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  1. Mississippi

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi

  2. EIS-0509: Mississippi River LNG Project, Plaquemines Parish,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9: Mississippi River LNG Project, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana EIS-0509: Mississippi River LNG Project, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory ...

  3. Neshoba County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Neshoba County, Mississippi Bogue Chitto, Mississippi Pearl River, Mississippi Philadelphia, Mississippi Tucker, Mississippi Union, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:...

  4. City of Water Valley, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley, Mississippi (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Water Valley Place: Mississippi Phone Number: (662) 473-3243 Outage Hotline: (662) 473-3243...

  5. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin ... Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy ...

  6. Mississippi - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Mississippi

  7. Mississippi - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Mississippi

  8. Mississippi - Search - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Mississippi

  9. Pathways Toward Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Production in the Mississippi River Watershed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pathways Toward Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Production in the Mississippi River Watershed March 24, 2015 Analysis and Sustainability Review Jason Hill University of Minnesota This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement * The overall goal of this project is to use an ecosystem service framework to evaluate the environmental impact of biomass production options and their placement on the landscape so as to guide the

  10. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  11. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

  12. Beijing Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co.Ltd. Place:...

  13. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  14. Rankin County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Mississippi Brandon, Mississippi Florence, Mississippi Flowood, Mississippi Jackson, Mississippi Pearl, Mississippi Pelahatchie, Mississippi Puckett, Mississippi...

  15. Bolivar County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Mississippi Alligator, Mississippi Benoit, Mississippi Beulah, Mississippi Boyle, Mississippi Cleveland, Mississippi Duncan, Mississippi Gunnison, Mississippi...

  16. Two Rivers Water & Light | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water & Light Jump to: navigation, search Name: Two Rivers Water & Light Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (920) 793-5550 Website: trwaterandlight.com Facebook: https:...

  17. Evaluation of the reliability of a conventional platform installed in South Pass Block 47 of the Mississippi River delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bea, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    In August 1995, the Energy Development Corporation (EDC) installed a conventional drilling and production platform in South Pass Block 47 (SP 47). Due to its proximity to the delta of the Mississippi River, this platform will be subject to the environmental forces developed by hurricanes and movements of the sea floor. This paper summarizes results from probability based study of the reliability characteristics of a conventional platform installed in SP 47. Bases for evaluation of the acceptability of the reliability of the platform are developed. This paper shows how reliability methods can be used to help improve the efficiency of offshore platforms. Application of traditional engineering approaches indicated the need for a mudslide resistant platform. Given that a mudslide resistant platform was required, then the gas reserves could not have been developed.

  18. Energy-water challenge emerges in Colorado River flows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-water challenge emerges in Colorado River flows Energy-water challenge emerges in Colorado River flows Climate-driven heat-stress and forest mortality on the Colorado River ...

  19. Hinds County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bolton, Mississippi Byram, Mississippi Clinton, Mississippi Edwards, Mississippi Jackson, Mississippi Learned, Mississippi Raymond, Mississippi Terry, Mississippi Utica,...

  20. Energy-water challenge emerges in Colorado River flows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-water challenge emerges in Colorado River flows At the Bradbury Latest Issue:June 2016 all issues All Issues submit Energy-water challenge emerges in Colorado River flows ...

  1. Holmes County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in Holmes County, Mississippi Cruger, Mississippi Durant, Mississippi Goodman, Mississippi Lexington, Mississippi Pickens, Mississippi Tchula, Mississippi West,...

  2. An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River estuary, Selangor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of ...

  3. Lauderdale County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Places in Lauderdale County, Mississippi Collinsville, Mississippi Marion, Mississippi Meridian Station, Mississippi Meridian, Mississippi Nellieburg,...

  4. Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  5. Quitman County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crenshaw, Mississippi Crowder, Mississippi Falcon, Mississippi Lambert, Mississippi Marks, Mississippi Sledge, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  6. Madison County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in Madison County, Mississippi Canton, Mississippi Flora, Mississippi Jackson, Mississippi Madison, Mississippi Ridgeland, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Record of Decision, Shutdown of the River Water System at the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Record of Decision, Shutdown of the River Water System at the Savannah River Site, ... for the Shutdown of the River Water System (RWEIS) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). ...

  8. Columbia River monitoring: Distribution of tritium in Columbia River water at the Richland Pumphouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirkes, R.L.

    1993-02-01

    The Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents the results of a special study conducted as part of the SESP to supplement the routine Columbia River monitoring program and provide information relative to the dispersion and distribution of Hanford origin contaminants entering the river through the seepage of ground water along the Hanford Site. Sampling was conducted along cross sections to determine the distribution of tritium within the Columbia River at Richland, Washington. The investigation was also designed to evaluate the relationship between the average tritium concentrations in the river water at this location and in water collected from the routine SESP river monitoring system located at the city of Richland drinking water intake (Richland Pumphouse). This study was conducted during the summers of 1987 and 1988. Water samples were collected along cross sections located at or near the Richland Pumphouse monitoring station.

  9. Movement of tagged dredged sand at thalweg disposal sites in the Upper Mississippi River. Volume 3. Additional results at Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, D.L.; Paddock, R.A.

    1985-04-01

    During routine channel maintenance, hydraulically dredged sand was tagged with sand coated with fluorescent dye before being deposited as a pile in the thalweg at three sites on the Upper Mississippi River. As discussed in the first two volumes of this report, bathymetry was measured and surface sediments were sampled to study changes in the topography of the disposal pile and the downstream movement of the tagged sand. At all three sites, topographic evidence of the pile disappeared after the first period of high river flow, which was followed by redevelopment of dunes in the disposal area. The tagged sand did not migrate into nearby border areas, backwaters, or sloughs, remaining in the main channel as it moved downstream. This volume presents the results of additional surveys at the Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites. At Gordon's Ferry, 25 bottom cores were taken to examine the three-dimensional distribution of tagged sand in the bottom sediments. The core analyses indicated that much of the tagged sand had been incorporated into the dune structure and that it resided primarily in the crests of the dunes.

  10. Missouri Water Treatment Plant Upgraded

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The city of St. Peters, Missouri obtains its water from one of the best known rivers. Eight pumps from underground wells in the Mississippi River floodplain send water to a lime-softening water treatment plant where it is prepared for drinking water purposes. But because the demand for clean water exists at all times, the plant consumes noticeably large amounts of money and energy.

  11. Lumbee River EMC- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lumbee River EMC is offering $850 rebates to residential customers who install solar water heaters on their homes. To qualify, the systems must be certified OG-300 by the Solar Ratings and...

  12. Lumbee River EMC- Solar Water Heating Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC is offering 6% loans to residential customers for the installation of solar water heaters on their homes.  To qualify, the systems must be certified OG-300 by the Solar Ratings and...

  13. South River EMC- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    South River Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is providing rebates to encourage their customers to install solar water heating systems. To be eligible for the rebate solar collectors must have...

  14. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flow system Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the...

  15. EIS-0268: Shutdown of River Water System at the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to shut down the Savannah R]ver Site River Water System in order to save money; that is, to prevent further expenditure of the...

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Salmon, Mississippi, Site, Water Sampling Location Map .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  17. UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papusch, R.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is to provide a basis for groundwater and surface water sampling at the Green River Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring locations.

  18. Leake County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carthage, Mississippi Lena, Mississippi Redwater, Mississippi Sebastopol, Mississippi Standing Pine, Mississippi Walnut Grove, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  19. Lafayette County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Lafayette County, Mississippi Abbeville, Mississippi Oxford, Mississippi Taylor, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  20. Water scarcity and development in the Tigris-Euphrates river basin. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This report will examine aspects of water scarcity and development, and discuss solutions available to avoid conflict over water in the Tigris-Euphrates River Basin. (MM).

  1. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  2. Lowndes County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mississippi Columbus AFB, Mississippi Columbus, Mississippi Crawford, Mississippi New Hope, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLowndesCounty,Mis...

  3. Choctaw County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Choctaw County, Mississippi Ackerman, Mississippi French Camp, Mississippi Mathiston, Mississippi Weir, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:...

  4. Simpson County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Mississippi Braxton, Mississippi D'Lo, Mississippi Magee, Mississippi Mendenhall, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSimpsonCounty,...

  5. DeSoto County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in DeSoto County, Mississippi Hernando, Mississippi Horn Lake, Mississippi Lynchburg, Mississippi Olive Branch, Mississippi...

  6. Coahoma County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coahoma, Mississippi Friars Point, Mississippi Jonestown, Mississippi Lula, Mississippi Lyon, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCoahomaCounty,Mis...

  7. Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-08-01

    This is a Congressionally-mandated effort to develop and demonstrate technologies for the conversion of biomass to ethanol in the State of Mississippi.

  8. Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  9. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Data report: Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fay, W M; Sargent, K A; Cook, J R

    1982-02-01

    This report presents the results of ground water, stream water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. The following samples were collected: Arkansas-3292 stream sediments, 5121 ground waters, 1711 stream waters; Louisiana-1017 stream sediments, 0 ground waters, 0 stream waters; Misissippi-0 stream sediments, 814 ground waters, 0 stream waters; Missouri-2162 stream sediments, 3423 ground waters 1340 stream waters; Oklahoma-2493 stream sediments, 2751 ground waters, 375 stream waters; and Texas-279 stream sediments, 0 ground waters, 0 stream waters. Neutron activation analyses are given for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, and Dy in ground water and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in sediments. The results of mass spectroscopic analysis for He are given for 563 ground water sites in Mississippi. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyzed sediment samples which were not analyzed by Savannah River Laboratory neutron activation.

  10. Hyporheic discharge of river water into fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R. )

    1999-12-01

    Fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawned predominantly in areas of the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River where hyporheic water discharged into the river channel. This upwelling water had a dissolved solids content (i.e., specific conductance) indicative of river water and was presumed to have entered highly permeable riverbed substrate at locations upstream of the spawning areas. Hyporheic discharge zones composed of undiluted ground water or areas with little or no upwelling were not used by spawning salmon. Rates of upwelling into spawning areas averaged 1,200 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 784 to 1,665 L?m-2?day-1) as compared to approximately 500 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 303 to 1,159 L?m-2?day-1) in non-spawning areas. Dissolved oxygen content of the hyporheic discharge near salmon spawning areas was about 9 mg?L-1 (+ 0.4 mg?L-1) whereas in non-spawning areas dissolved oxygen values were 7 mg?L-1 (+ 0.9 mg?L-1) or lower. In both cases dissolved oxygen of the river water was higher (11.3+ 0.3 mg?L-1). Physical and chemical gradients between the hyporheic zone and the river may provide cues for adult salmon to locate suitable spawning areas. This information will help fisheries managers to describe the suitability of salmon spawning habitat in large rivers.

  11. Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    The Salmon, Mississippi, Site, also called the Tatum Dome Test Site, is a 1,470-acre tract ... The Salmon test took place on October 22, 1964, at a depth of 2,700 feet below ground ...

  12. City of Tupelo, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tupelo City of Place: Mississippi Phone Number: 662-841-6460 Website: www.tupeloms.govwater-light Twitter: @TWLDEPT Facebook: https:www.facebook.comTupeloWaterLight Outage...

  13. Benton County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in Benton County, Mississippi Ashland, Mississippi Hickory Flat, Mississippi Snow Lake Shores, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBenton...

  14. Mississippi: Mississippi's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Mississippi.

  15. River stage influences on uranium transport in a hydrologically dynamic groundwater-surface water transition zone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zachara, John M.; Chen, Xingyuan; Murray, Chris; Hammond, Glenn

    2016-03-04

    A well-field within a uranium (U) plume in the groundwater-surface water transition zone was monitored for a 3 year period for water table elevation and dissolved solutes. The plume discharges to the Columbia River, which displays a dramatic spring stage surge resulting from snowmelt. Groundwater exhibits a low hydrologic gradient and chemical differences with river water. River water intrudes the site in spring. Specific aims were to assess the impacts of river intrusion on dissolved uranium (Uaq), specific conductance (SpC), and other solutes, and to discriminate between transport, geochemical, and source term heterogeneity effects. As a result of water tablemore » elevation fluctuations, river water intrusion, and changes in groundwater flow directions, time series trends for Uaq and SpC were found to be complex and displayed large temporal and well-to-well variability. The wells were clustered into subsets exhibiting common behaviors resulting from the intrusion dynamics of river water and the location of source terms. Hot-spots in Uaq varied in location with increasing water table elevation through the combined effects of advection and source term location. Heuristic reactive transport modeling with PFLOTRAN demonstrated that mobilized Uaq was transported between wells and source terms in complex trajectories, and was diluted as river water entered and exited the groundwater system. Moreover, while Uaq time-series concentration trends varied significantly from year-to-year as a result of climate-caused differences in the spring hydrograph, common and partly predictable response patterns were observed that were driven by water table elevation, and the extent and duration of river water intrusion.« less

  16. River stage influences on uranium transport in a hydrologically dynamic groundwater-surface water transition zone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zachara, John M.; Chen, Xingyuan; Murray, Chris; Hammond, Glenn

    2016-03-04

    In this study, a well-field within a uranium (U) plume in the groundwater-surface water transition zone was monitored for a 3 year period for water table elevation and dissolved solutes. The plume discharges to the Columbia River, which displays a dramatic spring stage surge resulting from snowmelt. Groundwater exhibits a low hydrologic gradient and chemical differences with river water. River water intrudes the site in spring. Specific aims were to assess the impacts of river intrusion on dissolved uranium (Uaq), specific conductance (SpC), and other solutes, and to discriminate between transport, geochemical, and source term heterogeneity effects. Time series trendsmore » for Uaq and SpC were complex and displayed large temporal and well-to-well variability as a result of water table elevation fluctuations, river water intrusion, and changes in groundwater flow directions. The wells were clustered into subsets exhibiting common behaviors resulting from the intrusion dynamics of river water and the location of source terms. Hot-spots in Uaq varied in location with increasing water table elevation through the combined effects of advection and source term location. Heuristic reactive transport modeling with PFLOTRAN demonstrated that mobilized Uaq was transported between wells and source terms in complex trajectories, and was diluted as river water entered and exited the groundwater system. While Uaq time-series concentration trends varied significantly from year-to-year as a result of climate-caused differences in the spring hydrograph, common and partly predictable response patterns were observed that were driven by water table elevation, and the extent and duration of river water intrusion.« less

  17. Yellow River Water and Hydropower Development Corp | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Henan Province, China Zip: 450003 Sector: Hydro Product: Responsible for developing hydroelectric projects over the Yellow River. Coordinates: 34.762501, 113.653023 Show Map...

  18. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2009-09-28

    This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

  19. Forecasting changes in water quality in rivers associated with growing biofuels in the Arkansas-White-Red river drainage, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Henriette I.; Baskaran, Latha M.; Schweizer, Peter E.; Turhollow, Anthony F.; Brandt, Craig C.; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2014-05-15

    We study that the mid-section of the Arkansas-White-Red (AWR) river basin near the 100th parallel is particularly promising for sustainable biomass production using cellulosic perennial crops and residues. Along this longitudinal band, precipitation becomes limiting to competing crops that require irrigation from an increasingly depleted groundwater aquifer. In addition, the deep-rooted perennial, switchgrass, produces modest-to-high yields in this region with minimal inputs and could compete against alternative crops and land uses at relatively low cost. Previous studies have also suggested that switchgrass and other perennial feedstocks offer environmentally benign alternatives to corn and corn stover. However, water quality implications remain a significant concern for conversion of marginal lands to bioenergy production because excess nutrients produced by agriculture for food or for energy contribute to eutrophication in the dead-zone in the Gulf of Mexico. This study addresses water quality implications for the AWR river basin. We used the SWAT model to compare water quality in rivers draining a baseline, pre-cellulosic-bioenergy and post-cellulosic-bioenergy landscapes for 2022 and 2030. Simulated water quality responses varied across the region, but with a net tendency toward decreased amounts of nutrient and sediment, particularly in subbasins with large areas of bioenergy crops in 2030 future scenarios. We conclude that water quality is one aspect of sustainability for which cellulosic bioenergy production in this region holds promise.

  20. Forecasting changes in water quality in rivers associated with growing biofuels in the Arkansas-White-Red river basin, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha Malar; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    The mid-section of the Arkansas-White-Red (AWR) river basin near the 100th parallel is particularly promising for sustainable biomass production using cellulosic perennial crops and residues. Along this longitudinal band, precipitation becomes limiting to competing crops that require irrigation from an increasingly depleted groundwater aquifer. In addition, the deep-rooted perennial, switchgrass, produces modest-to-high yields in this region with minimal inputs and could compete against alternative crops and land uses at relatively low cost. Previous studies have also suggested that switchgrass and other perennial feedstocks offer environmentally benign alternatives to corn and corn stover. However, water quality implications remain a significant concern for conversion of marginal lands to bioenergy production because excess nutrients produced by agriculture for food or for energy contribute to eutrophication in the dead-zone in the Gulf of Mexico. This study addresses water quality implications for the AWR river basin. We used the SWAT model to compare water quality in rivers draining a baseline, pre-cellulosic-bioenergy and post-cellulosic-bioenergy landscapes for 2022 and 2030. Simulated water quality responses varied across the region, but with a net tendency toward decreased amounts of nutrient and sediment, particularly in subbasins with large areas of bioenergy crops in 2030 future scenarios. We conclude that water quality is one aspect of sustainability for which cellulosic bioenergy production in this region holds promise.

  1. Forecasting changes in water quality in rivers associated with growing biofuels in the Arkansas-White-Red river drainage, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jager, Henriette I.; Baskaran, Latha M.; Schweizer, Peter E.; Turhollow, Anthony F.; Brandt, Craig C.; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2014-05-15

    We study that the mid-section of the Arkansas-White-Red (AWR) river basin near the 100th parallel is particularly promising for sustainable biomass production using cellulosic perennial crops and residues. Along this longitudinal band, precipitation becomes limiting to competing crops that require irrigation from an increasingly depleted groundwater aquifer. In addition, the deep-rooted perennial, switchgrass, produces modest-to-high yields in this region with minimal inputs and could compete against alternative crops and land uses at relatively low cost. Previous studies have also suggested that switchgrass and other perennial feedstocks offer environmentally benign alternatives to corn and corn stover. However, water quality implications remainmore » a significant concern for conversion of marginal lands to bioenergy production because excess nutrients produced by agriculture for food or for energy contribute to eutrophication in the dead-zone in the Gulf of Mexico. This study addresses water quality implications for the AWR river basin. We used the SWAT model to compare water quality in rivers draining a baseline, pre-cellulosic-bioenergy and post-cellulosic-bioenergy landscapes for 2022 and 2030. Simulated water quality responses varied across the region, but with a net tendency toward decreased amounts of nutrient and sediment, particularly in subbasins with large areas of bioenergy crops in 2030 future scenarios. We conclude that water quality is one aspect of sustainability for which cellulosic bioenergy production in this region holds promise.« less

  2. Forecasting changes in water quality in rivers associated with growing biofuels in the Arkansas-White-Red river basin, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jager, Yetta; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha Malar; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    The mid-section of the Arkansas-White-Red (AWR) river basin near the 100th parallel is particularly promising for sustainable biomass production using cellulosic perennial crops and residues. Along this longitudinal band, precipitation becomes limiting to competing crops that require irrigation from an increasingly depleted groundwater aquifer. In addition, the deep-rooted perennial, switchgrass, produces modest-to-high yields in this region with minimal inputs and could compete against alternative crops and land uses at relatively low cost. Previous studies have also suggested that switchgrass and other perennial feedstocks offer environmentally benign alternatives to corn and corn stover. However, water quality implications remain a significant concernmore » for conversion of marginal lands to bioenergy production because excess nutrients produced by agriculture for food or for energy contribute to eutrophication in the dead-zone in the Gulf of Mexico. This study addresses water quality implications for the AWR river basin. We used the SWAT model to compare water quality in rivers draining a baseline, pre-cellulosic-bioenergy and post-cellulosic-bioenergy landscapes for 2022 and 2030. Simulated water quality responses varied across the region, but with a net tendency toward decreased amounts of nutrient and sediment, particularly in subbasins with large areas of bioenergy crops in 2030 future scenarios. We conclude that water quality is one aspect of sustainability for which cellulosic bioenergy production in this region holds promise.« less

  3. The Mississippi CCS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doug Cathro

    2010-09-30

    The Mississippi CCS Project is a proposed large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which would have demonstrated advanced technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically, the Mississippi CCS Project was to accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petcoke to Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) plant that is selected for a Federal Loan Guarantee and would be the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Mississippi CCS Project was to promote the expansion of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana region which would supply greater energy security through increased domestic energy production. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure would have continued to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project were expected to be fulfilled through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 included the studies that establish the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the MG SNG Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Soso oil field in Mississippi. The overall objective of Phase 2, was to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, the Mississippi CO{sub 2} Pipeline to Denbury's Free State Pipeline, and an MVA system at the Soso oil field.

  4. Distributions of selenium, iodine, lead, thorium and uranium in Japanese river waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagami, K.; Uchida, S.

    2007-07-01

    Long-lived radionuclides released from nuclear facilities, such as deep underground disposal facilities, could reach humans through several transfer paths in the environment. Uses of ground water and river water for agricultural field irrigation and for drinking water are important paths. In order to understand behavior of long-lived radionuclides in the terrestrial water environment, we carried out a natural analogue study, that is, measurement of selenium (Se), iodine (I), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and uranium (U) concentrations in 45 Japanese rivers at 10 sampling points from the upper stream to the river mouth for each river. Geometric mean concentrations for Se, I, Pb, Th and U were 0.057, 1.4, 0.039, 0.0055, 0.0109 ng/mL, respectively. Distribution patterns from upper stream to river mouth were different by elements, for instance, the concentrations of I, Th and U increased when the sampling points were nearer the river mouth, while that of Se were almost constant. For Pb, the highest value was observed in the middle part of each river in many cases. (authors)

  5. Ground water flow velocity in the bank of the Columbia River, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, S.

    1995-12-01

    To properly characterize the transport of contaminants from the sediments beneath the Hanford Site into the Columbia River, a suite of In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors was deployed to accurately characterize the hydrologic regime in the banks of the river. The three dimensional flow velocity was recorded on an hourly basis from mid May to mid July, 1994 and for one week in September. The first data collection interval coincided with the seasonal high water level in the river while the second interval reflected conditions during relatively low seasonal river stage. Two flow sensors located approximately 50 feet from the river recorded flow directions which correlated very well with river stage, both on seasonal and diurnal time scales. During time intervals characterized by falling river stage, the flow sensors recorded flow toward the river while flow away from the river was recorded during times of rising river stage. The flow sensor near the river in the Hanford Formation recorded a component of flow oriented vertically downward, probably reflecting the details of the hydrostratigraphy in close proximity to the probe. The flow sensor near the river in the Ringold Formation recorded an upward component of flow which dominated the horizontal components most of the time. The upward flow in the Ringold probably reflects regional groundwater flow into the river. The magnitudes of the flow velocities recorded by the flow sensors were lower than expected, probably as a result of drilling induced disturbance of the hydraulic properties of the sediments around the probes. The probes were installed with resonant sonic drilling which may have compacted the sediments immediately surrounding the probes, thereby reducing the hydraulic conductivity adjacent to the probes and diverting the groundwater flow away from the sensors.

  6. EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS ...

  7. Hattiesburg, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Projects in Hattiesburg, Mississippi South Mississippi Electric Power Association (SMEPA) Smart Grid Project References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  8. Claiborne County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Claiborne County, Mississippi Port Gibson, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClaiborneCo...

  9. Strategic Energy Planning - Mississippi Choctaw

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Planning Lessons Learned Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians January 27, 2016 Mississippi Choctaw Overview  Federal Recognition in 1945  10,500 enrolled members  35,000 acres of Trust Land  8 Communities in East Central Mississippi  Democratically-elected Government Topics 1. Why Mississippi Choctaw decided to do a Strategic Energy Plan 2. Our Timeline 3. What data we gathered in advance 4. How we assembled our "Stakeholders" group 5. How we structured our 2 day

  10. Methods for Quantifying Shallow-Water Habitat Availability in the Missouri River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2012-04-09

    As part of regulatory requirements for shallow-water habitat (SWH) restoration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completes periodic estimates of the quantity of SWH available throughout the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. To date, these estimates have been made by various methods that consider only the water depth criterion for SWH. The USACE has completed estimates of SWH availability based on both depth and velocity criteria at four river bends (hereafter called reference bends), encompassing approximately 8 river miles within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. These estimates were made from the results of hydraulic modeling of water depth and velocity throughout each bend. Hydraulic modeling of additional river bends is not expected to be completed for deriving estimates of available SWH. Instead, future estimates of SWH will be based on the water depth criterion. The objective of this project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the USACE Omaha District, was to develop geographic information system methods for estimating the quantity of available SWH based on water depth only. Knowing that only a limited amount of water depth and channel geometry data would be available for all the remaining bends within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River, the intent was to determine what information, if any, from the four reference bends could be used to develop methods for estimating SWH at the remaining bends. Specifically, we examined the relationship between cross-section channel morphology and relative differences between SWH estimates based on combined depth and velocity criteria and the depth-only criterion to determine if a correction factor could be applied to estimates of SWH based on the depth-only criterion. In developing these methods, we also explored the applicability of two commonly used geographic information system interpolation methods (TIN and ANUDEM) for estimating SWH using four different elevation data

  11. Hydrogeologic controls on ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River near the Hanford Townsite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luttrell, S.P.; Newcomer, D.R.; Teel, S.S.; Vermeul, V.R.

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River in the Hanford Townsite vicinity. The primary objectives of the work are to: describe the hydrogeologic setting and controls on ground-water movement and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; understand the river/aquifer relationship and its effects on contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; quantify the ground-water and contaminant mass discharge to the Columbia River; and provide data that may be useful for a three-dimensional model of ground-water flow and contaminant transport in the Hanford Townsite study area. The majority of ground-water contamination occurs within the unconfined aquifer; therefore, ground-water and contaminant discharge from the unconfined aquifer is the emphasis of this study. The period of study is primarily from June 1990 through March 1992.

  12. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Debbie Beck, Tiffany Breske, Andrew McDermott, James Nissen, Craig Swedenborg U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service | Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge ...

  13. Mississippi Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional","-","-","-","-","-" "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","...

  14. Northcentral Mississippi E P A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northcentral Mississippi E P A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northcentral Mississippi E P A Place: Mississippi Phone Number: 662-895-2151 Website: www.northcentralepa.com...

  15. Mississippi Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    your school's state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the Middle School Coach page. Mississippi Region Middle School Regional Mississippi Mississippi...

  16. Designing a water leasing market for the Mimbres River, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno-Trujillo, Marissa Devan; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Broadbent, Craig; Brookshire, David; Coursey, Don; Jackson, Charles.; Polley, Adam; Stevenson, Bryan

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a conceptual framework for establishing water leasing markets in New Mexico using the Mimbres River as a test case. Given the past and growing stress over water in New Mexico and the Mimbres River in particular, this work will develop a mechanism for the short term, efficient, temporary transfer of water from one user to another while avoiding adverse effects on any user not directly involved in the transaction (i.e., third party effects). Toward establishing a water leasing market, five basic tasks were performed, (1) a series of stakeholder meetings were conducted to identify and address concerns and interests of basin residents, (2) several gauges were installed on irrigation ditches to aid in the monitoring and management of water resources in the basin, (3) the hydrologic/market model and decision support interface was extended to include the Middle and Lower reaches of the Mimbres River, (4) experiments were conducted to aid in design of the water leasing market, and (5) a set of rules governing a water leasing market was drafted for future adoption by basin residents and the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer.

  17. EIS-0121: Alternative Cooling Water Systems, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to provide environmental input into the selection and implementation of cooling water systems for thermal discharges from K– and C-Reactors and from a coal-fired powerhouse in the D-Area at the Savannah River Plant (SRP)

  18. Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy

    2009-03-30

    The ISEMP program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the spring 2008, PNW redeployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. This resumed previous data collection that was interrupted by river ice in early December 2007. Instruments were again removed from the river in early December 2008. This annual report covers the period from December 2007 through December 2008. The highest pH values occurred during the low-flow period from midsummer through the following midspring then dropped sharply during the annual snowmelt runoff period from late spring through early summer. Water temperature began rapidly increasing during the receding limb of the annual snowmelt hydrograph. Highest mean monthly temperatures occurred in July and August, while instantaneous maxima occurred during the period July-September. Dissolved oxygen reached its lowest levels during the period of highest water temperature in July-September. Specific conductivity remained very low at all sites throughout the year.

  19. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  20. Effects of uranium-mining releases on ground-water quality in the Puerco River Basin, Arizona and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Metre, P.C.; Wirt, L.; Lopes, T.J.; Ferguson, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe: (1) the water quality of the Puerco River alluvial aquifer, (2) the movement of water between the Puerco River and underlying alluvial aquifer, and (3) changes in the water quality of the alluvial and bedrock aquifers related to releases of contaminants by uranium-mining activities. This report focuses on the alluvial aquifer near the reach of the Puerco River that was subjected to continuous flow containing mine-dewatering effluents and to flow containing mine-dewatering effluents and to flow from the tailings-pond spill.

  1. Four-dimensional electrical conductivity monitoring of stage-driven river water intrusion: Accounting for water table effects using a transient mesh boundary and conditional inversion constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates two methods of providing a-priori information to a surface-based time-lapse three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) problem for monitoring stage-driven river bank storage along the Columbia River in the state of Washington, USA. First, a transient warping mesh boundary is implemented that conforms to the known location of the water table boundary through time, thereby enabling the inversion to place a sharp bulk-conductivity contrast at that boundary without penalty. Second, because river water specific conductance is less than groundwater specific conductance, a non-linear inequality constraint is used to allow only negative transient changes in bulk conductivity to occur within the saturated zone during periods of elevated river stage with respect to baseline conditions. Whereas time-lapse imaging results using traditional smoothness constraints are unable to delineate river bank storage, the water table and inequality constraints provide the inversion with the additional information necessary to resolve the spatial extent of river water intrusion through time. A surface based ERT array of 352 electrodes was used to autonomously produce four images per day of changes in bulk conductivity associated with river water intrusion over an area of approximately 300 m2 from April through October of 2013. Results are validated by comparing changes in bulk conductivity time series with corresponding changes in fluid specific conductance at several inland monitoring wells.

  2. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1991 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 131 gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and water levels at 431 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio.

  3. Flora, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Flora is a town in Madison County, Mississippi. It falls under Mississippi's 2nd...

  4. Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 1,470-acre Salmon, Mississippi, Site is located in Lamar County, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, in southwestern Mississippi. It is roughly square in shape, and each side is...

  5. Oxford, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Oxford is a city in Lafayette County, Mississippi. It falls under Mississippi's 1st...

  6. Natchez, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Natchez is a city in Adams County, Mississippi. It falls under Mississippi's 3rd congressional district.12...

  7. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  8. Land and water use characteristics in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1991-03-01

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of small amounts of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the offsite maximum individual and the offsite population within 50 miles of the SRS are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed for the commercial nuclear power industry by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC provides default values for dose model parameters for facilities not having enough data to develop site-specific values. A survey of land and water use characteristics for the Savannah River area has been conducted to determine as many site-specific values as possible for inclusion in the dose models used at the SRS. These site parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk, and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk, and vegetable consumption rates. The report that follows describes the origin of the NRC default values, the methodology for deriving regional data, the results of the study, and the derivations of region-specific usage and consumption rates. 33 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Mississippi Agency Weatherizing Homes, Creating Jobs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One Mississippi Community Action Agency has already doubled their output for weatherized homes from the previous year.

  10. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  11. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  12. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  13. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat

  14. Pearl River Valley El Pwr Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley El Pwr Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pearl River Valley El Pwr Assn Place: Mississippi Phone Number: Columbia: 601-736-2666 -- Hattiesburg: 601-264-2458 -- Purvis:...

  15. Environmental assessment for the natural fluctuation of water level in Par Pond and reduced water flow in Steel Creek below L-Lake at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Savannah River Operations Office Strategic Plan directs Savannah River Site (SRS) to find ways to reduce operating costs, and to determine what site infrastructure must be maintained and what infrastructure is surplus. Because of the mission change, L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support current missions and therefore provide an opportunity for operating cost reduction. If SRS determines that L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support future missions and are considered surplus, appropriate NEPA documentation will be prepared. The purpose of the proposed action in this Environmental Assessment is to begin an examination of the need for the Site`s river water system by (1) developing data needed to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of further reducing or eliminating the flow demands from the Site`s river water system and; (2) evaluating the potential of reducing operating costs by allowing the water level in Par Pond to fluctuate naturally through reduced pumping. This action also includes reducing the current flow rates from L-Lake to Steel Creek to natural stream flows while maintaining full pool. The recently approved Par Pond CERCLA Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) committed to evaluate in a NEPA document the environmental consequences of this proposed action. This document evaluated the remediation of human health and ecological risks associated with the three year drawdown of Par Pond. Should any of the parameters sampled in the reservoir and streams (e.g., water quality, biota, etc.) exceed established threshold levels during the implementation of the proposed action, water would again be pumped into the reservoir to minimize any impacts by bringing the water level back to an appropriate level about 58.2 m (195 ft).

  16. TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, R.

    2012-07-31

    Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

  17. Four-dimensional electrical conductivity monitoring of stage-driven river water intrusion: Accounting for water table effects using a transient mesh boundary and conditional inversion constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Tim; Versteeg, Roelof; Thomle, Jon; Hammond, Glenn; Chen, Xingyuan; Zachara, John

    2015-08-01

    Our paper describes and demonstrates two methods of providing a priori information to the surface-based time-lapse three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) problem for monitoring stage-driven or tide-driven surface water intrusion into aquifers. First, a mesh boundary is implemented that conforms to the known location of the water table through time, thereby enabling the inversion to place a sharp bulk conductivity contrast at that boundary without penalty. Moreover, a nonlinear inequality constraint is used to allow only positive or negative transient changes in EC to occur within the saturated zone, dependent on the relative contrast in fluid electrical conductivity between surface water and groundwater. A 3-D field experiment demonstrates that time-lapse imaging results using traditional smoothness constraints are unable to delineate river water intrusion. The water table and inequality constraints provide the inversion with the additional information necessary to resolve the spatial extent of river water intrusion through time.

  18. VES-0071- In the Matter of Mississippi Power Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 1, 2000, the Mississippi Power Company, of Gulfport, Mississippi (Mississippi Power), filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy an Application for...

  19. North East Mississippi E P A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mississippi E P A Jump to: navigation, search Name: North East Mississippi E P A Place: Mississippi Phone Number: 662.234.6331 Website: northeastpower.orgmainNavhom Facebook:...

  20. Benefits of Biofuel Production and Use in Mississippi

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that can be used to establish Mississippi as a leader in the growing bioeconomy. ... production can establish Mississippi as a leader in sustainable fuels-creating jobs and ...

  1. SEP Success Story: Mississippi Adopts New Rules to Save Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Adopts New Rules to Save Energy, Money SEP Success Story: Mississippi Adopts ... courtesy of the University of Kentucky. SEP Success Story: Research Laboratory ...

  2. Mississippi Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... High School Science Bowl Simpson County Mississippi Regional High School Science Bowl Smith County Mississippi Regional High School Science Bowl Stone County Louisiana Regional ...

  3. Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  4. ,"Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected ... 1: Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected ...

  5. ,"Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, ... 1: Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, ...

  6. Energy Secretary Moniz Visits Clean Coal Facility in Mississippi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mississippi Energy Secretary Moniz Visits Clean Coal Facility in Mississippi November 8, 2013 - 3:36pm Addthis On Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, Secretary Moniz and international energy ...

  7. Lincoln County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Lincoln County, Mississippi Brookhaven, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLincolnCounty,...

  8. Mississippi State Oil and Gas Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil and Gas Board Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mississippi State Oil and Gas Board Address: 500 Greymont Ave., Suite E Place: Mississippi Zip: 39202-3446 Website:...

  9. EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ...

  10. Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water QualityManagement for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2004-12-20

    The San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration Program (SJRRP) has recognized the potential importance of real-time monitoring and management to the success of the San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration endeavor. The first step to realizing making real-time management a reality on the middle San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River will be the installation and operation of a network of permanent telemetered gauging stations that will allow optimization of reservoir releases made specifically for fish water temperature management. Given the limited reservoir storage volume available to the SJJRP, this functionality will allow the development of an adaptive management program, similar in concept to the VAMP though with different objectives. The virtue of this approach is that as management of the middle SJR becomes more routine, additional sensors can be added to the sensor network, initially deployed, to continue to improve conditions for anadromous fish.

  11. Mississippi Public Service Commission Adopts Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy and Natural Resources Division, Mississippi ... solar-powered LED lights that replaced natural gas-powered streetlights in the city of Deming, New Mexico. | DOE ...

  12. Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  13. Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  14. Mississippi/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guidebook >> Mississippi Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical...

  15. Entergy Mississippi- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Entergy Mississippi offers residential energy efficiency programs to help residential customers save energy by providing rebates for lighting, heating and cooling equipment, A/C tune ups, and...

  16. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2014,"06301967" ,"Release...

  17. Mississippi Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.mississippipower.com Twitter: @mspower?mhpbmsmtwitter Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesMississippi-Power Outage Hotline: 1-800-487-3275 Outage Map:...

  18. Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Delaware Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Jersey New...

  19. Argonne National Laboratory and Mississippi State University...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory and Mississippi State University Partner to Create Energy Storage Technology Solutions for Southeast Region News Release Media Contacts Ben Schiltz ...

  20. Taylor, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    dataset (All States, all geography) US Census Bureau Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTaylor,Mississippi&oldid250859...

  1. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  2. ,"Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...282016 11:29:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Underground Storage" ... Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (MMcf)","Mississippi Natural Gas in ...

  3. Mississippi/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    No Coast Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program (Mississippi) Utility Rebate Program Yes Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency...

  4. Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

  5. Recovery Act State Memos Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mississippi For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION

  6. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operations Review; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

  7. Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced Resources International

    2002-11-30

    Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

  8. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  9. Chemical characterization of sediments and pore water from the upper Clark Fork River and Milltown Reservoir, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbaugh, W.G.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.; May, T.W.; Zajicek, J.L. . Midwest Science Center)

    1994-12-01

    The upper Clark Fork River basin in western Montana is widely contaminated by metals from past mining, milling, and smelting activities. As part of a comprehensive ecological risk assessment for the upper Clark Fork River, the authors measured physical and chemical characteristics of surficial sediment samples that were collected from depositional zones for subsequent toxicity evaluations. Sampling stations included five locations along the upper 200 km of the river, six locations in or near Milltown Reservoir and two tributary references. Concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn decreased from the upper stations to the downstream stations in the Clark Fork River but then increased in all Milltown Reservoir stations to levels similar to uppermost river stations. Large percentages of the total Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were extractable by dilute HCL for all samples. Copper and zinc accounted for greater than 95% of extractable metals on a molar basis. Acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) concentrations were typically moderate in grab sediment samples and appeared to regulate dissolved concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Zn in sediment pore waters. Acid-volatile sulfide is important in controlling metal solubility in the depositional areas of the Clark Fork River and should be monitored in any future studies. Spatial variability within a sampling station was high for Cu, Zn, and AVS; therefore, the potential for toxicity to sediment-dwelling organisms may be highly localized.

  10. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US

  11. An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River estuary, Selangor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamzah, Zaini Rosli, Tengku Nurliana Tuan Mohd Saat, Ahmad Wood, Ab. Khalik

    2014-02-12

    An estuary is an area that has a free connection with the open sea and it is a dynamic semi-enclosed coastal bodies. Ex-mining, aquaculture and industrial areas in Selangor are the sources of pollutants discharged into the estuary water. Radionuclides are considered as pollutants to the estuary water. Gamma radiations emitted by natural radionuclides through their decaying process may give impact to human. The radiological effect of natural radionuclides which are {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, were explored by determining the respective activity concentrations in filtered water along the Langat estuary, Selangor. Meanwhile, in- situ water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total suspended solid (TSS), pH and turbidity were measured by using YSI portable multi probes meter. The activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples are in the range of 0.17 - 0.67 Bq/L, 0.16 - 0.97 Bq/L and 1.22 - 5.57 Bq/L respectively. On the other hand, the concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF). The thorium concentrations are between 0.17 ppm to 0.28 ppm and uranium concentrations were 0.25 ppm to 0.31 ppm. The results show activity concentrations of radionuclides are slightly high near the river estuary. The Radium Equivalent, Absorbed Dose Rate, External Hazard Index, and Annual Effective Dose of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K are also studied.

  12. Mississippi Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional","-","-","-","-","-" "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","...

  13. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Grand Gulf Unit 1","1,251","9,643",100.0,"System Energy Resources, Inc" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,251","9,643",100.0

  14. Processing Tritiated Water at the Savannah River Site: A Production-Scale Demonstration of a Palladium Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessions, Kevin L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company (United States)

    2005-07-15

    The Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR) process was installed in the Tritium Facilities at the Savannah River Site to perform a production-scale demonstration for the recovery of tritium from tritiated water adsorbed on molecular sieve (zeolite). Unlike the current recovery process that utilizes magnesium, the PMR offers a means to process tritiated water in a more cost effective and environmentally friendly manner. The design and installation of the large-scale PMR process was part of a collaborative effort between the Savannah River Site and Los Alamos National Laboratory.The PMR process operated at the Savannah River Site between May 2001 and April 2003. During the initial phase of operation the PMR processed thirty-four kilograms of tritiated water from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The water was processed in fifteen separate batches to yield approximately 34,400 liters (STP) of hydrogen isotopes. Each batch consisted of round-the-clock operations for approximately nine days. In April 2003 the reactor's palladium-silver membrane ruptured resulting in the shutdown of the PMR process. Reactor performance, process performance and operating experiences have been evaluated and documented. A performance comparison between PMR and current magnesium process is also documented.

  15. Waterfowl of the Savannah River Plant: Comprehensive cooling water study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, J.J.; Kennamer, R.A.; Hoppe, R.T.

    1986-06-01

    Thirty-one species of waterfowl have been documented on the Savannah River Plant (SPR). The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) has been conducting waterfowl research on the site for the past 15 years. This research has included work on waterfowl utilization of the SRP, wood duck reproductive biology, and waterfowl wintering ecology. Results are described.

  16. Four-dimensional electrical conductivity monitoring of stage-driven river water intrusion: Accounting for water table effects using a transient mesh boundary and conditional inversion constraints

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Tim; Versteeg, Roelof; Thomle, Jon; Hammond, Glenn; Chen, Xingyuan; Zachara, John

    2015-08-01

    Our paper describes and demonstrates two methods of providing a priori information to the surface-based time-lapse three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) problem for monitoring stage-driven or tide-driven surface water intrusion into aquifers. First, a mesh boundary is implemented that conforms to the known location of the water table through time, thereby enabling the inversion to place a sharp bulk conductivity contrast at that boundary without penalty. Moreover, a nonlinear inequality constraint is used to allow only positive or negative transient changes in EC to occur within the saturated zone, dependent on the relative contrast in fluid electrical conductivity between surfacemore » water and groundwater. A 3-D field experiment demonstrates that time-lapse imaging results using traditional smoothness constraints are unable to delineate river water intrusion. The water table and inequality constraints provide the inversion with the additional information necessary to resolve the spatial extent of river water intrusion through time.« less

  17. Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Mississippi

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 43,362 44,170 44,253 1990's 43,184 43,693 44,313 45,310 43,803 45,444 46,029 47,311 45,345 47,620 2000's 50,913 51,109 50,468 50,928 54,027 54,936 55,741 56,155 55,291 50,713 2010's 50,537 50,636 50,689 50,153 50,238 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  18. Tennessee Valley Authority (Mississippi) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Tennessee Valley Authority Place: Mississippi References: Energy Information Administration.1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 18642 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  19. Entergy Mississippi Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ergy-mississippi.com Twitter: @EntergyMS Facebook: https:www.facebook.comEntergyMS Outage Hotline: 1-800-968-8243 Outage Map: www.etrviewoutage.comexternal References: EIA...

  20. Jackson, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Jackson is a city in Hinds County and Madison County and Rankin County, Mississippi. It falls...

  1. Enerkem Mississippi Biofuels Pontotoc, MS Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enerkem Mississippi Biofuels Pontotoc, MS Facility 2013 IBR Peer Review May 21 st , 2013 ... as part of the first wave of advanced biofuels projects in the U.S. The advanced and ...

  2. Mississippi County Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mississippi County Electric Coop Place: Arkansas Phone Number: 870-762-2586 or toll free 1-800-439-4563 Website: www.mceci.com Outage Hotline: 870-762-2586 or toll free...

  3. Montgomery County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Montgomery County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 097. It is classified as...

  4. Harrison County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Harrison County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 047. It is classified as...

  5. Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Larry, E.

    2007-04-30

    The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with

  6. South Mississippi El Pwr Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Mississippi El Pwr Assn Place: Mississippi Phone Number: 601.268.2083 Website: www.smepa.coop Outage Hotline: 601.268.2083 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

  7. East Mississippi Elec Pwr Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: East Mississippi Elec Pwr Assn Place: Mississippi Phone Number: Meridian Office: 601-581-8600 -- Quitman Office: 601-776-6271 -- DeKalb Office: 601-743-2641 --...

  8. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    292016 12:15:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035MS3" "Date","Mississippi...

  9. Southwest Mississippi E P A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    E P A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southwest Mississippi E P A Place: Mississippi Phone Number: (800) 287-8564 Website: southwestepa.com Outage Hotline: 1-800-287-8564...

  10. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Mississippi (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Transportation Data for

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Mississippi Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative

  12. Mississippi: Mississippi’s Clean Energy Resources and Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-15

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Mississippi.

  13. EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Moss Point, MS | Department of Energy 8: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS Documents Available for Download November 12, 2009 EIS-0428: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Construction and Startup of the Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, Mississippi December 1, 2009 EIS-0428:

  14. EIS-0509: Mississippi River LNG Project, Plaquemines Parish,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    23, 2014 EIS-0509: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Contact James Ward james.ward@hq.doe.gov (202) 586-7092 More Information http:louisianalngenergy.com...

  15. Singing River Elec Pwr Assn (Mississippi) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9,647.445 93,322.028 60,225 3,117.42 30,825.248 8,207 692.763 8,259.846 11 13,457.628 132,407.122 68,443 2008-06 9,059.584 86,892.462 60,106 3,046.146 30,089.083 8,193 709.428...

  16. AgraPure Mississippi Biomass Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell,D.A; Broadhead, L.W.; Harrell, W.J.

    2006-03-31

    The AgraPure Mississippi Biomass project was a congressionally directed project, initiated to study the utilization of Mississippi agricultural byproducts and waste products in the production of bio-energy and to determine the feasibility of commercialization of these agricultural byproducts and waste products as feedstocks in the production of energy. The final products from this project were two business plans; one for a Thermal plant, and one for a Biodiesel/Ethanol plant. Agricultural waste fired steam and electrical generating plants and biodiesel plants were deemed the best prospects for developing commercially viable industries. Additionally, oil extraction methods were studied, both traditional and two novel techniques, and incorporated into the development plans. Mississippi produced crop and animal waste biomasses were analyzed for use as raw materials for both industries. The relevant factors, availability, costs, transportation, storage, location, and energetic value criteria were considered. Since feedstock accounts for more than 70 percent of the total cost of producing biodiesel, any local advantages are considered extremely important in developing this particular industry. The same factors must be evaluated in assessing the prospects of commercial operation of a steam and electrical generation plant. Additionally, the access to the markets for electricity is more limited, regulated and tightly controlled than the liquid fuel markets. Domestically produced biofuels, both biodiesel and ethanol, are gaining more attention and popularity with the consuming public as prices rise and supplies of foreign crude become less secure. Biodiesel requires no major modifications to existing diesel engines or supply chain and offers significant environmental benefits. Currently the biodiesel industry requires Federal and State incentives to allow the industry to develop and become self-sustaining. Mississippi has available the necessary feedstocks and is

  17. Project Reports for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010 Project Project Reports for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010 Project The Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi ...

  18. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese

  19. Information retrieval system: impacts of water-level changes on uses of federal storage reservoirs of the Columbia River.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fickeisen, D.H.; Cowley, P.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Simmons, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    A project undertaken to provide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with information needed to conduct environmental assessments and meet requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Regional Act) is described. Access to information on environmental effects would help BPA fulfill its responsibilities to coordinate power generation on the Columbia River system, protect uses of the river system (e.g., irrigation, recreation, navigation), and enhance fish and wildlife production. Staff members at BPA identified the need to compile and index information resources that would help answer environmental impact questions. A computer retrieval system that would provide ready access to the information was envisioned. This project was supported by BPA to provide an initial step toward a compilation of environmental impact information. Scientists at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) identified, gathered, and evaluated information related to environmental effects of water level on uses of five study reservoirs and developed and implemented and environmental data retrieval system, which provides for automated storage and retrieval of annotated citations to published and unpublished information. The data retrieval system is operating on BPA's computer facility and includes the reservoir water-level environmental data. This project was divided into several tasks, some of which were conducted simultaneously to meet project deadlines. The tasks were to identify uses of the five study reservoirs, compile and evaluate reservoir information, develop a data entry and retrieval system, identify and analyze research needs, and document the data retrieval system and train users. Additional details of the project are described in several appendixes.

  20. Baseline ecological risk assessment Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Salmon Site (SS), formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site, located in Mississippi was the site of two nuclear and two gas explosion tests conducted between 1964 and 1970. A consequence of these testing activities is that radionuclides were released into the salt dome, where they are presently contained. During reentry drilling and other site activities, incidental liquid and solid wastes that contained radioactivity were generated, resulting in some soil, ground water and equipment contamination. As part of the remedial investigation effort, a Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment was conducted at the SS. The purpose is to gauge ecological and other environmental impacts attributable to past activities at the former test facility. The results of this facility-specific baseline risk assessment are presented in this document.

  1. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  2. One-way coupling of an integrated assessment model and a water resources model: evaluation and implications of future changes over the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-18

    An integrated model is being developed to advance our understanding of the interactions between human activities, terrestrial system and water cycle, and how system interactions will be affected by a changing climate at the regional scale. As a first step towards that goal, a global integrated assessment model including a waterdemand model is coupled offline with a land surface hydrology routing water resources management model. A spatial and temporal disaggregation approach is developed to project the annual regional water demand simulations into a daily time step and subbasin representation. The model demonstrated reasonable ability to represent the historical flow regulation and water supply over the Midwest (Missouri, Upper Mississippi and Ohio). Implications for the future flow regulation, water supply and supply deficit are investigated using a climate change projection with the B1 emission scenario which affects both natural flow and water demand. Over the Midwest, changes in flow regulation are mostly driven by the change in natural flow due to the limited storage capacity over the Ohio and Upper Mississippi river basins. The changes in flow and demand have a combined effect on the Missouri Summer regulated flow. The supply deficit tends to be driven by the change in flow over the region. Spatial analysis demonstrates the relationship between the supply deficit and the change in demand over urban areas not along a main river or with limited storage, and over areas upstream of groundwater dependent fields with therefore overestimated demand.

  3. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids,...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  4. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County...

  5. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - August 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  6. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County...

  7. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  8. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  9. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - July 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  10. 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric...

  11. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release Date:","12...

  12. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi...

  13. Argonne and Mississippi State University partner to create energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mississippi State University partner to create energy storage technology solutions for southeast region August 13, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Starkville, Miss., - The U.S. Department of...

  14. City of Philadelphia, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Mississippi Phone Number: 601-656-2601 Website: neshoba.orgutilities.html Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCentral-Electric-Power-Association...

  15. Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  16. Mississippi Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mississippi has substantial natural resources, including biomass, oil, coal, and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on ...

  17. Clay County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mississippi: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.6567838, -88.8263006 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  18. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

  19. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2014...

  20. Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade ... Release Date: 11192015 Next Release Date: 12312016 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane ...

  1. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30

    U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when

  2. Mississippi Power's UESC/ESCO Vetting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power's UESC/ESCO Vetting Joe Bosco May 18, 2016 Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR Mississippi Power Company Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 3-4, 2015 Houston, TX * Large Federal presence * UESC experience - 20 years OUR CULTURE: Southern Style * Unquestionable Trust * Superior Performance * Total Commitment Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 3-4, 2015 Houston, TX MPC's UESC Approaches * In-House - Business & Industry Services

  3. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Grand Gulf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    expiration date" 1,"1,251","9,643",88.0,"BWR","applicationvnd.ms-excel","applicationvnd.ms-excel" ,"1,251","9,643",88.0 "Data for 2010" "BWR Boiling Water Reactor."

  4. Seeking to calm troubled waters: The Missisquoi River Keepers Project and the development of a community-based river protection program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D.M.; Delaney, M.; Dickens, S.P.

    1995-12-01

    The Missisquoi River, in northwestern Vermont and southern Quebec, has become the focus of efforts to develop local community-based means to address environmental and cultural concerns affecting the region`s Native and non-Native peoples. The River flows through historical Abenaki territory, and is relied upon by tribal members for subsistence, cultural, and spiritual purposes. The River has been in a controversy involving aboriginal fishing and sovereignty rights, hydroelectric development, transboundary pollution problems, protection of Native cultural and historical sites, state resource management practices, and formal federal/state recognition of the Abenaki nation. The Missisquoi River Keepers Project is a cooperative program initiated by the Abenaki in 1993 to protect the River and its watershed by uniting often adversarial Native and non-Native communities in the region. This paper discusses how ecological monitoring, environmental and cultural education, community organizing, and outreach to federal, state and local officials are being utilized to identify the watershed`s problems and to resolve conflicts. The Project is working with different interest groups to develop consensus and to find creative means to reverse the degradation of the watershed. The Project has also provided legal and technical support in reviewing environmental permits, rule-making, and enforcement of federal, state and local statutes and regulations. The Project may serve as a useful model forlocal management of watershed protection programs.

  5. Evaluation of the water quality in the releases from thirty dams in the Tennessee River Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butkus, S.R.

    1990-09-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has routinely monitored dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature from the tailwater releases of its dams since the 1950s. The original objective of this monitoring was to collect baseline information to support reaeration research and determine the relative impact of impoundments on the assimilative capacity of the river system. This monitoring has continued even though the original objective was satisfied. New purposes for this monitoring data have arisen in support of several programs, without new consideration of the monitoring strategy and sampling design. The primary purpose of this report is to compare the historical release data for 30 dams in the Tennessee Valley based on four different objectives: (1) comparison of seasonal patterns, (2) comparison of baseline conditions using descriptive statistics, (3) evaluation of monotonic trends, and (4) discussion of monitoring strategies that might be required to determine compliance with existing and proposed criteria. A secondary purpose of the report is to compile the existing database into tables and figures that would be useful for other investigators. 51 refs., 210 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Operation of Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, Dockets Nos. 50-416 and 50-417: Mississippi Power and Light Company, Middle South Energy, Inc. , South Mississippi Electric Power Association. Final environmental statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The information in this Final Environmental Statement is the second assessment of the environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, located on the Mississippi River in Claiborne County, Mississippi. The Draft Environmental Statement was issued in May 1981. The first assessment was the Final Environmental Statement related to construction, which was issued in August 1973 prior to issuance of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station construction permits. In September 1981 Grand Gulf Unit 1 was 92% complete and Unit 2 was 22% complete. Fuel loading for Unit 1 is scheduled for December 1981. The present assessment is the result of the NRC staff review of the activities associated with the proposed operation of the Station, and includes the staff responses to comments on the Draft Environmental Statement.

  7. CHRONIC ZINC SCREENING WATER EFFECT RATIO FOR THE H-12 OUTFALL, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, D.; Looney, B.; Millings, M.

    2009-01-13

    In response to proposed Zn limits for the NPDES outfall H-12, a Zn screening Water Effects Ratio (WER) study was conducted to determine if a full site-specific WER is warranted. Using standard assumptions for relating the lab results to the stream, the screening WER data were consistent with the proposed Zn limit and suggest that a full WER would result in a similar limit. Addition of a humate amendment to the outfall water reduced Zn toxicity, but the toxicity reduction was relatively small and unlikely to impact proposed Zn limits. The screening WER data indicated that the time and expense required to perform a full WER for Zn is not warranted.

  8. EIS-0409: Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide funding for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project in Kemper County, Mississippi to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project proposed by Southern Power Company, through its affiliate Mississippi Power Company, which has been selected by DOE for consideration under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program.

  9. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella

  10. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Report for the period October 1992--March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, B.I.; Lomax, J.D.; Neilson, D.L.; Deo, M.D.

    1994-12-01

    The current project targeted three fluvial deltaic reservoirs in the Uinta Basin, Utah. In primary recovery, the performance of the Monument Butte unit was typical of an undersaturated reservoir whose initial pressure was close to the bubble point pressure. The unit was producing at a rate of 40 stb/day when the water flood was initiated. The unit has been producing at more than 300 stb/day for the past four years. The reservoir characteristics of Monument Butte were established in the geologic characterization study. The reservoir fluid properties were measured in the engineering study. Results of a comprehensive reservoir simulation study using these characteristics provided excellent match with the field production data. Extended predictions using the model showed that it would be possible to recover a total of 20--25% of the oil in place. In the Travis unit, logs from the newly drilled 14a-28 showed extensively fractured zones. A new reservoir was discovered and developed on the basis of the information provided by the formation micro imaging logs. This reservoir also behaved in a manner similar to undersaturated reservoirs with initial reservoir pressures close to the reservoir fluid bubble point. The water flood activity was enhanced in the Travis unit. Even through the reservoir continued to be gradually pressurized, the water flood in the Travis unit appeared to be significantly affected by existing or created fractures. A dual-porosity, dual permeability reservoir model provided a good match with the primary production history. The well drilled in the Boundary unit did not intersect any producible zones, once again illustrating the unique challenges to developing fluvial deltaic reservoirs.

  11. EIS-0428: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Mississippi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Moss Point, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a petroleum coke-to-substitute natural gas facility proposed to be built by Mississippi Gasification. The facility would be designed to produce 120 million standard cubic feet of gas per day. Other products would be marketable sulfuric acid, carbon dioxide, argon, and electric power. This project is inactive.

  12. Wet processing of palladium for use in the tritium facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC. Preparation of palladium using the Mound Muddy Water process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.

    1998-11-10

    Palladium used at Savannah River for tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to better understand the processes involved in preparing this material, Savannah River is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material and into the conditions necessary to produce palladium powder that meets their specifications. This better understanding may help to guarantee a continued reliable source for this material in the future. As part of this evaluation, a work-for-others contract between Westinghouse Savannah River Company and the Ames Laboratory Metallurgy and Ceramics Program was initiated. During FY98, the process for producing palladium powder developed in 1986 by Dan Grove of Mound Applied Technologies (USDOE) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in morphology in the final product. This report details the results of this study of the Mound Muddy Water process, along with the results of a round-robin analysis of well-characterized palladium samples that was performed by Savannah River and Ames Laboratory. The Mound Muddy Water process is comprised of three basic wet chemical processes, palladium dissolution, neutralization, and precipitation, with a number of filtration steps to remove unwanted impurity precipitates.

  13. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Grand Gulf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Grand Gulf" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,251","9,643",88.0,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,251","9,643",88.0 "Data for 2010" "BWR = Boiling Water Reactor."

  14. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, Rocky; Baldwin, Brian; Lang, David

    2011-10-01

    ‚€Ã‚¢ How will these crops affect fertilizer use and water quality? • What kind of water management is needed to maintain a productive crop? The answers to these questions will help supporting institutions across the state to improve land assessment and agronomic management practices for biomass production. In the last decade, energy supply has become a worldwide problem. Bioenergy crops could supply energy in the future. Bioenergy crops are plants, usually perennial grasses and trees, that produce a lot of biomass that can be converted into energy. Bioenergy crops can be grown for two energy markets: power generation, such as heat and electricity, or liquid fuel, such as cellulosic ethanol. These resources could reduce petroleum dependency and greenhouse gas production. Woody plants and herbaceous warm-season grasses, such as switchgrass, giant miscanthus,energy cane, and high yielding sorghums, could be major sources of biomass in Mississippi.

  15. Mississippi Adopts New Rules to Save Energy, Money | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Adopts New Rules to Save Energy, Money Mississippi Adopts New Rules to Save Energy, Money November 8, 2013 - 11:59am Addthis The Jackson County Welcome Center in Moss Point, Mississippi. The Mississippi Public Service Commission has approved new rules that will help provide utility customers several pathways to increase energy efficiency. | Photo courtesy of Energy and Natural Resources Division, Mississippi Development Authority The Jackson County Welcome Center in Moss Point,

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2014 LMSGRN.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  17. Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo

    2013-03-29

    Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate • 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and • their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: • TODAM and FLESCOT’s theories and mathematical formulations • TODAM and FLESCOT model structures • Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications • Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. • Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including • PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities • Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics • Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment • EMSL tour • Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

  18. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome Site, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  19. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  20. Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

    2008-02-01

    In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and

  1. The Savannah River Site is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul Cloessner, PhD Laboratory Fellow Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River ... target fabrication plant, which supplied the heavy water reactors at Savannah River. ...

  2. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  3. Mississippi Public Service Commission Adopts Energy Efficiency Rules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mississippi Public Service Commission (PSC) approved new energy efficiency rules for electric and natural gas utility companies to offer customers several pathways to increase energy efficiency. According to the PSC, the rules could potentially s

  4. Perry County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Perry County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 111. It is classified as...

  5. Jackson County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Jackson County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 059. It is classified as...

  6. Mississippi Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",15125,14707,14454,14340,142... " Other Gases",4,4,4,4,4 "Nuclear",1266,1268,1259,1251,1251 ...

  7. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  8. Mississippi (with State off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi (with State off) Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  9. City of Oxford, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxford Place: Mississippi Phone Number: 662-232-2373 or 662-236-1310 Website: www.oxfordms.netdepartmentse Twitter: @OxfordMS Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  10. Marion County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Marion County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 091. It is classified as...

  11. Mississippi Power- EarthCents New Home Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Mississippi Power offers incentives to its residential customers to help offset the cost of installing energy efficient measures in new homes. A three-level program is offered to encourage the...

  12. Lee County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lee County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 081. It is classified as...

  13. Smith County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Smith County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 129. It is classified as...

  14. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 14,797 13,076 ...

  15. Pike County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pike County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 113. It is classified as...

  16. Adams County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Adams County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 001. It is classified as...

  17. Scott County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Scott County is a county in Mississippi. Its FIPS County Code is 123. It is classified as...

  18. Mississippi Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",34254,39184,37408,36266,43331 " Coal",18105,17407,16683,12958,13629 " Petroleum",399,399,76,17,81 " Natural ...

  19. Argonne National Laboratory and Mississippi State University Partner to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Create Energy Storage Technology Solutions for Southeast Region - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research Argonne National Laboratory and Mississippi State University Partner to Create Energy Storage Technology Solutions for Southeast Region News Release Starkville, Miss., Aug. 13, 2015 - The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Mississippi State University (MSU) are collaborating to develop new technologies that address next-generation energy storage challenges.

  20. Mississippi - Seds - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi - Seds - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio

  1. Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) always seeks new opportunities to diversify its economy and create new career opportunities for tribal members, which is the purpose of this feasibility study. The MBCI will study the feasibility of locating a renewable energy installation on tribal lands. The technologies to be utilized in the renewable energy installation will be those that can readily handle poultry litter, either alone or in combination with wood residues. The purpose of the study is to determine whether such an installation can be both economically sustainable and consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the tribe. The feasibility study will result in the development of a thorough business plan that will allow the MBCI to make an informed decision regarding this project.

  2. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    917 853 860 607 595 558 1977-2014 Adjustments 26 1 109 65 29 -15 1977-2014 Revision Increases 92 77 105 91 39 82 1977-2014 Revision Decreases 250 70 156 300 75 29 1977-2014 Sales 17 31 11 159 39 115 2000-2014 Acquisitions 2 13 10 109 90 82 2000-2014 Extensions 132 33 24 4 5 9 1977-2014 New Field Discoveries 2 0 1 1 0 1 1977-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 2 1977-2014 Estimated Production 100 87 75 64 61 5

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas

  3. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin C.

    2016-01-06

    Underwaternoise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels and natural underwater sound sources in static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where soundsmore » created by flowing water are part of all measurements, both natural ambient and anthropogenic sources. Vessel sizes ranged from a small fishing boat with 60 hp outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, which were, on average, 40 dB greater than the sound created by an operating hydrokinetic turbine. As a result, a comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed sound attenuation.« less

  4. River and Harbors Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899 (33 U.S.C. 403) prohibits the unauthorized obstruction or alteration of any navigable water of the United States.

  5. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  6. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  7. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10). Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  8. Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  9. Mississippi Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,068 44,510 0 1970's 50,509 44,732 29,538 29,081 24,568 29,694 0 0 0 1980's 34,337 38,315 29,416 29,705 23,428 21,955 12,131 9,565 8,353 1990's 7,887 7,649 4,822 4,892 5,052 4,869 4,521 4,372 3,668 135,773 2000's 205,106 239,830 263,456 283,675 283,763 292,023 278,436 224,596 174,573 215,951 2010's 218,840 126,859 6,865 4,527

  10. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    This report summarizes the 2011 annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Salmon site1). The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. The Salmon site consists of 1,470 acres. The site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 10 miles west of Purvis, Mississippi, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

  11. Analysis of the Monitoring Network at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-01

    The Salmon site in southern Mississippi was the location of two underground nuclear tests and two methane-oxygen gas explosion tests conducted in the Tatum Salt Dome at a depth of 2,715 feet below ground surface. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]) and the U.S. Department of Defense jointly conducted the tests between 1964 and 1970. The testing operations resulted in surface contamination at multiple locations on the site and contamination of shallow aquifers. No radionuclides from the nuclear tests were released to the surface or to groundwater, although radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings were brought to the surface during re-entry drilling. Drilling operations generated the largest single volume of waste materials, including radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings and drilling fluids. Nonradioactive wastes were also generated as part of the testing operations. Site cleanup and decommissioning began in 1971 and officially ended in 1972. DOE conducted additional site characterization between 1992 and 1999. The historical investigations have provided a reasonable understanding of current surface and shallow subsurface conditions at the site, although some additional investigation is desirable. For example, additional hydrologic data would improve confidence in assigning groundwater gradients and flow directions in the aquifers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency monitored groundwater at the site as part of its Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program from 1972 through 2007, when DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) assumed responsibility for site monitoring. The current monitoring network consists of 28 monitoring wells and 11 surface water locations. Multiple aquifers which underlie the site are monitored. The current analyte list includes metals, radionuclides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  12. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 35 29 33 29 9 54 30 78 4 2 2010's 13 10 109 90 82 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions Mississippi Dry Natural Gas

  13. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 96 34 29 42 18 17 44 24 2 17 2010's 31 11 159 39 115 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

  14. Mississippi Natural Gas Imports (No intransit Receipts) (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) (No intransit Receipts) (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Imports (No intransit Receipts) (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 0 5,774 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Imports (Summary) Mississippi U.S. Natural Gas

  15. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi (with State off) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 19 37 19 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Mississippi Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves

  16. Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) (No intransit Receipts) (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Imports (No intransit Receipts) (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 0 5,774 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Imports (Summary) Mississippi U.S. Natural Gas

  17. Mississippi (with State off) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    off) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi (with State off) Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 19 37 19 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Mississippi Shale Gas Proved Reserves,

  18. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  19. LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

    2010-08-06

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6

  20. Reconnaissance of ground-water quality in the Papio-Missouri river natural resources district, Eastern Nebraska, July through September 1992. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verstraeten, I.M.; Ellis, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe the water quality of the principal aquifers in the study area. Wells representative of the geology and land use in the study area were selected for water-quality sampling. Variations in constituent concentration among aquifers are discussed. The report describes the spatial distributions of dissolved nitrite plus-nitrate as nitrogen and triazine and other acetanilide herbicides and evaluates the effects of cropland application of nitrogen and herbicides on the ground-water quality within the study area. The report also summarizes the concentrations of dissolved major and trace constituents including radionuclide activity and concentration.

  1. Savannah River

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements.

  2. Mississippi State University Wins DOE and GM Challenge X 2008 Advanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Competition | Department of Energy Mississippi State University Wins DOE and GM Challenge X 2008 Advanced Vehicle Competition Mississippi State University Wins DOE and GM Challenge X 2008 Advanced Vehicle Competition May 21, 2008 - 12:00pm Addthis Launches EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that Mississippi State University in Starkville, Miss. is the first place winner of Challenge X, in which 17 university teams from

  3. Metagenomic analysis of planktonic microbial consortia from a non-tidal urban-impacted segment of James River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Bonnie L.; LePrell, Rebecca V.; Franklin, Rima B.; Rivera, Maria C.; Cabral, Francine M.; Eaves, Hugh L.; Gardiakos, Vicki; Keegan, Kevin P.; King, Timothy L.

    2015-09-19

    Knowledge of the diversity and ecological function of the microbial consortia of James River in Virginia, USA, is essential to developing a more complete understanding of the ecology of this model river system. Metagenomic analysis of James River's planktonic microbial community was performed for the first time using an unamplified genomic library and a 16S rDNA amplicon library prepared and sequenced by Ion PGM and MiSeq, respectively. From the 0.46-Gb WGS library (GenBank:SRR1146621; MG-RAST:4532156.3), 4 x 106 reads revealed >3 x 106 genes, 240 families of prokaryotes, and 155 families of eukaryotes. From the 0.68-Gb 16S library (GenBank:SRR2124995; MG-RAST:4631271.3; EMB:2184), 4 x 106 reads revealed 259 families of eubacteria. Results of the WGS and 16S analyses were highly consistent and indicated that more than half of the bacterial sequences were Proteobacteria, predominantly Comamonadaceae. The most numerous genera in this group were Acidovorax (including iron oxidizers, nitrotolulene degraders, and plant pathogens), which accounted for 10 % of assigned bacterial reads. Polaromonas were another 6 % of all bacterial reads, with many assignments to groups capable of degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Albidiferax (iron reducers) and Variovorax (biodegraders of a variety of natural biogenic compounds as well as anthropogenic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and endocrine disruptors) each accounted for an additional 3% of bacterial reads. Comparison of these data to other publically-available aquatic metagenomes revealed that this stretch of James River is highly similar to the upper Mississippi River, and that these river systems are more similar to aquaculture and sludge ecosystems than they are to lakes or to a pristine section of the upper Amazon River. Altogether, these analyses exposed previously unknown aspects of microbial biodiversity, documented

  4. Metagenomic analysis of planktonic microbial consortia from a non-tidal urban-impacted segment of James River

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Bonnie L.; LePrell, Rebecca V.; Franklin, Rima B.; Rivera, Maria C.; Cabral, Francine M.; Eaves, Hugh L.; Gardiakos, Vicki; Keegan, Kevin P.; King, Timothy L.

    2015-09-19

    Knowledge of the diversity and ecological function of the microbial consortia of James River in Virginia, USA, is essential to developing a more complete understanding of the ecology of this model river system. Metagenomic analysis of James River's planktonic microbial community was performed for the first time using an unamplified genomic library and a 16S rDNA amplicon library prepared and sequenced by Ion PGM and MiSeq, respectively. From the 0.46-Gb WGS library (GenBank:SRR1146621; MG-RAST:4532156.3), 4 x 106 reads revealed >3 x 106 genes, 240 families of prokaryotes, and 155 families of eukaryotes. From the 0.68-Gb 16S library (GenBank:SRR2124995; MG-RAST:4631271.3; EMB:2184),more » 4 x 106 reads revealed 259 families of eubacteria. Results of the WGS and 16S analyses were highly consistent and indicated that more than half of the bacterial sequences were Proteobacteria, predominantly Comamonadaceae. The most numerous genera in this group were Acidovorax (including iron oxidizers, nitrotolulene degraders, and plant pathogens), which accounted for 10 % of assigned bacterial reads. Polaromonas were another 6 % of all bacterial reads, with many assignments to groups capable of degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Albidiferax (iron reducers) and Variovorax (biodegraders of a variety of natural biogenic compounds as well as anthropogenic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and endocrine disruptors) each accounted for an additional 3% of bacterial reads. Comparison of these data to other publically-available aquatic metagenomes revealed that this stretch of James River is highly similar to the upper Mississippi River, and that these river systems are more similar to aquaculture and sludge ecosystems than they are to lakes or to a pristine section of the upper Amazon River. Altogether, these analyses exposed previously unknown aspects of microbial biodiversity, documented the ecological responses of microbes to urban effects, and revealed

  5. Cuivre River Electric- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cuivre River Electric Cooperative, through the Take Control & Save program, offers rebates for cooperative members who purchase efficient geothermal and dual fuel heat pumps, and electric water...

  6. DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at the Cranfield site in Southwestern Mississippi. It is led by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), one of seven members of the Regional Carbon...

  7. DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A large-scale carbon dioxide storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected.

  8. Savannah River reactor process water heat exchanger tube structural integrity margin Task Number 92-005-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertz, G.E.; Barnes, D.M.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1992-02-01

    Twelve process water heat exchangers are designed to remove heat generated in the reactor tank. Each heat exchanger has approximately 9000, 1/2 inch diameter {times} 0.049 inches thick tubes. Minimum structural tubing requirements and the leak rate through postulated tubing defects are developed in this report A comparison of the structural requirements and the defect size calculated to produce leak rates of 0.5 lbs./day demonstrate adequate structural margins against gross tube rupture. Commercial nuclear experience with pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator plugging criteria are used for guidance in performing this analysis. It is important to note that the SRS reactors are low energy systems with normal operating pressures of 203 psig at 130{degree}F while the PWR is a high energy system with operating pressures near 2200 psig at 600{degree}F. Clearly the PVM steam generator has loadings which are more severe than the SRS heat exchangers. Consistent with the Regulatory Guide 1.121 criteria both wastage (wall thinning) and cracking are addressed. Structural limits on wall thinning and crack size are developed to preclude gross rupture. ASME Section XI criteria, with the factors of safety recommended by Regulatory Guide 1.121 are used to develop the allowable crack size criteria. Normal operating conditions (pressure, dead weight, and hydraulic drag) are considered with seismic and water hammer accident conditions. Both the wall thinning and crack size criteria are developed for the end-of-evaluation period. Allowances for corrosion, wear, or crack growth have not been included in this analysis Structurally, the tubing is over designed and can tolerate large defects with adequate margins against gross rupture. The structural margins of heat exchanger tubing are evident by contrasting the tubing`s structural capacity, per the ASME Code, with its operating conditions/configuration.

  9. Savannah River reactor process water heat exchanger tube structural integrity margin Task Number 92-005-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertz, G.E.; Barnes, D.M.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1992-02-01

    Twelve process water heat exchangers are designed to remove heat generated in the reactor tank. Each heat exchanger has approximately 9000, 1/2 inch diameter {times} 0.049 inches thick tubes. Minimum structural tubing requirements and the leak rate through postulated tubing defects are developed in this report A comparison of the structural requirements and the defect size calculated to produce leak rates of 0.5 lbs./day demonstrate adequate structural margins against gross tube rupture. Commercial nuclear experience with pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator plugging criteria are used for guidance in performing this analysis. It is important to note that the SRS reactors are low energy systems with normal operating pressures of 203 psig at 130{degree}F while the PWR is a high energy system with operating pressures near 2200 psig at 600{degree}F. Clearly the PVM steam generator has loadings which are more severe than the SRS heat exchangers. Consistent with the Regulatory Guide 1.121 criteria both wastage (wall thinning) and cracking are addressed. Structural limits on wall thinning and crack size are developed to preclude gross rupture. ASME Section XI criteria, with the factors of safety recommended by Regulatory Guide 1.121 are used to develop the allowable crack size criteria. Normal operating conditions (pressure, dead weight, and hydraulic drag) are considered with seismic and water hammer accident conditions. Both the wall thinning and crack size criteria are developed for the end-of-evaluation period. Allowances for corrosion, wear, or crack growth have not been included in this analysis Structurally, the tubing is over designed and can tolerate large defects with adequate margins against gross rupture. The structural margins of heat exchanger tubing are evident by contrasting the tubing's structural capacity, per the ASME Code, with its operating conditions/configuration.

  10. THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aquifer THE INL & THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER underneath the Idaho National Laboratory is one of the most productive groundwater resources in the U.S. Each year about 2 million acre-feet of water is drawn from the aquifer. Approximately 95 percent of the water withdrawn from the aquifer is used for irrigation, 3 per- cent for domestic water, and 2 percent for industrial purposes. The aquifer is the primary water source for more than 280,000 people in

  11. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    This report summarizes the 2012 annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Salmon site). The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. A revised plan is in preparation. The Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site is intended for release in 2013. The Salmon site consists of 1,470 acres. The site is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 10 miles west of Purvis, Mississippi, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, Mississippi The State of Mississippi owns the surface real estate subject to certain restrictions related to subsurface penetration. The State is the surface operator; the Mississippi Forestry Commission is its agent. The federal government owns the subsurface real estate (including minerals and some surface features), shares right-of-entry easements with the State, and retains rights related to subsurface monitoring. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, is responsible for the long-term surveillance of the subsurface real estate

  12. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9 104 -18 1980's 29 399 24 11 7 8 51 5 -1 17 1990's 82 106 -102 68 -1 31 13 -16 -19 34 2000's -20 53 81 -26 20 5 -26 37 12 26 2010's 1 109 65 29 -15 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release

  13. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 88 121 154 1980's 170 196 198 159 181 151 165 178 181 155 1990's 141 143 109 111 82 91 88 93 79 79 2000's 78 94 98 94 93 86 83 100 110 100 2010's 87 75 64 61 54 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  14. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 341 108 68 1980's 103 73 42 31 49 79 71 32 31 57 1990's 20 11 9 2 2 30 43 48 109 11 2000's 53 43 54 81 27 75 119 146 155 132 2010's 33 24 4 5 9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  15. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 148 118 124 1980's 151 161 372 279 193 176 214 96 85 192 1990's 142 151 121 108 133 46 88 56 112 120 2000's 39 43 75 41 55 27 40 50 96 250 2010's 70 156 300 75 29 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  16. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 55 107 71 1980's 45 75 226 179 176 88 192 153 130 181 1990's 163 88 121 64 55 73 87 66 177 165 2000's 84 70 89 67 48 57 96 53 108 92 2010's 77 105 91 39 82 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  17. Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 13 -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Imports Price

  18. Mississippi Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.82 1.63 2.51 2.76 2.79 2.91 2000's 3.75 7.85 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2010's -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring

  19. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Future Production (Million Barrels) Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5 1980's 5 5 6 6 5 4 3 3 3 3 1990's 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 2000's 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 3 3 4 2010's 4 6 4 3 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  20. Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Mississippi Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production Coalbed Methane Production

  1. Energy Department Awards Cooperative Agreement to Mississippi State University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cincinnati – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a cooperative agreement to Mississippi State University, Institute for Clean Energy Technology (MSU-ICET), to continue research efforts in the evaluation of High-Efficiency Particulate Air Filters (HEPA) and other technologies to enhance nuclear safety in the defense waste complex. The total value of the cooperative agreement over five years is $5 million. The project period of the cooperative agreement will be from January 20, 2015 through January 19, 2020.

  2. Born on an Air Force base in Mississippi, Jan never

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on an Air Force base in Mississippi, Jan never lived any place for more than three years as a child. Her family moved to Germany when she was seven, and she recalls trips all over Europe. "We visited Holland, camped in Italy for a summer, and toured numerous museums and castles. My dad had been a pilot in World War II and Korea, and he took us to Hitler's Eagle's Nest retreat, and even to the Dachau concentration camp. These made extremely strong impressions of the influences of cultural

  3. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Mississippi (with State Offshore) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 49 68 2000's 38 71 42 68 79 87 79 35 126 117 2010's 94 90 82 73 85 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015

  4. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 11 1980's 15 13 12 13 10 8 8 8 9 9 1990's 8 7 6 8 6 5 5 4 5 7 2000's 6 8 6 5 5 5 6 6 6 8 2010's 7 7 10 12 11 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  5. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 67 1980's 73 66 74 80 114 105 66 61 71 105 1990's 126 108 85 53 43 27 47 51 47 31 2000's 35 26 33 27 20 20 21 30 45 38 2010's 36 62 62 43 58 - = No Data Reported; --

  6. Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,954 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Egypt

  7. Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,820 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Gulf LNG, MS LNG

  8. MHK Projects/Old Town Bend | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Country United States Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Mississippi River Coordinates 34.3713, -90.7493 Project Phase Phase 1...

  9. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-04-01

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  10. EcoCAR 2 Announces Year One Winner: Mississippi State University |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Announces Year One Winner: Mississippi State University EcoCAR 2 Announces Year One Winner: Mississippi State University May 24, 2012 - 10:40am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Los Angeles, Calif. - EcoCAR 2: Plugging In to the Future today named Mississippi State University its Year One winner at the EcoCAR 2012 Competition in Los Angeles. The 15 universities competing in EcoCAR 2 gathered for six days of judged competition this week with $100,000 in prize

  11. Project Reports for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project | Department of Energy Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010 Project Project Reports for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010 Project The Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa Wind Energy Feasibility Study project will prepare the tribe for the development of clean, dependable, renewable wind energy on tribal land. Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. November 2009 status report (17.53 MB) October 2010 status

  12. The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

  13. Ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final, Revision 2, Version 5: Appendix E to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this appendix is to provide a ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Green River, Utah. Compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards will be achieved by applying supplemental standards (40 CFR {section} 192.22(a); 60 FR 2854) based on the limited use ground water present in the uppermost aquifer that is associated with widespread natural ambient contamination (40 CFR {section} 192.11(e); 60 FR 2854). The strategy is based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. The strategy will result in compliance with Subparts A and C of the EPA final ground water protection standards (60 FR 2854). The document contains sufficient information to support the proposed ground water protection strategy, with monitor well information and ground water quality data included as a supplement. Additional information is available in the final remedial action plan (RAP) (DOE, 1991a), the final completion report (DOE, 1991b), and the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1994a).

  14. SEP Success Story: Mississippi Adopts New Rules to Save Energy, Money

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An economic impact statement issued by the Mississippi Public Service Commission indicates new energy efficiency rules could potentially save the state’s consumers $2.3 billion by 2034 and create 9,500 jobs by 2030. Learn more.

  15. Mississippi State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-08-01

    The Mississippi State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state an federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Mississippi. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Mississippi. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Mississippi.

  16. Database of radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water, fish, waterfowl, gamebirds, and shellfish downstream of Hanford`s single-pass production reactors, 1960--1970. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiede, M.E.; Duncan, J.P.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from radionuclide emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The time periods of greatest interest to the HEDR study vary depending on the type of environmental media concerned. Concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River media from 1960--1970 provide the best historical data for validation of the Columbia River pathway computer models. This report provides the historical radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water (1960--1970), fish (1960--1967), waterfowl (1960--1970), gamebirds (1967--1970), and shellfish (1960--1970). Because of the large size of the databases (845 pages), this report is being published on diskette. A diskette of this report is available from the Technical Steering Panel (c/o K. CharLee, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, Department of Ecology, Technical Support and Publication Information Section, P.O. Box 47651, Olympia, Washington 98504-7651).

  17. Mississippi Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Mississippi Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us High School Regionals Mississippi Regional High

  18. Mississippi Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Mississippi Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Mississippi

  19. Characteristics of produced water discharged to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxiczone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Kimmell, T. A.; Rechner, A. C.

    2005-08-24

    Each summer, an area of low dissolved oxygen (the hypoxic zone) forms in the shallow nearshore Gulf of Mexico waters from the Mississippi River Delta westward to near the Texas/Louisiana border. Most scientists believe that the leading contributor to the hypoxic zone is input of nutrients (primarily nitrogen and phosphorus compounds) from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. The nutrients stimulate growth of phytoplankton. As the phytoplankton subsequently die, they fall to the bottom waters where they are decomposed by microorganisms. The decomposition process consumes oxygen in the bottom waters to create hypoxic conditions. Sources other than the two rivers mentioned above may also contribute significant quantities of oxygen-demanding pollutants. One very visible potential source is the hundreds of offshore oil and gas platforms located within or near the hypoxic zone. Many of these platforms discharge varying volumes of produced water. However, only limited data characterizing oxygen demand and nutrient concentration and loading from offshore produced water discharges have been collected. No comprehensive and coordinated oxygen demand data exist for produced water discharges in the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the results of a program to sample 50 offshore oil and gas platforms located within the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone. The program was conducted in response to a requirement in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) general National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for offshore oil and gas discharges. EPA requested information on the amount of oxygen-demanding substances contained in the produced water discharges. This information is needed as inputs to several water quality models that EPA intends to run to estimate the relative contributions of the produced water discharges to the occurrence of the hypoxic zone. Sixteen platforms were sampled 3 times each at approximately one-month intervals to give an estimate of

  20. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 98 53 17 1980's 359 45 15 9 17 10 0 1 20 25 1990's 21 12 5 10 4 14 0 0 0 0 2000's 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2010's 0 1 1 0 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release

  1. Mississippi Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,777 6,372 5,655 5,971 7,706 6,802 4,741 1990's 6,636 3,877 4,372 4,291 3,169 3,108 3,202 3,280 3,347 3,283 2000's 2,962 3,304 3,818 4,243 4,559 4,718 5,473 7,068 8,976 9,090 2010's 10,388 2,107 3,667 2,663 1,487 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  2. Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,582 9,158 8,521 1970's 7,893 5,840 9,153 6,152 5,357 7,894 4,836 4,979 5,421 8,645 1980's 4,428 4,028 7,236 6,632 7,202 6,296 6,562 8,091 7,100 5,021 1990's 7,257 4,585 4,945 4,829 3,632 3,507 3,584 3,652 3,710 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  3. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 43,362 44,170 44,253 1990's 43,184 43,693 44,313 45,310 43,803 45,444 46,029 47,311 45,345 47,620 2000's 50,913 51,109 50,468 50,928 54,027 54,936 55,741 56,155 55,291 50,713 2010's 50,537 50,636 50,689 50,153 50,238 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  4. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,312 1,263 1,282 1990's 1,317 1,314 1,327 1,324 1,313 1,298 1,241 1,199 1,165 1,246 2000's 1,199 1,214 1,083 1,161 996 1,205 1,181 1,346 1,132 1,141 2010's 980 982 936 933 943 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  5. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 370,094 372,238 376,353 1990's 382,251 386,264 392,155 398,472 405,312 415,123 418,442 423,397 415,673 426,352 2000's 434,501 438,069 435,146 438,861 445,212 445,856 437,669 445,043 443,025 437,715 2010's 436,840 442,479 442,840 445,589 444,423 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  6. Mississippi Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 44,979 36,329 31,594 2000's 30,895 30,267 26,997 26,003 21,869 21,496 22,131 27,316 28,677 28,951 2010's 28,117 28,828 48,497 23,667 19,787 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016

  7. Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 855 830 641 591 385 298 280 1990's 621 708 573 538 463 399 382 372 363 638 2000's 786 722 758 251 895 1,018 1,138 1,196 1,140 1,150 2010's 1,155 1,042 1,111 1,103 1,310 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  8. Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,127 971 1,334 1970's 1,270 1,217 1,058 878 679 567 520 367 485 1,146 1980's 553 830 831 633 618 458 463 437 811 380 1990's 445 511 416 395 425 377 340 300 495 5,462 2000's 11,377 15,454 16,477 11,430 13,697 14,308 14,662 13,097 10,846 18,354 2010's 18,405 11,221 486 466 495 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  9. Mississippi Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 255,475 241,342 306,733 2000's 300,652 332,589 343,890 265,842 282,051 301,663 307,305 364,067 355,006 364,323 2010's 438,733 433,538 494,016 420,594 412,979 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  10. Mississippi Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 211,116 206,871 178,426 197,217 195,299 196,912 148,167 1990's 149,012 126,637 129,340 131,450 105,646 95,349 88,805 98,075 88,723 83,232 2000's 70,965 76,986 112,979 133,901 145,692 52,923 60,531 73,460 96,641

  11. Project Reports for Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians- 2002 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) always seeks new opportunities to diversify its economy and create new career opportunities for tribal members, which is the purpose of this feasibility study. The MBCI will study the feasibility of locating a renewable energy installation on tribal lands. The technologies to be utilized in the renewable energy installation will be those that can readily handle poultry litter, either alone or in combination with wood residues. The purpose of the study is to determine whether such an installation can be both economically sustainable and consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the tribe. The feasibility study will result in the development of a thorough business plan that will allow the MBCI to make an informed decision regarding this project.

  12. Mississippi Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 777 731 645 647 647 615 585 1,148 1,101 807 2000's 954 935 707 937 943 895 993 2,327 1,942 1,715 2010's 1,983 2,067 1,958 2,123 2,772 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  13. Mississippi Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2014 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2015 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2016 NA NA NA NA NA NA Cubic Feet)

    Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per

  14. Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2014 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2015 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2016 2 2 2 2 7 7 Feet)

    Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.82 1.63 2.51 2.76 2.79 2.91

  15. Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,511 1980's 1,776 2,042 1,803 1,603 1,496 1,364 1,304 1,223 1,146 1,108 1990's 1,129 1,061 873 800 653 667 634 583 662 681 2000's 620 663 746 748 692 758 816 958 1,035 922 2010's 858 868 612 600 563 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  16. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,444 1980's 1,703 1,976 1,729 1,523 1,382 1,259 1,238 1,162 1,075 1,003 1990's 1,003 953 788 747 610 640 587 532 615 650 2000's 585 637 713 721 672 738 795 928 990 884 2010's 822 806

  17. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Savannah River Site Emergency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Savannah River Site Emergency Management Exercise Program November 2015 Office of ... plants, a heavy water extraction plant, a nuclear fuel and target fabrication ...

  18. Columbia River PUD- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia River PUD offers rebates for Energy Star manufactured homes, Energy Star appliances, duct sealing, ductless heat pumps, air-source heat pumps, Marathon water heaters, appliance recycling,...

  19. Water_Treatment.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    than 290 million gallons of contaminated water have been treated and released into the Missouri River from two similar water treatment facilities at the site and the nearby Quarry. ...

  20. Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2007-10-23

    This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

  1. Episodic potassic alteration of Ordovician tuffs in the Upper Mississippi Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.; Hay, R.L.; Kolata, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Tuffs of middle and late Ordovician age are altered to mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) and to K-feldspar in the Upper Mississippi Valley in northeast Iowa, southeast Minnesota, and southwest Wisconsin. Some and perhaps much of the I/S replaces previously feldspathized tuff, as shown by field and petrographic relationships. Samples for K-Ar dating were collected over a 200 km southeast-northwest traverse. Dates from authigenic K-feldspar are early Devonian and range from 397 +/- 13 to 406 +/- 18, averaging 400 m.y. in three samples, including a middle Ordovician tuff in Iowa and Minnesota and a late Ordovician tuff in Minnesota. Ages of illite layers in I/S are late Devonian and early Mississippian and range from 356 +/- 16 to 371 +/- 17, averaging 366 m.y. in 5 samples including 4 from two middle Ordovician tuffs in Minnesota and Iowa and the late Ordovician tuff in Minnesota. Oxygen-isotopic composition of the K-feldspar and I/S shows that the two minerals crystallized under different conditions and probably reflect introduction of waters of varying chemistry and temperature. K-feldspar very likely crystallized under higher temperatures and possibly lower salinity than the I/S. Introduction of these pore waters may have been caused by groundwater movements resulting from recharge in distal areas undergoing tectonic uplift. K-feldspar alteration was concurrent with early Devonian uplift on the Northeast Missouri Arch and possibly the Transcontinental Arch. Age of the illite layers corresponds to movements on the Sangamon Arch and possibly the Wisconsin Arch.

  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment of Radionuclide Monitoring in the CSRA Savannah River NERP Research ... Upcoming Seminars The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory is a research unit of the ...

  3. Mississippi Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.19 0.20 0.19 1970's 0.20 0.21 0.23 0.24 0.28 0.36 0.46 0.73 0.88 1.28 1980's 1.75 2.34 2.91 3.06 2.94 2.92 2.44 1.99 1.87 2.09 1990's 2.11 2.33 2.34 2.37 1.98 1.82 2.63 2.62 2.33 2.19 2000's 3.37 4.28 NA -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA

  4. Mississippi Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,014 1,015 1,018 1,018 1,021 1,022 1,025 1,020 1,020 2014 1,019 1,014 1,019 1,026 1,030 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,035 1,033 1,035 1,034 2015 1,036 1,033 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,030 1,030 1,029 1,031 1,028 1,029 1,030 2016 1,031 1,032 1,039 1,033 1,036 1,030

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Mississippi Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4

  5. Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.17 0.17 0.18 1970's 0.18 0.21 0.27 0.23 0.29 0.50 0.71 0.73 1.15 1.60 1980's 2.32 3.21 3.91 3.78 3.47 3.17 2.13 1.94 1.86 1.97 1990's 1.76 1.66 1.64 1.73 1.49 1.24 1.66 1.73 1.42 1.63 2000's 3.30 3.93 3.06 5.13 5.83 8.54 6.84 6.70 8.80 3.73 2010's 4.17 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  6. Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 1991 47,530 47,483 47,483 47,483 47,483 47,868 48,150 48,150 48,150 48,150 48,150 48,150 1992 48,150 48,150 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 47,851 48,049 1993 48,039 48,049 48,049 48,049 47,792 48,049 48,049 48,049

  7. Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 33,234 33,553 34,322 39,110 43,935 47,105 53,425 58,298 62,273 65,655 66,141 60,495 1991 43,838 39,280 39,196 45,157 48,814 50,833 52,841 54,954 60,062 64,120 56,034 50,591 1992 40,858 39,723 37,350 37,516 41,830 46,750 51,406 51,967 58,355 59,621 59,164 52,385 1993 46,427 38,859 32,754 35,256 42,524 46,737 51,884

  8. RiverHeath: Neighborhood Loop Geothermal Exchange System (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The flowing water provides a tremendous amount of heat transfer. As a result, the ... RiverHeath will serve as a template for other projects adjacent to the water. Authors: ...

  9. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes inspection and monitoring activities performed on and near the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2007. The Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities and the results of sample analyses. This report is submitted to comply with that requirement. The Tatum Salt Dome was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for underground nuclear testing during the cold war. The land surface above the salt dome, the Salmon Site, is located in Lamar County, Mississippi, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the successor to the AEC, is responsible for long-term surveillance and maintenance of the site. The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) was assigned this responsibility effective October 2006.

  10. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 12.93 -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities

  12. EIS-0385-S1: Ancillary Facilities for the Richton Site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since selecting the Richton site, DOE has engaged in further consultations with Federal and Mississippi state agencies and is now considering different locations from those addressed in DOE/EIS–0385 for certain facilities associated with the Richton SPR expansion site.

  13. Bisphenol-A sensors on polyimide fabricated by laser direct writing for on-site river water monitoring at attomolar concentration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Shutong; Wu, Jayne; Yu, Yongchao; Li, Ruozhou; Eda, Shigetoshi; Feng, Guoying; Chen, Jiangang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Hu, Anming

    2016-06-28

    This work presents an aptamer-based, highly sensitive and specific sensor for atto- to femtomolar level detection of bisphenol A (BPA). Because of its widespread use in numerous products, BPA enters surface water from effluent discharges during its manufacture, use, and from waste landfill sites throughout the world. On-site measurement of BPA concentrations in water is important for evaluating compliance with water quality standards or environmental risk levels of the harmful compound in the environment. The sensor in this work is porous, conducting, interdigitated electrodes that are formed by laser-induced carbonization of flexible polyimide sheets. BPA-specific aptamer is immobilized on themore » electrodes as the probe, and its binding with BPA at the electrode surface is detected by capacitive sensing. The binding process is aided by ac electroosmotic effect that accelerates the transport of BPA molecules to the nanoporous graphene-like structured electrodes. The sensor achieved a limit of detection of 58.28 aM with a response time of 20 s. The sensor is further applied for recovery analysis of BPA spiked in surface water. In conclusion, this work provides an affordable platform for highly sensitive, real time, and field-deployable BPA surveillance critical to the evaluation of the ecological impact of BPA exposure.« less

  14. Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q; Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Clark, D.R. )

    1992-12-01

    The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  15. EA-1865: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Kior, Inc., for Biorefinery Facilities in Georgia, Mississippi, and Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue a Federal loan guarantee to Kior, Inc., for biorefinery facilities in Georgia, Mississippi, and Texas. This EA is on hold.

  16. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 1997 and replaced with two other areas, both located in the Savannah River swamp. ... on the natural levy that parallels the Savannah River. Area: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...

  17. River Corridor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    River Corridor Richland Operations Office Richland Operations Office River Corridor B Reactor 300 Area 324 Building 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds C Reactor D and DR Reactors F ...

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Elk River Reactor - MN 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Elk River Reactor - MN 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Elk River Reactor (MN.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Reactor was dismantled and decommissioned by 1974 Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Elk River , Minnesota MN.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 MN.01-1 Site Operations: Boiling water reactor demonstration, research and development program MN.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated MN.01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive

  19. River Corridor Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Closure Hanford and previous contractors have completed much of the cleanup work in the River Corridor, shown here.

  20. Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta; Smith, Brennan T

    2008-02-01

    Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

  1. City of Columbus, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phone Number: 662-328-7192 ext. 113 or 114 Website: www.columbuslw.comindex.html Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesColumbus-Light-Water444721805615715 Outage Hotline:...

  2. City of Kosciusko, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cityelectric-dep Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Kosciusko-Light-Water-Office121990374525168 Outage Hotline: 662-289-1141 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  3. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  4. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  5. Uranium Resource Evaluation Project. Hydrochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance basic data for Palestine, Alexandria, and Natchez Quadrangles, Texas; Louisiana; Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-07

    Data are compiled for hydrochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Palestine, Alexandria and Natchez quadrangles in Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi.

  6. RIVER-RAD: A computer code for simulating the transport of radionuclides in rivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetrick, D.M.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Thorne, D.J.; Patterson, M.R.

    1992-11-01

    A screening-level model, RIVER-RAD, has been developed to assess the potential fate of radionuclides released to rivers. The model is simplified in nature and is intended to provide guidance in determining the potential importance of the surface water pathway, relevant transport mechanisms, and key radionuclides in estimating radiological dose to man. The purpose of this report is to provide a description of the model and a user's manual for the FORTRAN computer code.

  7. RIVER-RAD: A computer code for simulating the transport of radionuclides in rivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetrick, D.M.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Thorne, D.J.; Patterson, M.R.

    1992-11-01

    A screening-level model, RIVER-RAD, has been developed to assess the potential fate of radionuclides released to rivers. The model is simplified in nature and is intended to provide guidance in determining the potential importance of the surface water pathway, relevant transport mechanisms, and key radionuclides in estimating radiological dose to man. The purpose of this report is to provide a description of the model and a user`s manual for the FORTRAN computer code.

  8. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-03-01

    This report summarizes the annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2010. The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. The Salmon, MS, Site is a federally owned site located in Lamar County, MS, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis, MS, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, MS (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the 1,470-acre site. DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the operating agent for the surface and subsurface real estate.

  9. Mississippi exploration field trials using microbial, radiometrics, free soil gas, and other techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, J.S.; Brown, L.R.; Thieling, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Mississippi Office of Geology has conducted field trials using the surface exploration techniques of geomicrobial, radiometrics, and free soil gas. The objective of these trials is to determine if Mississippi oil and gas fields have surface hydrocarbon expression resulting from vertical microseepage migration. Six fields have been surveyed ranging in depth from 3,330 ft to 18,500 ft. The fields differ in trapping styles and hydrocarbon type. The results so far indicate that these fields do have a surface expression and that geomicrobial analysis as well as radiometrics and free soil gas can detect hydrocarbon microseepage from pressurized reservoirs. All three exploration techniques located the reservoirs independent of depth, hydrocarbon type, or trapping style.

  10. Mississippi's ratable-take rule preempted: Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Corp. v. State Oil and Gas Board

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Box, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    While the Court's objections to Mississippi's ratable-take rules as applied to interstate pipelines are clear, conservation lawyers have concerns about the impact of the Transco decision upon state interests in oil and gas conservation and because the decision does not clarify the limits of preemption of state conservation legislation. A variety of state regulatory legislation challenges will likely result in different contexts. These could affect interest on royalties, payment procedures, and could even lead to conflicting regulations.

  11. Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa Wind Energy Feasibility Study project will prepare the tribe for the development of clean, dependable, renewable wind energy on tribal land. The feasibility study reports resulting from this project, including technical and business analyses, will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement.

  12. Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    A high speed look at the removal of the Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal. A project sponsored by the Recovery Act on the Savannah River Site.

  13. Feasibility study of a corn-to-ethanol plant in Sardis, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    A feasibility study for a corn-to-ethanol plant in Panola County, Mississippi was carried out. This area is well suited for the production of ethanol from corn, as it has a mild climate, a plentiful supply of wood fuel, and a well-developed agricultural infrastructure. The project was designed for 5 million gallons per year, using the ACR Process, a process proven in 6 plants now operating. It was determined to be technically feasible for this size. However, without a state financial incentive such as a gasoline excise tax or sales tax exemption, the plant is not economically feasible in Mississippi. Even though a 4 cents per gallon federal excise tax exemption will likely remain, the economics without any other incentive are not strong enough to obtain financing or equity funds. While the Mississippi legislature decided not to consider a financial incentive in their 1982 session, an attempt will be made to introduce a proposal for a suitable exemption during the 1983 legislative session. Until then, the project is on hold.

  14. Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

  15. Office of River Protection - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of River Protection Office of River Protection Office of River Protection Office of River Protection Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease...

  16. Sandy River Delta Section 536 Ecosystem Restoration Project Environmen...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    County, Oregon East Channel Dam under Construction, Sandy River Delta, 1930s June 2013 ... unit(s) (in acres) IDC interest during construction IWR Institute for Water Resources KVA ...

  17. Mighty Microbes Where Rivers Run (Other) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microbes and their influential role in Earth's climate take center stage in the area where river water and groundwater mix - an area known as the hyporheic zone. PNNL ecologist ...

  18. Savannah River Site Vegetation Map | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Set-Aside Program SREL HOME Savannah River Site Vegetation Map swatch 1. Industrial swatch 2. Open water swatch 3. Bare soil / bare surface swatch 4. Sparse herbaceous vegetation swatch 5. Grasses and forbs swatch 6. Shrubs, grasses, and forbs swatch 7. Disturbed and revegetated in 1997 swatch 8. Marsh / aquatic macrophytes swatch 9. Young, open-canopy loblolly pine swatch 10. Open-canopy loblolly pine swatch 11. Young, dense-canopy loblolly pine swatch 12. Dense-canopy loblolly pine swatch 13.

  19. April 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-12

    Sampling and analysis were conducted on April 16-19, 2012, as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office Of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Duplicate samples were collected from locations SA1-1-H, HMH-5R, SA3-4-H, SA1-2-H, Pond W of GZ, and SA5-4-4. One trip blank was collected during this sampling event.

  20. Metal pollution of river Msimbazi, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ak'habuhaya, J.; Lodenius, M. )

    1988-01-01

    The Misimbazi River in Dar es Salaam is polluted with industrial, urban and agricultural waste waters. A preliminary investigation on the extent of metal pollution (Hg, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe, Ni, Cd, Mn, Al) was made from samples of sediments and biological indicators. The metal concentrations were in general low, but some of our results indicated industrial pollution.

  1. Columbia River Treaty History and 2014/2024 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    The Columbia River, the fourth largest river on the continent as measured by average annual flow, generates more power than any other river in North America. While its headwaters originate in British Columbia, only about 15 percent of the 259,500 square miles of the Columbia River Basin is actually located in Canada. Yet the Canadian waters account for about 38 percent of the average annual volume, and up to 50 percent of the peak flood waters, that flow by The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. In the 1940s, officials from the United States and Canada began a long process to seek a joint solution to the flooding caused by the unregulated Columbia River and to the postwar demand for greater energy resources. That effort culminated in the Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement between Canada and the United States for the cooperative development of water resources regulation in the upper Columbia River Basin. It was signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964.

  2. River and Plateau Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village August 18, 2015 - 10:36am Addthis River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village Alison LaBonte Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager To date, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is the only company to have built, operated and delivered power to a utility grid from a hydrokinetic tidal project, and to a local microgrid from a hydrokinetic

  3. Savannah River National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance 'Tin whiskers' suppression method Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have identified a treatment method that slows or prevents the formation of whiskers in lead-free solder. Tin whiskers spontaneously grow from thin films of tin, often found in microelectronic devices in the form of solders and platings. Background This problem was

  4. Great River (1973)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  5. River of Power (1987)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  6. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document is a brief progress report from each of the research and education projects that are currently funded through the ERWM contract. During third quarter 1993, approval was given by DOE for purchase of equipment. Equipment purchases were initiated and much of the equipment has been received and installed. The committees in charge of coordination of sampling and analyses associated with the collaborative research groups continued to meet and address these issues. Sampling has been done in the lower part of Devil`s Swamp and in the Devil`s Swamp Lake area. In addition, extensive sampling has been done in Bayou Trepagnier and in Bayou St. John. During this period, Tulane and Xavier Universities continued working closely with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The ORNL 1993 summer student internship program was completed. Plans were made for expanding the program to support 8 students next summer. Leonard Price, a Xavier University Chemistry professor and John Walz, a Tulane University Engineering professor each spent 5 weeks at ORNL. During this time these faculty worked with ORNL researchers exploring mutual interests and discussing possible future collaborations. In September, Drs. Carl Gehrs, Lee Shugart and Marshall Adams of ORNL, visited the Tulane and Xavier campuses. They presented two seminars and met with several of the investigators being supported by the ERWM contract. Tulane/Xavier project administrators participated in the Office of Technology Development`s ``New Technologies and Program Exhibition`` in the Rayburn House Office Building on September 23 and in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27.

  7. Lower Colorado River Authority | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Lower Colorado River Authority's communications requirements Lower Colorado River Authority (134.07

  8. about Savannah River National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The EDM capability at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is unique to the Savannah River Site. It allows for very fine, precise cutting of metal without destroying ...

  9. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  10. Savannah River Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Savannah River

  11. EIS-0165: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the impacts of construction and operation for the range of alternatives being considered and focuses on oil and brine spill risk and impacts of brine disposal. The proposed action entails the development of a plan for 250 million barrels of new crude oil storage capacity in two Gulf Coast salt domes to expand the Strategic Petroleum Reserve pursuant to Congressional directive (PL I 01-383 and PL 101-512). Storage capacity would be developed by solution-mining the salt which would require about two billion barrels of surface water and would generate about two billion barrels of salt brine.

  12. Historical river flow rates for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1991-06-10

    Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

  13. ,"Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","11/19/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","12/31/2016"

  14. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  15. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ms2m.xls"

  16. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  17. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  18. MHK Projects/Fortyeight Mile Point Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Mississippi River Coordinates 30.0447, -90.6659 Project Phase Phase ? PermitLicense Buildout (MW) 59 Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) 40 kW Number of Build Out Units...

  19. Predicted impacts from offshore produced water discharges on hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, V. J.; Hinz, S.C.; Justic, D.; Scavia, D.; Veil, J. A.; Satterlee, K.; Parker, M. E.; Wilson, S.; Environmental Science Division; LimnoTech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ of Michigan; Shell E&P Co.; Exxon Mobil Production Co.; U.S. EPA

    2008-06-01

    Summer hypoxia (dissolved oxygen < 2 mg/L) in the bottom waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico has received considerable scientific and policy attention because of potential ecological and economic impacts. This hypoxic zone forms off the Louisiana coast each summer and has increased from an average of 8,300 km{sup 2} in 1985-1992 to over 16,000 km{sup 2} in 1993-2001, reaching a record 22,000 km{sup 2} in 2002. The almost threefold increase in nitrogen load from the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) to the Gulf since the middle of the last century is the primary external driver for hypoxia. A goal of the 2001 Federal Action Plan is to reduce the 5-year running average size of the hypoxic zone to below 5,000 km{sup 2} by 2015. After the Action Plan was developed, a new question arose as to whether sources other than the MRB may also contribute significant quantities of oxygen-demanding substances. One very visible potential source is the hundreds of offshore oil and gas platforms located within or near the hypoxic zone, many of which discharge varying volumes of produced water. The objectives of this study were to assess the incremental impacts of produced water discharges on dissolved oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and to evaluate the significance of these discharges relative to loadings from the MRB. Predictive simulations were conducted with three existing models of Gulf hypoxia using produced water loads from an industry study. Scenarios were designed that addressed loading uncertainties, settleability of suspended constituents, and different assumptions on delivery locations for the produced water loads. Model results correspond to the incremental impacts of produced water loads, relative to the original model results, which included only loads from the MRB. The predicted incremental impacts of produced water loads on dissolved oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico from all three models were small. Even considering the predicted ranges between lower- and

  20. Technical summary of groundwater quality protection program at the Savannah River Site (1952--1986). Volume 2, Groundwater monitoring results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    Data is presented regarding ground water monitoring results from the Savannah River Plant for the years of 1952-1986. (CBS)

  1. Savannah river site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to supply and process tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen that is a vital component of nuclear weapons. SRS loads tritium and non-tritium...

  2. Bibliography, geophysical data locations, and well core listings for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    To date, comprehensive basin analysis and petroleum system modeling studies have not been performed on any of the basins in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Of these basins, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been selected for study because it is the most petroliferous basin in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, small- and medium-size companies are drilling the majority of the exploration wells. These companies do not have the resources to perform basin analysis or petroleum system modeling research studies nor do they have the resources to undertake elaborate information searches through the volumes of publicly available data at the universities, geological surveys, and regulatory agencies in the region. The Advanced Geologic Basin Analysis Program of the US Department of Energy provides an avenue for studying and evaluating sedimentary basins. This program is designed to improve the efficiency of the discovery of the nation`s remaining undiscovered oil resources by providing improved access to information available in the public domain and by increasing the amount of public information on domestic basins. This report provides the information obtained from Year 1 of this study of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. The work during Year 1 focused on inventorying the data files and records of the major information repositories in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and making these inventories easily accessible in an electronic format.

  3. The Role of Landscape in the Distribution of Deer-Vehicle Collisions in South Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, Jacob J; Cochran, David

    2012-01-01

    Deer-vehicle collisions (DVCs) have a negative impact on the economy, traffic safety, and the general well-being of otherwise healthy deer. To mitigate DVCs, it is imperative to gain a better understanding of factors that play a role in their spatial distribution. Much of the existing research on DVCs in the United States has been inconclusive, pointing to a variety of causal factors that seem more specific to study site and region than indicative of broad patterns. Little DVC research has been conducted in the southern United States, making the region particularly important with regard to this issue. In this study, we evaluate landscape factors that contributed to the distribution of 347 DVCs that occurred in Forrest and Lamar Counties of south Mississippi, from 2006 to 2009. Using nearest-neighbor and discriminant analysis, we demonstrate that DVCs in south Mississippi are not random spatial phenomena. We also develop a classification model that identified seven landscape metrics, explained 100% of the variance, and could distinguish DVCs from control sites with an accuracy of 81.3 percent.

  4. Surviving the toxics in south Louisiana: A minority perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, B.

    1995-12-01

    The Louisiana industrial corridor along the Mississippi River is lined with 136 petro-chemical plants and serves oil refineries. This approximates nearly one plant or refinery for every half mile of the river. The air, ground, and water along this corridor are so full or carcinogens that it has been described as a massive human experiment. Poor blacks live in river towns near the brunt of this discharge. Total mortality rates and cancer mortality rates in counties along the Mississippi River are significantly higher than in the rest of the nation`s counties. Moreover, the areas of greatest toxic discharge. Findings of disproportionately high mortality rates along the Mississippi, especially in communities on the lower river where toxic discharge minority and poor communities along the Mississippi River chemical corridor.

  5. Geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1985-06-13

    This report describes the geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin. The report contains a discussion of the hydrology as it relates to the movement of heated water, a description and interpretation of the thermal regime, and four maps: a generalized geological map, a structure contour map, a thermal gradient contour map, and a ground water temperature map. 10 figs. (ACR)

  6. The formation and maintenance of single-thread tie channels entering floodplain lakes: observations from three diverse river systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, Joel C; Dietrich, William E; Day, Geoff; Parker, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Tie channels connect rivers to floodplain lakes on many lowland rivers and thereby play a central role in floodplain sedimentology and ecology, yet they are generally unrecognized and little studied. here we report the results of field studies focused on tie channel origin and morphodynamics in three contrasting systems: the Middle Fly River, Papua New Guinea, the Lower Mississippi River, and Birch Creek in Alaska. Across these river systems, tie channels vary by an order of magnitude in size but exhibit the same characteristic morphology and appear to develop and evolve by a similar set of processes. In all three systems, the channels are characterized by a narrow, leveed single-thread morphology with maximum width approximately one tenth the width of the mainstem river. The channels typically have a V shaped cross-section, unlike most fluvial channels. These channels develop as lakes become isolated from the river by sedimentation. Narrowing of the connection between river and lake causes a sediment-laden jet to develop. Levees develop along the margins of the jet leading to channel emergence and eventual levee aggradation to the height of the mainstem levees. Bi-directional flow in these channels is common. Outflows from the lake scour sediment and prevent channel blockage. We propose that channel geometry and size are then controlled by a dynamic balance between channel narrowing by suspended sediment deposition and incision and widening by mass failure of banks during outflows. Tie channels are laterally stable and may convey flow for hundreds to a few thousand of years.

  7. Effects of river discharge on hyporheic exchange flows in salmon spawning areas of a large gravel-bed river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    The flow magnitude and timing from hydroelectric dams in the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States is managed in part for the benefit of salmon. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of current Hells Canyon Dam discharge operations on hydrologic exchange flows between the river and riverbed in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. Interactions between river water and pore water within the upper 1 m of the riverbed were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. The data were recorded at 20 min intervals over a period of 200 days when the mean daily discharge was 218–605 m3 s–1, with hourly stage changes as large as 1.9 m. Differences in head pressure between the river and riverbed were small, often within ±2 cm. Measured temperature gradients in the riverbed indicated significant interactions between the surface and subsurface water. Neither hydraulic nor temperature gradients at most sites were significantly affected by either short- or long-term changes in discharge operations from Hells Canyon Dam. Only 2 out of 14 study sites exhibited acute flux reversals between the river and riverbed resulting from short-term, large magnitude changes in discharge. The findings suggest small-scale piezometric head differences play a minor role in the hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed at the study sites. The processes controlling hydrologic exchange at the study sites are likely to be bedform-induced advective pumping, turbulence at the riverbed surface, and large-scale hydraulic gradients along the longitudinal profile of the riverbed. By incorporating the knowledge of hydrologic exchange processes into water management planning, regional agencies will be better prepared to manage the limited water resources among competing priorities that include salmon recovery, flood control, irrigation supply, hydropower production, and

  8. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

  9. Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place: Hudson, South Dakota Zip: 57034 Product: Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol is...

  10. Office of River Protection - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of River Protection Office of River Protection About ORP ORP Projects & Facilities Newsroom Contracts & Procurements Contact ORP Office of River Protection Email Email Page...

  11. Savannah River Site | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Savannah River Site FY 2016 FY 2016 Performance Evaluation Plan, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC FY 2015 FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Report, Savannah River Nuclear ...

  12. Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste ...

  13. Sky River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky River Wind Farm Facility Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  14. Flambeau River Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flambeau River Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name: Flambeau River Biofuels Place: Park Falls, Wisconsin Sector: Biomass Product: A subsidiary of Flambeau River Papers LLC...

  15. Raft River Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Raft River Geothermal Facility General Information Name Raft River Geothermal Facility Facility Raft River...

  16. Wing River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name Wing River Wind Farm Facility Wing River Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wing River...

  17. Loveland Water & Power- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loveland Water & Power, in conjunction with the Platte River Power Authority provides businesses incentives for new construction projects and existing building retrofits. The Electric...

  18. Loveland Water & Power - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    250 Office Lighting: 5 - 20 SensorsControls: 7 - 90 Summary Loveland Water & Power, in conjunction with the Platte River Power Authority provides businesses...

  19. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education

  20. Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Schlumberger soundings in the...

  1. Thinking outside the channel: Modeling nitrogen cycling in networked river ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Ashley; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Meyer, Judy; Wollheim, Wilfred; Peterson, Bruce; Mulholland, Patrick J; Bernhardt, Emily; Stanford, Jack; Arango, Clay; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dodds, Walter; Gregory, Stanley; Hall, Robert; Hamilton, Stephen; Johnson, Sherri; McDowell, William; Potter, Jody; Tank, Jennifer; Thomas, Suzanne; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Zeglin, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and urban development alters nitrogen and other biogeochemical cycles in rivers worldwide. Because such biogeochemical processes cannot be measured empirically across whole river networks, simulation models are critical tools for understanding river-network biogeochemistry. However, limitations inherent in current models restrict our ability to simulate biogeochemical dynamics among diverse river networks. We illustrate these limitations using a river-network model to scale up in situ measures of nitrogen cycling in eight catchments spanning various geophysical and land-use conditions. Our model results provide evidence that catchment characteristics typically excluded from models may control river-network biogeochemistry. Based on our findings, we identify important components of a revised strategy for simulating biogeochemical dynamics in river networks, including approaches to modeling terrestrial-aquatic linkages, hydrologic exchanges between the channel, floodplain/riparian complex, and subsurface waters, and interactions between coupled biogeochemical cycles.

  2. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 543 1990's 585 629 507 620 583 535 568 560 527 560 2000's 997 1,143 979 427 1,536 1,676 1,836 2,315 2,343 2,320 2010's 1,979 5,732 1,669 1,967 1,645 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  3. Lower Colorado River Authority | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Lower Colorado River Authority on Smart Grid communications requirements Lower Colorado River Authority (349.31

  4. Reese River Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Reese River Geothermal Project Project Location Information...

  5. Workers Demolish Reactor Support Facility as Part of River Corridor

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contract | Department of Energy Demolish Reactor Support Facility as Part of River Corridor Contract Workers Demolish Reactor Support Facility as Part of River Corridor Contract July 3, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis The site of the former 183-B Clearwell, an old water treatment facility for the historic B Reactor. The site of the former 183-B Clearwell, an old water treatment facility for the historic B Reactor. An aerial view of the site of the former 183-B Clearwell. An aerial view of the site of

  6. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  7. 1,"Victor J Daniel Jr","Coal","Mississippi Power Co",1992 2,"Grand Gulf","Nuclear","System Energy Resources, Inc",1408.5

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Victor J Daniel Jr","Coal","Mississippi Power Co",1992 2,"Grand Gulf","Nuclear","System Energy Resources, Inc",1408.5 3,"Baxter Wilson","Natural gas","Entergy Mississippi Inc",1143.2 4,"Jack Watson","Coal","Mississippi Power Co",998

  8. Savannah River Site Robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  9. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  10. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  11. Evaluation of the 1998 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook and Water Quality at Multiple Locations on the Snake and Columbia Rivers using CRiSP/RealTime, 1998 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beer, W. Nicholas; Hayes, Joshua A.; Shaw, Pamela

    1999-07-21

    Since 1988, wild salmon have been PIT-tagged through monitoring and research programs conducted by the Columbia River fisheries agencies and Tribes. Workers at the University of Washington have used detection data at Lower Granite Dam to generate predictions of arrival distributions for various stocks at the dam. The prediction tool is known as RealTime. In 1996, RealTime predictions were linked to a downstream migration model, CRiSP.1. The composite model, known as CRiSP/RealTime, predicts the arrival distribution and fraction transported at downriver locations.

  12. Unsteady flow model of Priest Rapids Dam releases at Hanford Reach, Columbia River, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneider, S.C.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1983-02-01

    A model was developed to simulate water levels at three locations on the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam River Mile 396.1 (River Kilometer 639.0) and River Mile 361.50 (River Kilometer 581.7). The model was calibrated and verified over a range of flows. The results of calibration and verification indicate that the model, with reasonable accuracy, simulates stages to within +-0.08 m (+- 0.25 ft) and surface wave timing to within +-20 min. The model can be used by researchers, river system managers, planners, and decision makers as a tool to predict fluctuating water levels at locations downstream of dams. Data produced by the model can be used to evaluate and quantify possible impacts on aquatic organisms, water supply, navigation, irrigation, recreation, and additional hydropower enhancement. Although the results of this model calibrationand the model simulations presented are site-specific, the methodology is generic. Therefore, the model can be adapted to reflect dam discharges and resulting river flows at other river systems affected by water-level fluctuations.

  13. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  14. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    81: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River ...

  15. 33 U.S.C. 403: River and Harbors Act of 1899

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899 (33 U.S.C. 403) prohibits the unauthorized obstruction or alteration of any navigable water of the United States.

  16. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mixed Swamp Forest This Set-Aside is one of the original ten SREL habitat reserve areas selected in 1968 to represent a diversity of bottomland hardwood/floodplain forest communities of a southern river swamp system. The majority of this Set-Aside is confined to the floodplain and, for the most part, these communities are relatively undisturbed, older growth mixtures of bottomland hardwood and swamp forests. Represented are aquatic, semi-aquatic, and terrestrial habitats associated with

  17. ARM - Lesson Plans: Rainfall and Water Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    It is easier to illustrate the effects of lacking rainfall (recent drought in the Papua New Guinea area could be an example). If rainfall increases, water flow in rivers will ...

  18. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  19. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  20. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  1. Look to the River Columbia River Opens New Opportunities for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  2. Factors governing sustainable groundwater pumping near a river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Hubbard, S.S.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this paper is to provide new insights into processes affecting riverbank filtration (RBF). We consider a system with an inflatable dam installed for enhancing water production from downstream collector wells. Using a numerical model, we investigate the impact of groundwater pumping and dam operation on the hydrodynamics in the aquifer and water production. We focus our study on two processes that potentially limit water production of an RBF system: the development of an unsaturated zone and riverbed clogging. We quantify river clogging by calibrating a time-dependent riverbed permeability function based on knowledge of pumping rate, river stage, and temperature. The dynamics of the estimated riverbed permeability reflects clogging and scouring mechanisms. Our results indicate that (1) riverbed permeability is the dominant factor affecting infiltration needed for sustainable RBF production; (2) dam operation can influence pumping efficiency and prevent the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed only under conditions of sufficient riverbed permeability; (3) slow river velocity, caused by dam raising during summer months, may lead to sedimentation and deposition of fine-grained material within the riverbed, which may clog the riverbed, limiting recharge to the collector wells and contributing to the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed; and (4) higher river flow velocities, caused by dam lowering during winter storms, scour the riverbed an thus increase its permeability. These insights can be used as the basis for developing sustainable water management of a RBF system.

  3. Flow and Transport in the Hanford 300 Area Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-13

    Contaminant migration in the 300 Area unconfined aquifer is strongly coupled to fluctuations in the Columbia River stage. To better understand the interaction between the river, aquifer, and vadose zone, a 2-D saturated-unsaturated flow and transport model was developed for a vertical cross-section aligned west-east across the Hanford Site 300 Area, nearly perpendicular to the river. The model was used to investigate water flow and tracer transport in the vadose zone-aquifer-river flow system, in support of the ongoing study of the 300 Area uranium plume. The STOMP simulator was used to model 1-year from 3/1/92 to 2/28/93, a period when hourly data were available for both groundwater and river levels. Net water flow to the river (per 1-meter width of shoreline) was 182 m3/y in the base case, but the cumulative exchange or total flow back and forth across the riverbed was 30 times greater. The low river case had approximately double the net water and Groundwater tracer flux into the river as compared to the base case.

  4. EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

  5. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  6. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  7. Kootenai River Biological Baseline Status Report : Annual Report, 1996.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Diana

    1997-02-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem in Idaho, Montana and British Columbia (B.C.) Canada has been severely degraded during the past 50 years. This aquatic ecosystem has changed from one that was culturally eutrophic, to one that is oligotrophic due to channelization, diking, impoundment (construction and operation of Libby Dam), and pollution abatement measures in the watershed. As a result of these influences, flow regimes, temperature patterns, and water quality were altered, resulting in changes in primary production and aquatic insect and fish populations. Construction of Libby Dam (creation of Lake Koocanusa) and closure of Cominco`s fertilizer plant resulted in decreased phosphorus load to the Kootenai River to below historical levels. Dissolved orthophosphorus concentrations averaged 0.383 mg/L in 1970 as compared to 0.039 mg/L in 1979. Total phosphorus concentrations followed a similar pattern. Both total phosphorus and soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations remained below 0.05 mg/L from 1976 to 1994, characterizing the river as oligotrophic. Post Libby Dam primary productivity levels in the river represent an ultra-oligotrophic to mesotrophic system. Since the construction and operation of Libby Dam, invertebrate densities immediately downstream from the dam increased, but species diversity decreased. Insect diversity increased with increasing distance from the dam, but overall species diversity was lower than would be expected in a free-flowing river. Fish species composition and abundance has also changed as a result of the changes in the river and its watershed.

  8. Cathodic protection of a remote river pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, B.A. )

    1994-03-01

    The 261-km long 500-mm diam Kutubu pipeline, which runs through dense jungle swamps in Papua, New Guinea, was built for Chevron Niugini to transport oil from the remote Kutubu oil production facility in the Southern Highlands to an offshore loading facility. The pipeline was laid with a section in the bed of a wide, fast-flowing river. This section was subject to substantial telluric effects and current density variations from changing water resistivities. The cathodic protection system's effectiveness was monitored by coupon off'' potentials and required an innovative approach.

  9. Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study's scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

  10. Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study`s scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

  11. Review of historical monitoring data on Techa River contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorobiova, M.I.; Degteva, M.O.; Burmistrov, D.S.; Safronova, N.G.; Kozheurov, V.P. ); Anspaugh, L.R. ); Napier, B.A. )

    1999-06-01

    The Mayak Production Association was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. The extensive increase in plutonium production during 1948--1955, as well as the absence of reliable waste-management technology, resulted in significant releases of liquid radioactive effluent into the rather small Techa River. This resulted in chronic external and internal exposure of about 30,000 residents of riverside communities; these residents from the cohort of an epidemiologic investigation. Analysis of the available historical monitoring data indicates that the following reliable data sets can be used for reconstruction of doses received during the early periods of operation of the Mayak Production Association: temporal pattern of specific beta activity of river water for several sites in the upper Techa region since July 1951; average annual values of specific beta activity of river water and bottom sediments as a function of downstream distance for the whole river since 1951; external gamma-exposure rates near the shoreline as a function of downstream distance for the whole Techa River since 1952; and external gamma-exposure rate as a function of distance from the shoreline for several sites in the upper and middle Techa since 1951.

  12. about Savannah River National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Transfer Systems and Reservoir Development The Savannah River Site (SRS) is rich in ... and capabilities of the plant are considered when new systems are being developed. ...

  13. RiverHeath Appleton, WI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The goal of the project is to produce a closed loop neighborhood-wide geothermal exchange system using the river as the source of heat exchange.

  14. Employment | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employment Openings are posted on the UGA Human Resources website. To search for employment opportunities at SREL, select Department #267 (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory). UGA HR

  15. Smith River Rancheria- 2006 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Smith River Rancheria has a strong commitment to becoming energy self-sufficient, reduce their energy costs, and stimulate economic development in the community.

  16. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  17. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  18. Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Percent) Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 31.9 17.1 14.2 15.5 11.1 7.9 -1.1 -5.7 -3.6 -2.3 -15.3 -16.4 1992 -6.8 1.1 -4.7 -16.9 -14.3 -8.0 -2.7 -5.4 -2.8 -7.0 5.6 3.5 1993 13.6 -2.2 -12.3 -6.0 1.7 0.0 0.9 6.3 4.6 1.9 -35.2 -40.7 1994 -53.0 -55.0 -36.7 -28.8 -29.8 -34.1 -28.0 -22.8 -26.7 -21.5 26.7 39.2 1995 50.8 54.7 11.0

  19. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 79-034-1440, Intex Plastics, Corinth, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salisbury, S.

    1984-03-01

    In response to a request from the president of the United Rubber Workers, Local 759, an investigation was begun into possible hazardous working conditions at the Hatco Plastics Division, Currently known as Intex Plastics, Corinth, Mississippi. The request indicated that several production and maintenance employees at that site had been disabled due to chemical poisoining and related illnesses. A medical survey was begun at the facility in March of 1979. Fifty employees participated by completing a questionnaire. A high prevalence of eye, nose, and throat irritation was found along with shortness of breath, cough, and skin rash among workers assigned to the Calender, Color, and Laminating Departments. Air sampling was performed in several departments. Except for methyl-ethyl-ketone (MEK), the levels of substances detected were quite low. The department with the highest exposure to airborne contaminants included the Print Service with 36 to 299 parts per million (ppm) MEK, laminating at 74 to 105ppm MEK, printing at 15 to 113ppm MEK, color at 15 to 24ppm MEK, premix at 0.3 to 6.8mg/cu m total dust, and calender at 0.1 to 0.6mg/cu m total dust.

  20. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mago, Pedro; Newell, LeLe

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  1. Hood River Production Program : Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coccoli, Holly; Lambert, Michael

    2000-02-01

    Effective habitat protection and rehabilitation are essential to the long-term recovery of anadromous fish populations in the Hood River subbasin. This Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was prepared to advance the goals of the Hood River Production Program (HRRP) which include restoring self-sustaining runs of spring chinook salmon and winter and summer steelhead. The HRPP is a fish supplementation and monitoring and evaluation program initiated in 1991 and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program. The HRPP is a joint effort of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Using recent watershed assessment and federal watershed analysis reports, this Plan reviews the historic and current condition of riparian, instream and upland habitats; natural watershed processes; anadromous and resident fish populations; identifies limiting factors, and indicates those subbasin areas that need protection or are likely to respond to restoration. Primary habitat restoration needs were identified as (1) improved fish screening and upstream adult passage at water diversions; (2) improved spawning gravel availability, instream habitat structure and diversity; and (3) improved water quality and riparian conditions. While several early action projects have been initiated in the Hood River subbasin since the mid 1990s, this Plan outlines additional projects and strategies needed to protect existing high quality habitat, correct known fish survival problems, and improve the habitat capacity for natural production to meet HRPP goals.

  2. Data Summary Report for teh Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulstrom, L.

    2011-02-07

    This data summary report summarizes the investigation results to evaluate the nature and distribution of Hanford Site-related contaminants present in the Columbia River. As detailed in DOE/RL-2008-11, more than 2,000 environmental samples were collected from the Columbia River between 2008 and 2010. These samples consisted of island soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater upwelling (pore water, surface water, and sediment), and fish tissue.

  3. North Sky River | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sky River Jump to: navigation, search Name North Sky River Facility North Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra...

  4. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Georgia Old Laboratory Site This 113.1-acre (45.8 ha) Set-Aside Area, adjacent to the former location of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, is one of the original ten SREL habitat reserves and was selected to complement the old-field habitat/plant succession studies at Field 3-412 (Area #1) and Field 3-409 (Area #28). This relatively disturbed Set-Aside provided field study sites where manipulative research could be carried out on old-fields and radioecology experiments could

  5. River and Plateau Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 2011) Page 1 Area RAP Committee Area of Interest Issue Manager(s) (*denotes lead) Other interested committee members Focus/Product For FY2012 Framing Questions/Issues (Articulated by Issue Managers) Cross- cutting River Corridor 100 & 300 Areas * 100 B/C Area * 100 K Area * 100 N Area * 100 D & H Areas * 100 F Area * 300 Area Shelley Cimon Dale Engstrom* Liz Mattson Jean Vanni Gerry Pollet Bob Suyama Wade Riggsbee 6 RODs RI/FS and Proposed Plans to be issued between now &

  6. River and Plateau Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2/15 River and Plateau Committee Priorities for advice on FY17 budget Not in priority order, numbering refers to last year's related advice points, per DOE response  (#1) The Board strongly urges DOE-Headquarters (HQ) to request full funding from Congress to meet all legal requirements of the ongoing cleanup work in FY 2016 and 2017 in addition to the following specific requests.  (#5) The Board advises DOE-RL to restore funding for removal and treatment of thousands of stored containers

  7. Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay

  8. Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company- November 14, 2003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Criticality Safety Violations at the Savannah River Site

  9. Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company- April 19, 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Employee Reprisal at the Savannah River Site

  10. Wild and Scenic Rivers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Scenic Rivers Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildandScenicRivers&oldid612228" Feedback Contact needs updating Image...

  11. Savannah River Remediation, College Create Job Opportunities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Remediation, College Create Job Opportunities for Graduates Savannah River Remediation, ... "With ongoing missions at the Savannah River Site and construction at Plant Vogtle and ...

  12. Kings River Conservation Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kings River Conservation Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kings River Conservation Dist Place: California Phone Number: 559-237-5567 Website: www.krcd.org Facebook: https:...

  13. Green River Biodiesel Incorporated | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Biodiesel Incorporated Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green River Biodiesel Incorporated Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77056 Product: Biodiesel project developer and...

  14. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site Office...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office - December 2009 Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site Office - December 2009 December 2009 Inspection of Nuclear Safety at the Savannah River Site Office and ...

  15. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Expanded Staff Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River Remediation Delivering the Mission Dave Olson President and Project Manager ... Liquid Waste Operations contractor Savannah River Remediation LLC * Began work in ...

  16. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These studies are being conducted in habitats on the Savannah River Site where the ... activities on the Savannah River Site can expose wildlife that use contaminated areas. ...

  17. Educational Materials | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Environmenta...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Snapshots The Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park The History of Radioecology Research at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Gray Foxes of the ...

  18. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 January 2010 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site This report provides the results of ...

  19. Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wisconsin (NewPage Corporation in Wisconsin Rapids and Flambeau River Papers, LLC in Park Falls). NewPage and Flambeau River have demonstrated successful collaboration on...

  20. Withlacoochee River Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Withlacoochee River Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Withlacoochee River Elec Coop Place: Florida Phone Number: 352-567-5133 Website: www.wrec.net Twitter: https:...

  1. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - February 2014 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site...

  2. River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    dress":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Language: English River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Screenshot References: EPRI1 River Atlas2 The...

  3. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Washington River...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Hanford - Feb 2014 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Hanford - Feb 2014 February...

  4. Savannah River Analytical Laboratories Achieve International...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Savannah River Analytical Laboratories Achieve International Standard Accreditation Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 12:55pm Savannah River National Laboratory's FH Analytical ...

  5. Grand River Dam Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Dam Authority Place: Oklahoma Phone Number: 918-256-5545 Website: www.grda.com Twitter: @okgrda Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesGrand-River-Dam-Authority...

  6. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  7. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  8. Par Pond water balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.A.; Dixon, K.L.

    1996-06-01

    A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs.

  9. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.; Spitzer, D.

    1994-12-16

    The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from producing nuclear weapons materials for national defense to managing the waste it has generated, restoring the environment, and enhancing industrial development in and around the site. But no matter what the site`s mission is, it will continue to maintain its comprehensive environmental monitoring and surveillance program. In 1994, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 30,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, foodstuffs, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

  10. Dry calorimetry at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ReFalo, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeters are used at the Savannah River Site to assay radioactive sources by measuring the emitted thermal power. The radioactive source is placed in a constant temperature environment and its thermal output is measured by non-destructive assay techniques. The isotopic mass is computed from the measured power through known watts/gram constants for each of the isotopes. The Equipment Engineering Section of the Savannah River Laboratory has developed calorimetric techniques which provide major improvements over other calorimeters. Improvements are in the areas of greater precision, reduced maintenance, and thermal control without using water. The elimination of water reduces criticality concerns during assay of fissionable materials and reduces health concerns during assay of tritium. Equipment Engineering Section has developed two basic dry calorimeter designs. The designs are identical in concept; however, they differ to accommodate different power levels. Each design has been tested demonstrating proof of concept. The current designs are for low wattage samples, .1 to 10 watts, and high wattage samples, 40 to 140 watts.

  11. Dry calorimetry at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ReFalo, L.A.

    1992-04-01

    Heat flow calorimeters are used at the Savannah River Site to assay radioactive sources by measuring the emitted thermal power. The radioactive source is placed in a constant temperature environment and its thermal output is measured by non-destructive assay techniques. The isotopic mass is computed from the measured power through known watts/gram constants for each of the isotopes. The Equipment Engineering Section of the Savannah River Laboratory has developed calorimetric techniques which provide major improvements over other calorimeters. Improvements are in the areas of greater precision, reduced maintenance, and thermal control without using water. The elimination of water reduces criticality concerns during assay of fissionable materials and reduces health concerns during assay of tritium. Equipment Engineering Section has developed two basic dry calorimeter designs. The designs are identical in concept; however, they differ to accommodate different power levels. Each design has been tested demonstrating proof of concept. The current designs are for low wattage samples, .1 to 10 watts, and high wattage samples, 40 to 140 watts.

  12. Savannah River site environmental report for 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.; Mamatey, A.

    1998-12-31

    The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of site-generated waste, restoration of the surrounding environment, and the development of industry in and around the site. However, SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC)-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program. In 1996, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 31,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Though the environmental monitoring program was streamlined in 1996-to improve its cost-effectiveness without compromising data quality or reducing its overall ability to produce critical information-thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, food products, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

  13. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next

  14. The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-06

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  15. Columbia River Pathway Dosimetry Report, 1944-1992. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Snyder, S.F.; Shipler, D.B.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate doses to individuals who were exposed to the radionuclides released to the Columbia River (the river pathway). This report documents the last in a series of dose calculations conducted on the Columbia River pathway. The report summarizes the technical approach used to estimate radiation doses to three classes of representative individuals who may have used the Columbia River as a source of drinking water, food, or for recreational or occupational purposes. In addition, the report briefly explains the approaches used to estimate the radioactivity released to the river, the development of the parameters used to model the uptake and movement of radioactive materials in aquatic systems such as the Columbia River, and the method of calculating the Columbia River`s transport of radioactive materials. Potential Columbia River doses have been determined for representative individuals since the initiation of site activities in 1944. For this report, dose calculations were performed using conceptual models and computer codes developed for the purpose of estimating doses. All doses were estimated for representative individuals who share similar characteristics with segments of the general population.

  16. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant (SRP), located at Aiken, South Carolina. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The following topics are discussed: general site information; air, soil, surface water and ground water; hydrogeology; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; release of tritium oxides; radioactivity in milk; contamination of ground water and wildlife; pesticide use; and release of radionuclides into seepage basins. 149 refs., 44 figs., 53 tabs.

  17. Concept Paper Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Savannah River Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Michael S. Navetta, PE Manager- Energy Park Initiative (803) 952-8806 michael.navetta@srs.gov U.S. EnergyFreedomCenter PREDECISIONAL DRAFT Today We Can Start To Unshackle America Decades of debate for ending America's dependence on foreign fossil fuels, climate change and environmentally positive energy has produced a myriad of technologies that independently offer a partial solution. Applying existing technologies

  18. Raft River Idaho Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Nash

    2015-05-13

    Raw magnetotelluric (MT) data covering the geothermal system at Raft River, Idaho. The data was acquired by Quantec Geoscience. This is a zipped file containing .edi raw MT data files.

  19. Assessing Summer and Fall Chinook Salmon Restoration in the Upper Clearwater River and Principal Tributaries, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnsberg, Billy D.; Statler, David P.

    1995-08-01

    This is the first annual report of a five year study to assess summer and fall chinook salmon restoration potential in the upper Clearwater River and principal tributaries, Salmon, Grande Ronde, and Imnaha Rivers. During 1994, the authors focused primarily on assessing water temperatures and spawning habitat in the upper Clearwater River and principal tributaries. Water temperature analysis indicated a colder temperature regime in the upper Clearwater River above the North Fork Clearwater River confluence during the winter as compared to the lower Clearwater. This was due to warm water releases from Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork moderating temperatures in the lower Clearwater River. Thermal temperature unit analysis and available literature suggest a 75% survival threshold level may be anticipated for chinook salmon egg incubation if spawning would occur by November 1 in the upper Clearwater River. Warm water upwelling in historic summer and fall chinook spawning areas may result in increased incubation survivals and will be tested in the future. The authors observed a total of 37 fall chinook salmon redds in the Clearwater River subbasin. They observed 30 redds in the mainstem Clearwater below the North Fork Clearwater River confluence and seven redds in the North Fork Clearwater River. No redds were observed in the South Fork Clearwater, Middle Fork Clearwater, or Selway Rivers. They observed one fall chinook salmon redd in the Salmon River. They recovered 10 fall chinook salmon carcasses in the Clearwater River to obtain biological measurements and to document hatchery contribution to spawning. Unseasonably high and cold Dworshak Dam releases coinciding with early juvenile fall chinook salmon rearing in the lower Clearwater River may be influencing selective life history traits including growth, smolt development, outmigration timing, behavior, and could be directly affecting survival. During July 1994, discharges from Dworshak Dam increased from a

  20. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  1. Mathematical model for oil slick transport and mixing in rivers. Special report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, H.T.; Yapa, P.D.; Wang, D.S.; Yang, X.Q.

    1993-08-01

    The growing concern over the impacts of oil spills on aquatic environments has led to the development of many computer models for simulating the transport and spreading of oil slicks in surface waters. Almost all of these models were developed for coastal environments. A few river models exist. These models only considered the movement of surface oil slicks. In this study a two-layer model, ROSS2, is developed for simulating oil spills in rivers. This model considers the oil in the river to consist of a surface slick and suspended oil droplets entrained over the depth of the flow. The oil transformation processes considered in the model include advection, mechanical spreading, turbulent diffusion and mixing, evaporation, dissolution, emulsification, shoreline deposition and sinking. The model can be used for simulating instantaneous or continuous spills either on or under the water surface in rivers with or without an ice cover. The model has been implemented for the Ohio-Monongahela-Allegheny river system and the upper St. Lawrence River. This report describes the model formulation and implementation. A case study is presented along with detailed explanations of the program structure and its input and output. Although it is developed for simulating oil spills, the model can be applied to spills of other hazardous materials. Computer models, Oil spills, Oil slicks, Rivers.

  2. Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

  3. Gas bubble disease in smallmouth bass and northern squawfish from the Snake and Columbia Rivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, J.C.; Becker, C.D.

    1980-11-01

    Supersaturation of the Columbia and Snake River systems was caused by entrainment of air into water spilling over hydroelectric dams. Total gas saturations of 100% or more have occurred during the spring in each river system. External signs of gas bubble diseases were noted in adult Smallmouth bass and northern squawfish collected from the lower Snake and mid-Columbia rivers during 1975-76. Emboli occurred beneath membranes of the opercula body, and fins of 72% of the smallmouth bass and 84% of the northern squawfish. Hemorrhage was also noted on the caudal, anal, and pectoral fins of several fish.

  4. Office of River Protection Looks Back on 2014 Achievements, Including Tank

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Retrieval Progress | Department of Energy Office of River Protection Looks Back on 2014 Achievements, Including Tank Retrieval Progress Office of River Protection Looks Back on 2014 Achievements, Including Tank Retrieval Progress December 23, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Since its construction in the mid-1970s, the 242-A Evaporator has removed nearly 68 million gallons of water from tank waste, which reduces the volume stored in the double-shell tanks to make room for waste retrieval from

  5. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  6. DOE to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site to September 2016 | Department of Energy to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River Site to September 2016 DOE to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River Site to September 2016 September 6, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Aiken, SC -- The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Operations Office today exercised its option to extend the current Savannah River Site Management and

  7. 2004 Savannah River Cooling Tower Collection (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Alfred; Parker, Matthew J.; Villa-Aleman, E.

    2005-05-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collected ground truth in and around the Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area cooling tower during the spring and summer of 2004. The ground truth data consisted of air temperatures and humidity inside and around the cooling tower, wind speed and direction, cooling water temperatures entering; inside adn leaving the cooling tower, cooling tower fan exhaust velocities and thermal images taken from helicopters. The F-Area cooling tower had six cells, some of which were operated with fans off during long periods of the collection. The operating status (fan on or off) for each of the six cells was derived from operations logbooks and added to the collection database. SRNL collected the F-Area cooling tower data to produce a database suitable for validation of a cooling tower model used by one of SRNL's customer agencies. SRNL considers the data to be accurate enough for use in a model validation effort. Also, the thermal images of the cooling tower decks and throats combined with the temperature measurements inside the tower provide valuable information about the appearance of cooling towers as a function of fan operating status and time of day.

  8. Snake River Plain FORGE Site Characterization Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Robert Podgorney

    2016-04-18

    The site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. This collection includes data on seismic events, groundwater, geomechanical models, gravity surveys, magnetics, resistivity, magnetotellurics (MT), rock physics, stress, the geologic setting, and supporting documentation, including several papers. Also included are 3D models (Petrel and Jewelsuite) of the proposed site. Data for wells INEL-1, WO-2, and USGS-142 have been included as links to separate data collections. These data have been assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Other contributors include the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CEAS), the University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, University of Wyoming, University of Oklahoma, Energy and Geoscience Institute-University of Utah, US Geothermal, Baker Hughes Campbell Scientific Inc., Chena Power, US Geological Survey (USGS), Idaho Department of Water Resources, Idaho Geological Survey, and Mink GeoHydro.

  9. BLM Humboldt River Field Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Field Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: BLM Humboldt River Field Office Abbreviation: Humboldt River Address: 5100 E. Winnemucca Blvd. Place: Winnemucca, Nevada Zip:...

  10. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Savannah River Remediation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    River Remediation, Llc, Liquid Waste Contract, Savannah River Site - November 2014 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Savannah River Remediation, Llc, Liquid Waste ...

  11. Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Full Document and Summary ...

  12. Savannah River Site - L-Area Southern Groundwater | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    L-Area Southern Groundwater Savannah River Site - L-Area Southern Groundwater January 1, ... InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River ...

  13. Savannah River Site - R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit ... InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River ...

  14. PP-366 Twin Rivers Paper Company, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Twin Rivers Paper Company, Inc. PP-366 Twin Rivers Paper Company, Inc. Presidential Permit authorizing Twin Rivers Paper Company, Inc. to construct, operate, and maintain ...

  15. Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery The Flambeau River biorefinery will be added to an existing pulp and ...

  16. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Office of River Protection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of River Protection - May 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Office of River Protection - May 2013 May 2013 Operational Awareness Visit at the Office of River...

  17. EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing ...

  18. EA-273 Rainy River Energy Corporation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rainy River Energy Corporation EA-273 Rainy River Energy Corporation Order authorizing Rainy River Energy Corporation to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-273 Rainy ...

  19. Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976) Reflection Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

  20. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Redirected from Savannah River National Laboratory) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Savannah River National Laboratory Name: Savannah River National Laboratory Place: Aiken,...

  1. Tulane/Xavier University hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Brief summaries of individual investigators participating in the Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Ecosystems are provided.

  2. Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River Basins ... Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: National Energy Technology Laboratory, ...

  3. Modeling the effects of river flow on population dynamics of piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) and least terns (Sternula antillarum) nesting on the Missouri River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buenau, Kate E.; Hiller, Tim L.; Tyre, Andrew J.

    2014-10-01

    (Anteau et al., 2012). The amount of ESH available for nesting in a given year is strongly affected by the amount of water entering the Missouri River system through precipitation and the management of water flow from six reservoirs operated by the USACE on the mainstem Missouri River. Prior to the construction of dams, the Missouri River experienced bimodal peak flows in spring and early summer in concordance with the melting of plains and mountain snowpack (Galat and Lipkin, 2000). Flows decreased during summer months, with river stage then dependent upon rainfall. The combination of consistent high flows and occasional extreme high flows, together with the meandering characteristic of the river, regularly reshaped and scoured vegetation from ESH.

  4. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki; Rogers, Rox

    2003-10-01

    The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a

  5. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-10

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  6. AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

    2011-01-14

    Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

  7. Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    tuff lens deep in the 1912 ash-flow sheet of the upper River Lethe area. Bicarbonate-sulfate waters resulting from interaction of near-surface waters and the cooling 1953-1968...

  8. Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  9. Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from the raft river geothermal area and environs, Cassia County, Idaho, Box Elder county, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  10. Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Corp. v. Oil and Gas Board of Mississippi: the demise of state ratable-take requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankenburg, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    Natural gas was not widely used until the 1930s when the development of seamless pipe enabled gas to be delivered at high compression to markets far from the wellhead. Now the availability and relatively low cost of natural gas have resulted in its widespread use in both home heating and industry. Regulation of this important fuel is consequently a hotly debated issue. The scope and fundamental purpose of the Natural Gas and Policy Act of 1978 (NGPA) was recently the subject of the Supreme Court's opinion in Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Corp v. Oil and Gas Board of Mississippi (Transcontinental). In a five-to-four decision, the Court held that the NGPA pre-empted the enforcement of a state ratable-take requirement. This Note examines Justice Blackmun's majority opinion and the persuasive dissent presented by Justice Rehnquist in the court's decision. The effects of the decision, the Court's first interpretation of NPGA, will undoubtedly be quite significant.

  11. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  12. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risher Pond and Expansion This Set-Aside was selected for the habitat reserve program in the 1960s to represent an abandoned farm pond community. It also historically was considered to be a water source for fire control on the Site. As a research Set-Aside, it represents a permanent aquatic habitat that traditionally has been a source of study organisms for various research projects. This farm pond supports a moderate population of aquatic and semi-aquatic turtles, including yellow-bellied

  13. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Craig's Pond and Sarracenia Bay Sarracenia Bay (upper left) and Craig's Pond The 142.9-acre (57.84 ha) Craig’s Pond and Sarracenia Bay Set-Aside contains the paired Craig’s Pond and Sarracenia Bay which are semi-permanent, open-water, aquatic/herbaceous Carolina bays. A partial 200 m buffer area comprised of natural and recently planted plantation pines, mixed pine/hardwoods, and sandhill scrub oak/pine communities surrounds these bays. Craig’s Pond is one of the largest true bays on the SRS,

  14. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thunder Bay This 82.2-acre (33.3 ha) Set-Aside is comprised of the semi-permanent, open-water, herbaceous Carolina bay Thunder Bay and a partial 200-m buffer area containing different species and ages of plantation pines. Within the buffer area are small inclusions of mixed pine/hardwood and bottomland hardwood communities. Thunder Bay is an isolated, intact Carolina bay which supports aquatic and herbaceous vegetation due to its extended hydroperiod. It is more semi-permanent than temporary and

  15. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dry Bay The 91.4-acre (37 ha) Dry Bay Set-Aside is comprised of the largely open-water Dry Bay and a partial 200-m buffer area of both relatively undisturbed and recently reforested pine plantations. Also within the buffer area are small inclusions of upland and bottomland hardwood communities. The Dry Bay Set-Aside represents a semi-permanent, herbaceous bay wetland with an extended hydroperiod. It is recognized by research ecologists at SREL as an important refuge for many aquatic and

  16. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mona Bay and Woodward Bay Woodward (on left) and Mona The 156.7-acre (63.4 ha) Mona Bay/Woodward Bay Set-Aside is an isolated assemblage of three Carolina bays (temporary ponds), surrounded primarily by a buffer area of recently established and maturing pine plantations. The paired Mona and Woodward Bays are relatively intact bays with shallow water depths, dominated by open herbaceous vegetation. Mona Bay is 27.9 acres (11.3 ha) in size and rivals Ellenton Bay (Area #1) as the second largest

  17. Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory- June 7, 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to Radioactive Material Control Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site

  18. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1988) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1988) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  19. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  20. Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...