National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for water management plan

  1. Best Management Practice #1: Water Management Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A successful water management program starts with developing a comprehensive water management plan. This plan should be included within existing facility operating plans.

  2. Ground water protection management program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

  3. Water resource management planning guide for Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, J.E.; Stephenson, D.E.; Steele, J.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.); Gordon, D.E. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant)

    1988-10-01

    The Water Resource Management Planning Guide provides an outline for the development of a Savannah River Plant Water Resource Management Plan (WRMP) to protect, manage, and monitor the site's water resources. The management plan is based on three principle elements: (1) protection of the water quality, (2) management of the water quantity, and (3) monitoring of the water quality and quantity. The plan will assure that changes in water quality and quantity are identified and that corrective action is implemented as needed. In addition, water management activities within and between Savannah River Plant (SRP) organizations and departments will be coordinated to ensure the proper management of water resources. This document is intended as a guide to suggest goals and objectives that will provide a basis for the development of a water resource plan for SRP. Planning should be flexible rather than rigid, and the plan outlines in this document was prepared to be modified or updated as conditions necessitate. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Water Resource Planning and Management using Motivated Machine JANUSZ STARZYK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starzyk, Janusz A.

    1 Water Resource Planning and Management using Motivated Machine Learning JANUSZ STARZYK School@ohio.edu Abstract Water resources planning and management require problem resolution and optimized use of resources. Since many objectives in water management are conflicting, it is hard to devise one optimum strategy

  5. Planning for the Future: Climate Adaptation in Hazard Mitigation Plans and Comprehensive Water Resource Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Gregory

    This project investigated whether hazard mitigation plans (HMPs) and comprehensive water resource management plans (CWRMPs) completed by cities and towns in Massachusetts account for the long term effects of climate change. ...

  6. Holistic Approach for Water Management Planning of Nong Chok District in Bangkok, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suksawang, Wilasinee

    2012-01-01

    Holistic Approach for Water Management Planning of Nong ChokSuksawang Holistic Approach for Water Management Planning ofas a metaphor to promote water detention systems for solving

  7. Water Resource Infrastructure in New York: Assessment, Management, & Planning Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Water Resource Infrastructure in New York: Assessment, Management, & Planning & Srinagesh Gavirneni NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE Resource Infrastructure in New York: Assessment, Management, & Planning ­ Year 3

  8. Analysis of City of Davis 2010 Urban Water Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Analysis of City of Davis 2010 Urban Water Management Plan Jessica Collado, Junyan Li, Vicki Lin Abstract With a growing population, the water demand in the city of Davis will increase, further depleting its aquifer. In order to prevent groundwater overdrafting, which can lead to degrading water quality

  9. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids in the Deschutes River. The Management Plan consists of five elements described in the Council's program: 1

  10. Soil Management Plan For The Potable Water System Upgrades Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, S. M.

    2007-04-01

    This plan describes and applies to the handling and management of soils excavated in support of the Y-12 Potable Water Systems Upgrades (PWSU) Project. The plan is specific to the PWSU Project and is intended as a working document that provides guidance consistent with the 'Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex' (Y/SUB/92-28B99923C-Y05) and the 'Record of Decision for Phase II Interim Remedial Actions for Contaminated Soils and Scrapyard in Upper East Fork Popular Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2229&D2). The purpose of this plan is to prevent and/or limit the spread of contamination when moving soil within the Y-12 complex. The major feature of the soil management plan is the decision tree. The intent of the decision tree is to provide step-by-step guidance for the handling and management of soil from excavation of soil through final disposition. The decision tree provides a framework of decisions and actions to facilitate Y-12 or subcontractor decisions on the reuse of excavated soil on site and whether excavated soil can be reused on site or managed as waste. Soil characterization results from soil sampling in support of the project are also presented.

  11. Sustainability Index for Water Resources Planning and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    demonstrating the use of the index. Tailor-made sustainability indexes are defined for water users in Mexico, environmental and hydrological integrity." Although this concept is still valid, water management policies of systems to actual or expected future changes. Vulnerability is the magnitude of an adverse impact

  12. An analysis of stakeholder perspectives on Texas Regional Water Planning and Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Kimberley A

    2000-01-01

    management strategies and planning considerations. The purpose is to identify points of consensus and points of divergence in order to develop a water plan for Texas that is fair and equitable. When a conflict is interest-based, as it is in the case of water...

  13. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

  14. INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    IN THE WASHINGTON, D.C. REGION UNDER THE FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT AMENDMENTS OF 1972 By Harvey Lieber as a follow-up to my book, Federalism and Clean Waters: The 1972Water Pollution Control Act, which had Institutional Arrangements 34 2. Sewage Treatment Capacity 37 3. Residuals 58 4. Water Supply 70 4. The Actors

  15. Palouse Subbasin Management Plan 3. Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palouse Subbasin Management Plan 3. Management Plan FINAL DRAFT ~ May 2004 Project Lead: Palouse-Rock Lake Conservation District Trevor Cook, Project Manager PO Box 438 St. John WA 99171 (509) 648;Palouse Subbasin Plan: MANAGEMENT PLAN Management Plan: Page 3 - 1 3. Management Plan 3.1 Background

  16. Technical assistance contractor management plan: Surface and ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report presents the general management structure of the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This team is a partnership of four major private subcontractors, which teamed together, are striving to be the leader in environmental restoration of uranium mining and milling operations. It will provide a pool of experts in various aspects of the technologies necessary to accomplish this goal, available to DOE to deal with mission concerns. The report expands on goals from TAC`s mission statement, which include management concerns, environment, safety, and health, quality, technical support, communications, and personnel.

  17. Privacy Management Plan 1 Privacy Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Privacy Management Plan 1 Privacy Management Plan Abstract The Privacy Management Plan outlines how Impact Assessment Tool (.docm) (staff only) Records Management Vice-Chancellor's Directive Handling Management Plan 2 Legislation Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (NSW) (PPIPIA) Health

  18. 320 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2000 SEASONAL RISK ANALYSIS FOR FLOODPLAINS IN THE DELAWARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    320 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2000 SEASONAL RISK ANALYSIS FOR FLOODPLAINS IN THE DELAWARE RIVER BASIN By Kirk Weiler,1 M. Todd Walter,2 Michael F. Walter,3

  19. A modeling approach to evaluate the impacts of water quality management plans implemented in a watershed in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of polluted water bodies, the United States * Corresponding author. Tel.: C1 2547746000; fax: C1 2547746001. E water quality standards, allocates pollution control responsibilities among pollution sourcesA modeling approach to evaluate the impacts of water quality management plans implemented

  20. DRAFT Fifteenmile Management Plan 5. Fifteenmile Subbasin Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT Fifteenmile Management Plan 5. Fifteenmile Subbasin Management Plan DRAFT May 25 2004 Group 5. FIFTEENMILE SUBBASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN Management Plans

  1. Digital Data Management Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Digital Data Management Plans Digital Data Management Plans Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental understanding of...

  2. Environmental Management System Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    OIA/OCA/assurance-sys/IA/index.html Management Program, R-3 • Environmental Management System Plan References 30.targets, and Environmental Management Programs 6. Structure

  3. 6 Management Plan Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    147 6 Management Plan Introduction The management plan integrates the vision for the White Salmon for restoration of fish and wildlife habitat and populations which form the bulk of the management plan is derived from that input. The scope of the management plan is somewhat narrower than the scope of the assessment

  4. PLAN 597: Planning for Water Resource Management Dr. Jordi Honey-Roses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    houses lecture rooms, offices and research laboratories. In 2011, as part of the UBC Renew project, and animal life support - New fume hoods, lab furniture and storage facilities - New building HVAC system in this analysis is extracted from the Ion meter software. The values used is the daily recorded water usage

  5. 8 Management Plan Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    312 8 Management Plan Introduction The management plan integrates the vision for the Lower Mid and populations which form the bulk of the management plan is derived from that input. The scope of the management and inventory are designed and may be used to guide restoration and management actions by many parties under

  6. In Press Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management -2009 INTEGRATED OPTIMIZATION OF A DUAL QUALITY WATER AND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    OF A DUAL QUALITY WATER AND1 WASTEWATER SYSTEM: A CASE STUDY OF GREATER BEIRUT, LEBANON2 3 Patrick A. Ray1 Greater Beirut25 2. Total unit costs to supply, reuse, and dispose of water in Greater Beirut, year 200026, disposal and reuse.39 Innovative water management strategies in general, and opportunities for water reuse

  7. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    LBNL/PUB-5352, Revision 6 Waste Management QualityAssurance Plan Waste Management Group Environment, HealthRev. 6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

  8. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  9. Environmental Management System Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

    2009-03-24

    Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

  10. Integrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    % Agriculture 77% #12;Urban Water UsesUrban Water Uses #12;IrrigationIrrigation Control Benefits #12;IrrigationIntegrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems Integrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems Wilkinson, Ph.D. Director, Water Policy Program Bren School of Environmental Science and Management

  11. Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 125, No. 3, pp. 143-153, May/June 1999 Some Derived Operating Rules for Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    1 Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 125, No. 3, pp. 143-153, May/June 1999 for reservoirs in series and in parallel for water supply, flood control, hydropower, water quality-term operation for hydropower production and energy storage. For reservoirs in parallel, additional new special

  12. WATER EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT (WEMP) Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (WEMP) ­ Annual Report Water Efficiency Management Plan (WEMP) By-Laws 2007). Hardcopy or email submission to be forwarded to: Water Efficiency Branch Water Corporation PO Box 100 Leederville 6007 water.efficiency@watercorporation.com.au MURDOCH UNIVERSITY at SOUTH

  13. Enabling better water management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    CASE STUDY Enabling better water management Seasonal Streamflow Forecast Service influencing water decisions Water management decisions made with confidence Using the Bureau's streamflow forecasting, ACTEW Water confidently removed temporary water restrictions after the millennium drought. Millennium drought

  14. WATER QUALITY PLAN MONITORING DATA REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;WATER QUALITY PLAN MONITORING DATA REPORT January to March 1993 TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES FREMP WQWM 93-02 DOE FR4P 1993-31 Prepared for FREMP Water QualityAVaste Management Committee by Don Morse PACIFIC REGION #12;Canadian Cataloging in Publication Data Main entry under title Water quality plan

  15. TWRS safety management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popielarczyk, R.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Management Program Plan for development, implementation and maintenance of the tank farm authorization basis is described. The plan includes activities and procedures for: (a) Updating the current Interim Safety Basis, (b) Development,implementation and maintenance of a Basis for Interim Operations, (c) Development, implementation and maintenance of the Final Safety Analyses Report, (d) Development and implementation of a TWRS information Management System for monitoring the authorization basis.

  16. Holistic Approach for Water Management Planning of Nong Chok District in Bangkok, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suksawang, Wilasinee

    2012-01-01

    Nong Chok Halal Market Planning and Design Project byNong Chok Halal Market Planning and Design Project. Bangkok:Nong Chok Halal Market Planning and Design Project by

  17. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  18. James Madison University Flood Water Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    James Madison University Flood Water Plan JMU Office of Risk Management: 9/30/2010 JAMES MADISON of Risk Management: 9/30/2010 Flooding - Dealing with flooding on JMU's Campus The University Police UNIVERSITY FLOOD EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN http://www.jmu.edu/safetyplan/flood/ Should faculty, staff, students

  19. Planning Water Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2008-01-01

    the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

  20. Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Global Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Team's Water Safety Plan Assistance 1.5 million deaths occur globally every year due to a lack of clean water, inadequate sanitation, and improper hygiene (1

  1. Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan describes the Department of Energy`s response to the vulnerabilities identified in the Plutonium Working Group Report which are a result of the cessation of nuclear weapons production. The responses contained in this document are only part of an overall, coordinated approach designed to enable the Department to accelerate conversion of all nuclear materials, including plutonium, to forms suitable for safe, interim storage. The overall actions being taken are discussed in detail in the Department`s Implementation Plan in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This is included as Attachment B.

  2. Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasekh, Amin

    2012-10-19

    of terrorism, several aspects of emergency management for WDSs remain at an undeveloped stage. A set of methods is developed to analyze the risk and consequences of WDS contamination events and develop emergency response support tools. Monte Carlo...

  3. Water management in hydraulic fracturing-a planning and decision optimization platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Neha, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing technology have enabled cost-effective production of unconventional resources, particularly shale gas in the U.S. The process of hydraulic fracturing is water intensive, requiring ...

  4. Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Management and Conservation Plan December 2005 #12;Texas Transportation Institute December 2005 Energy Management and Conservation Plan Page 2 of 24 Table of Contents Section One: Executive: Reporting Progress #12;Texas Transportation Institute December 2005 Energy Management and Conservation Plan

  5. Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    Quick guide to increasing Federal office building water efficiency, water management planning, performing a water audit, calculating a water balance, and best management practices.

  6. Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Daniel Arthur

    2012-03-31

    The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (â??target areaâ?ť), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a project or an area as one entity to optimize water use and minimize costs subject to regulatory and other constraints. It will facilitate analysis of options and tradeoffs, and will also simplify permitting and reporting to regulatory agencies. The system will help regulators study cumulative impacts of development, conserve water resources, and manage disposal options across a region. It will also allow them to track permits and monitor compliance. The public will benefit from water conservation, improved environmental performance as better system wide decisions are made, and greater supply of natural gas, with attendant lower prices, as costs are reduced and development is assisted through better planning and scheduling. Altogether, better economics and fewer barriers will facilitate recovery of the more than 300 trillion cubic feet of estimated recoverable natural gas resource in the Marcellus Shale in a manner that protects the environment.

  7. Lawn Water Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, James

    2006-06-26

    Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties...

  8. Water for Texas 2012: What is the plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    ?s Executive Summary. ?is plan is based on the ?drought of record,? which occurred in the ????s. Planning starts at the regional level with ?? regional water planning groups identifying water needs and recommending water management strategies... needs are projected to increase by ??? percent between ???? and ???? to ?.? million acre-feet per year. What can we do to get more water? ?e strategies recommended by regional water planning groups would provide, if implemented, ?.? million acre...

  9. Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604, 42 USC 7901 (hereinafter referred to as the Act''). Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial actions at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing sites. The Act, amended in January 1983, by Public Law 97-415, also authorizes DOE to perform remedial actions at vicinity properties in Edgemont, South Dakota. Cleanup of the Edgemont processing site is the responsibility of the Tennessee Valley Authority. This document describes the plan, organization, system, and methodologies used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated vicinity properties in accordance with the Act. The plan describes the objectives of the UMTRA Project, defines participants' roles and responsibilities, outlines the technical approach for accomplishing the objectives, and describes the planning and managerial controls to be used in integrating and performing the Project mission. 21 figs., 21 tabs.

  10. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  11. REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 3.1 INTRODUCTION Water supply planning on a regional scale

  12. Project Management Plan Chinese Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igusa, Kiyoshi

    impact of this project? · Data management: How do we collect, preserve and sort all of the files? Which special equipment, facilities needed or wanted? According to http://project-management-knowledge.com/ weProject Management Plan Chinese Food According to NSF, the basic elements of a project management

  13. Environmental Management System Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    430.2B mandates an energy management program that considersSTAR® or Federal Energy Management Programs, and USDA-Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management (

  14. Environmental Management System Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Management Program, R-3 • Environmental Management SystemEnvironmental policy 3. Environmental aspects 4. Legal andObjectives, targets, and Environmental Management Programs

  15. Strategic Plan Information Resources Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Resources Management Organizations, Policies, and Practices 12 Priorities 12 Planning 12 Quality AssuranceStrategic Plan for Information Resources Management For the Fiscal Years 2003-2007 Period by Texas Operations 14 Standards 15 Organization 15 Computer Networks 15 2 #12;Introduction & Summary Committed

  16. Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;© Crown resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission Practice Guide Forestry Commission, Edinburgh

  17. Environmental Management System Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    and locations chemicals are used as well as information about emergency plans and procedures. The current Hazardous

  18. Economic and Hydrologic Implications of Proposed Edwards Aquifer Management Plans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Carl R.; Jones, Lonnie L.; Williams, R. Lynn; Jordan, Wayne R.; McCarl, Bruce A.

    1993-01-01

    , according to Texas water law, ground water is a property right vested with the land owner. Throughout at least the past two decades, attempts to negotiate voluntary management plans to restrict pumpage have been unsuccessful, even though demand is projected...

  19. LFRG Program Management Plan (LFRG PMP)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PLAN SEPTEMBER 18, 2000 LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PLAN Jay...

  20. 8 Management Plan 8.1.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    145 8 Management Plan 8.1.1 Introduction The information below will be used by subbasin planners that will aid in the recovery of focal species. The management plan is made up of five components: the vision management and use of natural resources including reliable water supplies, fish and wildlife populations

  1. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  2. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

    1996-01-01

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  3. AVLIS production plant waste management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    Following the executive summary, this document contains the following: (1) waste management facilities design objectives; (2) AVLIS production plant wastes; (3) waste management design criteria; (4) waste management plan description; and (5) waste management plan implementation. 17 figures, 18 tables.

  4. Water & Energy Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Poornima Group of Colleges, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India #12;Executive Summary This document for Poornima Group's conservation efforts over the next eight years. PGC currently maintains an unsustainable method of water use Environmental Crisis Poornima Group of Colleges Water

  5. Waste shipment engineering data management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    This plan documents current data management practices and future data management improvements for TWRS Waste Shipment Engineering.

  6. Material Stabilization Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPEER, D.R.

    1999-09-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Materials Stabilization project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This is the top-level definitive project management document that specifies the technical (work scope), schedule, and cost baselines to manager the execution of this project. It describes the organizational approach and roles/responsibilities to be implemented to execute the project. This plan is under configuration management and any deviations must be authorized by appropriate change control action. Materials stabilization is designated the responsibility to open and stabilize containers of plutonium metal, oxides, alloys, compounds, and sources. Each of these items is at least 30 weight percent plutonium/uranium. The output of this project will be containers of materials in a safe and stable form suitable for storage pending final packaging and/or transportation offsite. The corrosion products along with oxides and compounds will be stabilized via muffle furnaces to reduce the materials to high fired oxides.

  7. PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that this model will not fully address all energy-water nexus issues. For example, engineering design of the water supply for specific future power plants will require more...

  8. Underground storage tank management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

  9. The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    III I II QUALITY ASSURANCE IMPLEMENTING MANAGEMENT PLAN I III SECTION 1 - MANAGEMENT Criterion 1 - Program II II WM-AND SAFETY DIVISION Waste Management Quality Assurance

  10. WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

  11. Evolution and Evaluation of the Active Management Area Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    of the Fourth Management Plans. This evaluation provides a foundation for change in the approach and contentEvolution and Evaluation of the Active Management Area Management Plans FINAL January 2008 Sharon B and Evaluation of the Active Management Area Management Plans Table of Contents Executive Summary i Introduction

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

  13. A reservoir management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allis, R.G.

    1989-06-16

    There are numerous documented cases of extraction of fluids from the ground causing surface subsidence. The cases include groundwater, oil and gas, as well as geothermal fluid withdrawal. A recent comprehensive review of all types of man-induced land subsidence was published by the Geological Survey of America. At the early stages of a geothermal power development project it is standard practice in most countries for an environmental impact report to be required. The possibility of geothermal subsidence has to be addressed, and usually it falls on the geophysicists and/or geologists to make some predictions. The advice given is vital for planning the power plant location and the borefield pipe and drain layout. It is not so much the vertical settlement that occurs with subsidence but the accompanying horizontal ground strains that can do the most damage to any man-made structure.

  14. Carbon Management Plan 1. Executive summary 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Carbon Management Plan June 2011 #12;2 #12;3 CONTENTS 1. Executive summary 5 2. Introduction 15 3. Background and context 16 4. Carbon management strategy 18 5. Carbon emissions baseline and projections 22 6. Past actions and achievements 30 7. Carbon Management Plan implementation 33 8. Carbon Management Plan

  15. Energy Emergency Planning and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-07-08

    To establish the administrative and operational framework of the Energy Emergency Management System (EEMS), and to establish the general criteria for the development and coordination of the Department's energy emergency planning activities. Cancels DOE 5500.8. Canceled by DOE O 151.1 of 9-25-95.

  16. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase I The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to specify U.S. Department of...

  17. Knowledge and plan execution management in planning fire fighting operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández Olivares, Juan

    Knowledge and plan execution management in planning fire fighting operations Marc de la Asunci to assist human experts in the design of forest fire fighting plans. Issues about how to engineer planning knowledge for such a system, how to monitor the execution of fighting plans and how to patch unfeasible

  18. Jefferson Lab Project Management & Integrated Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Manager (757) 269-7511, rode@jlab.org Program Development & Planning The Program Development function of Project Management Office serves three main purposes: 1. Monitor...

  19. Application of Specialized Optimization Techniques in Water Quantity and Quality Management with Respect to Planning for the Trinity River Basi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier Jr., W. L.; Shih, C. S.

    1970-01-01

    One of the major problems in the United States today involves controlling and limiting the pollution of the nation's water resources. The quality of water in streams, reservoirs and estuaries is continually being altered by natural and man...

  20. Identification of Management and Planning Problems of Urban Water Resources in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garner, K.; Shih, C. S.

    1971-01-01

    This interim report describes the research performed to date on Project A-017-TEX sponsored by the U. S. Department of Interior Office of Water Resources Research and the Texas A&M University Texas Water Resources ...

  1. DOE Real Property Asset Management Plan 2005 | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Real Property Asset Management Plan 2005 DOE Real Property Asset Management Plan 2005 RealPropertyAssetManagmentPlanAMPReportAug05.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE...

  2. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan The 2013 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan describes a framework for the effective...

  3. Optimization Online - Operations Risk Management by Planning ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmanuel Fragničre

    2007-08-01

    Aug 1, 2007 ... Operations Risk Management by Planning Optimally the Qualified Workforce Capacity. Emmanuel Fragničre(Emmanuel.Fragniere ***at*** ...

  4. Workforce Management Office WORKFORCE AND SUCCESSION PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 Workforce Management Office NOAA 1/1/2012 WORKFORCE AND SUCCESSION PLANNING Toolkit to Identify and Address Strategic Talent Gaps #12;Workforce & Succession Planning Toolkit NOAA Workforce .......................................................................................................3 Workforce Planning

  5. Mixed-use at the landscape scale : integrating agriculture and water management as a case study for interdisciplinary planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Christopher (Christopher John)

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-use planning is now a standard practice in city design and development. It is believed to support diverse and mutually reinforcing elements within a neighborhood. Agricultural landscapes present an analogous opportunity ...

  6. 7 Management Plan 7.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 Management Plan 7.1 Introduction The information below will be used by subbasin planners that will aid in the recovery of the focal species. The management plan is made up of five components inserted them here also for better clarity. Aquatic and terrestrial portions of the management plan were

  7. Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-26

    The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

  8. University of California, San Diego Water Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    University of California, San Diego Water Action Plan December 20, 2013 #12;i Table of Contents of the Water Action Plan Water Action Plan Committee Regional Scope of the Water Action Plan HISTORICAL PROGRESS IN WATER REDUCTION.......................................................... 5 Campus Irrigation

  9. PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIC PLAN FOR HONEY BEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarpy, David R.

    PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIC PLAN FOR HONEY BEES IN THE MID-ATLANTIC STATES (DE, MD, NC, NJ, PA, SC................................................................35 Honey Bee Pest Management Strategic Plan ­ Mid-Atlantic States 2 #12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. The USDA Office of Pest Management Policy (OPMP) is funding the production of Pest Management Strategic

  10. Enterprise Risk Management Plan December 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Enterprise Risk Management Plan FY 2015 December 2014 #12;2 Enterprise Risk Management Plan, FY 2015 Introduction Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI/or the continuing operation of the Institute's research program. TTI is committed to the management of risk in order

  11. University of Aberdeen Carbon Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    of Aberdeen is committed to reducing its carbon footprint and to playing its part in limiting the worstUniversity of Aberdeen Carbon Management Plan Higher Education Carbon Management Programme working with Page 1 The University of Aberdeen Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan (CMP

  12. Overview of the Hanford risk management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, T.G.

    1998-03-26

    The Project Hanford Management Contract called for the enhancement of site-wide decision processes, and development of a Hanford Risk Management Plan to adopt or develop a risk management system for the Hanford Site. This Plan provides a consistent foundation for Site issues and addresses site-wide management of risks of all types. It supports the Department of Energy planning and sitewide decision making policy. Added to this requirement is a risk performance report to characterize the risk management accomplishments. This paper presents the development of risk management within the context of work planning and performance. Also discussed are four risk elements which add value to the context.

  13. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    management assessments. Management assessment results mustbe documented. WMG management must take prompt action tolegal advice to Laboratory management, periodically conducts

  14. Employee Based Energy Management Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osho, O.; Lee, J.; McInerny, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Management Plan OLUSEUN OSHO, JIM LEE, SALLY MCINERNY, AND ZAHRA SARDOUEINASAB MECHANICAL ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA AT LAFAYETTE IETC CONFERENCE JUNE 2015 ESL-IE-15-06-29 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New... Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 LOUISIANA SMART AND SECURE ENERGY LABORATORY (LASSEL) Replacement to Louisiana Industrial Assessment (LIAC): ? LIAC at UL Lafayette from 1999-2012, funded by the DOE ? Last year of operation saved companies $12.8 million over a...

  15. Water Action Plan 2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UC Irvine Water Action Plan 2013 #12;2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE #12;WATER ACTION PLAN TABLE...........................................11 WATER USE.......................................................................13 MAIN..........................................14 RECYCLED WATER...........................................................14 STORMWATER

  16. A Risk Management Plan for Katharine Brumbaugh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    A Risk Management Plan for CubeSats Katharine Brumbaugh Ph.D. Student, Aerospace Engineering Review in Jan. 2013 · Selected for ELaNa in Spring 2012 (to be manifested) · Risk Management never truly Steps of a Detailed Risk Management Plan Main Step Sub-steps A. Identify Risks 1. Start with the mission

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  18. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.W. [ed.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan describes the new nuclear facility regulatory requirements basis for the Spemt Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and establishes the plan to achieve compliance with this basis at the new SNF Project facilities.

  20. Jefferson Lab Project Management & Integrated Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear physics research. Our focus is to provide project management and integrated planning support across the Lab that is aligned with Lab goals, objectives and guidance....

  1. LPP Risk Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LPP Risk Management Plan More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2006 Independent Oversight Review, Oak Ridge...

  2. Vice President, Planning and Asset Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    THIS VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT HAS BEEN MODIFIED TO EXTEND THE CLOSING DATE TO 7/10/2015. Planning and Asset Management is responsible for overseeing Bonneville Power Administration's transmission...

  3. Recent California water transfers: Emerging options in water management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, J.R.; Israel, M.

    1992-12-01

    Report examines the recent use of water transfers in California. Emphasis is on the use of water transfers during the current drought and how planners and operators of federal, state, and local systems can integrate water transfers into the planning and operations of their systems. Through the California experience, the study identifies motivations for incorporating water transfers into water supply systems, reviews a variety of water transfer types, and discusses the integration of water transfers with traditional supply argumentation and water conservation measures. Limitations, constraints, and difficulties for employing water transfers within existing systems are also discussed. The study focuses primarily on the technical, planning, and operational aspects of water transfers, rather than the legal, economic, and social implications. Water transfers, Water management, Water bank, Water supply, Water use, Water institutions, Infrastructure, California state water project, Water rights, Drought, Surface water, Groundwater.

  4. 2011-2015 Human Capital Management Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Legacy Management (LM) needs skilled and engaged staff to accomplish our mission and carry out our responsibilities to the American people. This Human Capital Management Plan (HCMP or...

  5. SUSTAINABLE URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    consumption Vehicle production 0.77 0.59 0.79 0.32 4.35 0.44 12.25 2.45 3.85 0.97 (Source: Harto, C; et al% Mining; 1% Decentralized Water Production (LID) Decentralized Energy Production Urban Farming #12;Water Footprint of Agricultural Products #12;`Water for Energy' and `Energy for Water' in US Water for Energy

  6. Water Management Best Practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, W.

    2011-01-01

    Municipal Manufacturing Mining Steam Electric Agriculture New Codes & Standards Green Certification& Labeling Programs ? Green Restaurants, Hotels, etc. ? Green Guide for Health Care ? LEED ? GBI ? EPA Water Sense ? EPA Energy Star US Green... of Assistance ? Texas Water Development Board ? www.twdb.state.tx.us ? California Urban Water Conservation Council ? www.cuwcc.org ? Alliance for Water Efficiency www.allianceforwaterefficiency.org ? EPA Water Sense and Energy Star Programs ? www...

  7. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    Waste Management group organization chart. Revised to updatecurrent practices. New organization chart, roles, andManagement Group organization chart. EH&S Waste Management

  8. Regional water planning Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    LOCATE: - Villages - Peri-urban area - Farmland - Roads - Stream - Small dam (KT bandhara) - Waste water for irrigation Percolation Fresh water supply Domestic and industrial use Waste water treatment Waste water Discharge waste water recycle Treat and discharge untreated Run-off #12;Urban water cycle DRINKING WATER

  9. All Over the Map: The Diversity of Western Water Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casado-Pérez, Vanessa; Cain, Bruce E.; Hui, Iris; Abbott, Coral; Doson, Kaley; Lebow, Shane

    2015-01-01

    local jurisdictions, effective water planning and managementfragmentation. State water plans are the main focus of thisStates have power over water rights (i.e. , the quantitative

  10. SMART WATER GRID PLAN B TECHNICAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    SMART WATER GRID PLAN B TECHNICAL REPORT FALL 2014 PREPARED BY: OLGA MARTYUSHEVA IN PARTIAL of water resources is currently under stress due to climatic changes, and continuous increase in water demand linked to the global population increase. A Smart Water Grid (SWG) is a two-way real time network

  11. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;' Our Mission The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse aims to advance the science and technology of sustainable water management through fundamental and applied research. Our Vision To be Australia's leading research centre for water reuse

  12. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    patterns, and implications." Water Policy 2 (3):175-99.A. K. 2004. "Integrated water resources management: areassessment." Water International 29 (2):248-56. Blomquist,

  13. Technical Assistance Contractor management plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project comprises Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (JEG) as the prime contractor and three teaming partner subcontractors: Roy F. Weston, Inc. (RFW), AGRA Earth and Environmental, Inc. (AGRA), and Geraghty and Miller, Inc. (G and M). The TAC contract`s scope is to provide technical, analytical, environmental, engineering, design, inspection, and management support services to the US Department of Energy (DOE) for both Surface and Ground Water Projects. The TAC team supports the DOE in completing surface remedial action and initiating ground water remediation work for start-up, characterization, compliance planning, design, construction oversight, and remedial operations. The TAC provides the DOE UMTRA Project Team with a dedicated management, scientific, and technical resource base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, which is supplemented by corporate resources. A carefully developed and maintained staff of technical experts is available to assess, analyze, develop, and execute cost-effective solutions to the demanding technical and institutional problems presented by the UMTRA Project.

  14. Office of Legacy Management's Strategic Plan 2016-2025 | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Legacy Management's Strategic Plan 2016-2025 Office of Legacy Management's Strategic Plan 2016-2025 Office of Legacy Management's Strategic Plan 2016-2025 More Documents...

  15. DOE/ME-0060, Real Property Asset Management Plan | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOEME-0060, Real Property Asset Management Plan DOEME-0060, Real Property Asset Management Plan DOE-ME-0060RealPropertyAssetManagementPlan2005-08.pdf More Documents &...

  16. CH 5 MANAGEMENT PLAN.DOC 5-1 5 Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CH 5 MANAGEMENT PLAN.DOC 5-1 5 Management Plan 5.1 Vision The Willamette Subbasin Plan Oversight. The ecosystem processes that have undergone the most disruptive change are flow, channel form, and connectivity. Disruptions in these processes, in turn, have created a host of negative habitat changes, including

  17. IDAHO WATER USER RECOMMENDATIONS MAINSTEM PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IDAHO WATER USER RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE MAINSTEM PLAN COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM SUBMITTED ON BEHALF OF THE COMMITTEE OF NINE AND THE IDAHO WATER USERS ASSOCIATION JUNE 15, 2001 and Flow Augmentation Policy in the Columbia River Basin #12;1 IDAHO WATER USER RECOMMENDATIONS

  18. Data Management Plan (outline) The Data Management Plan (DMP) for a proposal is a two-page document that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data Management Plan (outline) The Data Management Plan (DMP to the funder's Data Policy and (2) how the investigator plans to manage the data should cover the following topics: 1. Information about the data · Describe

  19. Project Management Plan Project Title: Natural Resources Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DEFINITION. The NRM Gateway is a knowledge management resource, designed to serve the needs of the NRMP; · Preserve institutional knowledge; · Develop practical and agency-approved webpages that provide usefulProject Management Plan Project Title: Natural Resources Management (NRM) Gateway Website

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  1. Real Property Asset Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    coverbooked.indd More Documents & Publications DOEME-0060, Real Property Asset Management Plan DOE Real Property Asset Management Plan 2005 coverbooked.indd...

  2. Research Data Management - Data Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Anna

    2012-01-01

    -Graduate Teaching Materials for Research Data Management Adapted by Anna Collins (2012) from modules created by Lindsay Lloyd-Smith (2011) for post-graduate training in Archaeology It makes use of training materials produced by the UK Data Archive on Managing...

  3. Developing a Corporate Water Management Strategy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutterow, V.

    2015-01-01

    MANAGEMENT STRATEGY Vestal Tutterow Senior Technical Consultant (o) 703.748.7248 Vestal.tutterow@ppc.com June 4, 2015 PPC | Developing a Corporate Water Management Strategy 1 PRESENTATION OUTLINE PPC | Developing a Corporate Water Management Strategy 2...

  4. Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    Establishes program planning and management requirements for the Departments Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program. Cancels: DOE N 473.9 and DOE M 470.1-1

  5. Project Management Plan Examples 1- 80

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The descriptions below should be used to navigate to the subject of...

  6. Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    The manual establishes program planning and management requirements for the Departments Safeguards and Security. Chg 1, dated 3-7-06 Cancels DOE N 473.9, DOE M 470.1-1 Chg 2.

  7. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;2 The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse was established in 2004 as a joint venture between the South Australian Water Corporation and the University of South Australia (UniSA), adding significant expertise to the water research capability in South

  8. Wake Forest University Medical Waste Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Greg

    Wake Forest University Medical Waste Management Plan June 15, 2009 Rev.1 1 Biohazard Waste without a permit from the Solid Waste Section. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulate Bloodborne Pathogens and Exposure Control Plans. Under state regulations a solid waste generator

  9. Design techniques for forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design techniques for forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Design by the Forestry Commission in 1998 as `Forest design planning: a guide to good practice'. This revised second edition published in 2014. ISBN: 978-0-85538-894-2 Forestry Commission (2014). Design techniques

  10. Draft of the PHENIX Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-10

    The PHENIX Management Plan provides the baselines and controls that the PHENIX and RHIC Projects will follow to meet the technical, cost, and schedule goals for the PHENIX detector at RHIC. This plan will be reviewed and updated as required, with revisions made by agreement among the signed participants.

  11. Carbon Management Plan for the Exeter Campuses 2010-2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearhop, Stuart

    .6.6 Building Energy Management System (BEMS) 7.6.7 Carbon Management Plan Ownership, Reporting and Coordination ­ Energy Manager Carbon Management Plan 2010 - 2020 Contents 1 Forewords 1.1 Foreword from the Vice Owner ­ G Whitehouse ­ Energy Manager Carbon Management Plan 2010 - 2020 6.5 Target Chosen 7 Carbon

  12. Developing a Water Management Strategy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities Water Use Reduction Developing a Water Management Strategy Developing a Water Management Strategy Developing a Water Management Strategy The Federal Energy...

  13. ConservationandDemand ManagementPlan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    to monitor system status for leaks and losses, energy management, Preventative Maintenance work and implement energy Conservation and Demand Management (CDM) plans starting in 2014. Requirementsofthe/replacements and minor construction projects to ensure energy efficient equipment is selected for systems and design

  14. Integrated Planning and Performance Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has any defined process - Current planning is de-centralized, short-term and budget-driven instead of strategy-driven - Project oversight relies on meetings and committee...

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts.

  16. National Ignition Facility Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, S G; Moore, T L

    2002-10-01

    This Configuration Management Plan (CMP) describes the technical and administrative management process for controlling the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project configuration. The complexity of the NIF Project (i.e., participation by multiple national laboratories and subcontractors involved in the development, fabrication, installation, and testing of NIF hardware and software, as well as construction and testing of Project facilities) requires implementation of the comprehensive configuration management program defined in this plan. A logical schematic illustrating how the plan functions is provided in Figure 1. A summary of the process is provided in Section 4.0, Configuration Change Control. Detailed procedures that make up the overall process are referenced. This CMP is consistent with guidance for managing a project's configuration provided in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1, Guide PMG 10, ''Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning''. Configuration management is a formal discipline comprised of the following four elements: (1) Identification--defines the functional and physical characteristics of a Project and uniquely identifies the defining requirements. This includes selection of components of the end product(s) subject to control and selection of the documents that define the project and components. (2) Change management--provides a systematic method for managing changes to the project and its physical and functional configuration to ensure that all changes are properly identified, assessed, reviewed, approved, implemented, tested, and documented. (3) Data management--ensures that necessary information on the project and its end product(s) is systematically recorded and disseminated for decision-making and other uses. Identifies, stores and controls, tracks status, retrieves, and distributes documents. (4) Assessments and validation--ensures that the planned configuration requirements match actual physical configurations and approved changes are implemented according to the change requirements documents.

  17. UNC CHARLOTTE EXPORT MANAGEMENT PLAN JULY 25, 2012 Page 1 of 21 Export Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    UNC CHARLOTTE EXPORT MANAGEMENT PLAN ­ JULY 25, 2012 Page 1 of 21 Export Management Plan I. Export laws and regulations are the bases for restricting use and access to this information. In particular, a "deemed export" (one requiring a license and imposing access restrictions) exists whenever

  18. Australia vs. CA Water Management Policy Cartaino, Ives, Ohanesian, Spitsyn ESM121 Water Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Australia vs. CA Water Management Policy Cartaino, Ives, Ohanesian, Spitsyn ESM121 Water Science and Management Australia vs. CA Water, Mila Spitsyn Abstract California has the most extensive water infrastructure arguably

  19. 5 Management Plan The management plan described in this section is a culmination of extraordinary efforts by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    290 5 Management Plan The management plan described in this section is a culmination and synthesis into the final construct. As a result, this management plan depends upon an assimilation work together to "derive" and establish the key elements of the Management Plan. Assessment

  20. National Flood Risk Management Planning Center of Expertise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    National Flood Risk Management Planning Center of Expertise The Flood Risk Management Planning Center of Expertise (FRM-PCX) was established and Reallocation, Hydropower, and Flood Risk Management. The FRM-PCX is a virtual

  1. Water Resources Council FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES For...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Resources Council FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES For Implementing E.O. 11988 43 FR 6030 February 10, 1978 (Second Reprinting) i- ' 1': : 8410-01 WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL...

  2. A Statewide Pest Management Plan for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1981-01-01

    comprehensive way, the future direc- tion for IPM programs within the state. The plan includes IPM systems for cotton, sorghum, corn, pea- nuts, rice, riceland mosquitoes, soybeans, citrus, pecans, timber, small grains, alfalfa, sunflowers and forage grass... Citrus Mutual, American Soybean Association-Texas Chap- ter, and the American Rice Growers Cooperative) have been extremely helpful in the development and review of this plan. The Texas Pest Management Association requested the writing of A...

  3. Hanford cultural resources management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C.

    1989-06-01

    As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 2: Water Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 2: Water Features UBC Okanagan 2007 Angele Clarke A SEEDS and Objectives 2 Methods 3 The Symbolic and Cultural Values of Water 3 Landscape Aesthetics Relationship to Water 5 UBC-Okanagan Campus Landscape and Water Features 8 Water Features and the Built Environment Campus

  5. Hanford site integrated pest management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giddings, R.F.

    1996-04-09

    The Hanford Site Integrated Pest Management Plan (HSIPMP) defines the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) decision process and subsequent strategies by which pest problems are to be solved at all Hanford Site properties per DOE-RL Site Infrastructure Division memo (WHC 9505090). The HSIPMP defines the roles that contractor organizations play in supporting the IPM process. In short the IPM process anticipates and prevents pest activity and infestation by combining several strategies to achieve long-term pest control solutions.

  6. 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals,...

  7. Water Management Guide - Building America Top Innovation | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Management Guide - Building America Top Innovation Water Management Guide - Building America Top Innovation Cover of the EEBA Water Management Guide. As energy codes and...

  8. 2008 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2008 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals,...

  9. 2002 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2002 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals,...

  10. 2001 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners 2001 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals,...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories, California sewer system management plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2010-02-01

    A Sewer System Management Plan (SSMP) is required by the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Order No. 2006-0003-DWQ Statewide General Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR) for Sanitary Sewer Systems (General Permit). DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Sandia Site Office has filed a Notice of Intent to be covered under this General Permit. The General Permit requires a proactive approach to reduce the number and frequency of sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) within the State. SSMPs must include provisions to provide proper and efficient management, operation, and maintenance of sanitary sewer systems and must contain a spill response plan. Elements of this Plan are under development in accordance with the SWRCB's schedule.

  12. Management and planning of UAV flight pattern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management and planning of UAV flight pattern Pre-conference Tutorial on Unmanned Aerial Vehicle in Geomatics ETH Zurich, 13/09/11 Magali Barbier UAV-g 2011 ­ Pre-conference Tutorial, Zurich, 13/09/112 Outline · Context: UAV, mission, autonomy, architecture · Experimental means · Application 1: visual

  13. Carbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    by the Carbon Reduction Commitment Energy Efficiency Scheme3 (CRC EES) and the EU Energy Performance in the most cost effective manner on an invest to save basis. Energy costs are projected to rise significantlyCarbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background Energy security and the increasing

  14. Water resources planning under climate change and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

    2007-01-01

    transfers or options. Demand-side management includes thepricing schemes, and demand-side management for urban water,of alternate demand side management, particularly

  15. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II On March...

  16. Integrated system dynamics toolbox for water resources planning.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Marissa Devan; Passell, Howard David; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Peplinski, William J.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Coursey, Don; Hanson, Jason; Grimsrud, Kristine; Thacher, Jennifer; Broadbent, Craig; Brookshire, David; Chemak, Janie; Cockerill, Kristan; Aragon, Carlos , Socorro, NM); Hallett, Heather , Socorro, NM); Vivoni, Enrique , Socorro, NM); Roach, Jesse

    2006-12-01

    Public mediated resource planning is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Unfortunately, supporting tools are lacking that interactively engage the public in the decision-making process and integrate over the myriad values that influence water policy. In the pages of this report we document the first steps toward developing a specialized decision framework to meet this need; specifically, a modular and generic resource-planning ''toolbox''. The technical challenge lies in the integration of the disparate systems of hydrology, ecology, climate, demographics, economics, policy and law, each of which influence the supply and demand for water. Specifically, these systems, their associated processes, and most importantly the constitutive relations that link them must be identified, abstracted, and quantified. For this reason, the toolbox forms a collection of process modules and constitutive relations that the analyst can ''swap'' in and out to model the physical and social systems unique to their problem. This toolbox with all of its modules is developed within the common computational platform of system dynamics linked to a Geographical Information System (GIS). Development of this resource-planning toolbox represents an important foundational element of the proposed interagency center for Computer Aided Dispute Resolution (CADRe). The Center's mission is to manage water conflict through the application of computer-aided collaborative decision-making methods. The Center will promote the use of decision-support technologies within collaborative stakeholder processes to help stakeholders find common ground and create mutually beneficial water management solutions. The Center will also serve to develop new methods and technologies to help federal, state and local water managers find innovative and balanced solutions to the nation's most vexing water problems. The toolbox is an important step toward achieving the technology development goals of this center.

  17. Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Configuration Management Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEIR, W.R.

    2000-12-18

    The Tank Waste Configuration Management (TWRS) Configuration Management Implementation Plan descibes the execution of the configuration management (CM) that the contractor uses to manage and integrate its programmatic and functional operations to perform work.

  18. Decision support for integrated water-energy planning.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Castillo, Cesar; Hart, William Eugene; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2009-10-01

    Currently, electrical power generation uses about 140 billion gallons of water per day accounting for over 39% of all freshwater withdrawals thus competing with irrigated agriculture as the leading user of water. Coupled to this water use is the required pumping, conveyance, treatment, storage and distribution of the water which requires on average 3% of all electric power generated. While water and energy use are tightly coupled, planning and management of these fundamental resources are rarely treated in an integrated fashion. Toward this need, a decision support framework has been developed that targets the shared needs of energy and water producers, resource managers, regulators, and decision makers at the federal, state and local levels. The framework integrates analysis and optimization capabilities to identify trade-offs, and 'best' alternatives among a broad list of energy/water options and objectives. The decision support framework is formulated in a modular architecture, facilitating tailored analyses over different geographical regions and scales (e.g., national, state, county, watershed, NERC region). An interactive interface allows direct control of the model and access to real-time results displayed as charts, graphs and maps. Ultimately, this open and interactive modeling framework provides a tool for evaluating competing policy and technical options relevant to the energy-water nexus.

  19. Water resources planning under climate change and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

    2007-01-01

    Scenario to Climatic Changes. Water Resources Management 19:2006) Quantifying the Urban Water Supply Impacts of Climateto the Shape of Supply? Water Demand Under Heterogeneous

  20. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Office of Legacy Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Legacy Management (LM), Grand Junction (See LM APS) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Office of Legacy Management (LM), Grand Junction (See LM APS) The ongoing and projected...

  1. AVLIS Production Plant Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    The AVLIS Production Plant is designated as a Major System Acquisition (in accordance with DOE Order 4240.IC) to deploy Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology at the Oak Ridge, Tennessee site, in support of the US Uranium Enrichment Program. The AVLIS Production Plant Project will deploy AVLIS technology by performing the design, construction, and startup of a production plant that will meet capacity production requirements of the Uranium Enrichment Program. The AVLIS Production Plant Project Management Plan has been developed to outline plans, baselines, and control systems to be employed in managing the AVLIS Production Plant Project and to define the roles and responsibilities of project participants. Participants will develop and maintain detailed procedures for implementing the management and control systems in agreement with this plan. This baseline document defines the system that measures work performed and costs incurred. This plan was developed by the AVLIS Production Plant Project staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in accordance with applicable DOE directives, orders and notices. 38 figures, 19 tables.

  2. Irrigation Water Quality Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and industrial waste water can impact water quality. In most irrigation situations, the primary water qual- ity

  3. All Over the Map: The Diversity of Western Water Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casado-Pérez, Vanessa; Cain, Bruce E.; Hui, Iris; Abbott, Coral; Doson, Kaley; Lebow, Shane

    2015-01-01

    nonpoint source pollution management programs. According tomanagement, environmen- tal concerns, water pollution

  4. Small Water System Management Program: 100 K Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunacek, G.S. Jr. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-29

    Purposes of this document are: to provide an overview of the service and potable water system presently in service at the Hanford Site`s 100 K Area; to provide future system forecasts based on anticipated DOE activities and programs; to delineate performance, design, and operations criteria; and to describe planned improvements. The objective of the small water system management program is to assure the water system is properly and reliably managed and operated, and continues to exist as a functional and viable entity in accordance with WAC 246-290-410.

  5. Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem Adaptive management How can our research help farmers ? #12;Discovery Farms concept Core farms

  6. CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA water managers can adapt by changing water supply portfolios and operations. An engineering economic A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC

  7. Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Wythe tx H2O | pg. 2 BACTERIA MANAGING tx H2O | pg. 3 IN TEXAS WATERS POLLUTION Managing Bacteria Pollution in Texas Waters tx H2O | pg. 4 W ith 310 water bodies in Texas failing to meetwater quality standards because of bacteria,managing bacteria... pollution is commanding the attention of water agencies, researchers and stake- holders across Texas. These water bodies are listed in the 2006 Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List for failing to meet the standards designed to protect...

  8. Texas Facilities Commission's Facility Management Strategic Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IC-09-11-12.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 4735 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IC-09-11-12.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Texas Facilities... Commission?s Facility Management Strategic Plan Jorge A. Ramirez Deputy Executive Director Building Operations & Plant Management ESL-IC-09-11-12 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17...

  9. 5.0 Management Plan 5.1 Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Blackfoot Subbasin Management Plan consists of a comprehensive set of conservation objectives and strategic218 5.0 Management Plan 5.1 Background The Management Plan is the heart of the Blackfoot Subbasin) strategic actions, 4) research, monitoring and evaluation and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act

  10. 7 Management Plan 7.1 Vision for the Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    227 7 Management Plan 7.1 Vision for the Subbasin The vision of the Wenatchee subbasin plan, address problems, reach consensus and implement actions to improve coordinated natural resource management management plan using watershed specific information ultimately leading towards compliance with the federal

  11. Cesium legacy safety project management work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, J.S.

    1998-04-21

    This Management Work Plan (MWP) describes the process flow, quality assurance controls, and the Environment, Safety, and Health requirements of the Cesium Legacy Safety Project. This MWP provides an overview of the project goals and methods for repackaging the non-conforming Type W overpacks and packaging the CsCl powder and pellets. This MWP is not intended to apply to other activities associated with the CsCl Legacy Safety Program (i.e., clean out of South Cell).

  12. Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

    2008-01-01

    of predicted water contents and water management in ani.e . , temperature and water content), and thus many modelsfor the water uptake and water content using macroscopic

  13. Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE MINERALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    is the amount and control of salt content in the used water dams. While there may be several dams at a givenSustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT interest. It arises in the provision of water for Queensland coal mines, where additional water

  14. STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1) for BUILDING 90 USER TEST BED FACILITY.G., GEOLOGIST/QSD (530) 222-4339 SWPPP Preparation Date: JUNE 10, 2012 #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan) 222-4339 Name and Title Telephone Number #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Building 90 User

  15. 6 Management Plan 6.1.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    192 6 Management Plan 6.1.1 Introduction Emphasis in this management plan is placed on selected focal habitats and fish and wildlife species described in the inventory and assessment. Management goals); others are already being mitigated through ongoing management (e.g., USFS adjustments to grazing

  16. UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN 2012-2013 JUNE 6, 2012 Enrollment Management Paradigm Enrollment management is a systematic, holistic, and integrated approach.................................................................................................................................................................................. 9 Strategic Goals

  17. Strategic Energy Management Plan for the 1990's 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.; Priest, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the strategic energy management plan implemented by the Defense Systems and Electronics Group (DSEG) of Texas Instruments (TI) to enable it to meet its energy management challenge into the 1990's. The strategic energy management...

  18. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality Branch Environmental Protection Dept. BC Environment Victoria, B.C. and Fraser Pollution Abatement Office ..................................................... WATER QUALITY OF UNDISTURBED AREAS ....................... LAND USE EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY

  19. Strategic Asset Management Plan 2006 -2011 Prepared by Director, Asset Management Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Strategic Asset Management Plan 2006 - 2011 Prepared by Director, Asset Management Services ­Strategic Asset Management Plan 2006-11 Table of Contents Executive Summary 3 1 Introduction 5 1.1 Purpose of the Strategic Asset Management Plan ................................................... 5 1.2 Background

  20. Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    The manual establishes program planning and management requirements for the Department’s Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program. Change 2 is a revision to Section M of both the Manual and the CRD to realign the process for establishing deviations from DOE directives containing safeguards and security requirements to reflect established Departmental policy as set forth in DOE O 251.1C. Original publication, 8-26-05; Chg 1, 3-7-06. Canceled by DOE O 470.4B

  1. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-02-01

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  2. Water Management for Evaporatively Cooled Condensers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Water Management for Evaporatively Cooled Condensers Theresa Pistochini May 23rd, 2012 ResearchAirCapacity,tons Gallons of Water Continuous Test - Outdoor Air 110-115 Deg F Cyclic Test - Outdoor Air 110-115 Deg F #12 AverageWaterHardness(ppm) Cooling Degree Days (60°F Reference) 20% Population 70% Population 10

  3. HotSpot Software Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the software configuration management procedures used to ensure that the HotSpot dispersion model meets the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot for consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendations 1 and 3 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  4. Best Management Practice #14: Alternative Water Sources | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Practice 14: Alternative Water Sources Best Management Practice 14: Alternative Water Sources Federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from...

  5. Drought management and its impact on public water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume represents the report on a colloquium sponsored by the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board, 5 September 1985. It includes five background papers on drought, drought management, risks for public systems, and legal and institutional aspects, plus appendices on conservation and rationing plans for Los Angeles and Salt Lake County. The conclusions of the volume include: (1) there is substantial need for continued research on drought and its impact on the management of public water systems; (2) sizing of the physical facilities of a system should not be based solely on full-service requirements during the drought of record, nor should such facilities be sized by the arbitrary specification of hydrologic risk; and (3) the key to adequate drought management of public water systems lies in predrought preparation.

  6. Management and operating contractor plan for transition to the project Hanford Management Contractor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waite, J.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-27

    This is Revision 1 to the M{ampersand}O Contractor Plan for Transition to the Project Hanford Management Contractor.

  7. Waste Management Committee Fiscal Year 2012 Work Plan | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Committee Fiscal Year 2012 Work Plan Waste Management Committee Fiscal Year 2012 Work Plan Topics: TA-21 TA-54 RiskBenefit Principles Consent Order WM-FY12-WP - September...

  8. Developing and assessing accident management plans for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.J.; Johnson, S.P.; Blackman, H.S.; Stewart, M.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-07-01

    This document is the second of a two-volume NUREG/CR that discusses development of accident management plans for nuclear power plants. The first volume (a) describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria that could be used for assessing the adequacy of accident management plans, (b) identifies the general attributes of accident management plans (Phase 1), (c) presents a prototype process for developing and implementing severe accident management plans (Phase 2), and (d) presents criteria that can be used to assess the adequacy of accident management plans. This volume (a) describes results from an evaluation of the capabilities of the prototype process to produce an accident management plan (Phase 3) and (b), based on these results and preliminary criteria included in NUREG/CR-5543, presents modifications to the criteria where appropriate.

  9. Decision Support for Water Planning: the ZeroNet Water-Energy Initiative.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, P. M. (Paul M.); Weintraub, Laura H. Z.; Ewers, Mary E.; Riggs, T. L. (Thomas L.); Wilson, C. J. (Cathy J.)

    2005-01-01

    Rapid population growth and severe drought are impacting water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry...), particularly in arid regions. New generation decision support tools, incorporating recent advances in informatics and geographic information systems (GIS), are essential for responsible water planning at the basin scale. The ZeroNet water-energy initiative is developing a decision support system (DSS) for the San Juan River Basin, with a focus on drought planning and economic analysis. The ZeroNet DSS provides a computing environment (cyberinfrastructure) with three major components: Watershed Tools, a Quick Scenario Tool, and a Knowledge Base. The Watershed Tools, based in the Watershed Analysis Risk Management Framework (WARMF), provides capabilities (1) to model surface flows, both the natural and controlled, as well as water withdrawals, via an engineering module, and (2) to analyze and visualize results via a stakeholder module. A new ZeroNet module for WARMF enables iterative modeling and production of 'what if' scenario libraries to examine consequences of changes in climate, landuse, and water allocation. The Quick Scenario Tool uses system dynamics modeling for rapid analysis and visualization for a variety of uses, including drought planning, economic analysis, evaluation of management alternatives, and risk assessment. The Knowledge Base serves simultaneously as the 'faithful scribe' to organize and archive data in easily accessible digital libraries, and as the 'universal translator' to share data from diverse sources and for diverse uses. All of the decision tools depend upon GIS capabilities for data/model integration, map-based analysis, and advanced visualization. The ZeroNet DSS offers stakeholders an effective means to address complex water problems.

  10. Microsoft Word - ContractManagementPlanningDRIVERS.doc | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ContractManagementPlanningDRIVERS.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - ARRAAttachment2.doc Microsoft Word - ARRAModelWAS.doc Microsoft Word - ARRAMOModelMod.doc...

  11. Spent Nuclear Fuel project integrated safety management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daschke, K.D.

    1996-09-17

    This document is being revised in its entirety and the document title is being revised to ``Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Integrated Safety Management Plan.

  12. Oregon Guidelines for Stormwater Management Plans for Removal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Guidelines for Stormwater Management Plans for RemovalFill Permit Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  13. BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan Amendments/Record of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan AmendmentsRecord of Decision for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  14. Irrigation System Management for Better Water Usage Howard Neibling, Extension Water Management Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Irrigation System Management for Better Water Usage Howard Neibling, Extension Water Management · Check pump discharge pressure. If too low, adjust or repair the pump. If additional lines have been added, the pump may need to be re-sized. · Clean pump intake on surface water supplies · Crop root zones

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun Williams

    2013-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2009-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

  17. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2011-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

  18. University of Glasgow Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan working with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swain, Peter

    fully in the initiatives which will help us reduce our carbon footprint and combat climate changeUniversity of Glasgow Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan working with Page 1 Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan (CMP) Albert Young, 3 November 2009 #12;University of Glasgow

  19. The Spanish General Radioactive Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espejo, J.M.; Abreu, A. [National Company for Radioactive Waste Limited Company (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    This paper mainly describes the strategies, the necessary actions and the technical solutions to be developed by ENRESA in the short, medium and long term, aimed at ensuring the adequate management of radioactive waste, the dismantling and decommissioning of nuclear and radioactive facilities and other activities, including economic and financial measures required to carry them out. Starting with the Spanish administrative organization in this field, which identifies the different agents involved and their roles, and after referring to the waste generation, the activities to be performed in the areas of LILW, SF and HLW management, decommissioning of installations and others are summarized. Finally, the future management costs are estimated and the financing system currently in force is explained. The so-called Sixth General Radioactive Waste Plan (6. GRWP), approved by the Spanish Government, is the 'master document' of reference where all the above mentioned issues are contemplated. In summary: The 6. GRWP includes the strategies and actions to be performed by Enresa in the coming years. The document, revised by the Government and subject to a process of public information, underlines the fact that Spain possesses an excellent infrastructure for the safe and efficient management of radioactive waste, from the administrative, technical and economic-financial points of view. From the administrative point of view there is an organisation, supported by ample legislative developments, that contemplates and governs the main responsibilities of the parties involved in the process (Government, CSN, ENRESA and waste producers). As regards the technical aspect, the experience accumulated to date by Enresa is particularly significant, as are the technologies now available in the field of management and for dismantling processes. As regards the economic-financial basis, a system is in place that guarantees the financing of radioactive waste management costs. This system is based on the generation of funds up front, during the operating lifetime of the facilities, through the application of fees established by Statutory provisions. Finally, a mandatory mechanism of annual revision for both technical issues and economic and financial aspects, allows to have updated all the courses of action. (authors)

  20. On Planning to Plan: Metaplanning Concepts in the Context of Management Science Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Steven Orla

    On Planning to Plan: Metaplanning Concepts in the Context of Management Science Modeling Hemant K-based reasoning--why we need to plan. Goals are before us and we need to figure out a means for achieving them and assumptions about the real world. The planning problem, at a very high level of abstraction

  1. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Kate Anderson...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Kate Anderson, Scott Clark, Matthew Ellis, Vincent Guthrie, Mark Hunsickler Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Kate...

  2. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards: Frequently Asked...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Water Management Awards: Frequently Asked Questions Federal Energy and Water Management Awards: Frequently Asked Questions Document answers frequently asked questions...

  3. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Charlie Dockham...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Charlie Dockham, Donna Maffeo, Sean Orgel, Patrick Ross, and Sara Wenniger Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners...

  4. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Guy Lunay, Kevin Myles...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Energy and Water Management Award Guy Lunay, Kevin Myles, Cullen Rabel, Elizabeth Taylor, Mark Trimarchi Federal Energy and Water Management Award Guy Lunay, Kevin Myles,...

  5. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 22nd Operations...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 22nd Operations Group Fuel Efficiency Office Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 22nd Operations Group Fuel Efficiency...

  6. Produced Water Management and Beneficial Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Carol Frost; Thomas Hayes; Leo Heath; Drew Johnson; David Lopez; Demian Saffer; Michael Urynowicz; John Wheaton; Mark Zoback

    2007-10-31

    Large quantities of water are associated with the production of coalbed methane (CBM) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. The chemistry of co-produced water often makes it unsuitable for subsequent uses such as irrigated agriculture. However, co-produced waters have substantial potential for a variety of beneficial uses. Achieving this potential requires the development of appropriate water management strategies. There are several unique characteristics of co-produced water that make development of such management strategies a challenge. The production of CBM water follows an inverse pattern compared to traditional wells. CBM wells need to maintain low reservoir pressures to promote gas production. This need renders the reinjection of co-produced waters counterproductive. The unique water chemistry of co-produced water can reduce soil permeability, making surface disposal difficult. Unlike traditional petroleum operations where co-produced water is an undesirable by-product, co-produced water in the PRB often is potable, making it a highly valued resource in arid western states. This research project developed and evaluated a number of water management options potentially available to CBM operators. These options, which focus on cost-effective and environmentally-sound practices, fall into five topic areas: Minimization of Produced Water, Surface Disposal, Beneficial Use, Disposal by Injection and Water Treatment. The research project was managed by the Colorado Energy Research Institute (CERI) at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and involved personnel located at CERI, CSM, Stanford University, Pennsylvania State University, the University of Wyoming, the Argonne National Laboratory, the Gas Technology Institute, the Montana Bureau of Mining and Geology and PVES Inc., a private firm.

  7. Water demand management in Kuwait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

  8. Hanford Sampling Quality Management Plan (HSQMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyatt, J.E.

    1995-04-28

    This document provides a management tool for evaluating and designing the appropriate elements of a field sampling program. This document provides discussion of the elements of a program and is to be used as a guidance document during the preparation of project and/or function specific documentation. This document does not specify how a sampling program shall be organized. The HSQMP is to be used as a companion document to the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) DOE/RL-94-55. The generation of this document was enhanced by conducting baseline evaluations of current sampling organizations. Valuable input was received from members of field and Quality Assurance organizations. The HSQMP is expected to be a living document. Revisions will be made as regulations and or Hanford Site conditions warrant changes in the best management practices. Appendices included are: summary of the sampling and analysis work flow process, a user`s guide to the Data Quality Objective process, and a self-assessment checklist.

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER Managing climate change risks in New York City's water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the effects of climate change must become a regular part of planning for water supply, sewer, wastewater Protection (NYCDEP), the agency responsible for managing New York City's (NYC) water supply, sewer focuses on the water supply, sewer, and wastewater treatment systems of NYC, but has wide application

  10. United: How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    . A?er a major drought in the ????s, the Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill ? in ????, which called for a comprehensive water management planning process and a water availability modeling system to make e?ective management of the surface water... as any possible impacts it might have on existing water rights in the basin. ?If someone applies for a new water right, we have many requirements, one of which is that we have to ?nd that the water is available, a?er we look at all existing water...

  11. Lead Exposure Management Plan 1.0. Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Lead Exposure Management Plan 1.0. Policy CSUF has developed the Lead Exposure Management Plan to reduce occupational and environmental exposure to lead, a potent neurotoxin and carcinogen that causes considers the nature of the task involved, confirmed and presumed exposures, and the lead content

  12. STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN 2015-2020:FIRST STAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STRATEGIC ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN 2015-2020:FIRST STAGE Dr. Charles J. Fey Vice President's overall strategic plan. SEM focuses on what is best for students and how to ensure their success while more influence over their student enrollments. #12;Strategic Enrollment Management "Strategic

  13. Industrial Engineering & ManagementStrategic Plan 2014-2018

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piao, Daqing

    Industrial Engineering & ManagementStrategic Plan 2014-2018 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology #12;Strategic Plan 2014-2018 Industrial Engineering and Management at Oklahoma State University and first Ph.D. in 1960. This School has been represented and led by giants in Industrial Engineering

  14. The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    AND SAFETY DIVISION Waste Management Quality AssuranceII I RECORD I WM-QAIMP Waste Management Quality Assurancefor hazardous waste management that have leadership

  15. The Challenges of Dynamic Water Management in the American West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doremus, Holly; Hanemann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Challenges of Dynamic Water Management in the AmericanWESTERN WATER PROJECTS ARE HIGHLY VULNERABLE TO GLOBALTO REDISTRIBUTING WATER . INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS

  16. 2003 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    List of 2003 Federal Energy and Water Management Award winners to individuals, small groups, and organizations.

  17. Risk Management Plan Electron Beam Ion Source Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management Plan for the Electron Beam Ion Source Project (EBIS) Project # 06-SC-002. There are three specific areas of risk that can be controlled and managed by the EBIS Project team and these are and operations. The BNL ISM clearly indicates that risk management is everybody's business and will be factored

  18. Impact of Syrian Refugees on Jordan's Water Management Research Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Syrian Refugees on Jordan's Water Management Research Questions: What impact has the influx of 590,000 refugees had on water resources? How can Jordan improve refugee and water management: -Water management in Jordan -Environmental impact assessments of refugee camps -Water resource

  19. Microsoft Word - C-Mod_Data_Managment_Plan_1.0_20140729.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Management Plan (Version 1.0, 29 July 2014) Alcator C-Mod Data Management Plan The Alcator Data Management Plan (DMP) describes the elements and procedures for storing,...

  20. University of Dundee Carbon Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Fordyce A.

    Carbon Management Strategy 2.1 Our low carbon vision 6 2.2 Context and drivers for Carbon Management 6 2 and sources of funding 18 6 Actions to Embed Carbon Management in Your Organisation 19 6.1 Corporate Strategy Appendix A: Carbon Management Matrix - Embedding 23 Appendix B: Energy Prices 24 #12;3 FOREWORD FROM

  1. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    green, T.

    2011-08-15

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in significant changes to this plan warranting the delay. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL in a sustainable manner. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B, respectively), and lists of actions in tabular format - including completed items as well as ongoing and new action items (Appendices C and D, respectively).

  2. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  3. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  4. Integrated Policy and Planning for Water and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    ....................................................................... 24 II.1.3. Water Consumption by Hydroelectric Power Plants................................ 25 II.1

  5. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with phytoremediation and bioremediation processes; · Document methods to increase water use efficiency for bioenergyHawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources Submitted to Hawaii Natural Energy Institute of any bioenergy crops in Hawaii is the availability of the land and water necessary to produce

  6. Energy-water analysis of the 10-year WECC transmission planning study cases.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Passell, Howard David; Castillo, Cesar; Moreland, Barbara

    2011-11-01

    In 2011 the Department of Energy's Office of Electricity embarked on a comprehensive program to assist our Nation's three primary electric interconnections with long term transmission planning. Given the growing concern over water resources in the western U.S. the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) requested assistance with integrating water resource considerations into their broader electric transmission planning. The result is a project with three overarching objectives: (1) Develop an integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners in the Western Interconnection to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning. (2) Pursue the formulation and development of the Energy-Water DSS through a strongly collaborative process between the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), Western Governors Association (WGA), the Western States Water Council (WSWC) and their associated stakeholder teams. (3) Exercise the Energy-Water DSS to investigate water stress implications of the transmission planning scenarios put forward by WECC, WGA, and WSWC. The foundation for the Energy-Water DSS is Sandia National Laboratories Energy-Power-Water Simulation (EPWSim) model (Tidwell et al. 2009). The modeling framework targets the shared needs of energy and water producers, resource managers, regulators, and decision makers at the federal, state and local levels. This framework provides an interactive environment to explore trade-offs, and 'best' alternatives among a broad list of energy/water options and objectives. The decision support framework is formulated in a modular architecture, facilitating tailored analyses over different geographical regions and scales (e.g., state, county, watershed, interconnection). An interactive interface allows direct control of the model and access to real-time results displayed as charts, graphs and maps. The framework currently supports modules for calculating water withdrawal and consumption for current and planned electric power generation; projected water demand from competing use sectors; and, surface and groundwater availability. WECC's long range planning is organized according to two target planning horizons, a 10-year and a 20-year. This study supports WECC in the 10-year planning endeavor. In this case the water implications associated with four of WECC's alternative future study cases (described below) are calculated and reported. In future phases of planning we will work with WECC to craft study cases that aim to reduce the thermoelectric footprint of the interconnection and/or limit production in the most water stressed regions of the West.

  7. Social Impact Management Plans: Innovation in corporate and public policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franks, Daniel M.; Vanclay, Frank

    2013-11-15

    Social Impact Assessment (SIA) has traditionally been practiced as a predictive study for the regulatory approval of major projects, however, in recent years the drivers and domain of focus for SIA have shifted. This paper details the emergence of Social Impact Management Plans (SIMPs) and undertakes an analysis of innovations in corporate and public policy that have put in place ongoing processes – assessment, management and monitoring – to better identify the nature and scope of the social impacts that might occur during implementation and to proactively respond to change across the lifecycle of developments. Four leading practice examples are analyzed. The International Finance Corporation (IFC) Performance Standards require the preparation of Environmental and Social Management Plans for all projects financed by the IFC identified as having significant environmental and social risks. Anglo American, a major resources company, has introduced a Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox, which requires mine sites to undertake regular assessments and link these assessments with their internal management systems, monitoring activities and a Social Management Plan. In South Africa, Social and Labour Plans are submitted with an application for a mining or production right. In Queensland, Australia, Social Impact Management Plans were developed as part of an Environmental Impact Statement, which included assessment of social impacts. Collectively these initiatives, and others, are a practical realization of theoretical conceptions of SIA that include management and monitoring as core components of SIA. The paper concludes with an analysis of the implications for the practice of impact assessment including a summary of key criteria for the design and implementation of effective SIMPs. -- Highlights: • Social impact management plans are effective strategies to manage social issues. • They are developed in partnership with regulatory agencies, investors and community. • SIMPs link assessment to ongoing management and address social and community issues. • SIMPs clarify responsibilities in the management of impacts, opportunities and risks. • SIMPs demonstrate a shift to include management as a core component of SIA practice.

  8. Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater A BiRd'S EyE ViEW foR NEW HAMPSHiRE Co Hampshire Communities Written by: Julia Peterson, New Hampshire Sea Grant and university of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Amanda Stone, university of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension James Houle, university

  9. DIVISION S-6--SOIL & WATER MANAGEMENT & CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION S-6--SOIL & WATER MANAGEMENT & CONSERVATION Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration Rates soil column within 20 yr following culti- Carbon sequestration rates, with a change from CT to NT, can in approximately 40 to and returning to the original land cover or other peren- 60 yr. Carbon sequestration rates

  10. FY 1999 Spent Nuclear Fuel Interim Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, M.

    1998-12-21

    This document has been prepared to present in one place the near and long-term plans for safe management of SRS SNF inventories until final disposition has been identified and implemented.

  11. DELAWARE TECHNICAL & COMMUNITY COLLEGE Sustainable Energy Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    DELAWARE TECHNICAL & COMMUNITY COLLEGE Sustainable Energy Management Plan Office of the President and collaborative research and supports graduate instruction in energy, environmental, and sustainable development policy, sustainable development, political economy of energy, environment and development, environmental

  12. Optimization for recipe-based, diet-planning inventory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents a new modeling framework and research methodology for the study of recipe-based, diet-planning inventory management. The thesis begins with an exploration on the classic optimization problem - the diet ...

  13. List of Appendices of the Subbasin Management Plan for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    List of Appendices of the Subbasin Management Plan for the Lower Middle Mainstem Columbia River. Rare Plants and Plant Communities of the Rock Creek watershed area. Appendix E. Adult salmon passage

  14. List of Appendices of the Subbasin Management Plan for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    List of Appendices of the Subbasin Management Plan for the White Salmon River Appendix A. White Plants and Plant Communities of the White Salmon watershed area. Appendix E. Fisheries Monitoring

  15. Grout treatment facility land disposal restriction management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1991-04-04

    This document establishes management plans directed to result in the land disposal of grouted wastes at the Hanford Grout Facilities in compliance with Federal, State of Washington, and Department of Energy land disposal restrictions. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Criteria for an effective water resource planning process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, James Myron

    1961-01-01

    In examining the present status of water resource planning in the Pacific Northwest, numerous critical inadequacies become readily apparent. One method of minimizing some of these inadequacies is through administrative ...

  17. Multiperiod Planning of Water Networks in Industrial Cities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishnu, Sumit Kumar

    2014-08-13

    approaches would be required to determine the optimal utilization of water over the planning horizon and beyond. Burgara-Montero et al [61] developed an optimization approach that incorporates seasonal variations in the optimal treatment of industrial...

  18. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electricity, motor fuels and natural gas. The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) submitted our agency planTexas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan 4th Quarterly Report. This includes, but is not limited to, various electrical, gas, lighting and plumbing fixtures and implements

  19. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electricity, motor fuels and natural gas. The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) submitted our agency planTexas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan 3rd Quarterly Report. This includes, but is not limited to, various electrical, gas, lighting and plumbing fixtures and implements

  20. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electricity, motor fuels and natural gas. The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) submitted our agency planTexas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan 1st Quarterly Report. This includes, but is not limited to, various electrical, gas, lighting and plumbing fixtures and implements

  1. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electricity, motor fuels and natural gas. The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) submitted our agency planTexas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan 2nd Quarterly Report. This includes, but is not limited to, various electrical, gas, lighting and plumbing fixtures and implements

  2. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREEN,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

  3. Criteria and Guidelines for the Federal Energy and Water Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Asked Questions Federal Energy and Water Management Awards: Nomination Quick Reference The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence...

  4. High-level waste management technology program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. RISK MANAGEMENT IN REAL OPTIONS BASED PHARMACEUTICAL PORTFOLIO PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    RISK MANAGEMENT IN REAL OPTIONS BASED PHARMACEUTICAL PORTFOLIO PLANNING Michael J. Rogers, Anshuman valuations and a risk management analysis for balancing risk versus reward tradeoffs. The resulting valuation that minimize risk for a specified level of return, to begin Phase I clinical testing from a set of candidate

  6. Carbon Management Plan for the Exeter Campuses 2010-2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearhop, Stuart

    Programme www.exeter.ac.uk/sustainability #12;Version 2010v1 dated 8/03/2011 Page 2 Owner ­ G Whitehouse ­ Energy Manager Carbon Management Plan 2010 - 2020 Contents 1 Forewords 1.1 Foreword from the Vice Drivers 3.4.2 National Drivers - Legislation 3.4.3 National Drivers ­ Government Strategy for Carbon

  7. Corrective Action Plan for Environmenta' Management Headquarters

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Environmenta' Management Headquarters Phase 2: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14 2014 Washington, DC 20585 August 2015 Corrective...

  8. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan and exclusively resulting from, or related to, the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower

  9. Capital Planning and Management Request for Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierman, Paul

    Biofuels and biomass Fuel cells 2. For each of the renewable energy technologies the following shall Plan & Design Guidelines. The CEF committee is seeking recommendations for optimal renewable energy

  10. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green,T.

    2009-10-23

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the entire BNL site including the Upton Reserve and has been reviewed by, The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers, and DOE, as well as appropriate BNL emergency services personnel. The BNL Fire Department is the lead on wildfire suppression. However, the BNL Natural Resource Manager will be assigned to all wildland fires as technical resource advisor.

  11. Data Management Plan Guide A data management plan describes data generated or used for a given project and states how that data will be managed, stored, accessed, and shared. The details of a data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Management Plan Guide A data management plan describes data generated or used for a given project and states how that data will be managed, stored, accessed, and shared. The details of a data management plan will vary depending on the circumstances of the project, but each data management plan should

  12. National estuary program guidance. Comprehensive conservation and management plans: Content and approval requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Estuaries and other coastal and marine waters are national resources increasingly threatened by pollution, habitat loss, coastal development, and resource conflicts. Congress established the National Estuary Program (NEP) under the Water Quality Act of 1987 to pioneer a broad and innovative approach to respond to these threats. The NEP, managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), identifies nationally significant estuaries and supports the development of comprehensive management plans to ensure their ecological integrity. Ultimately, these activities result in a comprehensive conservation and management plan (CCMP) for the estuary. The first section describes the requirements for approvable CCMPs. This guidance does not mandate the format in which the CCMP contents are presented.

  13. PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with increasing populations and costs associated with urban growth--related to infrastructure, energy, operationPLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District by Andrew K. Doi B. A in urban areas around the globe, yet per capita water consumption continues to increase. Faced

  14. The Texas Water Plan and its Institutional Problems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, C. W.; Trock, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    An expansion of tile supply of water and greater efficiency in its use are necessary for the future economic development of the state of Texas. Imported water, supplemental to that available in the state, is an important part of development plans...

  15. Water Supply Planning Using an Expert Geographic Information System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinney, Daene C.; Burgin, John F.; Maidment, David R.

    1995-01-01

    An expert geographic information system (expert GIS) for long-term regional water supply planning has been developed. This system has been evaluated through a case study examining a l9-county study region in South Texas with several water supply...

  16. Development and Demonstration of Advanced Forecasting, Power and Environmental Planning and Management Tools and Best Practices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Development and Demonstration of Advanced Forecasting, Power and Environmental Planning and Management Tools and Best Practices

  17. New Course Teaches Best Practices for Water Management for Federal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Course Teaches Best Practices for Water Management for Federal Facilities New Course Teaches Best Practices for Water Management for Federal Facilities May 8, 2014 - 11:13am...

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2012: EEBA Water Management Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored Water Management Guide, which identifies durability issues and solutions for high-performance homes. The Water Management Guide has sold 15,000 copies since its first printing.

  19. A liquid water management strategy for PEM fuel cell stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nguyen, Trung; Knobbe, M. W.

    2003-02-25

    Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a PEM fuel cell stack. Previous experimentation had found, and this experimentation confirms, that one very effective method of achieving proper gas and water management is the use...

  20. Why a water degree? Water: Resources, Policy, and Management is an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Why a water degree? Water: Resources, Policy, and Management is an interdisciplinary, holistically integrated bachelor of science degree specializing in water that includes training in water science, policy, and management to ensure that water is a sustainable resource. What could be more important? Water connects

  1. UC Merced -Capital Planning and Space Management (updated August 2012) Capital Planning Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Improvement Projects based on project cost: #12;UC Merced - Capital Planning and Space Management (updated with an estimated cost greater than $750,000. These projects are included in the Capital Financial Plan Capital Improvements varies based on the project cost. · Minor Capital Improvements Minor Capital

  2. Water Management of Noninsulating and Insulating Sheathings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-04-01

    There is an increasing market in liquid (or fluid) applied water management barriers for residential applications that could be used in place of tapes and other self-adhering membranes if applied correctly, especially around penetrations in the enclosure. This report discusses current best practices, recommends ways in which the best practices can be improved, and looks at some current laboratory testing and testing standards.

  3. Data Management Plan Managing your data throughout the life cycle of your research is essential to ensure usability,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Data Management Plan Managing your data throughout the life cycle of your research is essential data management plans as part of the grant proposal package. While it is not feasible to develop a comprehensive framework for a data management plan that would apply to all disciplines, the information below

  4. NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    · Pollution Prevention/Good Housekeeping for Municipal Operations #12;Storm Water Management Program July 2009NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FOR NPDES GENERAL PERMIT NO. NMR040000 79902-1049 (915) 433-9254 #12;#12;#12;Storm Water Management Program July 2009 ii This Page

  5. Water Resources Management Practicum 2005 Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Water Resources Management Practicum 2005 Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies University Context 2006 #12;#12;Water Resources Management Practicum 2005 Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies/263-2741 (voice/TDD), for information and referral. The Water Resources Management Practicum is a regular part

  6. Master plan: Guntersville Reservoir Aquatic Plant Management. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In 1989, Congress provided funding to start a five-year comprehensive project to manage aquatic plants in Guntersville Reservoir, to be jointly implemented by the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). TVA serves as the overall project coordinator and is the lead agency for this project. Known as the Joint Agency Guntersville Project (JAGP), the project will test and demonstrate innovative management technologies, and incorporate the most effective technologies into a comprehensive aquatic plant management plan for Guntersville Reservoir. The JAGP is intended to serve as a National Demonstration Project for aquatic plant management. As part of this JAGP, the Master Plan for Aquatic Plant Management for the Guntersville Reservoir Project, Alabama-Tennessee is authorized by Corps Contract Number DACW62-90-C-0067.

  7. Disruption Management ( Operations Research between planning ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    record: it can deliver high quality solutions for planning problems. .... w e have w orked on is that in order to carry out the daily operation , companies. 3 .... moves based on the current status of the storage and the kno w ledge on the future.

  8. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    the water quality and waste water elements. At the sameAll water supply, waste water, and flood control agenciesprovide services like waste water treatment and drinking

  9. Davis Water Consumption Efficiency Link, Phung, Purewal, Purewal, Salmon ESM 121 Water Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Davis Water Consumption Efficiency Link, Phung, Purewal, Purewal, Salmon ESM 121 Water Science and Management Water Consumption Efficiency of Toilets & Shower Heads in Davis: Old Davis Purewal, Kiernan Salmon Abstract The efficiency of household water consumption varies with the age

  10. The management, use, and stewardship of fresh water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The management, use, and stewardship of fresh water resources is an increasingly important in the physical mechanisms of water movement from an integrated perspective and studies the links between disturbances on water quality, forest hydrology, and technology transfer. http

  11. Guidelines for Developing Soil and Water Management Programs: Irrigated Pecans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    2002-01-01

    The book describes the performance of pecan trees; water testing; determining how water quality may affect tree growth; improving drainage; selecting an irrigation system, and water conditioning to manage nutrients. It also describes how to estimate...

  12. Securing Texas water: Experts call for additional planning, policies, expanding "new" water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    and policy for the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority, said the state no longer has the surplus water it had from SECURING TEXAS WATER Experts call for additional planning, policies, expanding ?new? water Summer 2012 tx H2O 3 ] the reservoirs built a...

  13. Managing the Transition State for Energy Strategic Planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehler, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    THE TRANSITION STATE FOR ENERGY STRATEGIC PLANNING a Thomas A. Koehler Eastman Kodak Company Rochester, New York ABSTRACT Corporate energy conservation programs have made substantial gains in reducing energy consumption during the last decade.... The responses to survive the mid-1970's global energy uncertainties were made in a crisis environment. Now, there is a transition from energy conservation to energy strategic planning. Energy engineers and managers need to im prove their managerial skills...

  14. Managing California’s Water: Insights from Interviews with Water Policy Experts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Null, Sarah E.; Bartolomeo, Eleanor; Lund, Jay R.; Hanak, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    2009. Bulletin 160–09: California water plan update.California Department of Water Resources. Available from:should be allowed to sell water in California? Third-party

  15. Water management, droughts and political hazards on the dry continent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keary, J. [Hunter Water Corp., Newcastle West, New South Wales (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    In Australia, the responsibility for water management lies with each State. Traditionally, water management has been carried out by public agencies and droughts have lead to a large amount of government activity and relief funding. Australian water management is currently undergoing major commercial reform. Common features of the reform are user pays pricing, improved water rights, corporatized water agencies, and a new role for the government. The recent major drought in Australia not only demonstrated that old habits are difficult to change but also provided examples where the commercial reforms to water management had improved outcomes.

  16. ORNL long-range environmental and waste management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, J.S.; Bates, L.D.; Brown, C.H.; Easterday, C.A.; Hill, L.G.; Kendrick, C.M.; McNeese, L.E.; Myrick, T.E.; Payne, T.L.; Pepper, C.E.; Robinson, S.M.; Rohwer, P.S.; Scanlan, T.F.; Smith, M.A.; Stratton, L.E.; Trabalka, J.R.

    1989-09-01

    This report, the ORNL Long-Range Environmental and Waste Management Plan, is the annual update in a series begun in fiscal year 1985. Its primary purpose is to provide a thorough and systematic planning document to reflect the continuing process of site assessment, strategy development, and planning for the current and long-term control of environmental issues, waste management practices, and remedial action requirements. The document also provides an estimate of the resources required to implement the current plan. This document is not intended to be a budget document; it is, however, intended to provide guidance to both Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) management as to the near order of magnitude of the resources (primarily funding requirements) and the time frame required to execute the strategy in the present revision of the plan. As with any document of this nature, the near-term (one to three years) part of the plan is a pragmatic assessment of the current program and ongoing capital projects and reflects the efforts perceived to be necessary to comply with all current state and federal regulations and DOE orders. It also should be in general agreement with current budget (funding) requests and obligations for these immediate years. 55 figs., 72 tabs.

  17. Using FRAMES to Manage Environmental and Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Millard, W. David; Gelston, Gariann M.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Pelton, Mitch A.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Lee, Cheegwan; Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Alex J.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Castleton, Karl J.

    2007-05-16

    The Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems FRAMES) is decision-support middleware that provides users the ability to design software solutions for complex problems. It is a software platform that provides seamless and transparent communication between modeling components by using a multi-thematic approach to provide a flexible and holistic understanding of how environmental factors potentially affect humans and the environment. It incorporates disparate components (e.g., models, databases, and other frameworks) that integrate across scientific disciplines, allowing for tailored solutions to specific activities. This paper discusses one example application of FRAMES, where several commercialoff-the-shelf (COTS) software products are seamlessly linked into a planning and decision-support tool that helps manage water-based emergency situations and sustainable response. Multiple COTS models, including three surface water models, and a number of databases are linked through FRAMES to assess the impact of three asymmetric and simultaneous events, two of which impact water resources. The asymmetric events include 1) an unconventional radioactive release into a large potable water body, 2) a conventional contaminant (oil) release into navigable waters, and 3) an instantaneous atmospheric radioactive release.

  18. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  19. Hanford Sampling Quality Management Plan (HSQMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyatt, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    HSQMP establishes quality requirements in response to DOE Order 5700. 6C and to 10 Code of Federal Regulations 830.120. HSQMP is designed to meet the needs of Richland Operations Office for controlling the quality of services provided by sampling operations. It is issued through the Analytical Services Program of the Waste Programs Division. This document describes the Environmental Sampling and Analysis Program activities considered to represent the best management activities necessary to achieve a sampling program with adequate control.

  20. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    4 April, 2013. (4) 2010 Water Use Survey Summary Estimates –State Totals; Texas Water Development Board: Austin, TX,indicators for urban water systems. Urban Water. 2004, 4,

  1. ARM - Lesson Plans: Moving Water and Waves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimate inMakingMoving Water and

  2. ARM - Lesson Plans: Sea Water and Agriculture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimatePast SeaSea Water and

  3. Biohazardous Waste Management Plan Page 2 of 15 Section Topic Page Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    #12;Biohazardous Waste Management Plan Page 2 of 15 INDEX Section Topic Page Number I Roster #12;Biohazardous Waste Management Plan Page 3 of 15 I. Scope The University of Washington Biohazardous Waste Management Plan (The Plan) applies to all University facilities in the City of Seattle

  4. WATERSHED MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN A MOUNTAIN RESORT COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATERSHED MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN A MOUNTAIN RESORT COMMUNITY: A CASE STUDY OF WHISTLER'S CRABAPPLE at local and municipal scales. As part of an overall movement towards sustainability, the mountain resort and visitors in a natural mountain environment. From a tourism perspective, Whistler faces the challenge

  5. Recommended Academic Plan for Agricultural Systems Management (ASM) University Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Recommended Academic Plan for Agricultural Systems Management (ASM) University Park Effective requirements. GWS, GHA, GQ, GN, GA, GH, and GS are codes used to identify General Education requirements. US, IL, and US;IL are codes used to designate courses that satisfy University United States

  6. Recommended Academic Plan for Agricultural Systems Management (ASM) Commonwealth Campuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Recommended Academic Plan for Agricultural Systems Management (ASM) Commonwealth Campuses Effective Education requirements. GWS, GHA, GQ, GN, GA, GH, and GS are codes used to identify General Education requirements. US, IL, and US;IL are codes used to designate courses that satisfy University United States

  7. BACHELOR OF SCIENCES IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Credits per term 15 Credits per academic year 31 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERMBACHELOR OF SCIENCES IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS ENG 0101 English Composition I 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 MGMT

  8. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , motor fuels and natural gas. The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) has been committed to reducingTexas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan Quarterly Report ­ June 30, gas, lighting and plumbing fixtures and implements. TTI Employee Awareness Program As a tenant agency

  9. Factors Influencing the Adoption of Water Quality Best Management Practices by Texas Beef Cattle Producers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2014-05-28

    and ranchers in preparing soil and water conservation plans to meet each land unitâ??s specific capabilities and needs. Plans include appropriate land treatment practices, Table 1.5 Best management practices for Texas livestock producers. BMP Category BMP... words. And finally to Mark, thank you for your continued guidance, patience, and quest for adventure. v ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The combined effort of a number of individuals made the completion of this dissertation possible. First...

  10. Best Management Practice #1: Water Management Planning | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy andandBeforeofOhio87-2007 JuneofEnergy 1:

  11. Managing Uncertainty in Operational Control of Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bargiela, Andrzej

    Managing Uncertainty in Operational Control of Water Distribution Systems A. Bargiela Department Operation of water distribution systems requires a variety of decisions to be made. There are system. There are system management decisions concerning the regulatory measures such as water pricing principles, effluent

  12. 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. Winners of the 2011 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards include:

  13. 2002 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. Winners of the 2002 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards include the following.

  14. 2001 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities. Winners of the 2001 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards include the following.

  15. Feasibility of ecosystem-based management in boreal forests: Management planning tools SFM Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asselin, Hugo

    Feasibility of ecosystem-based management in boreal forests: Management planning tools SFM Network Research Note Series No. 71 Highlights · The use of adaptive and user-friendly decision-support tools helps interest: a new decision-support tool in forestry From theory to practice Inthesummerof2007,Tembec

  16. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwager, K.; Green, T. M.

    2014-10-01

    The DOE policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by DOE and/or Its various contractors which can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wildland fire, operational, and prescribed fires. FMPs provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. The plan will be reviewed periodically to ensure fire program advances and will evolve with the missions of DOE and BNL.

  17. Managing water addition to a degraded core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Odar, F. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present information that can be used in severe accident management by providing an improved understanding of the effects of water addition to a degraded core. This improved understanding is developed using a diagram showing a sequence of core damage states. Whenever possible, a temperature and a time after accident initiation are estimated for each damage state in the sequence diagram. This diagram can be used to anticipate the evolution of events during an accident. Possible responses of plant instruments are described to identify these damage states and the effects of water addition. The rate and amount of water addition needed (1) to remove energy from the core, (2) to stabilize the core or (3) to not adversely affect the damage progression, are estimated. Analysis of the capability to remove energy from large cohesive and particulate debris beds indicates that these beds may not be stabilized in the core region and they may partially relocate to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel.

  18. Managing water addition to a degraded core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Odar, F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In this paper we present information that can be used in severe accident management by providing an improved understanding of the effects of water addition to a degraded core. This improved understanding is developed using a diagram showing a sequence of core damage states. Whenever possible, a temperature and a time after accident initiation are estimated for each damage state in the sequence diagram. This diagram can be used to anticipate the evolution of events during an accident. Possible responses of plant instruments are described to identify these damage states and the effects of water addition. The rate and amount of water addition needed (1) to remove energy from the core, (2) to stabilize the core or (3) to not adversely affect the damage progression, are estimated. Analysis of the capability to remove energy from large cohesive and particulate debris beds indicates that these beds may not be stabilized in the core region and they may partially relocate to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel.

  19. Question & Answer with Heather Harward: H2O4Texas Coalition promotes state water plan implementations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    2O Summer 2012 Story by Danielle Kalisek The ???? State Water Plan: Water for Texas was delivered to the governor by the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) in January ????. ?e report conveys a somber message: In drought conditions, Texas... does not have enough water, according to a press release on the TWDB website. ?e state water planning process ensures the state?s water resources are reviewed regularly, and the process ends with the development of a state water plan every ?ve...

  20. SAPHIRE 8 Software Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith

    2010-01-01

    The INL software developers use version control for both the formally released SAPHIRE versions, as well as for source code. For each formal release of the software, the developers perform an acceptance test: the software must pass a suite of automated tests prior to official release. Each official release of SAPHIRE is assigned a unique version identifier. The release is bundled into a standard installation package for easy and consistent set-up by individual users. Included in the release is a list of bug fixes and new features for the current release, as well as a history of those items for past releases. Each formal release of SAPHIRE will have passed an acceptance test. In addition to assignment of a unique version identifier for an official software release, each source code file is kept in a controlled library. Source code is a collection of all the computer instructions written by developers to create the finished product. The library is kept on a server, where back-ups are regularly made. This document describes the configuration management approach used as part of the SAPHIRE development.

  1. Water, culture and environmental health : : understanding community based planning to improve health outcomes in vulnerable populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stigler, Paula E.

    2013-01-01

    new options for improved water management. Paper presentedSan Diego Foundation. PI. Water quality as an environmentalProject Lead. Border water infrastructure program. Pala Band

  2. Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.J.

    1995-11-01

    As the consumption of energy increases, its impact on ambient air quality has become a significant concern. Recent studies indicate that fine particles from coal combustion cause health problems as well as atmospheric visibility impairment. These problems are further compounded by the concentration of hazardous trace elements such as mercury, cadmium, selenium, and arsenic in fine particles. Therefore, a current need exists to develop superior, but economical, methods to control emissions of fine particles. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine- particle collection appears to be the best method of overall air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and cannot be collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, this project will focus on developing technology not only to provide ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxic emissions, but also to capture vapor- phase trace metals such as mercury and selenium. Currently, the primary state-of-the-art technologies for particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). However, they both have limitations that prevent them from achieving ultrahigh collection of fine particulate matter and vapor-phase trace metals. The objective of this project is to develop a highly reliable advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC) that can provide > 99.99 % particulate collection efficiency for all particle sizes between 0.01 and 50 14m, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, and is cost-0443competitive with existing technologies. Phase I of the project is organized into three tasks: Task I - Project Management, Reporting, and Subcontract Consulting Task 2 - Modeling, Design, and Construction of 200-acfm AHPC Model Task 3 - Experimental Testing and Subcontract Consulting

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-07-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  4. Bushland Management For Water Yield: Prospects for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.; Griffin, Ronald C.; Kaiser, Ronald A.; Freeman, Lansingh S.; Blackburn, Wilbert H.; Jordan, Wayne R.

    1987-01-01

    [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] BRUSHLAND MANAGEMENT FOR WATER YIELD: PROSPECTS FOR TEXAS Bruce A. McCarl Professor- Agricultural Economics Ronald C. Griffin Associate Professor- Agricultural Economics Ronald A. Kaiser Assistant Professor... management. The main categories of these actions are a) continue current policy-no new initiatives; b) subsidize brush management through low-interest loans; c) cost share with those managing brush; d) refine property rights to resultant water so...

  5. The ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program Long Range Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrick, T.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 76 individual surplus facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. The ORNL SFMP has prepared this Long Range Plan to outline the long-term management strategy for those facilities included in the program. The primary objective of this plan are to: (1) develop a base of information for each ORNL SFMP facility, (2) conduct preliminary decommissioning analyses to identify feasible alternatives, (3) assess the current and future risk of each facility, (4) establish a priority list for the decommissioning projects, and (5) integrate the individual project costs and schedules into an overall program schedule and cost estimate for the ORNL site. The Long Range Plan also provides an overview of the ORNL SFMP management structure, specifies the decommissioning criteria to be employed, and identifies special technical problems, research and development needs, and special facilities and equipment that may be required for decommissioning operations.

  6. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Dale Allard...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dale Allard, Steven Benson, John Elliot, Ryan Jeter, and Ron Stertzback 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Dale Allard, Steven Benson, John Elliot, Ryan Jeter,...

  7. Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Award Winners Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners December 9, 2014 - 12:04pm Addthis The Energy Department today recognized 25 winners...

  8. Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Awards Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management Awards November 6, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The Energy Department today recognized 25 winners across the federal...

  9. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Ronald Allard...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ronald Allard, Joseph Eberly, Amy Hudson, James B. Shaffer Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Ronald Allard, Joseph Eberly, Amy Hudson, James B. Shaffer PDF icon...

  10. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Sandrine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandrine Schultz 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Sandrine Schultz fewm13schultzhighres.pdf fewm13schultz.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Federal...

  11. Best Management Practice #5: Water-Efficient Irrigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Water efficiency must be considered from the initial irrigation system design phase through installation to ensure optimal performance. Consistent management and maintenance is also essential.

  12. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner David Morin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster features 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award winner David Morin of the U.S. Air Force's Laughlin Air Force Base in Texas.

  13. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FEMP Announces 2015 Winners Find out who received this year's Federal Energy and Water Management Awards. Read more Get Inspired Get Inspired Read the stories behind the...

  14. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners William Kuster...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    William Kuster, John McDuffie, Dennis Svalstad, William Turnbull and Steven White Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners William Kuster, John McDuffie, Dennis Svalstad,...

  15. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Corrine...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corrine Kegel, Jane A. Kipp, and Dale Reckley 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners Corrine Kegel, Jane A. Kipp, and Dale Reckley fewm13usdaregiononemontanahig...

  16. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Corps Recruit San Diego 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine Corps Recruit San Diego fewm13usmcmcdepotsandiegohighres.pdf fewm13usmcmcdepotsandi...

  17. Energy Department Announces Federal Energy and Water Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    efficiency measures to improve energy, water, and vehicle fleet management that save taxpayer money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Through their innovative efforts, winners,...

  18. 2009 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities.

  19. 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities.

  20. 2008 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities.

  1. 2007 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities.

  2. Development of approaches to integrated water resources management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Guoting

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing need to manage water resources in a sustainable way, particularly in semi arid areas, with dramatic social and economic development as well as rapid population growth. Optimising water allocation in a ...

  3. Potential Role of Biochar in Water Management in Rainfed Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flavia, Namagembe

    2012-08-16

    employed to help manage agricultural water sustainably. Previous studies indicate that incorporation of biochar into sandy soil improves its water retention capacity. This study demonstrates how addition of biochar produced from different feedstock biomass...

  4. Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Joseph L.

    2001-01-11

    The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain ...

  5. 2005 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable energy technologies at federal facilities.

  6. 2006 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy and Water Management Awards recognize individuals, groups, and agencies for their outstanding contributions in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of advanced and renewable nergy technologies at federal facilities.

  7. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    V. D. ; Saegrov, S. ; Asset management for urban wastewater16) Parker, P. A. Asset Management Approach: Systems andFree Ride is Over: Asset Management Can Help Seminar, San

  8. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. A. Owca

    2007-06-21

    This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

  9. Waste management plan for Hanford spent nuclear fuel characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chastain, S.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Spinks, R.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-17

    A joint project was initiated between Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to address critical issues associated with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) stored at the Hanford Site. Recently, particular attention has been given to remediation of the SNF stored in the K Basins. A waste management plan (WMP) acceptable to both parties is required prior to the movement of selected material to the PNL facilities for examination. N Reactor and Single Pass Reactor (SPR) fuel has been stored for an extended period of time in the N Reactor, PUREX, K-East, and K-West Basins. Characterization plans call for transport of fuel material form the K Basins to the 327 Building Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) in the 300 Area for examination. However, PNL received a directive stating that no examination work will be started in PNL hot cell laboratories without an approved disposal route for all waste generated related to the activity. Thus, as part of the Characterization Program Management Plan for Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel, a waste management plan which will ensure that wastes generated as a result of characterization activities conducted at PNL will be accepted by WHC for disposition is required. This document contains the details of the waste handling plan that utilizes, to the greatest extent possible, established waste handling and disposal practices at Hanford between PNL and WHC. Standard practices are sufficient to provides for disposal of most of the waste materials, however, special consideration must be given to the remnants of spent nuclear fuel elements following examination. Fuel element remnants will be repackaged in an acceptable container such as the single element canister and returned to the K Basins for storage.

  10. WAP Memorandum 010: Quality Management Plan- Record Keeping and Reporting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    10 CFR 440.24 requires Grantees and Subgrantees administering the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) keep records as the Department of Energy (DOE) shall require. WAP Memorandum 15-10 Quality Management Plan addresses record keeping and reporting. The attached draft Client File Checklist identifies elements anticipated to be in a “complete” WAP client file. The specific contents and how the information is organized can still vary by Grantee.

  11. 2009-12 "Hold a Planned DOE-EM Meeting on LANL Water Quality...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 "Hold a Planned DOE-EM Meeting on LANL Water Quality Programs in a Northern New Mexico Location" 2009-12 "Hold a Planned DOE-EM Meeting on LANL Water Quality Programs in a...

  12. Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 1: An Overview of Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 1: An Overview of Water Use Angele Clarke A SEEDS Work Study Soils 11 Geology 12 Hydrology 13 Glenmore Ellison Improvement District 15 Description of UBCO Water Balance Situation 16 Inputs 16 Outputs 18 Description of UBCO Water Delivery System 19 Surface Water

  13. Westinghouse Hanford Company FY 1995 Materials Management Plan (MMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginson, M.C.

    1994-10-01

    The safe and sound operation of facilities and storage of nuclear material are top priorities within Hanford`s environmental management, site restoration mission. The projected materials estimates, based on the Materials Management Plan (MMP) assumptions outlined below, were prepared for Department of Energy (DOE) use in long-range planning. The Hanford MMP covers the period FY 1995 through FY 2005, as directed by DOE. All DOE Richland Operations (RL) Office facilities are essentially funded by the Office of Transition and Facilities Management, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). These facilities include PUREX, the UO{sub 3} plant, N-Reactor, T-Plant, K-Basins, FFTF, PFP and the 300 Area Fuel Fabrication facilities. Currently DP provides partial funding for the latter two facilities. Beginning in FY 1996 (in accordance with DOE-HQ MMP assumptions), EM will fund expenses related to the storage, monitoring, and safeguarding of all Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in the PFP. Ownership and costs related to movement and/or stabilization of that material will belong to EM programs (excluding NE material). It is also assumed that IAEA will take over inventory validation and surveillance of EM owned SNM at this time (FY 1996).

  14. Legacy Management CERCLA Sites. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riddle, Donna L.

    2007-05-03

    S.M. Stoller Corporation is the contractor for the Technical Assistance Contract (TAC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) operations. Stoller employs a management system that applies to all programs, projects, and business management systems funded through DOE-LM task orders. The management system incorporates the philosophy, policies, and requirements of health and safety, environmental compliance, and quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of project planning and implementation. Health and safety requirements are documented in the Health and Safety Manual (STO 2), the Radiological Control Manual (STO 3), the Integrated Safety Management System Description (STO 10), and the Drilling Health and Safety Requirements (STO 14). Environmental compliance policy and requirements are documented in the Environmental Management Program Implementation Manual (STO 11). The QA Program is documented in the Quality Assurance Manual (STO 1). The QA Manual (STO 1) implements the specific requirements and philosophy of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance. This manual also includes the requirements of other standards that are regularly imposed by customers, regulators, or other DOE orders. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 830, “Quality Assurance Requirements,” ANSI/ASQC E4-2004, “Quality Systems for Environmental Data and Technology Programs – Requirements with Guidance for Use,” and ISO 14001-2004, “Environmental Management Systems,” have been included. These standards are similar in content. The intent of the QA Manual (STO 1) is to provide a QA management system that incorporates the requirements and philosophy of DOE and other customers within the QA Manual. Criterion 1, “Quality Assurance Program,” identifies the fundamental requirements for establishing and implementing the QA management system; QA Instruction (QAI) 1.1, “QA Program Implementation,” identifies the TAC organizations that have responsibility for implementing the QA program requirements; and Appendix C of the QA Manual provides comparison tables that identify where the requirements of other standards are addressed in the QA Manual.

  15. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Evans, James W.; Parr, Patricia Dreyer

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  16. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    consumption and 7% of global energy consumption, withglobal water and wastewater infrastructure energy consumption

  17. Strategic Energy Management Plan For Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Steven A.; Hunt, W. D.

    2001-10-31

    This document reports findings and recommendations as a result of a design assistance project with Fort Buchanan with the goals of developing a Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Site. A strategy has been developed with three major elements in mind: 1) development of a strong foundation from which to build, 2) understanding technologies that are available, and 3) exploring financing options to fund the implementation of improvements. The objective of this report is to outline a strategy that can be used by Fort Buchanan to further establish an effective energy management program. Once a strategy is accepted, the next step is to take action. Some of the strategies defined in this Plan may be implemented directly. Other strategies may require the development of a more sophisticated tactical, or operational, plan to detail a roadmap that will lead to successful realization of the goal. Similarly, some strategies are not single events. Rather, some strategies will require continuous efforts to maintain diligence or to change the culture of the Base occupants and their efforts to conserve energy resources.

  18. Report on the Oregon Ballast Water Management Program in 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballast Water Management Program in 2004 Produced for the Oregon State Legislature By The Oregon Ballast regulations; shipping industry's compliance with Oregon law; and ballast water treatment technology as inefficient and having some safety constraints, ballast water exchange is still the primary treatment method

  19. Journal of Environmental Management 84 (2007) 534546 Collaborative environmental planning in river management: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Environmental Management 84 (2007) 534­546 Collaborative environmental planning in river Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) provides a well-established family of decision tools to aid stakeholder assessments of the National Envir- onmental Policy Act of 1969. In a recent national survey, the vast majority

  20. The Purdue Water Community Strategic Plan for 2011-2016 Interdisciplinary solutions for sustainable global and regional water resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Purdue Water Community Strategic Plan for 2011-2016 Interdisciplinary solutions for sustainable global and regional water resource Vision The Purdue Water Community (PWC) is a vibrant, interconnected information focused on solving global and regional water challenges. Mission The Purdue Water Community

  1. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-02-25

    This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

  2. Water Management: Clearing Cloudy and Muddy Water in Ponds and Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Water Management: Clearing Cloudy and Muddy Water in Ponds and Lakes T.L. Provin and J.L Pitt Professor and Soil Chemist, Program Specialist Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Cloudy or muddy water and ponds can

  3. Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-24

    This plan incorporates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) standard operating procedures (SOPs) into environmental monitoring activities and will be implemented at all sites managed by LM. This document provides detailed procedures for the field sampling teams so that samples are collected in a consistent and technically defensible manner. Site-specific plans (e.g., long-term surveillance and maintenance plans, environmental monitoring plans) document background information and establish the basis for sampling and monitoring activities. Information will be included in site-specific tabbed sections to this plan, which identify sample locations, sample frequencies, types of samples, field measurements, and associated analytes for each site. Additionally, within each tabbed section, program directives will be included, when developed, to establish additional site-specific requirements to modify or clarify requirements in this plan as they apply to the corresponding site. A flowchart detailing project tasks required to accomplish routine sampling is displayed in Figure 1. LM environmental procedures are contained in the Environmental Procedures Catalog (LMS/PRO/S04325), which incorporates American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), DOE, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance. Specific procedures used for groundwater and surface water monitoring are included in Appendix A. If other environmental media are monitored, SOPs used for air, soil/sediment, and biota monitoring can be found in the site-specific tabbed sections in Appendix D or in site-specific documents. The procedures in the Environmental Procedures Catalog are intended as general guidance and require additional detail from planning documents in order to be complete; the following sections fulfill that function and specify additional procedural requirements to form SOPs. Routine revision of this Sampling and Analysis Plan will be conducted annually at the beginning of each fiscal year when attachments in Appendix D, including program directives and sampling location/analytical tables, will be reviewed by project personnel and updated. The sampling location/analytical tables in Appendix D, however, may have interim updates according to project direction that are not reflected in this plan. Deviations from location/analytical tables in Appendix D prior to sampling will be documented in project correspondence (e.g., startup letters). If significant changes to other aspects of this plan are required before the annual update, then the plan will be revised as needed.

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2002-09-24

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to prepare a Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan. This document fulfills the requirement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This document was prepared by the Hydrology Section of the Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) Environmental Compliance Department, and it is the responsibility of this group to review the plan annually and update it every three years. This document is not, nor is it intended to be, an implementing document that sets forth specific details on carrying out field projects or operational policy. Rather, it is intended to give the reader insight to the groundwater protection philosophy at WIPP.

  5. Westinghouse Hanford Company FY 1996 Materials Management Plan (MMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginson, M.C.

    1995-12-01

    The safe and sound operation of facilities and the storage of nuclear material are top priorities within Hanford`s environmental management, site restoration mission. The assumptions, plans and Special Nuclear Material (SNM) inventory summaries contained in this document were prepared for Department of Energy (DOE) use for interim and long- range planning. In accordance with Richland DOE field office (DOE-RL) direction, year-end inventory values were not projected over an 11 year period, as historically done in previous MMP documents. This decision was made since significant SNM movements to or from Hanford are not projected in the foreseeable future. Instead, the inventory summaries within this document reflect an ``as of date`` of June 30, 1995.

  6. Managing Grazing for Water Quality Integrating research and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    tool box ­ not silver bullet. Factors that increase risk of water pollution with pathogens Distribution areas Distribution spaceDistribution space Factors that reduce risk of water pollution with pathogens that increase risk of water pollution with pathogens Distribution timeDistribution time cattle defecate near

  7. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy`s site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program`s ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program`s mission and vision, and summarizes the Program`s broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program`s approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program`s organization chart; the Commission`s regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms.

  8. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-11-07

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

  9. Office of Resource Management and Planning, February 2008 Page 1 1990's Budget Cut Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    , library materials, utilities, etc.: #12;Office of Resource Management and Planning, February 2008 PageOffice of Resource Management and Planning, February 2008 Page 1 1990's Budget Cut Overview. This was 21% of the 1,635 ladder faculty FTE (199091). Staff also participated in VERIP. Planning

  10. Data Management Plans for NEH Office of Digital Humanities Proposals and Awards1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    1 Data Management Plans for NEH Office of Digital Humanities Proposals and Awards1 Executive Summary The data management plan (DMP) should be short (no more than two pages) and will be submitted as a document supplementing a grant application. The plan will need to address two main topics: What data

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING / NEPA SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING / NEPA SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML@cemml.colostate.edu | http://www.cemml.colostate.edu Effective environmental planning and management of military and testing. The Center develops environmental planning documents for installations to incorporate

  12. RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Horton, Duane G.

    2001-01-18

    This document describes the interim status groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area A-AX.

  13. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    Buckley, C. A. ; Carbon footprint analysis for increasingeffectively reduce their carbon footprint. To accomplish7 February 2013. (8) The Carbon Footprint of Water; River

  14. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    C. ; Application of the LCA methodology to water managementtreatment plant. 10th SETAC LCA Case Studies Symposium.systems by using EIO-LCA-based multiobjective optimization.

  15. Risk Management for a Global Supply Chain Planning under Uncertainty: Models and Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Risk Management for a Global Supply Chain Planning under Uncertainty: Models and Algorithms Fengqi In this paper we consider the risk management for mid-term planning of a global multi-product chemical supply solve the resulting large scale industrial size problems. We also introduce risk management models

  16. texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality problems exist, affecting the environment and economy. Texas needs solutions. At the Texas Water Resources Institute, we help solve these pressing water

  17. Driving Water and Wastewater Utilities to More Sustainable Energy Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrel, L.; Liner, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Water Environment Federation (WEF) and industry leaders have identified the need for an energy roadmap to guide utilities of all sizes down the road to sustainable energy management through increased renewable energy production, energy...

  18. Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

    2008-01-01

    67   3.2.3 Temperature-gradient (heat-pipe)water management ( e.g . , heat-pipe effect), examination ofsubstantially due to this heat-pipe effect. Due to the

  19. Site design for urban water management in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera, José Pablo (Rivera De la Mora), 1967-

    2001-01-01

    As the world becomes aware of the scarcity of water resources and cities struggle to meet a growing demand, we face the challenge of finding more efficient ways to manage this vital resource. Cities in developing countries ...

  20. Managing water temperatures below hydroelectric facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.L.; Vermeyen, T.B.; O`Haver, G.G.

    1995-05-01

    Due to drought-related water temperature problems in the Bureau of Reclamation`s California Central Valley Project in the early 1990`s, engineers were forced to bypass water from the plants during critical periods. This was done at considerable cost in the form of lost revenue. As a result, an alternative method of lowering water temperature was developed and it has successfully lowered water temperatures downstream from hydroelectric facilities by using flexible rubber curtains. This innovative technology is aiding the survival of endangered fish populations. This article outlines the efforts and discusses the implementation of this method at several hydroelectric facilities in the area.

  1. University of Arizona Geography and Development 596J Water Management & Policy: The Water-Energy-Environment Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Arizona Geography and Development 596J 1 Water Management & Policy: The Water-Energy participants with a global overview of water management & policy challenges. Emphasis is placed on the water-energy water and energy have moved water-energy nexus analysis beyond straightforward quantification of energy

  2. Local Response to Global Climate Change: The Role of Local Development Plans in Climate Change Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2011-10-21

    change management issues in local policy making have remained a research rhetoric and have not yet translated into planning action. This gap between planning research and practice is probably due to lack of evidence based research on this issue...

  3. Optimal Location of Infiltration-Based Best Management Practices for Storm Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    and Bedient 1982; Zhen et al. 2004 is analogous to this study; however, this study focuses on infiltrationOptimal Location of Infiltration-Based Best Management Practices for Storm Water Management with a genetic algorithm to determine the optimal location of infiltration-based best management practices BMPs

  4. MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS COASTAL AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS COASTAL AQUIFERS C. P. Kumar Scientist `E1 dealing with exploitation, restoration and management of fresh groundwater in coastal aquifers, the key is disturbed by groundwater withdrawals and other human activities that lower groundwater levels, reduce fresh

  5. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01

    primary water management activities being considered relate to treatment of wastewater andprimary water concerns of the region: treatment of wastewater,

  6. forreading. Integrated Water Management for Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ; the Maderas del Carmen, Cańon de Santa Elena, and Ocampo Natural Reserve Areas in Mexico are threatened due. This research focuses on the Big Bend, a reach located along the Rio Grande mainstem. Important natural regions resource systems. Sustain- able water systems are those designed to meet present and future water demands

  7. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-02-14

    This 2002 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Permit Condition VII.U.3 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit) (New Mexico Environment Department [NMED], 1999a), and incorporates comments from the NMED received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2002 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. The Permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the most recent guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, and completion of the August 2001 sampling requested by the NMED, the Permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA processcan be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The NMED accepted that the Permittees are using the ACAA in a letter dated April 20, 2000.

  8. Bishop's University "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop's University "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Implementation Plan 1 Table Identification of all locations selling bottled water on campus................................Page 3 Alternative.......................................................................................Page 8 #12;Bishop's University "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Implementation Plan 2

  9. Management of produced water in oil and gas operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chirag V.

    2005-02-17

    Produced water handling has been an issue of concern for oil and gas producers as it is one of the major factors that cause abandonment of the producing well. The development of effective produced water management strategies poses a big challenge...

  10. Waste Management of Cuttings, Drilling Fluids, Flowback and Produced Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Waste Management of Cuttings, Drilling Fluids, Flowback and Produced Water the drill bit as it cuts deeper into the earth. This fluid, which is used only of the shale. Drilling muds are made up of a base fluid (water, mineral oil

  11. 11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jennifer

    Policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. Reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, ...

  12. Flexible design : an innovative approach for planning water infrastructure systems under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Melanie Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This thesis develops a framework for a flexible design approach to support decision-making in water supply infrastructure planning. It contrasts with a conventional, deterministic planning approach that uses past data or ...

  13. Data Management Plan for The Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Data Management Plan describes how DOE will handle data submitted by recipients as deliverables under the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

  14. Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans--Update

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-22

    This Guide provides guidelines for the development of an individual Cultural Resource Management Plan for each DOE facility and program. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  15. Suggested Elements for a Data Management Plan | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Suggested Elements for a Data Management Plan Funding Opportunities Funding Opportunities Home Grants & Contracts Support Award Search Public Abstracts Find Funding Early Career...

  16. Page 134 Environmental Studies and Planning Sonoma State University 2015-2016 Catalog ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Page 134 Environmental Studies and Planning Sonoma State University 2015-2016 Catalog ENVIRONMENTAL / Conservation and Restoration, Track 1 Thomas Jacobson / Planning and ENSP minors Rocky Rohwedder / Water Conservation and Restoration Planning Concentration Water Resources Management Bachelor of Science

  17. Lesson Learned by Environmental Management Complex-wide Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Roger Claycomb, Work Control Program Manager, DOE Idaho Operations Office. Office of Environmental Management Work Planning and Control Oversight. Contractor Good Practices and DOE EM Good Practices.

  18. Environmental guidelines for development of Cultural Resource Management plans. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to the DOE field managements with responsibility for the development of an individual Cultural Resource Management Plan for each DOE facility and program.

  19. Comparison of selected foreign plans and practices for spent fuel and high-level waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Hazelton, R.F.; Bradley, D.J.

    1990-04-01

    This report describes the major parameters for management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes in selected foreign countries as of December 1989 and compares them with those in the United States. The foreign countries included in this study are Belgium, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All the countries are planning for disposal of spent fuel and/or high-level wastes in deep geologic repositories. Most countries (except Canada and Sweden) plan to reprocess their spent fuel and vitrify the resultant high-level liquid wastes; in comparison, the US plans direct disposal of spent fuel. The US is planning to use a container for spent fuel as the primary engineered barrier. The US has the most developed repository concept and has one of the earliest scheduled repository startup dates. The repository environment presently being considered in the US is unique, being located in tuff above the water table. The US also has the most prescriptive regulations and performance requirements for the repository system and its components. 135 refs., 8 tabs.

  20. Water Management in A PEMFC: Water Transport Mechanism and Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    , 2010; accepted October 09, 2011 1 Introduction Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and the resulting drying and/or flooding in the constituent components. In current PEMFC technologies, water content flood, and block the pores of the CLs, GDLs, and gas chan- nels. Both a dry membrane and flooded

  1. University of Bristol Risk Management Policy (Updated September 2014) Strategic Planning and Governance Office, September 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    University of Bristol Risk Management Policy (Updated September 2014) 1 Strategic Planning and Governance Office, September 2014 University of Bristol Risk Management Policy 1. Risk management Given the uncertainties faced by institutions, it is helpful explicitly to identify and address risks. Risk management

  2. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01

    change and global water resources. Global Environmentalin Managing International Water Resources (No. WPS 1303):Darcy Lecture Tour. Ground Water, 45(4), 390-391. Sadoff,

  3. Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A.

    2011-03-11

    Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods for managing very large volumes of water most of which will contain large quantities of salt and other dissolved minerals. Produced water from oil and gas production also typically contains large quantities of dissolved solids. Therefore, many of the same practices that are established and used for managing produced water also may be applicable for extracted water. This report describes the probable composition of the extracted water that is removed from the formations, options for managing the extracted water, the pros and cons of those options, and some opportunities for beneficial use of the water. Following the introductory material in Chapter 1, the report is divided into chapters covering the following topics: (Chapter 2) examines the formations that are likely candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration and provides a general evaluation of the geochemical characteristics of the formations; (Chapter 3) makes some preliminary estimates of the volume of water that could be extracted; (Chapter 4) provides a qualitative review of many potential technologies and practices for managing extracted water and for each technology or management practice, pros and cons are provided; (Chapter 5) explores the potential costs of water management; and (Chapter 6) presents the conclusions.

  4. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lata

    1996-09-26

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  5. Process safety management and interim or remedial action plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, M.J.; Henney, D.A.; Heitzman, V.K. [HWS Consulting Group, Inc., Omaha, NE (United States); Day, D.W. [Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Remedial Actions, including Interim Remedial Activities, often require the use of treatment facilities or stabilization techniques using on-site chemical processes. As such, the 29 CFR 1910.119 Process Safety Management (PSM) of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (PSM Standard) and the USEPA regulations for Risk Management Planning require that these chemicals and their attendant potential hazards be identified. A Hazard and Operation (HAZOP) study, Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis, or equivalent graphic presentation of processes must be completed. These studies form a segment of the Process Hazard Analysis (PHA). HAZOP addresses each system and each element of a system that could deviate from normal operations and thus cause a hazard. A full assessment of each process is produced by looking at the hazards, consequences, causes and personnel protection needed. Many variables must be considered when choosing the appropriate PHA technique including the size of the plant, the number of processes, the types of processes, and the types of chemicals used. A mixture of these techniques may be required to adequately transmit information about the process being evaluated.

  6. Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) Waste Management Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VOLKMAN, D.D.

    1999-10-27

    This document is the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH), that implements the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC), HNF-MP-599, Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) document, and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement with Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), Sections 6.5 and 7.8. WHM is responsible for the treatment, storage, and disposal of liquid and solid wastes generated at the Hanford Site as well as those wastes received from other US Department of Energy (DOE) and non-DOE sites. WMH operations include the Low-Level Burial Grounds, Central Waste Complex (a mixed-waste storage complex), a nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility, the Transuranic Storage Facility, T Plant, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facility, 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, the 242-A Evaporator, 300 Area Treatment Effluent Disposal Facility, the 340 Facility (a radioactive liquid waste handling facility), 222-S Laboratory, the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility, and the Hanford TRU Waste Program.

  7. Effects of Brush Management on Water Resources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, C. Allan; Gregory, Lucas

    2008-01-01

    vegetation growing on abandoned agricultural fields nearby used only 6.2 inches of water. 10 Tromble (1972) also measured the daily rise and fall of a shallow riparian aquifer with a typical depth of 10 to 13 feet below a mesquite woodland...

  8. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 (Management Publication)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  9. FY95 software project management plan: TMACS, CASS computer systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spurling, D.G.

    1994-11-11

    The FY95 Work Plan for TMACS and CASS Software Projects describes the activities planned for the current fiscal year. This plan replaces WHC-SD-WM-SDP-008. The TMACS project schedule is included in the TWRS Integrated Schedule.

  10. Boston College Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan January 2014 BOSTON COLLEGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    9 Meetings 10 Plans Development and Maintenance 10 Plan Review, Testing, and Exercises 11 Training Additional Command Staff 19 Operations Staff 19 Logistics Staff 19 Planning Staff 20 Finance & Administration

  11. TIPSTER Text Phase II Configuration Management Plan Version1.2p 3June1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application LifeCycle The TIPSTER CM process imposes two control gates, PDR and FOC, on the TIPSTERTIPSTER Text Phase II Configuration Management Plan Version1.2p 3June1996 Architecture Committee Management (CM) Plan for identifying, controlling, and auditing the TIPSTER Architecture status

  12. NASA ROSES CCS NNH13ZDA001N-CARBON MSTMIP PHASE II DATA MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NASA ROSES CCS NNH13ZDA001N-CARBON MSTMIP PHASE II DATA MANAGEMENT PLAN 4-1 MSTMIP PHASE II: DATA UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, 4 CARNEGIE INSTITUTE, AND 5 JPL NASA The following Data Management Plan was part of the NASA ROSES 2013 Proposal North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model

  13. CAPITAL PLANNING AND SPACE MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR THE USE OF OUTDOOR SPACE ON THE CAMPUS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAPITAL PLANNING AND SPACE MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR THE USE OF OUTDOOR SPACE ON THE CAMPUS SPACE AND OUTDOOR SPACE Capital Planning and Space Management offers event scheduling to student taking responsibility and agreeing to reimburse the University for the Cost of whatever damage

  14. Linda YellinRichard AdamsAndres Weintraub Land Management Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hand side of the recreation impact of alternative E indicates that the demand for recreation facilitiesLinda YellinRichard AdamsAndres Weintraub Land Management Planning: a method of evaluating December 1982 #12;Land Management Planning: a method of evaluating alternatives Introduction " . Land

  15. The Kailua Community Survey Results and Implications for the Kailua Beach and Dune Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kailua Community Survey Results and Implications for the Kailua Beach and Dune Management Plan to Pay Connections to the Kailua Beach and Dune Management Plan Next Steps Appendices Appendix and revetments public and private property Figure 6. Protecting beach dunes on the basis of ecology and economics

  16. DataONE Example NSF Data Management Plan www.dataone.org 2011 DataONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ONE Example Data Management Plan, based on the work of C.D. Keeling and Colleagues,4]. In addition to the CO2 data, we will record weather data (wind speed and directionDataONE Example NSF Data Management Plan www.dataone.org © 2011 Data

  17. Utilization of Heat Pump Water Heaters for Load Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Jackson, Roderick K; Munk, Jeffrey D; Gehl, Anthony C; Lyne, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    The Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters require residential electric storage water heaters with volumes larger than 55 gallons to have an energy factor greater than 2.0 after April 2015. While this standard will significantly increase the energy efficiency of water heaters, large electric storage water heaters that do not use heat pump technologies may no longer be available. Since utilities utilize conventional large-volume electric storage water heaters for thermal storage in demand response programs, there is a concern that the amended standard will significantly limit demand response capacity. To this end, Oak Ridge National Laboratory partnered with the Tennessee Valley Authority to investigate the load management capability of heat pump water heaters that meet or exceed the forthcoming water heater standard. Energy consumption reduction during peak periods was successfully demonstrated, while still meeting other performance criteria. However, to minimize energy consumption, it is important to design load management strategies that consider the home s hourly hot water demand so that the homeowner has sufficient hot water.

  18. Complex Adaptive Systems Simulation-Optimization Framework for Adaptive Urban Water Resources Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giacomoni, Marcio

    2012-10-19

    challenge the continued well-being of society. Due to increasing environmental and financial constraints, water management paradigms have shifted from supply augmentation to demand management, and water conservation initiatives may efficiently decrease water...

  19. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammersley, R.J. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation.

  20. A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Stormwater Management Hydropower Generation Wastewateragricultural irrigation, hydropower, industry, fishing,dams for water storage and hydropower and diversions for

  1. Produced water volumes and management practices in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C. E.; Veil, J. A.

    2009-09-01

    Produced water volume generation and management in the United States are not well characterized at a national level. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked Argonne National Laboratory to compile data on produced water associated with oil and gas production to better understand the production volumes and management of this water. The purpose of this report is to improve understanding of produced water by providing detailed information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the ways in which produced water is disposed or reused. As the demand for fresh water resources increases, with no concomitant increase in surface or ground water supplies, alternate water sources, like produced water, may play an important role. Produced water is water from underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil or gas production. Because the water has been in contact with hydrocarbon-bearing formations, it contains some of the chemical characteristics of the formations and the hydrocarbons. It may include water from the reservoir, water previously injected into the formation, and any chemicals added during the production processes. The physical and chemical properties of produced water vary considerably depending on the geographic location of the field, the geologic formation, and the type of hydrocarbon product being produced. Produced water properties and volume also vary throughout the lifetime of a reservoir. Produced water is the largest volume by-product or waste stream associated with oil and gas exploration and production. Previous national produced water volume estimates are in the range of 15 to 20 billion barrels (bbl; 1 bbl = 42 U.S. gallons) generated each year in the United States (API 1988, 2000; Veil et al. 2004). However, the details on generation and management of produced water are not well understood on a national scale. Argonne National Laboratory developed detailed national-level information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the manner in which produced water is managed. This report presents an overview of produced water, summarizes the study, and presents results from the study at both the national level and the state level. Chapter 2 presents background information on produced water, describing its chemical and physical characteristics, where it is produced, and the potential impacts of produced water to the environment and to oil and gas operations. A review of relevant literature is also included. Chapter 3 describes the methods used to collect information, including outreach efforts to state oil and gas agencies and related federal programs. Because of the inconsistency in the level of detail provided by various state agencies, the approaches and assumptions used to extrapolate data values are also discussed. In Chapter 4, the data are presented, and national trends and observations are discussed. Chapter 5 presents detailed results for each state, while Chapter 6 presents results from federal sources for oil and gas production (i.e., offshore, onshore, and tribal lands). Chapter 7 summarizes the study and presents conclusions.

  2. MIDDLE SNAKE SUBBASINS MANAGEMENT PLAN SUPPLEMENT PRIORITIZED IMPLEMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................7 Key Limiting Factor #1: Water Flow/Browsing..........................................................................................9 Key Limiting Factor #5: Water Quality ...................................................................................16 Fourth Priority ­ Restore Water Flows

  3. Characterization program management plan for Hanford K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, L.A.

    1995-10-18

    A management plan was developed for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) to work together on a program to provide characterization data to support removal, conditioning and subsequent dry storage of the spent nuclear fuels stored at the Hanford K Basins. The Program initially supports gathering data to establish the current state of the fuel in the two basins. Data Collected during this initial effort will apply to all SNF Project objectives. N Reactor fuel has been degrading with extended storage resulting in release of material to the basin water in K East and to the closed conisters in K West. Characterization of the condition of these materials and their responses to various conditioning processes and dry storage environments are necessary to support disposition decisions. Characterization will utilize the expertise and capabilities of WHC and PNL organizations to support the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project goals and objectives. This Management Plan defines the structure and establishes the roles for the participants providing the framework for WHC and PNL to support the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project at Hanford

  4. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

  5. Measure Guideline: Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, B.

    2011-12-01

    Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas. When conducting a total gut rehab of a structure or constructing a new home, best practice installation and detailing for effective waterproofing are critically important at bathtub and shower assemblies. Water management issues in a structure may go unrecognized for long periods, so that when they are finally observed, the damage from long-term water exposure is extensive. A gut rehab is often undertaken when a home has experienced a natural disaster or when the homeowners are interested in converting an old, high-energy-use building into a high-quality, efficient structure that meets or exceeds one of the national energy standards, such as ENERGY STAR or LEED for homes. During a gut rehab, bath areas need to be replaced with diligent attention to detail. Employing effective water management practices in the installation and detailing of tub and shower assemblies will minimize or eliminate water issues within the building cavities and on the finished surfaces. A residential tub-and-shower surround or shower-stall assembly is designed to handle a high volume of water - 2.5 gallons per minute, with multiple baths occurring during a typical day. Transitions between dissimilar materials and connections between multiple planes must be installed with care to avoid creating a pathway for water to enter the building assemblies. Due to the high volume of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure, a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. At each stage of construction, successive trades must take care not to create a defect nor to compound or cover up a previous trade's defect. Covering a defect hides the inevitable point of failure and may even exacerbate the situation.

  6. An Implementation Plan for Integrated Control and Asset Management of Petroleum Production Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, James H.

    An Implementation Plan for Integrated Control and Asset Management of Petroleum Production and maintenance. A research project was initiated to study the feasibility of an intelligent asset management. I. INTRODUCTION Asset management in modern process plants has become a very challenging process

  7. Towards Solid IT Change Management: Automated Detection of Conflicting IT Change Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemper, Alfons

    Towards Solid IT Change Management: Automated Detection of Conflicting IT Change Plans Sebastian kemper@in.tum.de Abstract--Change Management, a core process of the Informa- tion Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL), is concerned with the management of changes to networks and services to satisfy

  8. "Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    . Current regulations, promulgated at the local and state levels, have focused on impacts of development"Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management." Teresa Culver Associate Professor tculver@virginia.edu ce.virginia.edu/faculty/culvert.html Dept. of Civil & Environmental

  9. Decision Support System for Adaptive Water Supply Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    levels, 3 optimum reservoir balancing, and 4 maximum hydropower revenues. Case studies document the value for potential floods require adaptive management of the system as climatic and hydrologic events occur, and the maximization of revenues from three hydropower facilities. It is normally assumed that the water supply system

  10. Optimization Models for Shale Gas Water Management Linlin Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Optimization Models for Shale Gas Water Management Linlin Yang , Jeremy Manno and Ignacio E With the advancement in directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, shale gas is predicted to provide 46% of the United States natural gas supply by 20351 . The number of wells drilled in the Marcellus shale play has

  11. Emergy Analysis of Sugarcane (energy crop) Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    diagrams Energy & Material Flow Data Emergy computations Analysis 5. Case Study #12;12Annual Southwest and Material Flow data #12;EmergyEvaluationTable 15 Unit Solar Solar Data EMERGY* EMERGY Note Item Unit (unitsEmergy Analysis of Sugarcane (energy crop) Water Management HENDRY COUNTY SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS

  12. Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  13. All Over the Map: The Diversity of Western Water Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casado-Pérez, Vanessa; Cain, Bruce E.; Hui, Iris; Abbott, Coral; Doson, Kaley; Lebow, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Tribes generally have senior water rights over all otherto ensure that they comply with water compacts made with thepre-existing Indian tribes water rights in the New Mexico

  14. Refrigerant charge management in a heat pump water heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Jie; Hampton, Justin W.

    2014-06-24

    Heat pumps that heat or cool a space and that also heat water, refrigerant management systems for such heat pumps, methods of managing refrigerant charge, and methods for heating and cooling a space and heating water. Various embodiments deliver refrigerant gas to a heat exchanger that is not needed for transferring heat, drive liquid refrigerant out of that heat exchanger, isolate that heat exchanger against additional refrigerant flowing into it, and operate the heat pump while the heat exchanger is isolated. The heat exchanger can be isolated by closing an electronic expansion valve, actuating a refrigerant management valve, or both. Refrigerant charge can be controlled or adjusted by controlling how much liquid refrigerant is driven from the heat exchanger, by letting refrigerant back into the heat exchanger, or both. Heat pumps can be operated in different modes of operation, and segments of refrigerant conduit can be interconnected with various components.

  15. Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.

    2011-06-03

    Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

  16. Rangeland Resource Management for Texans: Strategic Planning for Success 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, William E.

    2002-03-04

    - gic plan may be for 10 or 20 years, but you will need a tac- tical plan for a shorter period, perhaps 5 years. Defining Your Mission All planning should begin with a comprehensive look at your enterprise and what it is all about. Defining the mis- sion...

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program A Reference Plan for Control Room Modernization: Planning and Analysis Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo; Ronald Boring; Lew Hanes; Kenneth Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is collaborating with a U.S. nuclear utility to bring about a systematic fleet-wide control room modernization. To facilitate this upgrade, a new distributed control system (DCS) is being introduced into the control rooms of these plants. The DCS will upgrade the legacy plant process computer and emergency response facility information system. In addition, the DCS will replace an existing analog turbine control system with a display-based system. With technology upgrades comes the opportunity to improve the overall human-system interaction between the operators and the control room. To optimize operator performance, the LWRS Control Room Modernization research team followed a human-centered approach published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-0711, Rev. 3, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (O’Hara et al., 2012), prescribes four phases for human factors engineering. This report provides examples of the first phase, Planning and Analysis. The three elements of Planning and Analysis in NUREG-0711 that are most crucial to initiating control room upgrades are: • Operating Experience Review: Identifies opportunities for improvement in the existing system and provides lessons learned from implemented systems. • Function Analysis and Allocation: Identifies which functions at the plant may be optimally handled by the DCS vs. the operators. • Task Analysis: Identifies how tasks might be optimized for the operators. Each of these elements is covered in a separate chapter. Examples are drawn from workshops with reactor operators that were conducted at the LWRS Human System Simulation Laboratory HSSL and at the respective plants. The findings in this report represent generalized accounts of more detailed proprietary reports produced for the utility for each plant. The goal of this LWRS report is to disseminate the technique and provide examples sufficient to serve as a template for other utilities’ projects for control room modernization.

  18. Facilities Operations, Planning, and Engineering Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Richard M.

    Facilities Operations, Planning, and Design Engineering Services Energy Management & Water Reception Campus Maintenance Housing Support Life Safety Services HVAC Energy Management Controls Campus Grounds Maintenance Carolina North Forest Management Stormwater Maintenance In-house Landscape

  19. Appendix 22 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..............................................................................................................................2-11 SECTION 3.0 APPLICABLE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS .............................................................3-1 3.1 MONTANA WATER QUALITY STANDARDS............................................................................................3-1 3.2 TRIBAL WATER QUALITY STANDARDS

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A.; Busby, Jeremy; Hallbert, Bruce; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Smith, Curtis; Barnard, Cathy

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  2. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  3. Climate change and water supply, management and use: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.H.; Draves, J.D.; Hunsaker, C.T.

    1992-05-01

    There is evidence that atmospheric concentrations Of C0{sub 2}, tropospheric 0{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4}, among other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect, have increased in recent decades, and that these changes may induce changes in global air temperatures and regional climate features in coming years. A literature review was conducted to sample the literature base on which our understanding of the water resource impacts of climate change rests. Water resource issues likely to be important include hydrologic response to climate change, the resilience of water supply systems to changing climatic and hydrologic conditions, and the effects of climate change on water quality and water uses (such as navigation and energy generation). A computer-assisted search of literature on the effects of climate change on these subjects was conducted. All studies were classified by type of paper (e.g., review, discussion, case study), region, water resource variable studied, and source of climate scenario. The resulting bibliography containing more than 200 references was largely annotated. Case studies of potential hydrologic impacts have been more common than studies of impacts on water management or water use, but this apparent research gap is decreasing. Case studies demonstrating methods of incorporating potential risks of climate change into water project planning and management have been performed. Considerable variability in regional coverage exists; the Great Lakes basin and California receive relatively more attention than such regions as New England and the Missouri River basin. General circulation model-based and hypothetical climate scenarios have been the dominant sources of climate scenarios used in case studies, although a variety of other methods for developing climate scenarios have been developed.

  4. Planning for water efficient cities: Landscape, microclimate, and heterogeneity in residential water demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lassiter, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Abundance: Economic Solutions to Water Scarcity. Kindle ed.and K. S. Jones. 2014. Water use Classification of Landscapearea-map. ———. . .2008. Water use during Water Shortage

  5. Community water systems recovering from the drought: Lessons learned; plans made 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Story by Kathy Wythe Community water systems recovering from the drought LESSONS LEARNED; PLANS MADE Summer 2012 tx H2O 7 ] An East Texas water supply reservoir was so low that water was unable to be withdrawn using the normal intake...

  6. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

  7. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  8. The Optimized Integration of the Decontamination Plan and the Radwaste Management Plan into Decommissioning Plan to the VVR-S Research Reactor from Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barariu, G. [National Authority for Nuclear Activity-Subsidiary of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Projects (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents the progress of the Decontamination Plan and Radioactive Waste Management Plan which accompanies the Decommissioning Plan for research reactor VVR-S located in Magurele, Ilfov, near Bucharest, Romania. The new variant of the Decommissioning Plan was elaborated taking into account the IAEA recommendation concerning radioactive waste management. A new feasibility study for VVR-S decommissioning was also elaborated. The preferred safe management strategy for radioactive wastes produced by reactor decommissioning is outlined. The strategy must account for reactor decommissioning, as well as rehabilitation of the existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant and the upgrade of the Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at Baita-Bihor. Furthermore, the final rehabilitation of the laboratories and reusing of cleaned reactor building is envisaged. An inventory of each type of radioactive waste is presented. The proposed waste management strategy is selected in accordance with the IAEA assistance. Environmental concerns are a part of the radioactive waste management strategy. In conclusion: The current version 8 of the Draft Decommissioning Plan which include the Integrated concept of Decontamination and Decommissioning and Radwaste Management, reflects the substantial work that has been incorporated by IFIN-HH in collaboration with SITON, which has resulted in substantial improvement in document The decommissioning strategy must take into account costs for VVR-S Reactor decommissioning, as well as costs for much needed refurbishments to the radioactive waste treatment plant and the Baita-Bihor waste disposal repository. Several improvements to the Baita-Bihor repository and IFIN-HH waste treatment facility were proposed. The quantities and composition of the radioactive waste generated by VVR-S Reactor dismantling were again estimated by streams and the best demonstrated practicable processing solution was proposed. The estimated quantities of materials to be managed in the near future raise some issues that need to be solved swiftly, such as treatment of aluminum and lead and graphite management. It is envisaged that these materials to be treated to Subsidiary for Nuclear Research (SCN) Pitesti. (authors)

  9. Real-Time Water Quality Management in the Grassland Water District

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josphine R.; Taylor, Christophe M.; Marciochi, Don; Lower, Scott; Woodruff, Veronica; Wright, Diane; Poole, Tim

    2004-12-10

    The purpose of the research project was to advance the concept of real-time water quality management in the San Joaquin Basin by developing an application to drainage of seasonal wetlands in the Grassland Water District. Real-time water quality management is defined as the coordination of reservoir releases, return flows and river diversions to improve water quality conditions in the San Joaquin River and ensure compliance with State water quality objectives. Real-time water quality management is achieved through information exchange and cooperation between shakeholders who contribute or withdraw flow and salt load to or from the San Joaquin River. This project complements a larger scale project that was undertaken by members of the Water Quality Subcommittee of the San Joaquin River Management Program (SJRMP) and which produced forecasts of flow, salt load and San Joaquin River assimilative capacity between 1999 and 2003. These forecasts can help those entities exporting salt load to the River to develop salt load targets as a mechanism for improving compliance with salinity objectives. The mass balance model developed by this project is the decision support tool that helps to establish these salt load targets. A second important outcome of this project was the development and application of a methodology for assessing potential impacts of real-time wetland salinity management. Drawdown schedules are typically tied to weather conditions and are optimized in traditional practices to maximize food sources for over-wintering wildfowl as well as providing a biological control (through germination temperature) of undesirable weeds that compete with the more proteinaceous moist soil plants such as swamp timothy, watergrass and smartweed. This methodology combines high resolution remote sensing, ground-truthing vegetation surveys using established survey protocols and soil salinity mapping using rapid, automated electromagnetic sensor technology. This survey methodology could be complemented with biological surveys of bird use and invertebrates to produce a robust long-term monitoring strategy for habitat health and sustainability.

  10. 384 Power plant waste water sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagerty, K.J.; Knotek, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the 384 Power House Sampling and Analysis Plan. The Plan describes sampling methods, locations, frequency, analytes, and stream descriptions. The effluent streams from 384, were characterized in 1989, in support of the Stream Specific Report (WHC-EP-0342, Addendum 1).

  11. Information Resources Management Strategic Plan Appendix FY2014...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strategic Plan Goal 1 through three enterprise IRM performance measures: Modernization Cost Savings Reinvested into DOE Mission: Measure the amount of savings from modernization...

  12. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Environmental Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Business Center. EMCBCNEPA-APS-2013 More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Planning Summary for EM Consolidated Business Center (EMCBC) 2012 General Counsel's Reminder...

  13. Water resources: sustainable water supply management and basin wide modelling Internationally it has been recognized that the most important challenge to ensuring sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Water resources: sustainable water supply management and basin wide modelling Internationally it has been recognized that the most important challenge to ensuring sustainable water use is implementing integrated water resources management (IWRM). It provides the best framework for balancing

  14. 2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Office of Environmental Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

  15. Developing and assessing accident management plans for nuclear power plants, Development process and criteria. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S.; Meyer, O.R.; Ward, L.W. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-08-01

    This document is the first volume of a two-volume NUREG/CR. It describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria that can be used for assessing the adequacy of severe accident management plans for nuclear power plants. The general attributes of accident management plans (Phase 1) are identified, and a process for developing and implementing severe accident management plans (Phase 2) is described. This process is based on a prototype process described in NUREG/CR-5543. The prototype process was revised using results from an evaluation of this process (Phase 3), which is documented in Volume 2. General criteria for assessing the adequacy of accident management plans are also presented (Phase 4). These criteria were based on process specific criteria presented in Volume 2 and NUREG/CR-5543.

  16. Developing and assessing accident management plans for nuclear power plants, Development process and criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S.; Meyer, O.R.; Ward, L.W. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-08-01

    This document is the first volume of a two-volume NUREG/CR. It describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria that can be used for assessing the adequacy of severe accident management plans for nuclear power plants. The general attributes of accident management plans (Phase 1) are identified, and a process for developing and implementing severe accident management plans (Phase 2) is described. This process is based on a prototype process described in NUREG/CR-5543. The prototype process was revised using results from an evaluation of this process (Phase 3), which is documented in Volume 2. General criteria for assessing the adequacy of accident management plans are also presented (Phase 4). These criteria were based on process specific criteria presented in Volume 2 and NUREG/CR-5543.

  17. A Forest Fire Simulation Tool for Economic Planning in Fire Suppression Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    A Forest Fire Simulation Tool for Economic Planning in Fire Suppression Management Models fire spread behavior of forest fires provides important information for decision-making. Specific resource positioning to control and extinguish forest fire, decisions can be validated before

  18. Integrating regional strategic transportation planning and supply chain management : along the path to sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sgouridis, Sgouris P

    2005-01-01

    A systems perspective for regional strategic transportation planning (RSTP) for freight movements involves an understanding of Supply Chain Management (SCM). This thesis argues that private sector freight shippers and ...

  19. Management Policy for Planning, Programming, Budgeting, Operation, Maintenance and Disposal of Real Property

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-05-20

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) management policy for the planning, programming, budgeting, operation, maintenance and disposal of real property owned by the United States and under the custody and control of DOE.

  20. The Evolution of California State Water Planning 1850-1928

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, W. Turrentine; Pisani, Donald J

    1983-01-01

    underground both water These cost, it from at Auburn, to delay not entirely But the aqueduct Dam,Dam expected as well as provide cheap power to those who water. 11 on underground

  1. Program and Project Management Policy for the Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Acquisition of Capital Assets

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-10

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) program and project management policy for the planning, programming, budgeting, and acquisition of capital assets consistent with the following Office of Management and Budget (OMB) circulars: OMB Circular A-11, Part 3, Planning, Budgeting, and Acquisition of Capital Assets, and the supplement to Part 3, Capital Programming Guide; OMB Circular A-123; OMB Circular A-127; and OMB Circular A-130. Does not cancel other directives. Canceled by DOE N 251.99

  2. Developing a Water Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeCommunication &20081-929-200499Actof2014 BudgetDepartment of Energy

  3. Integrated Energy-Water Planning in the Western and Texas Interconnections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent Tidwell; John Gasper; Robert Goldstein; Jordan Macknick; Gerald Sehlke; Michael Webber; Mark Wigmosta

    2013-07-01

    While long-term regional electricity transmission planning has traditionally focused on cost, infrastructure utilization, and reliability, issues concerning the availability of water represent an emerging issue. Thermoelectric expansion must be considered in the context of competing demands from other water use sectors balanced with fresh and non-fresh water supplies subject to climate variability. An integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) is being developed that will enable planners in the Western and Texas Interconnections to analyze the potential implications of water availability and cost for long-range transmission planning. The project brings together electric transmission planners (Western Electricity Coordinating Council and Electric Reliability Council of Texas) with western water planners (Western Governors’ Association and the Western States Water Council). This paper lays out the basic framework for this integrated Energy-Water DSS.

  4. Public Attitudes toward Water Management and Drought in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoutenborough, James W.; Vedlitz, Arnold

    2013-12-19

    Water management is becoming increasingly salient as climate change continues to alter the environment, resulting in more severe and frequent droughts. To address water management issues, large-scale projects may be needed. ...

  5. Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-03-02

    This Soil Management Plan applies to all activities conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that involve soil disturbance and potential management of waste soil. The plan was prepared under the direction of the Y-12 Environmental Compliance Department of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Soil disturbances related to maintenance activities, utility and building construction projects, or demolition projects fall within the purview of the plan. This Soil Management Plan represents an integrated, visually oriented, planning and information resource tool for decision making involving excavation or disturbance of soil at Y-12. This Soil Management Plan addresses three primary elements. (1) Regulatory and programmatic requirements for management of soil based on the location of a soil disturbance project and/or the regulatory classification of any contaminants that may be present (Chap. 2). Five general regulatory or programmatic classifications of soil are recognized to be potentially present at Y-12; soil may fall under one or more these classifications: (a) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) pursuant to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facilities Agreement; (b) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); (c) RCRA 3004(u) solid waste managements units pursuant to the RCRA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 permit for the ORR; (d) Toxic Substances and Control Act-regulated soil containing polychlorinated biphenyls; and (e) Radiologically contaminated soil regulated under the Atomic Energy Act review process. (2) Information for project planners on current and future planned remedial actions (RAs), as prescribed by CERCLA decision documents (including the scope of the actions and remedial goals), land use controls implemented to support or maintain RAs, RCRA post-closure regulatory requirements for former waste management units, legacy contamination source areas and distribution of contamination in soils, and environmental infrastructure (e.g., caps, monitoring systems, etc.) that is in place or planned in association with RAs. (3) Regulatory considerations and processes for management and disposition of waste soil upon generation, including regulatory drivers, best management practices (BMPs), waste determination protocols, waste acceptance criteria, and existing waste management procedures and BMPs for Y-12. This Soil Management Plan provides information to project planners to better coordinate their activities with other organizations and programs with a vested interest in soil disturbance activities at Y-12. The information allows project managers and maintenance personnel to evaluate and anticipate potential contaminant levels that may be present at a proposed soil disturbance site prior to commencement of activities and allows a more accurate assessment of potential waste management requirements.

  6. Waste Management Plan for the Oak Ridge National Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project Quality Assurance Plan, this Waste Management Plan establishes clear lines of responsibility and authority, documentation requirements, and operational guidance for the collection, identification, segregation, classification, packaging, certification, and storage/disposal of wastes. These subjects are discussed in the subsequent sections of this document.

  7. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Planning: The Key to Surviving Drought 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-05-02

    survival strategy. However, even survival requires that you have a plan flexible enough to deal with the individual circum- stances of each drought as it comes. What is a drought? Droughts are a part of all environments and have plagued agriculturalists... in 2 of every 5 years. How can I survive a drought? Surviving drought requires planning for it. Your plan should include strategies for finances, grazing manage- ment and stock reduction, as well as for vegetation recov- ery after the drought ends...

  8. Water Management of Noninsulating and Insulating Sheathings: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-04-01

    There is an increasing market in liquid (or fluid) applied water management barriers for residential applications that could be used in place of tapes and other self-adhering membranes if applied correctly, especially around penetrations in the enclosure. This report discusses current best practices, recommends ways in which the best practices can be improved, and looks at some current laboratory testing and testing standards.

  9. The Essentials for GA Water Planning The Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    and may extend to 10-12 years. · The process is likely to cost each state millions in legal fees Measures 4. State & Substate Planning Structure 5. Institutional Powers & Authorities 6. Intergovernmental

  10. Decision Support for IntegratedDecision Support for Integrated WaterWater--Energy PlanningEnergy Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    · Thermoelectric cooling · Hydropower · Extraction and refining · Fuel production (ethanol, hydrogen) Estimated -Cost Regulators -Air Quality -Water Quality -Instream Flows -Water Rights -Energy Reliability development: · Identify metrics and variables, · System conceptualization, and · Model review. ­ Decision

  11. Decision Support for IntegratedDecision Support for Integrated WaterWater--Energy PlanningEnergy Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    /Commercial -Industrial -Agriculture -Environment -Energy Energy Providers -Peak/Base -Generation Type -Location -Capacity Surface Water Ground Water Population Growth Industry Fuels Wind Hydro Solar Thermoelectric #12;System by ­ Fuel type, - Installed c

  12. An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

    2011-04-30

    This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan, fiscal year 1994. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A was promulgated in final form on September 26, 1988. The order requires heads of field organizations to prepare and to submit updates on the waste management plans for all operations under their purview according to the format in Chap. 6, {open_quotes}Waste Management Plan Outline.{close_quotes} These plans are to be submitted by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) in December of each year and distributed to the DP-12, ES&H-1, and other appropriate DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) organizations for review and comment. This document was prepared in response to this requirement for fiscal year (FY) 1994. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) waste management mission is reduction, collection, storage, treatment, and disposal of DOE wastes, generated primarily in pursuit of ORNL missions, in order to protect human health and safety and the environment. In carrying out this mission, waste management staff in the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) will (1) guide ORNL in optimizing waste reduction and waste management capabilities and (2) conduct waste management operations in a compliant, publicly acceptable, technically sound, and cost-efficient manner. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of this document is compilation and consolidation of information on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what activities are planned for FY 1994, and how all of the activities are documented.

  14. INL Site Executable Plan for Energy and Transportation Fuels Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest L. Fossum

    2008-11-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  15. Advancing the concept of real-time water quality management in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    quality objectives #12;ALTERNATIVE TO SALT TMDL LOAD MANAGEMENT Real Time Component: Allows additional Project selenium load management Seasonal wetland water quality management in Grasslands Ecological Area JOAQUIN RIVER WATER QUALITY FORECASTING MODEL #12;GRASSLAND BYPASS PROJECT SELENIUM LOAD MANAGEMENT #12

  16. Uncertainty Management in Optimal Disassembly Planning through Learning-based Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reveliotis, Spiridon "Spyros"

    from the more traditional manufacturing processes is the need to effec- tively model and manageUncertainty Management in Optimal Disassembly Planning through Learning-based Strategies Spyros A. Reveliotis, IIE Member School of Industrial & Systems Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology 765 Ferst

  17. Toward a State Landscape Policy: Incremental Planning and Management in Vermont1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toward a State Landscape Policy: Incremental Planning and Management in Vermont1 Mark B. Lapping 2, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405. Abstract: The issue of landscape management and enhancement has been of deep concern to Vermonters for many decades. This concern, which has been institutionalized

  18. A 10-Step Plan for Organization and Management of University Records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    , preserve and transmit the knowledge, wisdom and values that will help ensure the survival management decision making Preserving Historical records Records have a life cycle. 1. Records are firstA 10-Step Plan for Organization and Management of University Records UW- Madison Archives

  19. IT Capital Planning Corporate Management Improvement Program (CMIP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Corporate Management Improvement Program (CMIP) was initiated by the Department in recognition of the fact that corporate legacy systems that support administrative functions were nearing the...

  20. Guidelines for improved institutional analysis in water resources planning.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, H M; Weatherford, D E; Cortner, H J

    1984-01-01

    1955. Univeristy of Wisconsin, Oil shale development inavailability of water for oil shale and coal gasificationtechniques which have allowed oil shale companies to acquire

  1. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    production including selection of biomass feedstocks, modeling of crop water use; technologies including of biomass feedstocks, agricultural practices, and any other factors; and · Estimate and document biofuel

  2. Capacity planning and change management in an aerospace overhaul cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, David, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - This thesis analyzes the transformation of the Small Components Cell in Pratt & Whitney's aftermarket division through lean manufacturing techniques. The thesis focuses on use of a labor capacity planning model, ...

  3. Construction Management Applications: Challenges in Developing Execution Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onder, Nilufer

    Steel suppliers Detailers Design development Develop contract documents Bidding General contract award fabricator Steel erector Lower tier subcontractors Steel suppliers Detailers Steel contract execution the execution deviates from the as- planned schedule (APS), automatically suggest alternatives Assumptions

  4. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24...

  5. 2004-2005 Texas Water Resources Institute Mills Scholarship Application Water Management, Soil Salinity and Landscape Ecology in Laguna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    of natural resources that support urban centers, agriculture, fisheries, tourism, and natural areas. Major Program (Border 2012) are the development of effective water resource management strategies that balance compete with natural ecosystems for water resources. In addition, anthropogenic activities sometimes

  6. Information Infrastructure for Publishing and Integrating Water Resource Data from Pacific Rim Universities in Support of Hydrologic Modeling and Integrated Water Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaslavsky, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    Publishing and Integrating Water Resource Data from PacificModeling and Integrated Water Resource Management Finalin publishing and analyzing local water data, configuring a

  7. Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, part III: Dynamic breakthrough and intermittent drainage characteristics from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, part III: Dynamic breakthrough and intermittent Water management Gas diffusion layer Water transport Dynamic breakthrough Intermittent drainage a b s t r a c t The transport of liquid water and gaseous reactants through a gas diffusion layer (GDL

  8. Agricultural Water Management 146 (2014) 7583 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural Water Management 146 (2014) 75­83 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Agricultural Water Management journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/agwat Interactive effects of water January 2014 Accepted 13 July 2014 Available online 13 August 2014 Keywords: Water-table Maize Sowing date

  9. "Some, for all, forever" Managing Water for Sustainable Development in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    "Some, for all, forever" Managing Water for Sustainable Development in South Africa Priscilla" Integrated Water Resources Management in South Africa" a. Natural Conditions and Hydrology b. Pollution c. Population and a Legacy of Inequality d. New Legislation: The National Water Act of 1998 and the Water

  10. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Naturita UMTRA Project processing site in the spring of 1994. No water sampling was performed during 1993 at either the Naturita processing site (NAT-01) or the Dry Flats disposal site (NAT-12). Results of previous water sampling at the Naturita processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated as a result of uranium processing activities. Baseline ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Dry Flats disposal site. Water sampling activities scheduled for April 1994 include preconstruction sampling of selected monitor wells at the processing site, surface water sampling of the San Miguel River, sampling of several springs/seeps in the vicinity of the disposal site, and sampling of two monitor wells in Coke Oven Valley. The monitor well locations provide sampling points to characterize ground water quality and flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been updated to reflect constituents related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation. Water sampling will be conducted annually at minimum during the period of construction activities.

  11. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Worrall, Andrew; Robb, Kevin R.; Snead, Mary A.

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  12. Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. 400 area secondary cooling water sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penn, L.L.

    1996-10-29

    This is a total rewrite of the Sampling and Analysis Plan in response to, and to ensure compliance with, the State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4501 issued on July 31, 1996. This revision describes changes in facility status and implements requirements of the permit.

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Centre for Sustainable Information Management: A Business Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    classroom or research space. In addition, many of these documents are not well managed; for instance, some Information Management: A Business Plan Jeff Svanhill Jennifer Hume Liya Zhuang Perry Sih Ryan Zhang MBA UBC FT MBA 2013 | Project 2 12/5/2011 Centre for Sustainable Information Management: A Business Plan

  16. Incorporation of Agricultural Risk into Water Resource Planning Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    , domestic, municipal, agricultural and industrial uses of water, ... and all relevant means (including nonstructural as well as structural measures) singly, in combination, or in alternative combinations reflecting different choice patterns for providing...

  17. Operations Risk Management by Planning Optimally the Qualified ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-07-31

    procedures as well as the training of the staff). The logic underlying risk management in a Basel II context is always the same for each category of banking risks.

  18. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental, LLC

    2011-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

  19. Integrating impact assessment and conflict management in urban planning: Experiences from Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltonen, Lasse; Sairinen, Rauno

    2010-09-15

    The article examines the interlinkages between recent developments in conflict management and impact assessment procedures in the context of urban planning in Finland. It sets out by introducing the fields of impact assessment and conflict mediation. It then proceeds to discuss the development of impact assessment practices and the status of conflict mediation in Finnish land use planning. The case of Korteniitty infill development plan in Jyvaeskylae is used to demonstrate how the Finnish planning system operates in conflict situations - and how social impact assessment can contribute to managing planning conflicts. The authors ask how the processes of impact assessment contribute to conflict management. Based on the Finnish experience, it is argued that social impact assessment of land use plans can contribute to conflict management, especially in the absence of institutionalised conflict mediation processes. In addition, SIA may acquire features of conflict mediation, depending on extent and intensity of stakeholder participation in the process, and the quality of linkages it between knowledge production and decision-making. Simultaneously, conflict mediation practices and theoretical insights can inform the application of SIA to help it address land use conflicts more consciously.

  20. Planning for Water Scarcity: The Vulnerability of the Laguna Region, Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Flores, Maria Del Rosario

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation examined declining groundwater availability and management strategies for addressing water shortages in the Laguna region located in the states of Coahuila and Durango. Excessive pumping of groundwater ...

  1. RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Duane G.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.

    2001-01-01

    This document describes the groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area C located in the 200 East Area of the DOE Hanford Site. This plan is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).

  2. Automatic data for applied railway management : passenger demand, service quality measurement, and tactical planning on the London Overground Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frumin, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    The broad goal of this thesis is to demonstrate the potential positive impacts of applying automatic data to the management and tactical planning of a modern urban railway. Tactical planning is taken here to mean the set ...

  3. Developing and assessing accident management plans for nuclear power plants. Evaluation of a prototype process: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.J.; Johnson, S.P.; Blackman, H.S.; Stewart, M.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-07-01

    This document is the second of a two-volume NUREG/CR that discusses development of accident management plans for nuclear power plants. The first volume (a) describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria that could be used for assessing the adequacy of accident management plans, (b) identifies the general attributes of accident management plans (Phase 1), (c) presents a prototype process for developing and implementing severe accident management plans (Phase 2), and (d) presents criteria that can be used to assess the adequacy of accident management plans. This volume (a) describes results from an evaluation of the capabilities of the prototype process to produce an accident management plan (Phase 3) and (b), based on these results and preliminary criteria included in NUREG/CR-5543, presents modifications to the criteria where appropriate.

  4. Computerized Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    supply diversions, several hydroelectric plants and numerous environ- mental instream flow requirements. Each of these active permits is included in the datasets. Besides the commission using the WAM/WRAP modeling system in water rights permiting... actions be consistent with relevant regional plans. River authorities, water districts and other water management organizations are beginning to use the WRAP model in operational planning studies to optimize operations of their facilities...

  5. Environmental guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management plans. Working draft for comment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    DOE has stewardship responsibilities for managing the cultural resources remaining on DOE-owned and other lands impacted by DOE programs. Goal of the DOE-wide Cultural Resource Management (CRM) program is to identify and consolidate compliance actions associated with statutory and regulatory requirements. This document is to provide guidelines to DOE field managers; its implementation is intended to assure that each DOE facility and program complies with executive orders, statutes, and regulations governing the management of cultural resources. It covers CRM goals, existing conditions, CRM methods, CRM procedures and administration, and plan attachments. Glossary, legislation, and documents are covered in appendices.

  6. Microsoft Word - 07 Texas Water Plan.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnowReportJ.NextWater VaporASME/AIAA Wind1,Water

  7. Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

    2007-09-07

    Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential on the cathode) and the resulting effects of the kinetic reactions. Next, at low currents, the behavior of a PEFC is dominated by kinetic losses. These losses mainly stem from the high overpotential of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR). As the current is increased, ohmic losses become a factor in lowering the overall cell potential. These ohmic losses are mainly from ionic losses in the electrodes and separator. At high currents, mass-transport limitations become increasingly important. These losses are due to reactants not being able to reach the electrocatalytic sites. Key among the issues facing PEFCs today is water management. Due to their low operating temperature (< 100 C), water exists in both liquid and vapor phases. Furthermore, state-of-the-art membranes require the use of water to provide high conductivity and fast proton transport. Thus, there is a tradeoff between having enough water for proton conduction (ohmic losses), but not too much or else the buildup of liquid water will cause a situation in which the reactant-gas-transport pathways are flooded (mass-transfer limitations). Figure 3 displays experimental evidence of the effects of water management on performance. In Figure 3(a), a neutron image of water content displays flooding near the outlet of the cell due to accumulation of liquid water and a decrease in the gas flowrates. The serpentine flow field is clearly visible with the water mainly underneath the ribs. Figure 3(b) shows polarization performance at 0.4 and 0.8 V and high-frequency resistance at 0.8 V as a function of cathode humidification temperature. At low current densities, as the inlet air becomes more humid, the membrane resistance decreases, and the performance increases. At higher current densities, the same effect occurs; however, the higher temperatures and more humid air also results in a lower inlet oxygen partial pressure.

  8. UMTRA Ground Water Project management action process document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    A critical U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to plan, implement, and complete DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). These facilities include the 24 inactive processing sites the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.) identified as Title I sites, which had operated from the late 1940s through the 1970s. In UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings and directed the DOE to stabilize, dispose of, and control the tailings in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The UMTRA Surface Project deals with buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the processing sites and any associated vicinity properties (VP). Surface remediation at the processing sites will be completed in 1997 when the Naturita, Colorado, site is scheduled to be finished. The UMTRA Ground Water Project was authorized in an amendment to the UMTRCA (42 USC Section 7922(a)), when Congress directed DOE to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. The UMTRA Ground Water Project addresses any contamination derived from the milling operation that is determined to be present at levels above the EPA standards.

  9. Mixed Waste Management Facility, revised FY94 Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streit, R.

    1994-07-31

    This revision of the FY94 Plan incorporates changes to work during FY94 in response to the DOE request in the DOE KD-1 decision letter of June 28,1994. This letter provided guidance of both scope and budget profile in response to the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) issued by the MWMF Project in April, 1994. This work plan only addresses work for the remainder of FY94. A revised plan for the complete project is in development and will be issued separately. Since February, 1994, the MWMF Project has been operating on DOE guidance directing that work on the CDR be completed, that only other essential work be continued to maintain the project, and that costs be maintained at approximately the January, 1994 spending levels until a KD-1 decision was made. This has formed the basis for monthly reports through June, 1994. The baseline contained in this report will become the basis for reports during the remainder of FY94.

  10. Name Title S1 Process Team Division Caitlin Angus Deputy Enrolment Manager Enrolment planning support Enrolments Student Client Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    Name Title S1 Process Team Division Caitlin Angus Deputy Enrolment Manager Enrolment planning Officer Results, Student Progress Progression - Wantirna Student Admin Services Justine Bell Results

  11. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2006-03-03

    This document describes a groundwater assessment plan for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site.

  12. Characterization Program Management Plan for Hanford K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAKER, R.B.; TRIMBLE, D.J.

    2000-12-12

    The management plan developed to characterize the K Basin spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and sludge was originally developed for Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to work together on a program to provide characterization data to support removal, conditioning, and subsequent dry storage of the SNF stored at the Hanford K Basins. The plan also addressed necessary characterization for the removal, transport, and storage of the sludge from the Hanford K Basins. This plan was revised in 1999 (i.e., Revision 2) to incorporate actions necessary to respond to the deficiencies revealed as the result of Quality Assurance surveillances and audits in 1999 with respect to the fuel characterization activities. Revision 3 to this Program Management Plan responds to a Worker Assessment resolution determined in Fical Year 2000. This revision includes an update to current organizational structures and other revisions needed to keep this management plan consistent with the current project scope. The plan continues to address both the SNF and the sludge accumulated at K Basins. Most activities for the characterization of the SNF have been completed. Data validation, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) document reviews, and OCRWM data qualification are the remaining SNF characterization activities. The transport and storage of K Basin sludge are affected by recent path forward revisions. These revisions require additional laboratory analyses of the sludge to complete the acquisition of required supporting engineering data. Hence, this revision of the management plan provides the overall work control for these remaining SNF and sludge characterization activities given the current organizational structure of the SNF Project.

  13. Impacts of Delayed Drawdown on Aquatic Biota and Water Quality in Seasonally Managed Wetlands of the Grasslands Ecological Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2009-01-01

    and Wildlife Service, 1982. Grassland Water District. 2008.www.grasslandwetlands.org/>. Grassland Water District. "Ecological and Water Management Characterization of

  14. University of Bath Carbon Management Plan working with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    at Stake 20 4 Carbon Management Projects 23 4.1 Existing projects 24 4.2 District heating projects 25 4 Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs DH District Heating DTI Department of Trade and Industry Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method CHP Combined Heat and Power CCL Climate

  15. Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and Control for Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Rich Davies, Kami Lowry, Mike Schlender, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ted Pietrok, Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO). Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and Control for Research and Development. Work Planning and Control (WP&C) is essential to assuring the safety of workers and the public regardless of the scope of work Research and Development (R&D) activities are no exception.

  16. EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

  17. FLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT MEASURES FOR FLOOD MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    of information technology, manufacturing, management, and adaptive social-ecological systems. We identify fiveFLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT MEASURES FOR FLOOD MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS1 Kara N. DiFrancesco and Desiree D. Tullos2 ABSTRACT: Discussions

  18. Investigation of Project Management Planning Practices for Renovation of Historical Buildings in Urban Contexts Located in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escamilla, Edelmiro

    2012-07-16

    and project planning. The third body centered on facility management as it relates to project management issues in the delivery of a construction project. Combining these bodies of knowledge into one literature review contributed to the development of a...

  19. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  20. Site specific plan. [Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs.