:10.5194/os-6-775-2010 © Author

  18. Predictability and Diagnosis of Low Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niklas Schneider

    2009-06-17

    The report summarized recent findings with respect to Predictability and Diagnosis of Low Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific, with focus on the dynamics of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, oceanic adjustments and the coupled feedback in the western boundary current of the North and South Pacific, decadal dynamics of oceanic salinity, and tropical processes with emphasis on the Indonesian Throughflow.

  19. Calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifers from Enewetak Atoll, Western Pacific Ocean: Geologic and geophysical investigations of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bybell, L.M.; Poore, R.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Boring of the carbonate sequence at the northern end of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, was conducted in 1985, as part of the Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration (PEACE) Program. The overall goal of the program was to characterize physical effects of large-scale nuclear blasts, which were conducted in the early 1950's, on the sediments of the atoll. In the report the authors document the occurrences of stratigraphically diagnostic planktic microfossils in samples from Enewetak (generally referred to as core) and outline the rationale for incorporating all available diagnostic planktic assemblages into a composite sequence that was used to date the Enewetak benthic zonation.

  20. Regional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    in the tropical eastern Pacific and western Indian Ocean than in the tropical western Pacific and eastern IndianRegional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening* HIROKI TOKINAGA, SHANG-PING XIE, AND AXEL TIMMERMANN International Pacific Research Center, SOEST

  1. Eolian inputs of lead to the North Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.E.; Halliday, A.N.; Rea, D.K.; Owen, R.M.

    2000-04-01

    The authors evaluate the importance of natural eolian Pb to the dissolved oceanic Pb budget by measuring the isotopic composition of Pb in 35 Holocene and late Quaternary sediment samples from the North Pacific and in 10 samples of Chinese loess. When the Pacific is divided into sediments provinces based on published {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} and sedimentological data, Pb from the central North Pacific tends to be the most radiogenic and homogeneous due to the dominance of eolian Chinese loess. Lead from the marginal North Pacific and the sparsely sampled regions south of 5{degree}N are less radiogenic and more variable owing to hemipelagic inputs from various volcanic arcs and older continental crust located around the Pacific Rim. {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios provide the most distinctive provenance information due to the relatively high ratios in Chinese loess. The Chinese loess samples come from 3 localities and span up to 2 Myr of time. Acetic-acid leachate, bulk loess, and loess silicate fractions were analyzed separately. Leachate Pb is considerably less radiogenic than silicate Pb. The isotopic composition of the silicate component closely matches the sediment data from the central North Pacific, confirming the dominance of eolian loess in this region. The authors divided up a suite of published hydrogenous Pb-isotope data from the Pacific Ocean according to their locations within the three independently defined sediment provinces. These data define three distinct fields differentiated primarily by their {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios, which increase going form the Central to Southern to Marginal provinces. This relationship with sediment province strongly suggests that natural eolian and probably hemipelagic inputs significantly impact the seawater Pb budget. Direct support for the dominance of eolian Chinese loess in the central North Pacific dissolved Pb budget comes from the close match between loess leachate Pb and the Central Province hydrogenous Pb data. Eolian inputs are likely to dominate local seawater Pb budgets only where eolian Pb fluxes are high relative to hemipelagic Pb fluxes and where the flux of Pb carried by deep water advection is low.

  2. SPRING 2010 ISSUE 11 JMBA Global Marine Environment 3 ur oceans comprise 97% of the water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    on Earth and cover around 71% of the surface. They are the world's main heat and CO2 store and play a key the atmosphere since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. A proportion of the carbon uptake is exported via the four ocean `carbon pumps' (Solubility, Biological, Continental Shelf and Carbonate Counter

  3. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-05

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #4 and #5: Case study overview of the grounds maintenance program for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  4. We are fishing out the oceans, killing off the wild animals, cutting down the forests, denuding the mountains, using up the fresh water, even turning land into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    the mountains, using up the fresh water, even turning land into desert. We are polluting the oceans, the fresh water, the land, the air. We waste most of the energy coming from the sun and from the earth. Instead of using the energy to make capital investments that benefit the whole earth, such as pollution remediation

  5. PHYTOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN OCEANIC WATERS OFF KE-AHOLE POINT, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bienfang, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    in the water column off Ke-ahole Point, Hawaii. ReportDepartment, University of Hawaii. 15 pp. Bienfang P.in oligotrophic waters off Hawaii. Marine Biology. Bienfang

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  7. PAC I F I C C OAS T S A L M O N Pacific Coast Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recreationally and commercially in the Pacific Ocean, Puget Sound, and in freshwater rivers on their spawning of gear depending on location: in the Pacific Ocean all harvest is by trolling; in Puget Sound, gillnetsPAC I F I C C OAS T S A L M O N 1 U N I T 12 Pacific Coast Salmon Unit 12 ROBERT G. KOPE NMFS

  8. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 2 of -42-foot project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Strand, J.A.; Kohn, N.P.; Squires, A.L. (Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. The recommended plan consists of deepening the harbor channels from the presently authorized water depth of {minus}35 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) to {minus}42 ft MLLW and supplying the harbor with adequate turning basins and berthing areas. Offshore ocean disposal of the dredged sediment is being considered, provided there is no evident of harmful ecological effects. It harmful ecological effects are not evident then the appropriate certifications from state environmental quality agencies and concurrence from the Environmental Protection Agency can be obtained to allow disposal of sediment. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) collected sediment cores from 23 stations in Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, evaluated these sediment cores geologically, performed chemical analyses for selected contaminants in sediments, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in the tissues of Macoma Nasuta. 43 refs., 26 figs., 61 tabs.

  9. Ocean Water Vapor and Cloud Burden Trends Derived from the Topex Microwave Radiometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    algorithm is a log-linear regression algorithm with coefficients that are stratified by wind speed and water. TMR OBSERVATIONS The TMR flew in a 10-day non-sun-synchronous exact repeat orbit with an inclination

  10. The Cold Dark Ocean This talk will help younger students understand that most of the ocean is an expansive cold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the El Niño/La Niña cycle in the Pacific Ocean and how it impacts the climate of the Southeast UThe Cold Dark Ocean This talk will help younger students understand that most of the ocean is an expansive cold dark abyss. The concepts of solar heating of the ocean surface and effects of temperature

  11. Benthic foraminiferal faunal changes during the Eocene/Oligocene climate transition at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites 1209A and 1211A from the Shatsky Rise, central Pacific Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian, Meaghan Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    .............................................................................................. 9 Age Model ............................................................................................................ 12 Statistical Analysis... of benthic foraminifera indicate environmental conditions at the time of burial, as well as recording ? 18 O values of bottom water (Thomas, 1985, 1992, 2000; Boardman et al., 1987; Sen Gupta and Machain-Castillo, 1993). 6 Results from this study...

  12. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

  13. SOUTHERN OCEAN EDDY MIXING AND THE FORMATION OF MODE WATERS J.B. Salle, R. Morrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fronts (PF, SAF and SAF- N). Sallee, J.B. N. Wienders, K. Speer and R.A. Morrow, 2006. Formation.B; Morrow, R. ; Speer, K., 2008. Eddy heat diffusion and Subantarctic Mode Water formation, Geophys. Res. Lett, 35, L05607, doi:10.1029/2007GL032827 Sallée, J.B. Morrow, R.; Speer, K. and Lumpkin, R

  14. Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) • Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) • Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 – 081103) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) • Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 – 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 – 090397) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 – 012296) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) • Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 – 102192) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 – 111093) • The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) • Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 – Jan, 1996) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R/V Th

  15. Eddy-Induced Heat Transport in the Subtropical North Pacific from Argo, TMI, and Altimetry Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Eddy-Induced Heat Transport in the Subtropical North Pacific from Argo, TMI, and Altimetry transport induced by mesoscale oceanic eddies is estimated by combining satellite- derived sea surface temperature­salinity data. In the North Pacific Ocean subtropical gyre, warm (cold) temperature anomalies

  16. Cooling history of the Pacific lithosphere Michael H. Ritzwoller*, Nikolai M. Shapiro, Shi-Jie Zhong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    Cooling history of the Pacific lithosphere Michael H. Ritzwoller*, Nikolai M. Shapiro, Shi or blithosphereQ forms and thickens as the plate cools during its journey away from mid-ocean ridges. Numerous, particularly across the Pacific, does not cool continuously as it ages. Based on a seismic model of the Pacific

  17. Nitrogen uptake by plants subsidized by Pacific salmon carcasses: a hierarchical experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, John D.

    the Pacific Rim. Salmon are born in freshwater, with most popu- lations migrating as juveniles to the oceanNitrogen uptake by plants subsidized by Pacific salmon carcasses: a hierarchical experiment Morgan and transport large numbers of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) to riparian areas beside small coastal streams

  18. Walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogram-ma) and Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that inhabit the north- eastern Pacific Ocean rim. Both species are important components of marine bird, mammal482 Walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogram- ma) and Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) are forage fish and Speckman, 1997;Anderson and Piatt,1999).Young- of-the-year (YOY) walleye pollock and YOY Pacific herring

  19. Two new species of deep-water Corallimorpharia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) from the Northeast Pacific, *Corallimorphus denhartogi* and *C. pilatus*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; White, Tracy R.; Pearson, Katherine E.

    2002-04-01

    of Actiniaria. We describe two new species of corallimorpharians from deep water off the west coast of North America as *Corallimorphus denhartogi*, n. sp. and *Corallimorphus pilatus*, n. sp. The former occurs at depths of 2550-4300 m from Oregon to Baja...

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS, this source should be appropriately acknowledged. Ocean Drilling Program Scientific Prospectus No. 102 Publications homepage on the World Wide Web at: http://www-odp.tamu.edu/publications This publication

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT ENGINEERING II: WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU September 1990 #12;This informal

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST PACIFIC SEISMIC OBSERVATORY AND HAMMER DRILL ENGINEERING TESTS Dr. Toshihiko Kanazawa Co-Chief Scientist Earthquake Research Institute Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  3. GECCO Ocean Energy System Luis Maristany, Nicole Waters, Billy W. Wells Jr., Mario Suarez, Richard Gestewitz, Alexej Wiest,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    types of materials, supplies, as well as energy; however the exploration of wave energy as a resource Operation) is a wave energy converter that extracts kinetic energy from ocean waves using a rugged, innovative mechanical multi-system. Index Terms--Ocean energy, wave energy, hydrokinetic energy, alternative

  4. Diatom species composition and abundance in water column assemblages from five drill sites in Prydz Bay, Antarctica, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 119: distributional patterns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Sung-Ho

    1989-01-01

    , 1958; Frenguelli and Orlando, 1958; Manguin, 1960; Cassie, 1963, Hargraves, 1968; Hasle, 1969; Fenner e! al. , 1976). Quantitative diatom studies have become numemus, but there are still few available for the Antarctic region. Although phytoplankton... studies have covered extensive areas of the Southern Ocean (Hart, 1942; Boden, 1949; Hasle, 1956, 1969; Marumo, 1957; Kozlova, 1966; Zernova, 1970; Steyaert, 1973a, b, 1974; and Jacques er al. , 1979), while very few are related to inshore waters. Only...

  5. Air-sea interaction at contrasting sites in the Eastern Tropical Pacific : mesoscale variability and atmospheric convection at 10°N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, J. Thomas (John Thomas), 1976-

    2007-01-01

    The role of ocean dynamics in driving air-sea interaction is examined at two contrasting sites on 125°W in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean using data from the Pan American Climate Study (PACS) field program. Analysis ...

  6. Ocean Salmon Ranching in the North Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucile, Mark J.

    1982-01-01

    chum salmon returning to Sakhalin. . . show that an averagegained complete control of Sakhalin. A. NETBOY, supra notethe south- ern portion of Sakhalin to Japan. Id. 143. Areas

  7. Nitrite dynamics in the open ocean - clues from seasonal and diurnal variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    2009, Paytan et al. 2009, Wankel et al. 2010). The conservedPacific Ocean. Limnol Oceanogr Wankel SD, Chen Y, Kendall C,

  8. Water vapor and temperature inversions near the 0 deg C level over the tropical western Pacific. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    During the Intensive Observation Period (IOP), several periods of water vapor and temperature inversions near the 0 deg C level were observed. Satellite and radiosonde data from TOGA COARE are used to document the large-scale conditions and thermodynamic and kinematic structures present during three extended periods in which moisture and temperature inversions near the freezing level were very pronounced. Observations from each case are synthesized into schematics which represent typical structures of the inversion phenomena. Frequency distributions of the inversion phenomena along with climatological humidity and temperature profiles are calculated for the four-month IOP.

  9. EARLY LIFE HISTORY AND SPAWNING OF THE ALBACORE, THUNNUS ALALUNGA, IN HAWAIIAN WATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the vertebral column, determined from measurements made on 21 intact specimens caught in the Pacific Ocean, were

  10. Reduced ventilation and enhanced magnitude of the deep Pacific carbon pool during the last glacial period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, L.; McCave, I. N.; Carter, L.; Fallon, S.; Scrivner, A. E.; Primeau, F.

    2014-12-15

    to mid-depth radiocarbon-age difference over the last 20 kyr. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 274, 322–326. onk Ramsey, C., Staff, R.A., Bryant, C.L., Brock, F., Kitagawa, H., van der Plicht, J., Schlolaut, G., Marshall, M.H., Brauer, A., Lamb, H.F., Payne, R... at intermediate water depth in the Pacific Ocean during the last deglaciation. Paleoceanography 24, PA2223. Stuiver, M., Polach, H.A., 1977. Reporting of 14C data. Radiocarbon 19, 355–363. Talley, L.D., Pickard, G.L., Emery, W.J., Swift, J.H., 2011. Descriptive...

  11. Miocene-Early Pliocene diatomaceous sedimentation patterns in the Pacific: A response to paleooceanography and paleoclimatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, J.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Biosiliceous sediments greatly expanded their distribution in the North Pacific during the late early to early middle Miocene (18-15 Ma), at least partly due to enhanced basin-basin fractionation of deep waters between the North Atlantic and North Pacific, which began in 17 Ma. Subsequently, in the late middle and late Miocene, diatomaceous sedimentation responded to the following series of successive cooling steps. (1) High-latitude cooling between 14.9 and 12.4 Ma caused an intensification of upwelling in the marginal North Pacific as evidenced by a wider distribution of laminated sediments and a decline in carbonate preservation. (2) Cooling across the middle Miocene-late Miocene boundary (10.3-9.2 Ma and 9.0-8.3 Ma) led to further increases in upwelling and raised biogenic opal accumulation rates in upwelling regions of the eastern equatorial Pacific, California, and Peru. (3) Cooling in the latest Miocene to earliest Pliocene (6.2-4.8 114a) resulted in further regional differentiation of biosiliceous sedimentation patterns in the North Pacific, probably reflecting steeper productivity gradients in upwelling regions. Biogenic opal accumulation rates declined in the eastern equatorial Pacific, but probably increased in coastal upwelling regions off California, Peru, and in the Bering Sea. (4) A decline in diatom sedimentation in waters off southern California during the earliest Pliocene (4.5-4.0) Ma coincided with a period of warmer paleotemperatures and a decline in opal accumulation rates in the equatorial Pacific. A major increase in biosiliceous sedimentation in the Southern ocean occurred at this same time.

  12. Particulate matter in the central subtropical Pacific 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colgan, Annette Renee

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of particulate matter (PM) in the Central Subtropical Pacific and its relationships with water masses and currents were determined from optical and hydrographic data. Beam attenuation data were collected with a Sea Tech...

  13. Impacts of increasing anthropogenic soluble iron and nitrogen deposition on ocean biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    some increased CO 2 outgassing in the equatorial Pacific. [estimated oceanic O 2 outgassing associated to global warm-increased oceanic O 2 outgassing by $10 Tmol O 2 /a in the

  14. Compound-Specific Radiocarbon Analyses of Phospholipid Fatty Acids and n-Alkanes in Ocean Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

  15.  COMPOUND-SPECIFIC RADIOCARBON ANALYSES OF PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACIDS AND n -ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

  16. Effects of internal waves on low frequency, long range, acoustic propagation in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jinshan

    2007-01-01

    This thesis covers a comprehensive analysis of long-range, deep-ocean, low-frequency, sound propagation experimental results obtained from the North Pacific Ocean. The statistics of acoustic fields after propagation through ...

  17. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  18. Ocean Heat Transport and Water Vapor Greenhouse in a Warm Equable Climate: A New Look at the Low Gradient Paradox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian E. J.

    The authors study the role of ocean heat transport (OHT) in the maintenance of a warm, equable, ice-free climate. An ensemble of idealized aquaplanet GCM calculations is used to assess the equilibrium sensitivity of global ...

  19. A DNS capability for obtaining underwater light field and retrieving upper ocean conditions via in-water light measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zao, Mech. E. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the ocean surface conditions (surface elevation, temperature, wind speed, etc.) becomes more and more important for both real life and military applications. This thesis presents a direct numerical simulation ...

  20. Pacific Island Energy Snapshots

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These energy snapshots highlight the energy landscape of islands in the Pacific and the surrounding area.

  1. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia, Canada. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I thank Lula E. Greene, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experi ment

  2. Ocean Systems Lecture 16 & 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    to thrive in oceans and lakes they need sunlight and nutrients. But thermal stratification tends to separateOcean Systems Lecture 16 & 17 #12;Hydroclimate, heat budgets and stratification For plants the nature of stratification. Light, less dense, water floats on top of colder, less dense water. Plankton

  3. GECCO Ocean Energy System Luis Maristany, Nicole Waters, Billy W. Wells Jr., Mario Suarez, Richard Gestewitz, Alexej Wiest,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    types of materials, supplies, as well as energy; however the exploration of wave energy as a resource is still in its infancy. The Florida Institute of Technology has constructed an alternative energy system Operation) is a wave energy converter that extracts kinetic energy from ocean waves using a rugged

  4. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. )

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  5. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 1, Analyses and discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F.

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  6. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large will unavoidably affect pelagic fish... ­ Noise and water pollution ­ FAD effects ­ Entrainment and Impingement

  7. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  8. Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Norman Willis William

    1997-01-01

    A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ ...

  9. Water Clean Water Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Keep Our Water Clean Keep Our Water Clean Home and garden pesticides and fertilizers are polluting residues wash into gutters, storm drains, and streams by rain,garden watering,or cleaning up drinking water. Follow these tips to keep our rivers, creeks, and oceans clean. What can you do to protect

  10. 90E 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 0 30 60 OCEAN ATLANTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREENLAND EUROPE AFRICA SOUTH AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN 418 625 626-636 637-641 642-644 645 646 647 648-649 650-656 657-659 660-661 662 1102-1103 1104-1106 1107 1108-1118 1119 1120 1121 1122 1123 1124 1125 1126-1134 998-1001 SOUTHERN OCEAN

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 ENGINEERING AND SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 ENGINEERING AND SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EAST PACIFIC RISE Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  12. n intriguing class of ocean-circulation pattern is that exhibiting a retroflec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    , is the considerable `leakage' of water from the Indian Ocean into the upper kilometre of the Atlantic Ocean as a `valve' regulating the buoyancy of water in the upper kilometre of the South Atlantic Ocean and may

  13. Storm-induced upwelling of high pCO2 waters onto the continental shelf of the western Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    shelf. A single 10-day event led to the outgassing of 0.18­0.54 Tg-C and caused aragonite outgassing events and the expansion of waters that are undersaturated in carbonate minerals over the shelf

  14. MFRPAPER1117 Net-Pen Culture of Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Oncorhynch us spp. , In the PacifIC Northwest. The National Marine Fisheries Service initiated the research capital cost~ anu the limited fresh \\\\ ater \\\\ ill prevent much new con- ~lrUCllon or e'\\pansl n of salmon annual ranges of water temperature (6.5- 16°C) and salinit) (26-3 I Il/oo!. helter from the wind. depths

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 181 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 181 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHWEST PACIFIC GATEWAYS Dr. Robert M acknowledgment of this source. Scientific Prospectus No. 81 First Printing 1998 Distribution Electronic copies of this publication may be obtained from the ODP Publications Home Page on the World Wide Web at http

  16. Mid-ocean microseisms Peter D. Bromirski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    , and the Hawaiian Islands appear to be a significant source of LPDF energy in the North Pacific when waves arrive peak, is caused by ocean wave energy couplin Sciences and Technology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA (fkd@hawaii.edu) Ralph A

  17. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 96, NO. C8, PAGES 14,707-14,730, AUGUST 15, 1991 The Structure of the Transition Zone Between Coastal Waters and the Open Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    region between 60 km and 150 km offshore. The spring transition, as seen in coastalsea level and winds The Structure of the Transition Zone Between Coastal Waters and the Open Ocean off Northern California, Winter the boundary between low steric sea level inshore and high steric sea level offshore, dominated both

  18. Ocean response to arbitrary wind perturbations in the low-frequency approximation: implications for ENSO and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    expansion about a small parameter that involves the dominant frequency of the wind forcing and the oceanic1 Ocean response to arbitrary wind perturbations in the low-frequency approximation: implications study the response of the ocean thermocline in the Pacific to arbitrary periodic wind stress

  19. Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: I interannual variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    Y. Tang Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: I interannual variability Received: 20 Two hybrid coupled models (HCMs), an intermediate complexity dynamical ocean model cou- pled to either), hybrid models (e.g., Barnett et al. 1993; Balmaseda et al. 1994,1995), and fully coupled general

  20. Tropical Pacific mid-latitude teleconnections in medieval times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobb, Kim

    records from widely distributed regions around the planet, and in many cases is consistent with a cool centennial-scale drought, elevated incidence of wild fire, cool sea surface temperatures (SSTs) along). Proxy records from the tropical Pacific Ocean show contemporaneous changes indicating cool central

  1. Skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, are distributed throughout the Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    343 Skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, are distributed throughout the Pacific Ocean in tropical at processing plants in Manta (Ecuador), Assessment of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) spawning activity 2000. Fish. Bull. 99:343­350 (2001). Abstract­An investigation of skip- jack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis

  2. THE INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER 1 PUBLICATIONS 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawai`i at Mänoa. The IPRC mission of the nature and predict- ability of climate variations and change in the Asia- Pacific region: the Japan Agency for Marine- Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), NASA and NOAA. Financial support

  3. Response of the North Pacific Subtropical Countercurrent and its Variability to Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    1 Response of the North Pacific Subtropical Countercurrent and its Variability to Global Warming of the North Pacific Subtropical Countercurrent (STCC) and its variability to global warming is examined where mode water forms. Keywords: North Pacific Subtropical Countercurrent, global warming, decadal

  4. Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    2006-01-01

    . Three quarter of our planet's surface is covered by water where a richer biodiversity than life on land exists--more major taxonomic groupings of animals can be found in the oceans than on land. The oceans food, energy, and mineral resources, oceans also play a critical role in regulating Earth's weather

  5. Critical role for mesoscale eddy diffusion in supplying oxygen to hypoxic ocean waters1 Anand Gnanadesikan*3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    by the current generation of Earth System Models. Using satellite-based22 estimate of oxygen consumption 1000 m2 /s. Varying Aredi across a suite24 of Earth System Models yields a broadly consistent result with about 1/3 of these waters39 dropping below 10 M (solid black line, Fig. 1c,d).40 The Earth System Models

  6. The ocean covers 71 percent of the Earth's surface and contains 97 percent of the planet's water. It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    weather and regulates climate. It is the greenest pathway for global commerce, and it is an effective to meet our food, water and energy needs, and far too few scientists and engineers in this generation or the next are yet equipped to tackle these challenges. The gap is daunting, made more so by the accelerating

  7. PACIFIC NORTHWEST CYBER SUMMIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Matlock, Gordon W.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.; Smith, Karen S.

    2013-08-07

    On March 26, 2013, the Snohomish County Public Utility District (PUD) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) jointly hosted the Pacific Northwest Cyber Summit with the DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, the White House, Washington State congressional delegation, Washington State National Guard, and regional energy companies.

  8. Lagrangian tools to monitor transport and mixing in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Prants; M. V. Budyansky; M. Yu. Uleysky

    2012-05-20

    We apply the Lagrangian approach to study surface transport and mixing in the ocean. New tools have been developed to track the motion of water masses, their origin and fate and to quantify transport and mixing. To illustrate the methods used we compute the Lagrangian synoptic maps a comparatively small marine bay, the Peter the Great Bay in the Japan Sea near Vladivostok city (Russia), and in a comparatively large region in the North Pacific, the Kuroshio Extension system. In the first case we use velocity data from a Japan Sea circulation numerical model and in the second one the velocity data are derived from satellite altimeter measurements of anomalies of the sea height distributed by AVISO.

  9. Migration for Environmentally Displaced Pacific Peoples: Legal Options in the Pacific Rim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabucanon, Gil Marvel

    2012-01-01

    the four above-mentioned Pacific Rim states have developedand interests of these Pacific Rim states, but it is alsothe Pacific. All four Pacific Rim countries discussed in

  10. Development of a Species Distribution Model for the East Pacific Green Sea Turtle using Ecological Geoprocessing Tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Roxanne

    2012-10-19

    East Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, play ecologically important roles in marine habitats which range from grazing (and thus regularly "mowing") algae and seagrass beds to cycling nutrients between the ocean and land. However...

  11. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  12. Anatomy and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatomy and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 118, doi:10.1002/ 2013JC009339. 1. Introduction [2] Mesoscale eddy

  13. INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Center (IPRC) conducts such research, with emphasis on climate variability and change in the Asia-Pacific Data-Research Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 INTRODUCING with scientists at the Frontier Research Center for Global Change. This model captures such salient features

  14. Oceans and Climate Change Peter Rhines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , animals, atmosphere and ocean ... totally isolated except for an energy source: the sun #12;The value of the Atlantic circulation (kinetic energy density) from altimetry satellites #12;Oceans and the Global) Daphnia (water flea) Duckweed (floating water lens) #12;#12;#12;microcosm: a sealed flask with plants

  15. Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote 2013. [1] Penetration of solar radiation in the ocean is determined by the attenuation coefficient (Kd indicated that the penetration of the blue-green radiation for most oceanic waters is $30­40% deeper than

  16. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Ray G; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2012-01-01

    Fernandez (2010), The surface water and ocean topographyObserving terrestrial surface water and oceanic submesoscaleof trends in streamflow and water availability in a changing

  17. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 1 APRIL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1461 135 years of global ocean warming between the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    of global warming. Warming in the Atlantic Ocean is stronger than in the Pacific. Systematic errors and indicates that globally the oceans have been warming at least since the late-nineteenth or earlyLETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 1 APRIL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1461 135 years of global ocean

  18. ISBN: 978-0-12-391851-2 "Ocean Circulation and Climate, 2nd Ed. A 21st century perspective"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    , persistent currents along the western boundaries of the world's major ocean basins are called "western Australian Current in the Pacific Ocean. Keywords Western boundary current, Gulf Stream, Brazil Current, persistent currents along the western boundaries of the world's major ocean basins are some of the most

  19. S53juNE 2010STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2009 | 3. GLOBAL OCEANS--J. M. Levy, ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    's energy budget. · Ocean heat fluxes played a dual role in the dynamics of large-scale SST anomalies Niño a considerable build up of heat was observed in the upper equatorial Pacific Ocean. Global integrals of upper-ocean heat content for the last several years have reached values consistently higher

  20. S53JULY 2010STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2009 | 3. Global oceans--J. M. Levy, Ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's energy budget. · Ocean heat fluxes played a dual role in the dynamics of large-scale SST anomalies. Heat Niño a considerable build up of heat was observed in the upper equatorial Pacific Ocean. Global integrals of upper-ocean heat content for the last several years have reached values consistently higher

  1. Water resources and environmental hazards: Emphasis on hydrologic and cultural insight in the Pacific Rim. Proceedings of the AWRA annual summer symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, R.; Back, W.; Sidle, R.C.; Johnson, A.V. [eds.

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held June 25--28,1995 in Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary and international forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on water-resources management and hydrologic consequences associated with natural and human-induced hazards in various countries. Attention was focused on comparing and contrasting the experience of managers, diverse technical specialists, and public policy decision makers that arise from the application of water resources principles, technologies, and theories in different hydrologic and geologic terrains, climate regimes, and legal and cultural settings. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  2. Overflows and upper ocean interactions : a mechanism for the Azores current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kida, Shinichiro

    2006-01-01

    The oceanic response to overflows is explored using a two-layer isopycnal model. Overflows are a major source of the dense water of the global deep ocean, originating from only a few marginal seas. They enter the open ocean ...

  3. Dimethylsulfide gas transfer coefficients from algal blooms in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of dimethylsulfide in water, J. Geophys. Res. -Oceans, 98,for dimethylsulfide in fresh water and seawater, Geo- phys.is predominantly on the water side, a characteristic it

  4. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

  5. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 7 -Woodgate Schematic Surface and Atlantic Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water WESTERN ARCTIC (PACIFIC) HALOCLINE Halocline Water LHW ­ Lower Halocline Water AW ­ Atlantic Water DW ­ Deep Water European Speak: e.g. Manley Circulation Jones, 2001 Typical Arctic profiles Bottom Water "the rest" Western Arctic warmer ATLANTIC WATER T

  6. Pacific Biodiesel: Renewable and Sustainable

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Pacific Biodiesel topic and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  7. PACIFIC SOUTHWESTt (-A FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - ment in 1964. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We thank Lula E. Greene and the biometries staff of the Pacific Southwest

  8. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  9. OBSERVATIONS ON JUVENILE OCEANIC SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OBSERVATIONS ON JUVENILE OCEANIC SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM HAWAIIAN WATERS AND SIERRA SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM HAWAIIAN WATERS AND SIERRA MACKEREL (SCOMBEROMORUS SIERRA) FROM September 1948. While operating in Hawaiian waters, seven juvenile KatsllwollllS pelamis (Linnaeus) 1758

  10. Meridional Eddy Heat Flux Density: Direct observations of q in the ocean are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Meridional Eddy Heat Flux Density: ·Direct observations of q in the ocean are sparse and exhibit large spatio-temporal variability. ·Differential heating of the globe causes a net transport of heat (Qtot) poleward by the ocean and atmosphere. ·Models predict at 36oN in the Pacific that total heat

  11. Role of the ENSOIndian Ocean coupling on ENSO variability in a coupled GCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    the key to the rapid transition to an opposite phase. This remote impact of the Indian Ocean SSTanomalyis Nino/La Nina. Without the involvement of the Indian Ocean, the phase transition is much slower linked to the change of zonal wind stress in the western Pacific, which leads to a rapid demise of El

  12. Predictability and Diagnosis of Low-Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Arthur J. Miller

    2008-10-15

    Predicting the climate for the coming decades requires understanding both natural and anthropogenically forced climate variability. This variability is important because it has major societal impacts, for example by causing floods or droughts on land or altering fishery stocks in the ocean. Our results fall broadly into three topics: evaluating global climate model predictions; regional impacts of climate changes over western North America; and regional impacts of climate changes over the eastern North Pacific Ocean.

  13. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 92, NO. C13, PAGES 14,648-14,662, DECEMBER 15, 1987 On the Parameterization of Irradiance for Open Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    On the Parameterization of Irradiance for Open Ocean Photoprocesses DAVID A. SIEGEL AND T. D. DICKEY Ocean Physics Group of downwelling spectral irradiance were made during the fall of 1982 in the North Pacific Ocean (near 33øN, 142øW). These data are used to produce vertical profiles of downwelling irradiance for visible energy (400-700 nm

  14. Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  15. Antarctic ice sheet fertilises the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Death, R.

    Southern Ocean (SO) marine primary productivity (PP) is strongly influenced by the availability of iron in surface waters, which is thought to exert a significant control upon atmospheric CO2 concentrations on glacial/interglacial ...

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 198 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (successors to the Planning Committee) and the Pollution Prevention and Safety Panel. Technical Editor: Karen thermal maximum, the mid-Maastrichtian deep-water event, and the early Aptian Oceanic Anoxic Event

  17. Sandia Energy - High-Fidelity Hydrostructural Analysis of Ocean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrostructural Analysis of Ocean Renewable Power Company's (ORPC's) TidGen Turbine Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Partnership News News & Events Computational...

  18. Relative Role of Dynamic and Thermodynamic Processes in the Development of the Indian Ocean Dipole: An OGCM Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    in 1997 across the Indo-Pacific Ocean. In the tropical Pacific the largest El Nino in the last 100 years dipole events in the tropical IO, many of which coexisted with El Ninos (Reverdin et al. 1986, Hastenrath et al. 1993, Reason et al. 2000). In fact, the temporal correlation between the El Nino and IO dipole

  19. Microbe-Metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    B) and those present within methane seep Euryarchaea ( PMI,margin: the influence of methane seeps and oxygen minimumisotope signatures and methane use by New Zealand cold seep

  20. Microbe-metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew Reichmann

    2010-01-01

    B) and those present within methane seep Euryarchaea ( PMI,margin: the influence of methane seeps and oxygen minimumisotope signatures and methane use by New Zealand cold seep

  1. A decade of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    central California (1996­ 1999) and north of Kauai (1997­1999, 2002­2006) transmitted to receivers mounted on the bottom at 183 m depth near Kaneohe, Hawaii, to transmit to bottom-mounted receivers 2000

  2. Subsurface ocean argon disequilibrium reveals the equatorial Pacific shadow zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Archer,1 Steven Emerson,2 Charles Stump,2 and Cara Henning3 Received 18 May 2006; revised 27 July with theoretical and model predictions. Citation: Gehrie, E., D. Archer, S. Emerson, C. Stump, and C. Henning (2006 to pathway. Walin [1982], Speer [1997], and Nurser et al. [1999] reason that the production of thermocline

  3. Microbe-metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew Reichmann

    2010-01-01

    lipid biomarkers for microbes with chemoautotrophicOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microbe-Metazoan Interactions atxiv xvii xviii Chapter 3. Microbes, Macrofauna, and Methane:

  4. Microbe-Metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    lipid biomarkers for microbes with chemoautotrophicOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microbe-Metazoan Interactions atxiv xvii xviii Chapter 3. Microbes, Macrofauna, and Methane:

  5. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    an effective tsunami warning system for this region.to put an effective tsunami warning system in place. The

  6. Microbe-metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew Reichmann

    2010-01-01

    2002; Levin et al. 2003; Sommer et al. 2010) whereas clam2001; Levin et al. 2003; Sommer et al. 2006) and frenulaterates (Sommer et al. 2009). Comparable

  7. Microbe-Metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurber, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    2002; Levin et al. 2003; Sommer et al. 2010) whereas clam2001; Levin et al. 2003; Sommer et al. 2006) and frenulaterates (Sommer et al. 2009). Comparable

  8. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    as the Indonesian Throughflow. Wave energy at a variety ofexamine the properties of wave energy propagating into theto show that intraseasonal wave energy is also effectively

  9. Subtropical ocean ecosystem structure changes forced by North Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiu, Peng

    in microalgae, cyano- bacteria and modeled and measured zooplankton biomass were also observed during. While interann- ual trends in mesozooplankton biomass and phyto- plankton pigments have been reported

  10. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    compared the spectral energy east and west of Lombok Strait.wave energy bypassed Lombok Strait and continued east alongpropagate east- ward from Lombok to Ombai. Because energy is

  11. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    as a proxy for Kelvin wave energy, and comparing the rms SLAas the Indonesian Throughflow. Wave energy at a variety ofexamine the properties of wave energy propagating into the

  12. ARM - Lesson Plans: Temperature of the Pacific Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimatePast

  13. A dynamical picture of the oceanic tides Eugene I. Butikova)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    of the oceans, the actual system that responds with tides and tidal currents to the well-known tideA dynamical picture of the oceanic tides Eugene I. Butikova) Department of Physics, St. Petersburg waves. To clarify the underlying physics, we use a simple model of the ocean that consists of a water

  14. NOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Observes Fifth Anniversary of Oceanic,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the oceans, coastal waters, and estuaries. investigating their currents, the structure and con- toursNOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Observes Fifth Anniversary of Oceanic, Atmospheric, and Environmental Activities NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, cele- brated its fifth anniversary 3

  15. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Rim nations. As such, the management of the HMS fisheries s coordinated by the Pacific FisheryRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  16. 21st century change in ocean response to climate forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mar?elja, Stjepan

    2015-01-01

    Modeling globally averaged information on climate forcing from the land surface temperature data, the sea surface temperatures (SST) and the empirically determined relationship between the changes in SST and the turbulent diffusion of heat into the upper ocean demonstrates a consistent link. The modeling is accurate throughout the 20th century despite the different phases of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) or the strong divergence between land and ocean surface warming. It only fails during the last 15 years when SST drops well below the trend. The finding reinforces the view that slower global warming over the previous 15 years is not a caused by a negative phase of the IPO or by the variations in the upper ocean (top 700 m) warming but results from a change in the ocean behavior leading to increased heat transfer into the deeper ocean.

  17. Deep-tow study of magnetic anomalies in the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tominaga, Masako

    2006-10-30

    The Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) is a region of low amplitude, difficult-to-correlate magnetic anomalies located over Jurassic oceanic crust. We collected 1200 km of new deep-tow magnetic anomaly profiles over the Pacific JQZ that complement 2 deep...

  18. Micro-phytoplankton biomass of the equatorial Pacific in spring 1992 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Duan

    1995-01-01

    Along one transect in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean the micro-phytoplankton (>15 gm in one dimension) biomass in the upper 200 in was examined. The samples were taken during the most recent El Nifio event and examined in the light microscope...

  19. Size-specific opal-bound nitrogen isotope measurements in North Pacific sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Size-specific opal-bound nitrogen isotope measurements in North Pacific sediments Anja S. Studer a composition of diatom opal (d15 Ndb) is a valuable recorder of nitrate utilization in the polar surface oceans the measurement of the biogenic opal fraction up to 150 lm in size, which should represent the bulk

  20. Possibility of Using a Satellite-Based Detector for Recording Cherenkov Light from Ultrahigh-Energy Extensive Air Showers Penetrating into the Ocean Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shustova, O P; Khrenov, B A

    2011-01-01

    We have estimated the reflected component of Cherenkov radiation, which arises in developing of an extensive air shower with primary energy of 10^20 eV over the ocean surface. It has been shown that, under conditions of the TUS experiment, a flash of the reflected Cherenkov photons at the end of the fluorescence track can be identified in showers with zenith angles up to 20 degrees.

  1. New Cities of the Pacific Rim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward J. Blakely; Robert J. Stimson

    1992-01-01

    The future cities on the Pacific Rim." Comparative Urban and43 New Cities of the Pacific Rim Edward J. Blakely and43 New Cities of the Pacific Rim Edward J. Blakely and

  2. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Pacific Southwest Research Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Pacific Southwest Research Station Publications List Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest Ecosystems Center for Urban Forest Research Chemical branch of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed

  3. Pacific rim lures explorationists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nation, L.

    1991-09-01

    The Pacific Rim has been far and away the most attractive hunting ground for explorationists in the past year. Observers point to political initiatives coupled with a growing demand as igniting the region's numerous hydrocarbon possibilities. This paper describes some of the new incentives and the resultant exploration results and developments in China, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Vietnam. A major sign of the region's political maturity is the willingness for the countries involved to solve the longstanding disputes over the claims in hydrocarbon-prone South China Sea.

  4. Role of the oceans in the atmospheric cycle of carbonyl sulfide. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is both the dominant sulfur gas in the remote troposphere and, along with volcanoes, a major source of sulfur for the stratospheric sulfate layer. Prior to this work the ocean was regarded as a major sink for atmospheric OCS. The purpose of this study has been to assess the magnitude of the global air-sea flux of OCS. The author designed an analytical system which was centered around a Varian-3700 gas chromatograph with a flame-photometric detector. To increase the sensitivity of the detector, the hydrogen gas for the flame was doped with sulfur hexafloride. Air samples were concentrated in a liquid nitrogen cooled freeze-out loop, then injected into the gas chromatograph. Water samples purged with sulfur-free zero-air which was analyzed similarly. The author also built a permeation tube system for chemical standardization. This equipment was taken on two oceanographic cruises on the Pacific Ocean on board the NOAA ship DISCOVERER, one in the spring of 1983 and a second in the spring of 1984. Both of these cruises included measurements of air and sea-water concentrations of OCS.

  5. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Pacific Northwest National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Activity Report, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - January 2014 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - January 2014 February 2014 PNNL...

  6. Independent Oversight Review, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    September 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - September 2013 September 2013 Review of the Fire Protection Program at Pacific Northwest...

  7. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion leachate can reduce surface erosion. Res. Note PSW-342, 4 p., illus. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Exp from north- western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay frac- tions. As a result, the soil

  8. Pacific Northwest Government Contracting Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Government Contract Assistance Program (GCAP) and Pacific Northwest Defense Coalition (PNDC) cordially invite you to attend our annual Pacific Northwest Government Contracting Conference. The 2015 conference offers a full day of robust and informative training, coupled with networking opportunities. Attendees will learn from seasoned professionals and receive training specifically tailored to companies pursuing the government marketplace.

  9. Leveraging UESCs for Innovative Water Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UESCs for Innovative Water Projects Kate McMordie Stoughton Pacific Northwest National Laboratory FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR April 22-23, 2015 Nashville, TN...

  10. Water resource opportunity assessment: Fort Dix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Hostick, D.J.; Elliott, D.B.; Fitzpatrick, Q.K.; Dahowski, R.T.; Dison, D.R

    1996-12-01

    This report provides the results of the water resource opportunity assessments performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Fort Dix facility located in Fort Dix, New Jersey.

  11. Loggerhead sea turtles are circum-global, inhabiting temperate, sub-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. In the Pacific, loggerhead sea turtles have been in the North Pacific Ocean occurs in Japan; there is no known nesting in the east- ern North Pacific (Márquez in the oceanic realm of the central North Pacific Ocean are of Japanese stock (Dutton et al., 1998). Tagging

  12. Exploring the climate change refugia potential of equatorial Pacific coral reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drenkard, Elizabeth Joan

    2015-01-01

    Global climate models project a 21st century strengthening of the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC). The consequent increase in topographic upwelling of cool waters onto equatorial coral reef islands would mitigate ...

  13. APRU: Association of Pacific Rim Universities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    No. 549 KYOT O UNIVER SITY FO UN D E D #12;APRU: Association of Pacific Rim Universities APRU APRU Downturn Environment and Development: Scien- tific, Social and Technological Challenges for the Pacific Rim for the Next Century in the Pacific Rim Global Pressures, Local Impacts: Challenge for the Pacific Rim APEC

  14. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  15. Deep-Water Flow over the Lomonosov Ridge in the Arctic Ocean M.-L. TIMMERMANS, P. WINSOR, AND J. A. WHITEHEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winsor, Peter

    the geothermal heat flux or diffusive fluxes at the deep-water boundaries. 1. Introduction The two main basins horizontal or vertical gradients in 14 C in the Canadian Basin (Makarov and Canada Ba- sins) below 2250 m

  16. Mechanisms of subantarctic mode water upwelling in a hybrid-coordinate Hao Zuo a,d,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    of SAMW in the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans. The modest penetration of SAMW into the North,d, , Alberto C. Naveira Garabato a , Adrian L. New b , Andreas Oschlies c a School of Ocean and Earth Science to be key in the supply of nutrients to support biological production over much of the world ocean excluding

  17. Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit/Department of Botany, University of Hawai`i Manoa, 3190 Maile Way, St John 410, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA. Email: dduffy@hawaii.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    ). Cumulatively, Oceania generates less than .01% of world CO2 emissions (Boden et al. 2008). Consequently, the Pacific island states cannot change the trajectory of increasing atmospheric and oceanic CO2. Perhaps the world and Oceania forever. In this paper, Oceania includes the Pacific islands of Micronesia, Melanesia

  18. Migratory shearwaters integrate oceanic resources across the Pacific Ocean in an endless summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    signal in primary production with the shearwaters’ migrationonset of migration coincides with the period when primarythe postbreeding migration. Vertically-integrated primary

  19. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Dye

    2006-12-15

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

  20. Inversion for subbottom sound velocity profiles in the deep and shallow ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souza, Luiz Alberto Lopes de

    2005-01-01

    This thesis investigates the application of acoustic measurements in the deep and shallow ocean to infer the sound velocity profile (svp) in the seabed. For the deep water ocean, an exact method based on the Gelfand-Levitan ...

  1. Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion Ralf Starzmann Fluid of harnessing the energy from ocean waves is the oscillating water column (OWC) device. The OWC converts

  2. Role of the oceans in the atmospheric cycle of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is both the dominant sulfur gas in the remote troposphere and, along with volcanoes, a major source of sulfur for the stratospheric sulfate layer. Prior to this work the ocean was regarded as a major sink for atmospheric OCS. The purpose of this study has been to assess the magnitude of the global air-sea flux of OCS. The author designed an analytical system which was centered around a Varian-3700 gas chromatograph with a flame-photometric detector. To increase the sensitivity of the detector, the hydrogen gas for the flame was doped with sulfur hexafluoride. Air samples were concentrated in a liquid nitrogen cooled freeze-out loop, then injected into the gas chromatograph. Water samples purged with sulfur-free zero-air which was analyzed similarly. He also built a permeation tube system for chemical standardization. This equipment was taken on two oceanographic cruises on the Pacific Ocean, one in the spring of 1983 and a second in the spring of 1983. Both of these cruises included measurements of air and seawater concentrations of OCS from the equator to the Aleutian Islands. The Henry's law constant of solubility for OCS was measured in the laboratory for filtered and boiled seawater at three temperatures.

  3. California cooperative oceanic fisheries investigations. Reports volume 37, January 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olfe, J.

    1996-10-01

    Scientists from the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), the Southwest Fisheries Science Center of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have collaborated for 46 years in the longest-running large-scale study ever undertaken in the ocean. This study was begun in order to understand the causes of changes in population, over time, of commercially important fishes in California`s coastal waters. When the study began, the Pacific sardine was by far the most significant species of economic concern to the State of California. Because its population changes were thought to be caused by a diversity of atmospheric, oceanic, and biological variables, a wide array of measurements in the California Current region were begun and have been continued to this day. This long time series of data allows not only a better understanding of the flux of fish populations, but also lays the foundation for understanding interdecadal and secular change in the seas. This document contains papers from symposium of the 1995 CalCOFI Conference related to interdecadal changes in the ecology of the California current.

  4. RADIOCARBON,Vol 42, Nr 2,2000, P 249-256 @2000 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona SOUTHWEST SUBTROPICAL PACIFIC SURFACE WATER RADIOCARBON IN A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    to alter the coupled ocean-atmosphere system's internal oscillations such as ENSO, Guilderson and Schrag, it remains uncertain whether this shift is part of an underlying dynamically driven natural variability the extra-tropics and trop- tCenter for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National

  5. Ocean Carbon Cycle Data from the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The U.S. JGOFS program, a component of the U.S Global Change Research Program, grew out of the recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences workshop in 1984. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP). Data are available throughout the U.S. JGOFS web site at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/ and from the U.S. JGOFS Data System at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/jg/dir/jgofs/. Major named segments of the project are: Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) Study, Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Study, Equatorial Pacific Process Study, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (1989), Arabian Sea Process Study, and the Southern Ocean Process Study.

  6. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

  7. Evaluating WRF-Chem aerosol indirect effects in Southeast Pacific marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saide P. E.; Springston S.; Spak, S. N.; Carmichael, G. R.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.; Yang, Q.; Howell, S.; Leon, D. C.; Snider, J. R.; Bandy, A. R.; Collett, J. L.; Benedict, K. B.; de Szoeke, S. P.; Hawkins, L. N.; Allen, G.; Crawford, I.; Crosier, J.

    2012-03-29

    We evaluate a regional-scale simulation with the WRF-Chem model for the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), which sampled the Southeast Pacific's persistent stratocumulus deck. Evaluation of VOCALS-REx ship-based and three aircraft observations focuses on analyzing how aerosol loading affects marine boundary layer (MBL) dynamics and cloud microphysics. We compare local time series and campaign-averaged longitudinal gradients, and highlight differences in model simulations with (W) and without (NW) wet deposition processes. The higher aerosol loadings in the NW case produce considerable changes in MBL dynamics and cloud microphysics, in accordance with the established conceptual model of aerosol indirect effects. These include increase in cloud albedo, increase in MBL and cloud heights, drizzle suppression, increase in liquid water content, and increase in cloud lifetime. Moreover, better statistical representation of aerosol mass and number concentration improves model fidelity in reproducing observed spatial and temporal variability in cloud properties, including top and base height, droplet concentration, water content, rain rate, optical depth (COD) and liquid water path (LWP). Together, these help to quantify confidence in WRF-Chem's modeled aerosol-cloud interactions, especially in the activation parameterization, while identifying structural and parametric uncertainties including: irreversibility in rain wet removal; overestimation of marine DMS and sea salt emissions, and accelerated aqueous sulfate conversion. Our findings suggest that WRF-Chem simulates marine cloud-aerosol interactions at a level sufficient for applications in forecasting weather and air quality and studying aerosol climate forcing, and may do so with the reliability required for policy analysis.

  8. Evaluating WRF-Chem aerosol indirect effects in Southeast Pacific marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Carmichael, Gregory; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.; Yang, Qing; Howell, S. G.; Leon, Dolislager; Snider, Jefferson R.; Bandy, Alan R.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Benedict, K. B.; de Szoeke, S.; Hawkins, Lisa; Allen, Grant; Crawford, I.; Crosier, J.; Springston, S. R.

    2012-03-30

    We evaluate a regional-scale simulation with the WRF-Chem model for the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), which sampled the Southeast Pacific's persistent stratocumulus deck. Evaluation of VOCALS-REx ship-based and aircraft observations focuses on analyzing how aerosol loading affects marine boundary layer (MBL) dynamics and cloud microphysics. We compare local time series and campaign averaged longitudinal gradients, and highlight differences in model simulations with (W) and without wet (NW) deposition processes. The higher aerosol loadings in the NW case produce considerable changes in MBL dynamics and cloud microphysics, in accordance with the established conceptual model of aerosol indirect effects. These include increase in cloud albedo, increase in MBL and cloud heights, drizzle suppression, increase in liquid water content, and increase in cloud lifetime. Moreover, better statistical representation of aerosol mass and number concentration improves model fidelity in reproducing observed spatial and temporal variability in cloud properties, including top and base height, droplet concentration, water content, rain rate, optical depth (COD) and liquid water path (LWP). Together, these help to quantify confidence in WRF-Chem's modeled aerosol-cloud interactions, while identifying structural and parametric uncertainties including: irreversibility in rain wet removal; overestimation of marine DMS and sea salt emissions and accelerated aqueous sulfate conversion. Our findings suggest that WRF-Chem simulates marine cloud-aerosol interactions at a level sufficient for applications in forecasting weather and air quality and studying aerosol climate forcing, including the reliability required for policy analysis and geo-engineering applications.

  9. Climate effects on future runoff regimes of Pacific mountain tributaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rango, A.; Roberts, R. [Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD (United States). Hydrology Lab.; Martinec, J.

    1995-12-31

    Because most Pacific mountain tributaries are situated in the Northern hemisphere, the runoff regime is characterized by high river flows in April-September and low river flows in October--March. With regard to global warming, a partial shift of inflows into the Pacific Ocean from the summer to the winter has to be expected. For quantitative evaluations, the SRM snowmelt runoff model is applied in several basins in the Pacific rim, ranging from 57{degree} North (west coast of Canada) to 45{degree} South (east coast of New Zealand). In the Kings River basin of California (4,000 km{sup 2}, 171--4,341 m a.s.l.) with the envisaged rise of temperature, runoff in October--March is significantly increased at the expense of snow accumulation in winter and summer runoff. Also, summer runoff peaks are shifted to earlier dates. Similar redistribution of runoff is evaluated for the Illecillewaet River basin of British Columbia (1,155 km{sup 2}, 509--3,150 m a.s.l.), a tributary to the Columbia River. However, an additional effect is observed: because nearly 10% of the surface is covered with permanent snowfields and glaciers, runoff would be temporarily increased from these frozen reserves. A quantitative analysis reveals that in the Illecillewaet basin, even a moderate increase of precipitation would not offset a gradual disappearance of glaciers due to increased melting.

  10. The circulation of the ocean is usually divided into two parts, a wind-driven circulation that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurements show that the thermohaline circulation turns over all the deep water in the ocean every 600 years, in the formation of new deep water in the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. Large volumes of cold polar water occurs and how upwelled deep water returns to the areas of deep-water formation. The main new development

  11. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate Scale Water Quality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-10-01

    The Salish Sea, including Puget Sound, is a large estuarine system bounded by over seven thousand miles of complex shorelines, consists of several subbasins and many large inlets with distinct properties of their own. Pacific Ocean water enters Puget Sound through the Strait of Juan de Fuca at depth over the Admiralty Inlet sill. Ocean water mixed with freshwater discharges from runoff, rivers, and wastewater outfalls exits Puget Sound through the brackish surface outflow layer. Nutrient pollution is considered one of the largest threats to Puget Sound. There is considerable interest in understanding the effect of nutrient loads on the water quality and ecological health of Puget Sound in particular and the Salish Sea as a whole. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a coupled hydrodynamic and water quality model. The water quality model simulates algae growth, dissolved oxygen, (DO) and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound to inform potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or control human impacts to DO levels in the sensitive areas. The project did not include any additional data collection but instead relied on currently available information. This report describes model development effort conducted during the period 2009 to 2012 under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cooperative agreement with PNNL, Ecology, and the University of Washington awarded under the National Estuary Program

  12. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glein, Christopher; Waite, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to obtain a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model indicates that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ~11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by clays and carbonates on the ocean floor. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecule...

  13. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK to waves and current, sediment transport, high pressure and temperature variations, and renewable energy methods, water wave mechanics, sediment transport. R. CENGIZ ERTEKIN Professor, PhD 1984, UC Berkeley

  14. Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benot Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho proponents (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    drilling capabilities to achieve +6000 m of penetration in +4000 m water depth. The future scientific oceanDrilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benoît Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho, K. Okino, P. Pezard, E. Takazawa, T. Tsuji, S. Umino The mid-ocean ridges and the new oceanic

  15. Blue Waters An Extraordinary Computer to Enable Extraordinary Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blue Waters An Extraordinary Computer to Enable Extraordinary Research Thom Dunning National Center for Supercomputing Applications Blue Waters Extraordinaire · 25 February 2011 · Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (NCSA Building, NPCF) · Three major computing systems (Abe, Lincoln, Ember) Blue Waters Extraordinaire

  16. ASSOCIATION OF PACIFIC RIM UNIVERSITIES (APRU) Theme: Global Challenges Pacific Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    ASSOCIATION OF PACIFIC RIM UNIVERSITIES (APRU) Theme: Global Challenges ­ Pacific Perspectives Symposium: APRU Responses to Asia-Pacific Issues Stephen J. Toope, UBC ­ Thursday, July 1, 2010 ASK? These are complex global challenges, yes, but to what extent are they also "Asia-Pacific issues?" Most importantly

  17. Designed for: Ocean Observing Demo: A collaboration between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effective low cost ocean observing system. This system was recently developed and deployed for offshore oil. The Fetch node was deployed in 550 feet of water to measure ocean temperature and pressure, and the Tsunami Observing Initiatives Pioneer Array. The Fetch will record pressure and temperatures at this site prior

  18. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Fine Particles for Ocean and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Golomb; David Ryan; Eugene Barry

    2007-01-08

    Since the submission of our last Semi-annual Report, dated September 2006, the research objectives of this Co-operative Agreement shifted toward geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. In the period September 2006-February 2007, experiments were conducted in a High-Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) for creating emulsions of liquid carbon dioxide (/CO{sub 2})-in-water stabilized by fine particles for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Also, emulsions were created in water of a binary mixture of liquid carbon dioxide and liquid hydrogen sulfide (/H{sub 2}S), called Acid Gas (AG). This leads to the possibility of safe disposal of AG in deep geologic formations, such as saline aquifers. The stabilizing particles included pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), unprocessed flyash, collected by an electrostatic precipitator at a local coal-fired power plant, and pulverized siderite (FeCO{sub 3}). Particle size ranged from submicron to a few micrometers. The first important finding is that /CO{sub 2} and /H{sub 2}S freely mix as a binary liquid without phase separation. The next finding is that the mixture of /CO{sub 2} and /H{sub 2}S can be emulsified in water using fine particles as emulsifying agents. Such emulsions are stable over prolonged periods, so it should not be a problem to inject an emulsion into subterranean formations. The advantage of injecting an emulsion into subterranean formations is that it is denser than the pure liquid, therefore it is likely to disperse in the bottom of the geologic formation, rather than buoying upward (called fingering). In such a fashion, the risk of the liquids escaping from the formation, and possibly re-emerging into the atmosphere, is minimized. This is especially important for H{sub 2}S, because it is a highly toxic gas. Furthermore, the emulsion may interact with the surrounding minerals, causing mineral trapping. This may lead to longer sequestration periods than injecting the pure liquids alone.

  19. MFR PAPER 1160 Assessment of North Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    catchers under the jurisdiction of IWC members-in- cluding the "North Pacific Rim" gov- ernments of CanadaMFR PAPER 1160 Assessment of North Pacific Stocks of Whales management of these valuable re- sources. The following report reviews the status of whales and whaling in the north Pacific and summarizes

  20. Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations BByy AAllaann PPaarrkkeerr,, ZZoollttáánn) 867-6553 E-mail: parkeral@evergreen.edu Web: www.evergreen.edu/nwindian Climate Change and Pacific Rim and drought pat- terns. South Pacific Indigenous peo- ples are finding their islands inundated by rising sea

  1. Agricultural Opportunities in the Pacific Rim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Brian

    Agricultural Opportunities in the Pacific Rim American Society of Farm Managers and Rural and objectives · Objective: Better understand how agricultural export opportunities in the Pacific Rim and Mexico) are top export destinations and they count as Pacific Rim · Of course, we also import from Canada

  2. Earth MattErsNewsletter of UBC Earth, Ocean and atmospheric sciences Vol. 1 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth MattErsNewsletter of UBC Earth, Ocean and atmospheric sciences Vol. 1 2014 8 News Transforming undergraduate education, reopening of the Pacific Museum of Earth, and more 18 New Faculty Three on their latest investigations #12;PhotobyKirstenHodge ii EarthMatters 2014 iii Contents iii From the Editor iv

  3. OCEAN MODEL SIMULATIONS OF A GAP WIND EVENT IN THE GULF OF TEHUANTEPEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, David

    winds", are generated as cold air masses surge southward across the Gulf of Mexico and are forced14B.6 OCEAN MODEL SIMULATIONS OF A GAP WIND EVENT IN THE GULF OF TEHUANTEPEC Jon M. Schrage1. INTRODUCTION Off the Pacific coast of southern Mexico, in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, strong northerly winds often

  4. Role of Indian Ocean warming in the development of Philippine Sea anticyclone during ENSO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Masahiro

    Role of Indian Ocean warming in the development of Philippine Sea anticyclone during ENSO Masahiro] The anomalous, low-level anticyclone near the Philippines and suppressed convection over the western Pacific convection over the maritime continent generates the Philippine Sea anticyclone. From a series of the moist

  5. Temporal Data Mining for the Discovery and Analysis of Ocean Climate Indices*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    , El Nino, the anomalous warming of the eastern tropical region of the Pacific, has been linked America [Tay98]. For this paper, we will be concerned with teleconnections, such as El Nino, that involve of the Earth's oceans. For example, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) is an OCI that is associated with El

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM CUMULATIVE INDEX GEOGRAPHIC AND SITE INDEX 1AABW Africa SW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM CUMULATIVE INDEX GEOGRAPHIC AND SITE INDEX 1AABW · Africa SW A AABW. See Antarctic Bottom Water AAIW. See Antarctic Intermediate Water Abaco event, geology, 101B27:428­430; 29:1­19 organogenic dolomites, 175B15:1­17 pore water, 175A20:547­553 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM CUMULATIVE INDEX

  7. 1. Department, course number, title ORE 603 Oceanography for Ocean Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Course 3. Course Catalog Description Physical, chemical, biological and geological ocean environments. ABET Course Learning Outcomes 7. Topics Covered 1. Ocean Basins and Margins 2. Properties of Water / Sea Water Chemistry 3. Water, Salt and Heat Balance 4. Physical Laws and Equations of Motion 5

  8. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  9. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  10. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

  11. PACIFIC EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    PACIFIC EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER Vector-Valued Ground Motion Intensity Measures of the intensity measures is also shown to be useful for characterizing the effect of near-fault ground motions/08 OCTOBER 2006 #12;Vector-Valued Ground Motion Intensity Measures for Probabilistic Seismic Demand Analysis

  12. Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data can be obtained from the University of Oregon Solar Moni- toring Laboratory after obtaining permission

  13. Ocean Energy Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-05

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas-water paleoceanography with those of the zonal and meridional paleo-wind circulation. OBJECTIVES The eleven oroposed

  15. Accelerated simulation of passive tracers in ocean circulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    to be particularly powerful tools when combined with ocean general circulation models (GCMs). (See England and Maier's circulation, such as the poleward transport of heat, water mass transfor- mation and ventilation

  16. Ecological traits influencing range expansion across large oceanic dispersal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    Francisco, CA 94118, USA 4 Centro de Cie^ncias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005 water [2,7], both of which reduce the potential for ocean-wide colonization by near shore organ- isms

  17. High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

    2006-01-01

    of enhanced carbon biomass and export at 55 degrees S duringHigh Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean PhoebeSurface waters with high biomass levels and high proportion

  18. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Elliot L. Richardson, Secretary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Ocean Fisheries: Introductory Remarks, Maurice E. Stansby 2 Pollution and the Northeast Pacific on the Waters of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean, Robert C. Clark, Jr. 27 Impact of Cooling Waters on the Aquatic-With Special Application to Areas Adjacent to the Northeastern Pacific Ocean, George R. Snyder 39 Effects

  19. Oceanography December 2008 53 THE WINDDRIVEN COASTAL OCEAN: NOW IN HIGHDEF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    of wind-driven coastal ocean ecosystems. ese tools allowed us to probe the entire water column, the air (vertical sections), winds and ocean currents (arrows), and surface chlo- rophyll (green shades at seaOceanography December 2008 53 THE WINDDRIVEN COASTAL OCEAN: NOW IN HIGHDEF By John A. Barth, John M

  20. CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    gradient technologies. This paper is focused on Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) and the needCHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms

  1. An Open Ocean Trial of Controlled Upwelling Using Wave Pump Technology ANGELICQUE WHITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Angelicque

    An Open Ocean Trial of Controlled Upwelling Using Wave Pump Technology ANGELICQUE WHITE College) ABSTRACT In 1976, John D. Isaacs proposed to use wave energy to invert the density structure of the ocean of deep water to the surface ocean. Although Isaacs's wave-powered pump has taken many forms, from energy

  2. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    gallon, if we took all of the salt out of the world oceans it would be enough to cover the entire planet of water that helped cool the Earth's surface and gradually collected to help form the oceans

  3. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  4. GEOCHEMISTRY OF PARTICULATE AND DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON IN THE CENTRAL NORTH PACIFIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    -carbonate system of the open ocean is still not completely understood today. This investigation incorporated both for 15 months at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series station, ALOHA, was predominantly controlled waters are a very small sink for anthropogenic CO2, this CO2 has penetrated to a depth of 700 m

  5. Trade war in the Pacific: ASEAN and the Trans-Pacific Partnership https://theconversation.edu.au/trade-war-in-the-pacific-asean-and-the-trans-pacific-partnership-10937[3/12/2012 11:38:09 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    centred on South-East Asia and a United States-led Pacific Rim. Moreover, it is not clear whetherTrade war in the Pacific: ASEAN and the Trans-Pacific Partnership https://theconversation.edu.au/trade-war-in-the-pacific-asean-and-the-trans-pacific-partnership-10937[3/12/2012 11:38:09 AM] TC Home

  6. Identification of Central-Pacific and Eastern-Pacific types of ENSO in CMIP3 Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jin-Yi; Kim, Seon T.

    2010-01-01

    Cold tongue El Niño and warm pool El Niño, J. Clim. , 22,western?Pacific warm pool, respectively. The identificationthe western Pacific warm pool and others towards the inter-

  7. NOAA/NMFS Developments Initial Assessment of Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    several months of monitoring test mining in the Pacific, Stressing the preliminary nature" vessel Sec/co 445, He emphasized, however, there could be chronic long-term, low- level effects which- charged by the mining ship at the sur- face, as well as in the water columns between the sea floor

  8. An Assessment of the Status of Captive Broodstock Technology of Pacific Salmon, 1995 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnaken, Conrad V.W.; Hard, Jeffrey J.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides guidance for the refinement and use of captive broodstock technology for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) by bringing together information on the husbandry techniques, genetic risks, physiology, nutrition, and pathology affecting captive broodstocks. Captive broodstock rearing of Pacific salmon is an evolving technology, as yet without well defined standards. At present, we regard captive rearing of Pacific salmon as problematic: high mortality rates and low egg viability were common in the programs we reviewed for this report. One of the most important elements in fish husbandry is the culture environment itself. Many captive broodstock programs for Pacific salmon have reared fish from smolt-to-adult in seawater net-pens, and most have shown success in providing gametes for recovery efforts. However, some programs have lost entire brood years to diseases that transmitted rapidly in this medium. Current programs for endangered species of Pacific salmon rear most fish full-term to maturity in fresh well-water, since ground water is low in pathogens and thus helps ensure survival to adulthood. Our review suggested that captive rearing of fish in either freshwater, well-water, or filtered and sterilized seawater supplied to land-based tanks should produce higher survival than culture in seawater net-pens.

  9. Independent Oversight Review, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    October 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - October 2012 October 2012 Review of the Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the...

  10. Pacific Fuel Cell Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Cell Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pacific Fuel Cell Corporation Address: 26985 Lakeland Blvd. Place: Euclid, Ohio Zip: 44132 Sector: Buildings, Efficiency,...

  11. 2006 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of both the Federal system and the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This surplus energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These energy deficits will be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due to economic conditions or closures, additional contract purchases, and/or the addition of new generating resources. This study incorporates information on Pacific Northwest (PNW) regional retail loads, contract obligations, and contract resources. This loads and resources analysis simulates the operation of the power system in the PNW. The simulated hydro operation incorporates plant characteristics, streamflows, and non-power requirements from the current Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). Additional resource capability estimates were provided by BPA, PNW Federal agency, public agency, cooperative, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers furnished through annual PNUCC data submittals for 2005 and/or direct submittals to BPA. The 2006 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary document of Federal system and PNW region loads and resources, and (2) a technical appendix which presents regional loads, grouped by major PNW utility categories, and detailed contract and resource information. The technical appendix is available only in electronic form. Individual customer information for marketer contracts is not detailed due to confidentiality agreements. The 2006 White Book analysis updates the 2004 White Book. This analysis shows projections of the Federal system and region's yearly average annual energy consumption and resource availability for the study period, OY 2007-2016. The study also presents projections of Federal system and region expected 1-hour monthly peak demand, monthly energy demand, monthly 1-hour peak generating capability, and monthly energy generation for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. BPA is investigating a new approach in capacity planning depicting the monthly Federal system 120-hour peak generating capability and 120-hour peak surplus/deficit for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. This document analyzes the PNW's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency;

  12. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  13. Ocean Energy Resource Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource assessment for the United States.

  14. ENCYCLOPEDIA OCEAN SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENCYCLOPEDIA OF OCEAN SCIENCES Editor-in-Chief JOHN H. STEELE Editors STEVE A. THORPE KARL K in Marine Biology 26: 115-168. Rosland Rand Giske .I (1997) A dynamic model for tbe life history

  15. Uranium-series radionuclide records of paleoceanographic and sedimentary changes in the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Sharon Susanna

    2009-01-01

    The radionuclides ²³¹Pa and ²³?Th, produced in the water column and removed from the ocean by particle scavenging and burial in sediments, offer a means for paleoceanographers to examine past dynamics of both water column ...

  16. APRU FELLOWS PROGRAM 2012 in partnership with NUS Asia Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    -cities rise around the Pacific Rim, natural hazards from earthquakes and tsunamis, pollution, cross, Singapore The Value of Water: Water, Values and Society in the Asia Pacific Region How do we value water and management around the Asia Pacific region? Oceans cover 70 per cent of the globe. The Pacific Ocean makes up

  17. Upper ocean control on the solubility pump of CO2 by Takamitsu Ito1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    and the degree of saturation of the waters. The depth of thermocline sets the relative volume of warm and cold waters, which sets the mean solubility of CO2 in the ocean. The degree of saturation depends lead to changes in atmospheric pCO2 of as much as 30 ppmv. The deep ocean carbon reservoir

  18. Technology Solutions Case Study: Heat Pump Water Heater Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-08-01

    In this project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory studied heat pump water heaters, an efficient, cost-effective alternative to traditional electric resistance water heaters that can improve energy efficiency by up to 62%.

  19. Pacific Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: EnergyInc the former Jump to:Pacific

  20. Role of the upper ocean structure in the response of ENSO-like SST variability to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noh, Yign

    Role of the upper ocean structure in the response of ENSO-like SST variability to global warming)-like variability to global warming varies comparatively between the two different climate system models, i are reduced in the eastern equatorial Pacific under global warming, which erodes the thermo- cline feedback

  1. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    from the meltdown of the 3 reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant in March 2011 quickly Current as it passes by Japan, whether tsunami debris, glass fishing floats, or radioactive contaminants Nuclear Meltdowns", which provided some interesting perspective on Pacific Ocean radiation. It turns out

  2. Visualising Fe speciation diversity in ocean particulate samples by micro X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @lbl.gov Environmental context. Iron-bearing particles in the ocean have attracted interest due to the role of iron to something manageable. The Western Subarctic Pacific particles were grouped into four main populations, each into three clusters: (1) Fe3þ -bearing clays þ Fe3þ oxyhydroxides, (2) Fe2þ silicates þ Fe3þ oxyhydroxides

  3. Blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) are widely distributed throughout the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans (Nakamura, 1985). In the Pacific, blue marlin are harvested data (Kleiber et al., 2003) indicate that there is a single stock of blue marlin in the Pacific Ocean- ies for the stock of blue marlin in the Pacific Ocean, there have been few published studies

  4. Now Available: Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Now Available: Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project - Technology Performance Report Volume 1 Now Available: Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project -...

  5. Energy, Transportation Ministers from Asia-Pacific Nations Pledge...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Ministers from Asia-Pacific Nations Pledge Cooperation on Cleaner, More Energy-Efficient Transportation Energy, Transportation Ministers from Asia-Pacific Nations...

  6. SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc Carnegie Corporation Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc...

  7. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Pacific Data Electric, Inc....

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pacific Data Electric, Inc. - February 12, 2015 February 12, 2015 Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Pacific Data Electric, Inc. On...

  8. Department of Energy Cites the University of California and Pacific...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the University of California and Pacific Data Electric, Inc., for Worker Safety and Health Program Violations Department of Energy Cites the University of California and Pacific...

  9. NORTHEAST PACIFIC ALBACORE OCEANOGRAPHY SURVEY, 1961

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    444 NORTHEAST PACIFIC ALBACORE OCEANOGRAPHY SURVEY, 1961 by R. W. Owen, Jr. SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC OCEANOGRAPHY SURVEY, 1961 by R, W. Owen, Jr. United States Fish and Wildlife Service Special Scientific Report PACIFIC ALBACORE OCEANOGRAPHY SURVEY, 1961 by R. W. Owen, Jr. Fishery Biologist Research Bureau

  10. NORTH PACIFIC OCEANOGRAPHY, FEBRUARY-APRIL 1962

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    477: NORTH PACIFIC OCEANOGRAPHY, FEBRUARY- APRIL 1962 by Felix Favorite, Betty-Ann Morse, Alan H'auUke, Commissioner Bureau of Commep.cial FlSHERif;s, Donald L. McKernan, Director NORTH PACIFIC OCEANOGRAPHY OCEANOGRAPHY, FEBRUARY - APRIL 1962 by Felix Favorite and Betty-Ann Morse, Oceanographers Alan H. Haselwood

  11. Royal Pacific: Order (2013-SE-33004)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Royal Pacific, Ltd. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Royal Pacific had failed to certify that various basic models of medium base compact fluorescent lamps, ceiling fans, ceiling fan light kits, and illuminated exit signs comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  12. Pacific and Atlantic herring produce burst pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    Pacific and Atlantic herring produce burst pulse sounds Ben Wilson1,2* , Robert S. Batty3 wild-caught herring. Pacific herring pro- duce distinctive bursts of pulses, termed Fast Repetitive Tick (FRT) sounds. These trains of broadband pulses (1.7­22 kHz) lasted between 0.6 s and 7.6 s. Most

  13. Pacific Northwest Power Supply Adequacy Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Pacific Northwest Power Supply Adequacy Assessment for 2019 Final Report May 7, 2014 Council Document Number 2014-04 #12;2 Executive Summary The Pacific Northwest's power supply is expected resources: demand-side actions and emergency resources used only during shortages. The assumption about

  14. Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

  15. Partnerships in the Pacific Rim

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendorf, A.W. [Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States). Power Generation Services

    1997-09-01

    Due to the ever-increasing need to use global marketing as a means of gaining new business, Sargent and Lundy, like many of its competitors, has looked to stronger partnering relationships (e.g. alliances, teaming agreements, etc.) to enhance its ability to compete. New power generation plants, often developed, owned and operated by independent power companies in pacific Rim countries is one of the greatest sources of new business for engineering firms prepared to compete in this arena. In general, Sargent and Lundy focuses on three types of partnering relationships developed for international power markets in pacific Rim countries. These three relationships can be summarized as follows: partnering with other US-based organizations; partnering with non-US based organizations located in a country different than that of the intended market; and partnering with organizations located in the same country as the intended market. The features of each of the three partnering relationships discussed here involve considerable business development and logistics considerations and many other details that generally do not affect US-based partnering arrangements focusing on US business. The situation-specific details necessary to develop a successful partnering relationship depend greatly upon the client`s needs as well as the final goals of all companies involved.

  16. Variability in Labrador Sea Water formation Variabiliteit in the formatie van Labrador Zee Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    deep convection takes place. Deep convection is vertical mixing of water over a large depth is the only way in which the water in the deep ocean is exposed to the atmosphere, and the only rapid interaction between water in the deep ocean and in the surface layer. Deep convection is a typical winter

  17. GFD-2 OC-513 Spring 2013 P.B. Rhines MWF 10.30-11.20 Ocean Teaching Building 205

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    => potential vorticity thermal wind · rotation and stratification: the layered, stiffened ocean fluid · Ekman: wind-stress and buoyancy flux · stratification and the `quiet' interior water column · mapping

  18. EFFECTS OF BENZENE (A TOXIC COMPONENT OF PETROLEUM) ON SPAWNING PACIFIC HERRING, CLUPEA HARENGUS PALLASI

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    EFFECTS OF BENZENE (A TOXIC COMPONENT OF PETROLEUM) ON SPAWNING PACIFIC HERRING, CLUPEA HARENGUS and larvae through yolk absorption, 43%. Exposure to benzene also induced premature spawning and resulted-labeled benzene and/or metabolites in ovarian eggs (14 times initial concentration in water in 24-48 h; 1.4 ILlig

  19. Carbon dioxide release from the North Pacific abyss during the last deglaciation

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    Pedersen, Tom

    LETTERS Carbon dioxide release from the North Pacific abyss during the last deglaciation Eric D , John R. Southon6 & Roger Francois1 Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were significantly lower the surface waters above but only a small increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration8 . We speculate

  20. MARINE MAMMALS OF THE PACIFIC REGION AND HAWAII marine mammals of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ); and endangered Hawaiian monk seals. Fourteen stocks have known population trends: seven are increasing, one marine mammal stocks are highlighted in this chapter: the Hawaiian monk seal, the Pacific Islands Stock Inland Waters 12,844 771 > 30 > 34 No S Hawaiian monk seal 1,214 Undet. Unknown Unknown Yes E D Northern