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1

AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

2

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 39, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2001 423 Amazon Floodplain Water Level Changes Measured  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Floodplain Water Level Changes Measured with Interferometric SIR-C Radar Douglas E. Alsdorf, Laurence C surface provide an alternative to permanent gauging. Satellite radar altimetry promises measurements-HH-band shuttle imaging radar (SIR-C) data reveals centimeter-scale changes in the elevations of water surfaces

Smith, Laurence C.

3

MEASUREMENTS OF PAST 14C LEVELS AND 13C/12C RATIOS IN THE SURFACE WATERS OF THE WORLD'S SUBPOLAR OCEANS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under this project we have developed methods that allow the reconstruction of past {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean by measuring the {sup 14}C contents of archived salmon scales. The overall goal of this research was to reduce of the uncertainty in the uptake of fossil CO{sub 2} by the oceans and thereby improve the quantification of the global carbon cycle and to elucidate the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs), with their three dimensional global spatial coverage and temporal modeling capabilities, provide the best route to accurately calculating the total uptake of CO{sub 2} by the oceans and, hence, to achieving the desired reduction in uncertainty. {sup 14}C has played, and continues to play, a central role in the validation of the OGCMs calculations, particularly with respect to those model components which govern the uptake of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and the transport of this carbon within the oceans. Under this project, we have developed time-series records of the {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of three areas of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean. As the previously available data on the time-history of oceanic surface water {sup 14}C levels are very limited, these time-series records provide significant new {sup 14}C data to constrain and validate the OGCMs.

Brown, T A

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

4

Intercomparison and validation of continental water level products derived  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. Satellite radar altimeter measurements of lake and reservoir water levels complement in situIntercomparison and validation of continental water level products derived from satellite radar water level products derived from satellite radar altimetry Martina Ricko,a Charon M. Birkett,b James A

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

5

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (< 30 psi) is less than half the pressure on the 7th floor (>80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

Significance of steam separator models for BWR water level transients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The loss-of-power accident (LOPA) test is required in the series of startup tests for a new plant. In this test, the reactor water level goes down further than in other tests, but it stays a sufficient margin above the lower limit level. However, there is a tendency for simulation results to give an overly conservative water level response compared with test data. Such a situation requires greater standby pump capacity in the feedwater system. After reviewing several possible model improvements, it was noted that the performance of the steam separator has a significant effect on the reactor water level calculation for this event. To develop an improved model, the inverse problem approach (IPA) was applied. The IPA consists of three main procedures: (a) state estimation from the sensed signal, (b) forced simulation to replace the method variable with the estimated state, and (c) introducing hypothetical parameters and tracing them so that the difference between calculated and measured reactor water levels is minimized during the simulation. The simulation results are summarized.

Akiyama, T.; Shida, T.; Shibuya, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendalow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

DATA QUALIFICATION REPORT: WATER-LEVEL DATA FROM THE NYE COUNTY EARLY WARNING DRILLING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to evaluate unqualified, water-level data gathered under the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and to determine whether the status of the data should be changed to ''qualified'' data in accordance with AP-SIII.2Q (Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data). The corroboration method (as defined in Attachment 2 of AP-SIII.2Q) was implemented to qualify water-level data from Nye County measurements obtained directly from the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Program Office (NWRPO). Comparison of United States Geological Survey (USGS) measurements contained in DTN GS990608312312.003 with the Nye County water-level data has shown that the differences in water-level altitudes for the same wells are significantly less than 1 meter. This is an acceptable finding. Evaluation and recommendation criteria have been strictly applied to qualify Nye County measurements of water levels in selected wells measured by the USGS. However, the process of qualifying measured results by corroboration also builds confidence that the Nye County method for measurement of water levels is adequate for the intended use of the data (which is regional modeling). Therefore, it is reasonable to extend the term of ''qualified'' to water-level measurements in the remaining Nye County Phase I wells on the basis that the method has been shown to produce adequate results for the intended purpose of supporting large-scale modeling activities for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The Data Qualification Team recommends the Nye County, water-level data contained in Appendix D of this report be designated as ''qualified''. These data document manual measurements of water-levels in eight (8) EWDP Phase I drillholes that were obtained prior to the field installation of continuous monitoring equipment.

F. H. Dove, P. Sanchez, and L. Saraka

2000-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

10

STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1) for BUILDING 90 USER TEST BED FACILITY.G., GEOLOGIST/QSD (530) 222-4339 SWPPP Preparation Date: JUNE 10, 2012 #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan) 222-4339 Name and Title Telephone Number #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Building 90 User

Eisen, Michael

11

Regional Drinking Water Security District Level Pilot Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Drinking Water Security District Level Pilot Project Concept Note Milind Sohoni Head that most habitations of several talukas will face drinking water stress for much of the coming year. The central objective of the project will be to ensure regional drinking water security for a district

Sohoni, Milind

12

In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) fuel cell performance requires effective water management. To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operations. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells, with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) properties. High resolution neutron radiography was used to image fuel cells during a variety of conditions. The effect of specific operating conditions, including flow direction (co-flow or counter-flow) was examined. Counter-flow operation was found to result in higher water content than co-flow operation, which correlates to lower membrane resistivity. A variety of cells were used to quantify the membrane water in situ during exposure to saturated gases, during fuel cell operation, and during hydrogen pump operation. The quantitative results show lower membrane water content than previous results suggested.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, Daniel S [NIST; Jacobson, David L [NIST; Arif, Muhammad [NIST

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

PCB Radiation Mechanisms: Using Component-Level Measurements to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PCB Radiation Mechanisms: Using Component-Level Measurements to PCB Radiation Mechanisms: Using Component-Level Measurements to Determine System-Level Radiated EmissionsDetermine System-Level Radiated Radiation Directly from PCB StructuresRadiation Directly from PCB Structures Signal or component voltage

Stuart, Steven J.

14

Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component automotiveWe need to characterize automotive components the way we characterize circuitcomponents the way we

Stuart, Steven J.

15

Effects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan wetland complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Accepted 17 April 2009 Keywords: Wetlands Boreal region Synthetic aperture radar Water level SoilEffects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan was negatively correlated to water depth in all open (non-forested) wetlands when water table levels were more

Turetsky, Merritt

16

Water Use Transfers: Current Procedures and Possible Measures for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, § 6) ­ Policy choice as to preferential right to water in times of shortage ·Right to divertWater Use Transfers: Current Procedures and Possible Measures for Improvement Current Legal Requirements of Water Transfers David J. A. Bargen #12;Nature of Water and Scarcity Drive Water Appropriation

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

17

Water-Level Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the water-level monitoring plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Water-level monitoring of the groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site is performed to fulfill the requirements of various state and federal regulations, orders, and agreements. The primary objective of this monitoring is to determine groundwater flow rates and directions. To meet this and other objectives, water-levels are measured annually in monitoring wells completed within the unconfined aquifer system, the upper basalt-confined aquifer system, and in the lower basalt-confined aquifers for surveillance monitoring. At regulated waste units, water levels are taken monthly, quarterly, semi-annually, or annually, depending on the hydrogeologic conditions and regulatory status of a given site. The techniques used to collect water-level data are described in this document along with the factors that affect the quality of the data and the strategies employed by the project to minimize error in the measurement and interpretation of water levels. Well networks are presented for monitoring the unconfined aquifer system, the upper basalt-confined aquifer system, and the lower basalt-confined aquifers, all at a regional scale (surveillance monitoring), as well as the local-scale well networks for each of the regulated waste units studied by this project (regulated-unit monitoring). The criteria used to select wells for water-table monitoring are discussed. It is observed that poor well coverage for surveillance water-table monitoring exists south and west of the 200-West Area, south of the 100-F Area, and east of B Pond and the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). This poor coverage results from a lack of wells suitable for water-table monitoring, and causes uncertainty in representation of the regional water-table in these areas. These deficiencies are regional in scale and apply to regions outside of the operational areas, so these deficiencies do not in anyway reflect on the adequacy of the local-scale well networks used for regulated-unit monitoring. The sediments comprising the unconfined aquifer system have been subdivided into nine hydro-geologic units. The specific hydrogeologic units present within the saturated open interval of each onsite well used for water-level measurements are identified. This was accomplished by geologic interpretation at individual wells combined with extrapolation to nearby wells using a three-dimensional, regional-scale conceptual model of the Hanford Site hydrostratigraphy.

D.R. Newcomer; J.P. McDonald; M.A. Chamness

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Feasibility Study of Developing a Virtual Chilled Water Flow Meter at Air Handling Unit Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a virtual Air handling unit (AHU) level water flow meter is explored by using a control valve as a measurement device. The flow through the valve is indirectly calculated using differential pressure over both the valve and its...

Song, L.; Swamy, A.; Shim, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Exploiting Two Intelligent Models to Predict Water Level: A field study of Urmia lake, Iran  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploiting Two Intelligent Models to Predict Water Level: A field study of Urmia lake, Iran Shahab. The measurements from a single tide gauge at Urmia Lake, Northwest Iran, were used to train and validate the GP of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran. Tel: 0098-411-3392786 Fax: 0098-411-3345332, (e-mail: sha- hab kvk66@yahoo

Fernandez, Thomas

20

Measuring Water Collection Times in Kenyan Informal Settlements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water is thought to contribute to the over-work or time shortage of women. Thus, Blackden and Wodon [3114 Measuring Water Collection Times in Kenyan Informal Settlements James Davis University and interviews to measure the time taken to collect water in two Kenyan informal settlements. The time devoted

Davis, James E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF STEAM-WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF STEAM-WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT calculations. X-ray computer tomography (CT) aided by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. The measured steam-water relative permeability curves assume a shape similar to those obtained by Corey (1954

Stanford University

22

Measurements of extremely low radioactivity levels in BOREXINO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The techniques researched, developed and applied towards the measurement of radioisotope concentrations at ultra-low levels in the real-time solar neutrino experiment BOREXINO at Gran Sasso are presented and illustrated with specific results of widespread interest. We report the use of low-level germanium gamma spectrometry, low-level miniaturized gas proportional counters and low background scintillation detectors developed in solar neutrino research. Each now sets records in its field. We additionally describe our techniques of radiochemical ultra-pure, few atom manipulations and extractions. Forefront measurements also result from the powerful combination of neutron activation and low-level counting. Finally, with our techniques and commercially available mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy, new low-level detection limits for isotopes of interest are obtained.

Arpesella, C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Measurements of extremely low radioactivity levels in BOREXINO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The techniques researched, developed and applied towards the measurement of radioisotope concentrations at ultra-low levels in the real-time solar neutrino experiment BOREXINO at Gran Sasso are presented and illustrated with specific results of widespread interest. We report the use of low-level germanium gamma spectrometry, low-level miniaturized gas proportional counters and low background scintillation detectors developed in solar neutrino research. Each now sets records in its field. We additionally describe our techniques of radiochemical ultra-pure, few atom manipulations and extractions. Forefront measurements also result from the powerful combination of neutron activation and low-level counting. Finally, with our techniques and commercially available mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy, new low-level detection limits for isotopes of interest are obtained.

Borexino Collaboration; C. Arpesella

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Torsional ultrasonic technique for reactor vessel liquid level measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have undertaken a detailed study of an ultrasonic waveguide employed as a level, density, and temperature sensor. The purpose of this study was to show how such a device might be used in the nuclear power industry to provide reliable level information with a multifunction sensor, thus overcomming several of the errors that led to the accident at Three Mile Island. Some additional work is needed to answer the questions raised by the current study, most noticably the damping effects of flowing water.

Dress, W.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapor: Measurements and photochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of magnitude between the surface and the tropopause, and isotopically heavy water is pref- erentially removedIsotopic composition of stratospheric water vapor: Measurements and photochemistry David G. Johnson composition of stratospheric water vapor that result from methane oxidation and reactions with O( ¢¡ ). We

26

Water quality parameter measurement using spectral signatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the photography, and Richard Carter of the Data Processing Center of Texas A4M who digitized the scanner data. As- sistance in preparing and editing the manuscript were provided by my committee members, Dr. W. P. James, and Dr. J. P, German, with special... water shown in figure I-1. I=rom cultures of various phytoplankton, he obtained the signatures shown in figure I-2. Figures I- 1 (P. 10) and I- 2 (p . II) indicate that water has a minimum attenuation and phytoplankton a maximum attenuation at short...

White, Paul Edward

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of ground-based remotely sensed liquid water cloud properties using shortwave radiation measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of low level water clouds. A number of remote sensing retrieval techniques provide either radar-only retrie- vals or combine millimeter-wave radar with microwave radiometer measurements (Frisch et al., 1995 radiation measurements from the ground. The remote sensing observations of radar reflectivity, microwave

Haak, Hein

28

Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive Species andWater Levels, Invasive Species and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ­­ ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive." IPCC Risk management is the framework to discuss adaptation to climate change impacts. Risk The Water Resources Working Group will assess and synthesize climate change impacts to Wisconsin's water

Sheridan, Jennifer

29

Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind global sea level by 30.0 mm and decreasing the rate of sea level rise. The load from impounded water change on sea level rise sources, which include thermal expansion of seawater and the melting of glaciers

Conrad, Clint

30

Water Calibration Measurements for Neutron Radiography: Application to Water Content Quantification in Porous Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using neutron radiography, the measurement of water thickness was performed using aluminum (Al) water calibration cells at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold-Guide (CG) 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Calibration of water thickness is an important step to accurately measure water contents in samples of interest. Neutron attenuation by water does not vary linearly with thickness mainly due to beam hardening and scattering effects. Transmission measurements for known water thicknesses in water calibration cells allow proper correction of the underestimation of water content due to these effects. As anticipated, strong scattering effects were observed for water thicknesses greater than 2 mm when the water calibration cells were positioned close to the face of the detector / scintillator (0 and 2.4 cm away, respectively). The water calibration cells were also positioned 24 cm away from the detector face. These measurements resulted in less scattering and this position (designated as the sample position) was used for the subsequent experimental determination of the neutron attenuation coefficient for water. Neutron radiographic images of moist Flint sand in rectangular and cylindrical containers acquired at the sample position were used to demonstrate the applicability of the water calibration. Cumulative changes in the water volumes within the sand columns during monotonic drainage determined by neutron radiography were compared with those recorded by direct reading from a burette connected to a hanging water column. In general, the neutron radiography data showed very good agreement with those obtained volumetrically using the hanging water-column method. These results allow extension of the calibration equation to the quantification of unknown water contents within other samples of porous media.

Kang, Misun [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-lin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Perfect, Edmund [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Horita, Juske [Texas Tech University (TTU); Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Measure Guideline: Transitioning to a Tankless Water Heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Measure Guideline provides information to help residential builders and retrofitters with the design, specification, selection, implementation, installation, and maintenance issues of transitioning from tank-type water heaters to tankless water heaters. The report compares the differences between tankless and tank-type water heaters, highlighting the energy savings that can be realized by adopting tankless water heaters over tank-type water heaters. Selection criteria and risks discussed include unit sizing and location, water distribution system, plumbing line length and diameter, water quality, electrical backup, and code issues. Cost and performance data are provided for various types of tankless and tank-type water heaters, both natural gas fired and electric. Also considered are interactions between the tankless water heater and other functional elements of a house, such as cold water supply and low-flow devices. Operating costs and energy use of water distribution systems for single- and two-story houses are provided, along with discussion of the various types of distribution systems that can be used with tankless water heaters. Finally, details to prepare for proper installation of a tankless water heater are described.

Brozyna, K.; Rapport, A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

J.M. Fenelon

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

33

Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in Bangladesh Graziano, PhD The present study examined the associations between drinking water and urinary arsenic levels currently drinking water containing concentrations of arsenic 50 g/L. The risk for skin lesions in relation

van Geen, Alexander

34

Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surfaceContamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water S therapeutic classes was analysed from resource and drinking water in two catchment basins located in north

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

35

Measurement of the Cotton Mouton effect of water vapour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we report on a measurement of the Cotton Mouton effect of water vapour. Measurement performed at room temperature ($T=301$ K) with a wavelength of 1064 nm gave the value $\\Delta n_u = (6.67 \\pm 0.45) \\cdot 10^{-15}$ for the unit magnetic birefringence (1 T magnetic field and atmospheric pressure).

Della Valle, F; Gastaldi, U; Messineo, G; Milotti, E; Pengo, R; Piemontese, L; Ruoso, G; Zavattini, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Water Use Efficiency in Plant Growth and Ambient Carbon Dioxide Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-42 1972 Water Use Efficiency in Plant Growth and Ambient Carbon Dioxide Level C.H. M. van Bavel Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

van Bavel, C. H. M.

37

Evaluation of Uranium Measurements in Water by Various Methods - 13571  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 2000, EPA amended its drinking water regulations for radionuclides by adding a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for uranium (so called MCL Rule)[1] of 30 micrograms per liter (?g/L). The MCL Rule also included MCL goals of zero for uranium and other radionuclides. Many radioactively contaminated sites must test uranium in wastewater and groundwater to comply with the MCL rule as well as local publicly owned treatment works discharge limitations. This paper addresses the relative sensitivity, accuracy, precision, cost and comparability of two EPA-approved methods for detection of total uranium: inductively plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry. Both methods are capable of measuring the individual uranium isotopes U-234, U- 235, and U-238 and both methods have been deemed acceptable by EPA. However, the U-238 is by far the primary contributor to the mass-based ICP-MS measurement, especially for naturally-occurring uranium, which contains 99.2745% U-238. An evaluation shall be performed relative to the regulatory requirement promulgated by EPA in December 2000. Data will be garnered from various client sample results measured by ALS Laboratory in Fort Collins, CO. Data shall include method detection limits (MDL), minimum detectable activities (MDA), means and trends in laboratory control sample results, performance evaluation data for all methods, and replicate results. In addition, a comparison will be made of sample analyses results obtained from both alpha spectrometry and the screening method Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA) performed at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) FUSRAP Maywood Laboratory (UFML). Many uranium measurements occur in laboratories that only perform radiological analysis. This work is important because it shows that uranium can be measured in radiological as well as stable chemistry laboratories and it provides several criteria as a basis for comparison of two uranium test methods. This data will indicate which test method is the most accurate and most cost effective. This paper provides a benefit to Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and other Department of Defense (DOD) programs that may be performing uranium measurements. (authors)

Tucker, Brian J. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure Group, 150 Royall Street, Canton, MA (United States)] [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure Group, 150 Royall Street, Canton, MA (United States); Workman, Stephen M. [ALS Laboratory Group, Environmental Division, 225 Commerce Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80524 (United States)] [ALS Laboratory Group, Environmental Division, 225 Commerce Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80524 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Average Soil Water Retention Curves Measured by Neutron Radiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water retention curves are essential for understanding the hydrologic behavior of partially-saturated porous media and modeling flow transport processes within the vadose zone. In this paper we report direct measurements of the main drying and wetting branches of the average water retention function obtained using 2-dimensional neutron radiography. Flint sand columns were saturated with water and then drained under quasi-equilibrium conditions using a hanging water column setup. Digital images (2048 x 2048 pixels) of the transmitted flux of neutrons were acquired at each imposed matric potential (~10-15 matric potential values per experiment) at the NCNR BT-2 neutron imaging beam line. Volumetric water contents were calculated on a pixel by pixel basis using Beer-Lambert s law after taking into account beam hardening and geometric corrections. To remove scattering effects at high water contents the volumetric water contents were normalized (to give relative saturations) by dividing the drying and wetting sequences of images by the images obtained at saturation and satiation, respectively. The resulting pixel values were then averaged and combined with information on the imposed basal matric potentials to give average water retention curves. The average relative saturations obtained by neutron radiography showed an approximate one-to-one relationship with the average values measured volumetrically using the hanging water column setup. There were no significant differences (at p < 0.05) between the parameters of the van Genuchten equation fitted to the average neutron radiography data and those estimated from replicated hanging water column data. Our results indicate that neutron imaging is a very effective tool for quantifying the average water retention curve.

Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Horita, Juske [Texas Tech University (TTU); Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy and Water Conservation Measures for Hanford (2013)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed an energy and water evaluation of selected buildings on the Hanford Site during the months of May and June 2012. The audit was performed under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Sustainability Performance Office to identify key energy conservation measures (ECMs) and water conservation measures (WCMs). The evaluations consisted of on-site facility walk-throughs conducted by PNNL staff, interviews with building-operating personnel, and an examination of building designs and layouts. Information on 38 buildings was collected to develop a list of energy and water conservation measures. Table ES.1 is a summary of the ECMs, while table ES.2 is a summary of the WCMs.

Reid, Douglas J.; Butner, Ryan S.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Tidal response variation and recovery following the Wenchuan earthquake from water level data of multiple wells in the nearfield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

m) Water level (m) Time (year) LGH f Water level (m) WaterBB and JY. For the well LGH, phases are negative before theEarth tides for well LGH after the Wenchuan earthquake. The

Lai, Guijuan; Ge, Hongkui; Xue, Lian; Brodsky, Emily E; Huang, Fuqiong; Wand, Weilai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Level Set Based Simulations of Two-Phase Oil-Water Flows in Pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application is the lubricated pipelining of crude oil by the addition of water. We want to eÃ?ciently transportLevel Set Based Simulations of Two-Phase Oil-Water Flows in Pipes Hyeseon Shim July 31, 2000 Abstract We simulate the axisymmetric pipeline transportation of oil and water numerically under

Soatto, Stefano

42

THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF LAKE ERIE WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS ON SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION A Thesis Presented. Shore Approved by Adviser Civil Engineering Graduate Program #12;#12;ABSTRACT A recent decline in water used to estimate the wave climate over the entire lake. Shallow water effects were approxi- mated

Foster, Diane

43

Title: Hydraulic modeling of a mixed water level control hydro-mechanical gate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Hydraulic modeling of a mixed water level control hydro-mechanical gate Ludovic Cassan1 Abstract: The article describes the hydraulic functioning of a mixed water level control hydro- mechanical of the model to reproduce the functioning of this complex hydro-mechanical system. CE database Subject headings

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements David M. Slocum,* Thomas M such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

45

Measurement of Water Transport Properties Through Membrane-Electrode Assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a similar apparatus with Pd/H electrodes and obtained EOD equal to 2.5 and 0.9 at 30°C for a fully hydratedMeasurement of Water Transport Properties Through Membrane-Electrode Assemblies I. Membranes of Ag/AgCl electrodes to derive a constant current across a membrane in contact on both sides with a 0

46

NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE ISAAC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services Photo Credit: NOAA National high tide cycle was not measured due to station/sensor damage (Appendix 3). Individual time series

47

Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the saturated-zone, site-scale flow and transport model (CRWMS M&O 2000) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for model calibration. The previous analysis was presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01, Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (USGS 2001). This analysis is designed to use updated water-level data as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain. The objectives of this revision are to develop computer files containing (1) water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002), (2) a table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS0109083 12332.003), and (3) a potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternate concept from that presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01 for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and data from borehole USW WT-24. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow and transport model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for ground-water management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model, as well as provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral ground-water flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment.

P. Tucci

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

activity levels measured: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Huang; William H. Karasov; Kathleen A. Patnode; Colin R. Jefcoate 137 Retrospective radon progeny measurements through measurements of 210 activities on glass objects using stacked...

49

Origin of elevated water levels encountered in Pahute Mesa emplacement boreholes: Preliminary investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of standing water well above the predicted water table in emplacement boreholes on Pahute Mesa has been a recurring phenomenon at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). If these levels represent naturally perched aquifers, they may indicate a radionuclide migration hazard. In any case, they can pose engineering problems in the performance of underground nuclear tests. The origin of these elevated waters is uncertain. Large volumes of water are introduced during emplacement drilling, providing ample source for artificially perched water, yet elevated water levels can remain constant for years, suggesting a natural origin instead. In an effort to address the issue of unexpected standing water in emplacement boreholes, three different sites were investigated in Area 19 on Pahute Mesa by Desert Research Institute (DRI) staff from 1990-93. These sites were U-19az, U-19ba, and U-19bh. As of this writing, U-19bh remains available for access; however, nuclear tests were conducted at the former two locations subsequent to this investigations. The experiments are discussed in chronological order. Taken together, the experiments indicate that standing water in Pahute Mesa emplacement holes originates from the drainage of small-volume naturally perched zones. In the final study, the fluids used during drilling of the bottom 100 m of emplacement borehole U-19bh were labeled with a chemical tracer. After hole completion, water level rose in the borehole, while tracer concentration decreased. In fact, total mass of tracer in the borehole remained constant, while water levels rose. After water levels stabilized in this hole, no change in tracer mass was observed over two years, indicating that no movement of water out of the borehole is taking place (as at U- 19ba). Continued labeling tests of standing water are recommended to confirm the conclusions made here, and to establish their validity throughout Pahute Mesa.

Brikowski, T.; Chapman, J.; Lyles, B.; Hokett, S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Measurements of water vapor adsorption on the Geysers rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers was measured at 150 °C and at 200 °C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 ? p/p0 ? 0.98, where p0 is the saturated water vapor pressure. The rocks were crushed and sieved into three fractions of different grain sizes (with different specific surface areas). Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, BET surface area analyses were performed by Porous Materials Inc. on the same rock samples using nitrogen or krypton adsorption measurements at 77 K. Specific surface areas and pore volumes were determined. These parameters are important in estimating water retention capability of a porous material. The same laboratory also determined the densities of the samples by helium pycnometry. Their results were then compared with our own density values obtained by measuring the effect of buoyancy in compressed argon. One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously (Shang et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995) between 90 and 130°C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang et al. (1994a, 1994b, 1995), some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms (with closing points at p/p0 ? 0.6) were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated processes were not present, and no increase in water adsorption with temperature was observed

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Horita, Juske; Simonson, John M.; Mesmer, Robert E.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

51

Modelling Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Kinetics for Removal of Trace Levels of Divalent Cations in Ultrapure Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchanger resin fluid film mass transfer coefficients and the ionic diffusivities from which they are derived are often measured by use of ion exchange resin columns. Such tests, usually run dynamically using short resin beds, are often performed using relatively high (ppm) concentrations of ions to accurately measure output concentrations as a function of flow rate. The testing described herein was performed to determine fluid film ionic diffusivities for cationic concentrations typical of ultrapure water ({le}ppb levels) containing ppm levels of ammonia. Effective ionic diffusivities at these low ionic concentrations and high pHs were needed to complete a computer model (SIMIX) to be used in ion exchange simulations. SIMIX is a generalized multicomponent ion exchange model designed to simulate the removal of divalent cations from ultrapure water.

B. Widman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Quantitative Methodology for Assessing State-Level Nuclear Security Measures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The international community faces a growing threat from nuclear terrorism. The complexity of the threats of nuclear terrorism, the variety of nuclear security measures that… (more)

Myers, Christopher 1985-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Analytical Methods for Measuring Mercury in Water, Sediment and Biota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) exists in a large number of physical and chemical forms with a wide range of properties. Conversion between these different forms provides the basis for mercury's complex distribution pattern in local and global cycles and for its biological enrichment and effects. Since the 1960’s, the growing awareness of environmental mercury pollution has stimulated the development of more accurate, precise and efficient methods of determining mercury and its compounds in a wide variety of matrices. During recent years new analytical techniques have become available that have contributed significantly to the understanding of mercury chemistry in natural systems. In particular, these include ultra sensitive and specific analytical equipment and contamination-free methodologies. These improvements allow for the determination of total mercury as well as major species of mercury to be made in water, sediments and soils, and biota. Analytical methods are selected depending on the nature of the sample, the concentration levels of mercury, and what species or fraction is to be quantified. The terms “speciation” and “fractionation” in analytical chemistry were addressed by the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) which published guidelines (Templeton et al., 2000) or recommendations for the definition of speciation analysis. "Speciation analysis is the analytical activity of identifying and/or measuring the quantities of one or more individual chemical species in a sample. The chemical species are specific forms of an element defined as to isotopic composition, electronic or oxidation state, and/or complex or molecular structure. The speciation of an element is the distribution of an element amongst defined chemical species in a system. In case that it is not possible to determine the concentration of the different individual chemical species that sum up the total concentration of an element in a given matrix, meaning it is impossible to determine the speciation, it is a useful practice to do fractionation instead. Fractionation is the process of classification of an analyte or a group of analytes from a certain sample according to physical (e.g. size, solubility) or chemical (e.g. bonding, reactivity) properties."

Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Gill, Gary A.; Horvat, Milena

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Quantitative Methodology for Assessing State-Level Nuclear Security Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The international community faces a growing threat from nuclear terrorism. The complexity of the threats of nuclear terrorism, the variety of nuclear security measures that States can devote resources towards to address the threats, and the limited...

Myers, Christopher 1985-

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Informatively optimal levels of confidence for measurement uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relate to the quality of measurement result and its informational sufficiency. Then principles and ..... conforming with nearly average of permissible redundancy, in terms of generally accepted rule of providing ..... Quality Assurance. Vol.

David

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

56

Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants Cédric JOIN Gérard ROBERT for hydroelectric run-of-the river power plants. To modulate power generation, a level trajectory is planned, the set-point is followed even in severe operating conditions. Keywords: Hydroelectric power plants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

57

IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotationalvibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy levels and transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rotational­ vibrational line positions, transition intensities, and energy levels, with associated critically. These transitions give rise to 18 486 validated energy levels, of which 10 446 and 8040 belong to o-H2 16 O and p-H2IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational­vibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy

Chance, Kelly

58

An ultrasonic sound speed sensor for measuring EGR levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas recirculation (EGR) has been used for years to improve the performance of internal combustion the combustion reaction, which has for the desired EGR level based on engine para- been shown to reduce NO xMechanical Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada 2Atmospheric Sciences Division

59

Pressurized water reactor fuel assembly subchannel void fraction measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The void fraction measurement experiment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies has been conducted since 1987 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry as a Japanese national project. Two types of test sections are used in this experiment. One is a 5 x 5 array rod bundle geometry, and the other is a single-channel geometry simulating one of the subchannels in the rod bundle. Wide gamma-ray beam scanners and narrow gamma-ray beam computed tomography scanners are used to measure the subchannel void fractions under various steady-state and transient conditions. The experimental data are expected to be used to develop a void fraction prediction model relevant to PWR fuel assemblies and also to verify or improve the subchannel analysis method. The first series of experiments was conducted in 1992, and a preliminary evaluation of the data has been performed. The preliminary results of these experiments are described.

Akiyama, Yoshiei [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Fuel and Core Engineering Dept.; Hori, Keiichi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Hyougo (Japan); Miyazaki, Keiji [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Mishima, Kaichiro [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Sugiyama, Shigekazu [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Fuel Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The use of low-level liquid scintillation spectrometry for rapid measurement and decision making  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid scintillation spectrometry (LSC) has proved over the last fifteen years to be an excellent tool for low-level counting of beta- and alpha-particle emitters. Using low-level instruments the determination of, for instance {sup 90}Sr, could be considerably simplified in the laboratory, saving time and also money for chemicals and manpower. Furthermore, low-level instruments have been successfully used for measurements when fast analysis was required. The four instruments (Quantulus, Wallac Oy), that the author uses, have not only very low background, which cuts measurement time considerably; but from the pulse- height spectra much information about the nature of the radionuclides present and the absence of specific radionuclides can be extracted. From the absence of high-energy beta-particle activity in the pulse-height spectra of precipitation in the first days after the Chernobyl accident the author could draw the conclusion, that practically no {sup 90}Y was present and therefore only small amounts of {sup 90}Sr, if any, could be expected in precipitation and later in food. This enabled them to make the decision not to waste time with a large number of {sup 90}Sr analyses. Large numbers of drinking water samples could be screened for contamination much more sensitively and faster than by gamma-ray spectrometry. More examples will be presented of cases where rapid information was needed; how contamination and nuclear installations can be easily checked and how LSC helped to cut down the time required, the manpower and the costs for radon measurements and environmental surveillance.

Schoenhofer, F. [Federal Inst. for Food Control and Research (Austria)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]) (referred to as the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale flow model or site-scale SZ flow model in this report) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for calibration of groundwater flow models. This report also contains an expanded discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. The analysis of the potentiometric data presented in Revision 00 of this report (USGS 2001 [DIRS 154625]) provides the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target heads, and hydraulic gradients for the calibration of the SZ site-scale flow model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Revision 01 of this report (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) used updated water-level data for selected wells through the year 2000 as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain based on an alternative interpretation of perched water conditions. That revision developed computer files containing: Water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002); A table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS010908312332.003); and A potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternative concept from that presented by USGS (2001 [DIRS 154625]) for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data presented in USGS (2004 [DIRS 168473]) include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) Phases I and II and data from Borehole USW WT-24. This document is based on Revision 01 (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) and expands the discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. This uncertainty assessment includes an analysis of the impact of more recent water-level data and the impact of adding data from the EWDP Phases III and IV wells. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for groundwater management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model and provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral groundwater flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment (TSPA).

K. Rehfeldt

2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

Mental fatigue evaluation by steroid level measurement in Parotid fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Play 1968 Major Subject. : Inc'ustrial Engineering MENTAL FATIGUE EVALUATION BY STEROID LEVEL MEASURLMENT. IN PAROTID FLUID A Thesis by HARPAL SINGH ApproveH as to tyle and. content by: P'hpirman of Committee) (Memb sr ) 1 1 PREFACE Alta...&ough indu trial engineering has had a phenomenal growth rate, a certain basic avenue has not been explored. The avenue 1 am refer- ring to is that of human fatigue and related phenomena. The reasons for this neglect are basically two: (1) Tnvestigation...

Singh, Harpal

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Photothermal measurement of the thermal conductivity of supercooled water O. Benchikh, D. Fournier, A. C. Boccara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal diffusivity measurements of supercooled water have been performed between + 40 °C and - 23 °C properties of supercooled water have been measured [1 ]. However, the thermal conduc- Article published

Boyer, Edmond

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-water complexes measured Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water complexes measured Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acid-water complexes measured Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NUCLEATION OF...

65

Low-level 14C measurements and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and isotope enrichment were used in 1991 to estimate that the 14C content of methane in natural gas was {<=}1.6x10-18 of the total carbon. The low content of 14C in underground hydrocarbons was verified later in the remarkable results from the Borexino test scintillation counter for solar neutrino studies. Since then studies of the 14C background problem have demonstrated that much of the background originally observed in the AMS measurements can, in principle, be eliminated. However, many difficulties and other backgrounds are to be faced as the limit for AMS is pushed still further towards possibly a ratio of < 10-21. These will be discussed.

Litherland, A.E.; Beukens, R.P.; Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W.E. [IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A7 (Canada); Gove, H.E. [IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627-0171 (United States)

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Nonparametric Instrumental Variable Approach to Estimating the Environmental Kuznets Curve for Water Pollutants at the Global Level1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specifically on air pollution (e.g., Bruvoll and Medin, 2003; Deacon and Norman, 2006; Heerink et al., 2001 for Water Pollutants at the Global Level1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin,2 Krishna P. Paudel, Mahesh Pandit for Water Pollutants at the Global Level Abstract We examine the relationship between income and water

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

67

Development of a neural network model to nowcast/forecast the coastal water level anomalies on the entrance to Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The water level anomaly, or the difference between the observed water level and that predicted by harmonic analysis (meteorological tide), was studied in this thesis for two locations on the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Wind and water level...

Nam, Young Joo

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Level-set RANS method for sloshing and green water simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. After validations, the method is applied to simulate sloshing flows in LNG tank and green water over the platform. In sloshing flows, the level-set RANS method captures the large impact pressure accurately on LNG tank walls. It also generates a plunging...

Yu, Kai

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Level-set RANS method for sloshing and green water simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. After validations, the method is applied to simulate sloshing flows in LNG tank and green water over the platform. In sloshing flows, the level-set RANS method captures the large impact pressure accurately on LNG tank walls. It also generates a plunging...

Yu, Kai

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry­1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse

Amelung, Falk

71

Water availability at farm household level a case study in the Nyando district in South-Western Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water availability at farm household level ­ a case study in the Nyando district in South of Crop Production Ecology Uppsala 2011 Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences #12;2 Water: Women collecting water in a well, Onjiko, Kenya. Photo: Erika Näslund Keywords: Water availability

72

Laboratory measurement of water imbibition into low-permeability welded tuff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

repository. As water infiltrates down from the ground surface through the fracture network, some water mayLaboratory measurement of water imbibition into low-permeability welded tuff M.Q. Hu*, P. Persoff accurately water imbibi- tion and vapor condensation into welded tuff of low permeability. Automatically

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

73

Water transport in fuel cell membranes measured by laser interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) The coefficients of electro-osmotic drag were found to increase with the increasing water content, which indicates that the Grotthuss mechanism of proton transfer is not active in the membranes with low water ...

Kim, Jungik, 1973-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Interannual variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite approach: A case study for the Rio Negro River basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interferometric radar measurements of water level changes onlevels derived from radar altim- etry and GRACE measurements

Frappart, Frédéric; Papa, Fabrice; Famiglietti, James S; Prigent, Catherine; Rossow, William B; Seyler, Frédérique

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

MEASUREMENT OF HEAT TRANSFER DURING DROP-WISE CONDENSATION OF WATER ON POLYETHYLENE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEASUREMENT OF HEAT TRANSFER DURING DROP-WISE CONDENSATION OF WATER ON POLYETHYLENE Gagan Deep distribution of temperature during drop-wise condensation over a polyethylene substrate was measured using on the substrate was simultaneously visualized. Static contact angles of water on polyethylene are measured

Khandekar, Sameer

76

Intracellular Water Exchange for Measuring the Dry Mass, Water Mass and Changes in Chemical Composition of Living Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell’s buoyant ...

Cermak, Nathan

77

Time domain measurement of the THz refractivity of water vapor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

region," Metrologia 18(2), 49­52 (1982). 7. R. J. Hill and R. S. Lawrence, "Refractive index of water

Oklahoma State University

78

A Nonparametric Instrumental Variable Approach to Estimating the Environmental Kuznets Curve for Water Pollutants at the Global Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), as well as papers focusing specifically on air pollution (e.g., Bruvoll and Medin, 2003; Deacon and Norman for Water Pollutants at the Global Level Krishna P. Paudel1 , C.-Y. Cynthia Lin2 , Mahesh Pandit the Environmental Kuznets Curve for Water Pollutants at the Global Level Abstract We examine the relationship

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

79

IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotationalvibrational spectra of water vapor. Part I--Energy levels and transition wavenumbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Water vapor Transition wavenumbers Atmospheric physics Energy levels MARVEL Information systemIUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational­vibrational spectra of water vapor. Part I--Energy levels and transition wavenumbers for H2 17 O and H2 18 O Jonathan Tennyson a,Ã, Peter F. Bernath b

Chance, Kelly

80

Measure Guideline: Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas. When conducting a total gut rehab of a structure or constructing a new home, best practice installation and detailing for effective waterproofing are critically important at bathtub and shower assemblies. Water management issues in a structure may go unrecognized for long periods, so that when they are finally observed, the damage from long-term water exposure is extensive. A gut rehab is often undertaken when a home has experienced a natural disaster or when the homeowners are interested in converting an old, high-energy-use building into a high-quality, efficient structure that meets or exceeds one of the national energy standards, such as ENERGY STAR or LEED for homes. During a gut rehab, bath areas need to be replaced with diligent attention to detail. Employing effective water management practices in the installation and detailing of tub and shower assemblies will minimize or eliminate water issues within the building cavities and on the finished surfaces. A residential tub-and-shower surround or shower-stall assembly is designed to handle a high volume of water - 2.5 gallons per minute, with multiple baths occurring during a typical day. Transitions between dissimilar materials and connections between multiple planes must be installed with care to avoid creating a pathway for water to enter the building assemblies. Due to the high volume of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure, a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. At each stage of construction, successive trades must take care not to create a defect nor to compound or cover up a previous trade's defect. Covering a defect hides the inevitable point of failure and may even exacerbate the situation.

Dickson, B.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements of wood chips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagram of a Wood Chip Moisture Content Measurement DeviceMeasurement of Moisture Content in Wood Chips Using NMR andWood chip water-content tests were done over a broad range of moisture contents

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements ofwood chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a device that measures the water content of wood chips, pulp and brown stock for the paper industry. This device employs a permanent magnet as the central part of a NMR measurement system. This report describes the magnet and the NMR measurement system. The results of water content measurements in wood chips in a magnetic field of 0.47 T are presented.

Barale, P.J.; Fong, C.G.; Green, M.A.; Luft, P.A.; McInturff,A.D.; Reimer, J.A.; Yahnke, M.

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

Soil Water Retention Measurements Using a Combined Tensiometer-Coiled Time Domain Reflectometry Probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Water Retention Measurements Using a Combined Tensiometer-Coiled Time Domain Reflectometry al., 1975; Arya et al.,that can be used to determine soil water retention curves in both 1975; Royer of a standard tensiometer. The combined tensiometer-coiled TDR probe was con- of soil water retention curves

Wildenschild, Dorthe

84

Quantitative concentration measurements of creatinine dissolved in water and urine using Raman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the lack of suitable materials with refractive indices lower that of water (n 1.33). Recently, howeverQuantitative concentration measurements of creatinine dissolved in water and urine using Raman in water and in urine. At short integration times, where shot noise is most troublesome, the enhanced

Berger, Andrew J.

85

Determination of efficiency of anechoic or decoupling hull coatings using water tank acoustic measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of efficiency of anechoic or decoupling hull coatings using water tank acoustic and radiated noise, respectively. Measurement of test panels in a water tank gives only the reflection in a water tank has already been presented in a previous paper [2]. The purpose of the present paper

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS William P a heat pump water heater (HPWH). After developing the HPWH, a field-test plan was implemented whereby 20 evaluate this effect. #12;INTRODUCTION Domestic water heaters account for approximately 2.5 EJ (2.4 x 1015

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

87

Ecosystem-scale measurements of biomass water using cosmic ray neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem-scale measurements of biomass water using cosmic ray neutrons Trenton E. Franz,1,2 Marek 2013. [1] Accurate estimates of biomass are imperative for under- standing the global carbon cycle. However, measurements of biomass and water in the biomass are difficult to obtain at a scale consistent

Zreda, Marek

88

Polychlorinated biphenyls in water, sediment and selected organisms of Galveston Bay, Texas: environmental levels and bioaccumulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PGLYCKQBINATH3 BIPHEtKLS IN hATER, S~~BKtlT KiD SEIZCTED QRGMJIB&% OF VPAIGN BAY, ~z. ENVIEG~ I~S KG BIOACC21ULATIGN. A Thesis by RALPH ~ STARE'r ~i'tted to the Graduate College of TQMs ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MAS~~ QF SCIENCE Play 1980 Major Subject: Biology POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN WATER, SEDIMENT AND SELECTED ORGANISMS OF GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS. ENVIRONMENTAL LEVELS AND BIOACCUMULATION A Thesis RALPH GARNER STAHL, JR. Approved...

Stahl, Ralph Garner

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Plant water use in a greenhouse: theory and measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature, and the storage tank temperature if applicable. The external transport coefficient for water vapor between crop and air was considered constant in the SG79 model, equivalent to a -1 resistance of 250 s m . The leaf resistance is made to vary... with the predicted water use by the SG79 model. A description of this test follows. The Lysimeters Four lysimeters of about 0. 02 m , made from plastic pots were 2 installed in the turf growing in the test greenhouse and were weighed every two hours during...

Shaer, Yacoub Adib

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components ofTankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine if it was feasible to collect information regarding energy use and hot water delivery from tankless gas water heaters using the sensors and controls built into the water heaters. This could then be used to determine the water heater efficiency ? the ratio of energy out (hot water delivered) to energy in (energy in the gas) in actual residential installations. The goal was to be as unobtrusive as possible, and to avoid invalidating warranties or exposing researchers to liability issues. If feasible this approach would reduce the costs of instrumentation.This paper describes the limited field and laboratory investigations to determine if using the sensors and controls built into tankless water heaters is feasible for field monitoring.It was more complicated to use the existing gas flow, water and temperature sensors than was anticipated. To get the signals from the existing sensors and controls is difficult and may involve making changes that would invalidate manufacturer warrantees. The procedures and methods for using signals from the existing gas valves, water flow meters and temperature sensors will vary by model. To be able to monitor different models and brands would require detailed information about each model and brand.Based on these findings, we believe that for field monitoring projects it would be easier, quicker and safer to connect external meters to measure the same parameters rather than using the sensors and controls built into tankless water heaters.

Lutz, Jim; Biermayer, Peter

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

91

Measuring indigenous photosynthetic organisms to detect chemical warefare agents in water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of testing water to detect the presence of a chemical or biological warfare agent is disclosed. The method is carried out by establishing control data by providing control water containing indigenous organisms but substantially free of a chemical and a biological warfare agent. Then measuring photosynthetic activity of the control water with a fluorometer to obtain control data to compare with test data to detect the presence of the chemical or agent. The test data is gathered by providing test water comprising the same indigenous organisms as contained in the control water. Further, the test water is suspected of containing the chemical or agent to be tested for. Photosynthetic activity is also measured by fluorescence induction in the test water using a fluorometer.

Greenbaum, Elias; Sanders, Charlene A.

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council calls for wildlife mitigation at hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River System. Beginning April, 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration funded a study of the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse and Kerr Dams on the western Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffittii) inhabitating the Flathead Valley of northwest Montana. The study was conducted by personnel of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MDFWP), to: (1) identify the size and productivity of this population, (2) identify current habitat conditions and losses of nesting and brood-rearing areas, (3) describe the effects of water level fluctuations on nesting and brood-rearing, and (4) identify mitigation alternatives to offset these effects. Annual pair and nest surveys were used to document the location and fate of goose nests. The number of known nesting attempts varied from 44 in 1984 to 108 in 1985, to 136 in 1986 and 134 in 1987. Fifty-four percent of the annual meeting nesting effort took place on elevated sites which were secure from the flooding and dewatering effects of fluctuating water levels. An average of 15 nests were found on stumps in the remnant Flathead River delta, however, an area strongly influenced by the operation of Kerr Dam. Annual nest losses to flooding and predation attributable to fluctuations caused by the dam were recorded. 53 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

Casey, Daniel

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Final Report for ARM Project Measuring 4-D Water Vapor Fields with GPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water vapor is a primary element in the Earth’s climate system. Atmospheric water vapor is central to cloud processes, radiation transfer, and the hydrological cycle. Using funding from Department of Energy (DOE) grant DE-FG03-02ER63327, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) developed new observational techniques to measure atmospheric water vapor and applied these techniques to measure four dimensional water vapor fields throughout the United States Southern Great Plains region. This report summarizes the development of a new observation from ground based Global Positioning System (GPS) stations called Slant Water Vapor (SW) and it’s utilization in retrieving four dimensional water vapor fields. The SW observation represents the integrated amount of water vapor between a GPS station and a transmitting satellite. SW observations provide improved temporal and spatial sampling of the atmosphere when compared to column-integrated quantities such as preciptitable water vapor (PW). Under funding from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, GPS networks in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region were deployed to retrieve SW to improve the characterization of water vapor throughout the region. These observations were used to estimate four dimensional water vapor fields using tomographic approaches and through assimilation into the MM5 numerical weather model.

Braun, John

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Under Vehicle Perception for High Level Safety Measures Using A Catadioptric Camera System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost. Moreover, displaying the under frames of the vehicles by typical perspective cameras that haveUnder Vehicle Perception for High Level Safety Measures Using A Catadioptric Camera System Caner Sahin and Mustafa Unel Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences Sabanci University Istanbul, Turkey

Yanikoglu, Berrin

95

Using Circuit-Level Power Measurements in Household Energy Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Circuit-Level Power Measurements in Household Energy Management Systems Alan Marchiori and Qi,qhan}@mines.edu Abstract The first requirement for any intelligent household energy management system is to be able energy consumption, but re- quires a lot of additional hardware­one meter per device in the home

Han, Qi "Chee"

96

Measurements of the spatial and energy distribution of thermal neutrons in uranium, heavy water lattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intracell activity distributions were measured in three natural uranium, heavy water lattices of 1. 010 inch diameter, aluminum clad rods on triangular spacings of 4. 5 inches, 5. 0 inches, and 5. 75 inches, respectively, ...

Brown, Paul S. (Paul Sherman)

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development of a lidar polarimeter technique of measuring suspended solids in water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE OF MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER A Thesis by DAVID W. PRESLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1980 Major Subject; Electrical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE OF MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER A Thesis by DAVID W, PRESLEY Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committee H d of Department...

Presley, David W

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Water borne transport of high level nuclear waste in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this report is to examine the feasibility of the very deep borehole experiment and to determine if it is a reasonable method of storing high level nuclear waste for an extended period of time. The objective ...

Cabeche, Dion Tunick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects

Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Power levels in office equipment: Measurements of new monitors and personal computers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electronic office equipment has proliferated rapidly over the last twenty years and is projected to continue growing in the future. Efforts to reduce the growth in office equipment energy use have focused on power management to reduce power consumption of electronic devices when not being used for their primary purpose. The EPA ENERGY STAR[registered trademark] program has been instrumental in gaining widespread support for power management in office equipment, and accurate information about the energy used by office equipment in all power levels is important to improving program design and evaluation. This paper presents the results of a field study conducted during 2001 to measure the power levels of new monitors and personal computers. We measured off, on, and low-power levels in about 60 units manufactured since July 2000. The paper summarizes power data collected, explores differences within the sample (e.g., between CRT and LCD monitors), and discusses some issues that arise in m etering office equipment. We also present conclusions to help improve the success of future power management programs.Our findings include a trend among monitor manufacturers to provide a single very low low-power level, and the need to standardize methods for measuring monitor on power, to more accurately estimate the annual energy consumption of office equipment, as well as actual and potential energy savings from power management.

Roberson, Judy A.; Brown, Richard E.; Nordman, Bruce; Webber, Carrie A.; Homan, Gregory H.; Mahajan, Akshay; McWhinney, Marla; Koomey, Jonathan G.

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Process for measuring low cadmium levels in blood and other biological specimens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for measuring low levels of cadmium in blood and other biological specimens is provided without interference from high levels of alkali metal contaminants by forming an aqueous solution and without contamination by environmental cadmium absent the proteins from the specimen, selectively removing cadmium from the aqueous solution on an anion exchange resin, thereby removing the alkali metal contaminants, resolubilizing cadmium from the resin to form a second solution and analyzing the second solution for cadmium, the process being carried out in a cadmium-free environment.

Peterson, David P. (Orland Park, IL); Huff, Edmund A. (Lemont, IL); Bhattacharyya, Maryka H. (Naperville, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Measurement of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) in raw drinking water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to assess the pathways for human exposure to methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) and to understand the extent of MTBE contamination in watersheds, a purge and trap gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method to measure part-per-trillion (ppt) concentrations of MTBE in environmental waters was developed. A variety of California's raw drinking waters were analyzed. No detectable MTBE was found in deep groundwater (>1000 feet). However shallow groundwater ({approx}250 feet) contained MTBE concentrations of non-detect to 1300 ppt. MTBE concentrations measured in rivers and lakes ranged from non-detect to 3500 ppt. East (San Francisco) Bay area rain water contained approximately 80 ppt MTBE.

Davisson, M L; Koester, C J; Moran, J E

1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200?s. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

Advanced quadrupole ion trap instrumentation for low level vehicle emissions measurements. CRADA final report for number ORNL93-0238  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amenable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of sensitivity, specificity, speed, and flexibility with respect to the technical requirements of the top 15 analyzer.

McLuckey, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Goeringer, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dearth, M.A. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Environmental Research Consortium

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Directional solvent for membrane-free water desalination-A molecular level study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of desalination technologies has been identified as vital to fulfilling future water demand. In this paper, we use molecular simulation to demonstrate that decanoic acid can dissolve water but reject salt, and ...

Luo, Tengfei

106

Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

salinity simulations of sea level rise scenarios. AppendixSan Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversiona 1-D model of sea level rise in an estuary must account for

Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

soil water potential that describes the energy status of the soil water and is an important parameterNon-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator S-3120, United States 1. Introduction Knowledge of soil water content is critical to agricultural, hydrological

Johnson, Peter D.

109

High performance gamma measurements of equipment retrieved from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to 90% saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

Troyer, G.L.

1997-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Reactive ion etching-assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements on the single nanoparticle level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement is of essential importance for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this work, we develop a class of single-particle SERS approaches, i.e., reactive ion etching (RIE)-assisted SERS measurements correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) strategy (RIE/SERS/SEM), enabling precise and high-resolution identification of single gold nanoparticle (AuNP) in facile and reliable manners. By using AuNP-coated silicon wafer and quartz glass slide as models, we further employ the developed RIE/SERS/SEM method for interrogating the relationship between SERS substrates and enhancement factor (EF) on the single particle level. Together with theoretical calculation using an established finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method, we demonstrate silicon wafer as superior SERS substrates, facilitating improvement of EF values.

Wang, Si-Yi; Jiang, Xiang-Xu; Wei, Xin-Pan; Lee, Shuit-Tong, E-mail: apannale@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; He, Yao, E-mail: apannale@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials - FUNSOM, Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, and Devices Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Xu, Ting-Ting [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials - FUNSOM, Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, and Devices Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

Low-Level Plutonium Bioassay Measurements at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) are important alpha emitting radionuclides contained in radioactive debris from nuclear weapons testing. {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu are long-lived radionuclides with half-lives of 24,400 years and 6580 years, respectively. Concerns over human exposure to plutonium stem from knowledge about the persistence of plutonium isotopes in the environment and the high relative effectiveness of alpha-radiation to cause potential harm to cells once incorporated into the human body. In vitro bioassay tests have been developed to assess uptakes of plutonium based on measured urinary excretion patterns and modeled metabolic behaviors of the absorbed radionuclides. Systemic plutonium absorbed by the deep lung or from the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion is either excreted or distributed to other organs, primarily to the liver and skeleton, where it is retained for biological half-times of around 20 and 50 years, respectively. Dose assessment and atoll rehabilitation programs in the Marshall Islands have historically given special consideration to residual concentrations of plutonium in the environment even though the predicted dose from inhalation and/or ingestion of plutonium accounts for less than 5% of the annual effective dose from exposure to fallout contamination. Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a state-of-the-art bioassay test to assess urinary excretion rates of plutonium from Marshallese populations. This new heavy-isotope measurement system is based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The AMS system at LLNL far exceeds the standard measurement requirements established under the latest United States Department of Energy (DOE) regulation, 10CFR 835, for occupational monitoring of plutonium, and offers several advantages over classical as well as competing new technologies for low-level detection and measurement of plutonium isotopes. The United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has independently verified the accuracy and precision of the AMS detection system for low-level bioassay measurements of plutonium isotopes through participation in an intercomparison exercise whereby performance evaluation samples were prepared in a synthetic urine matrix and submitted to participating laboratories for blind analysis. The results of the analyses were then sent to the NIST to independently evaluate the performance of laboratory participants. At LLNL, the AMS measurements of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu met ANSI 13.30 criteria for both precision and accuracy at all sample test levels. Livermore scientists continue to test the performance of the Marshall Islands Plutonium Urinalysis Program by routine blind analysis of externally prepared quality control test samples, and through the rigorous implementation of standardized methods and procedures. Although not addressed directly in the report, AMS measurements show that the urinary excretion of plutonium by selected Marshallese populations fall into a low and reproducible range. Moreover, there appears to be no evidence of small incremental intakes of plutonium associated with resettlement activities - past or present. The improved quality, reliability and detection sensitivity of AMS for low-level plutonium isotope measurements will enable DOE to develop high-quality, baseline urinary excretion data for Marshallese populations, and accurately assess and track potential uptakes of plutonium. associated with resettlement activities and/or from long-term changes in plutonium exposure conditions in the Marshall Islands.

Hamilton, T; Brown, T; Hickman, D; Marchetti, A; Williams, R; Kehl, S

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components of Tankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Procedures for Water Heaters; Final Rule," FederalTesting of Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance," DavisInc. , "T-K2 Instantaneous Water Heater Installation Manual

Lutz, Jim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

FORECASTING THE RESPONSE OF COASTAL WETLANDS TO DECLINING3 WATER LEVELS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DISTURBANCES IN THE GREAT4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i 1 2 FORECASTING THE RESPONSE OF COASTAL WETLANDS TO DECLINING3 WATER LEVELS AND ENVIRONMENTALMaster University23 (Biology) Hamilton, Ontario24 TITLE: Forecasting the response of coastal wetlands to declining plants in Lake Ontario coastal36 wetlands while taking into account other factors such as urbanization

McMaster University

114

Direct Determination of Trace-Level Haloacetic Acids in Drinking Water by Two-1 Dimensional Ion Chromatography with Suppressed Conductivity2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Direct Determination of Trace-Level Haloacetic Acids in Drinking Water by Two-1 Dimensional Ion thetreatment process of drinking water, disinfectants (chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide)13 react on water of the nine existing Halo-Acetic Acids (HAA) are commonly found15 in drinking water(Monochloroacetic acid MCAA

Boyer, Edmond

115

Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Differential Pressure Instrument with Wireless Telemetry for In-Situ Measurement of Fluid Flow across Sediment-Water Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry ...

Gardner, Alan T.

117

A Simple Method to Continuous Measurement of Energy Consumption of Tank Less Gas Water Heaters for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy consumptions of hot water supply in restaurants or residential houses are large amount, guidelines for optimal design are not presented. measurements of energy consumption of tank less gas water heaters very difficult unless gas flow meters...

Yamaha, M.; Fujita, M.; Miyoshi, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

Tattersall, Wade [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia) [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, 4810 Queensland (Australia); Chiari, Luca [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia (Australia)] [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia (Australia); Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); White, Ron D. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, 4810 Queensland (Australia)] [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, 4810 Queensland (Australia); Brunger, M. J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia (Australia) [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Buckman, Stephen J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia) [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Garcia, Gustavo [Instituto de F?sica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigationes Cient?ficas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de F?sica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigationes Cient?ficas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, Francisco [Departamento de F?sica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Departamento de F?sica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Shear viscosity measurements in the binary mixture butyl cellosolve-water near its upper and lower critical consolute points  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been measured for a two-component critical liquid system, butyl cellosolve-water, in the region to report measurements of the shear viscosity of critical binary mixture butyl cello- solve (2-n353 Shear viscosity measurements in the binary mixture butyl cellosolve-water near its upper

Boyer, Edmond

120

Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Measuring optical absorption coefficient of pure water in UV using the integrating cavity absorption meter.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drop in reflectance below around 350 nm makes the material not suitable for the UV region. Note that for a spherical cavity with diameter of 10 cm and wall reflectance of 95% for wavelength of 250 nm, the effective path length is just 1.3 m, much... properties of water............................................................ 2 2. Measurement methods .................................................................. 6 3. ICAM...

Wang, Ling

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

Measurement of Water Vapor Concentration using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tunable diode laser spectroscopy and the Beer-Lambert relation has been used to measure the absorption of water vapor both in an absorption cell and in a shock tube. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a laser diagnostic capable of determining...

Barrett, Alexander B.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Estimation of Recharge to the Middle Trinity Aquifer of Central Texas Using Water-Level Fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the aquifer for 1999 and 2000. As part of the investigation, the Edwards Aquifer Research & Data Center (EARDC) staff worked with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) and local groundwater conservation districts to install five new recording well monitors...

Jennings, Marshall; Chad, Thomas; Burch, John; Creutzburg, Brian; Lambert, Lance

124

Shear Strength Correlations for Kaolin/Water Slurries: A Comparison of Recent Measurements with Historical Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents testing funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation and performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with Fauske and Associates, LLC (FAI) to determine the behavior of vessel spanning bubbles. The shear strengths of four samples of kaolin/water mixtures obtained by PNNL from FAI were measured and are reported here. The measured shear strengths of these samples were then used to determine how the Rassat correlation fit these new measurements or if a new correlation was needed. These results were then compared with previously reported data.

Burns, Carolyn A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Russell, Renee L.

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

125

Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450 deg. C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

Fokapic, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrda, D.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Mihaljev, Z. [Scientific Veterinary Institute, Rumenacki put 20, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Cupic, Z. [Research Institute for Reproduction, A.I. and Embryo Transfer Temerin, 21235 Temerin, Industrijska zona bb. (Serbia)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

126

A measure of technological level for the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Fetching) are present in all societies, and v2137 (Planting) is identical to v2139 (Harvesting).

Eff, E. Anthon; Maiti, Abhradeep

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Measure Guideline: Heat Pump Water Heaters in New and Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for builders, contractors, homeowners, and policy-makers. This document is intended to explore the issues surrounding heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) to ensure that homeowners and contractors have the tools needed to appropriately and efficiently install HPWHs. Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) promise to significantly reduce energy consumption for domestic hot water (DHW) over standard electric resistance water heaters (ERWHs). While ERWHs perform with energy factors (EFs) around 0.9, new HPWHs boast EFs upwards of 2.0. High energy factors in HPWHs are achieved by combining a vapor compression system, which extracts heat from the surrounding air at high efficiencies, with electric resistance element(s), which are better suited to meet large hot water demands. Swapping ERWHs with HPWHs could result in roughly 50% reduction in water heating energy consumption for 35.6% of all U.S. households. This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for builders, contractors, homeowners, and policy-makers. While HPWHs promise to significantly reduce energy use for DHW, proper installation, selection, and maintenance of HPWHs is required to ensure high operating efficiency and reliability. This document is intended to explore the issues surrounding HPWHs to ensure that homeowners and contractors have the tools needed to appropriately and efficiently install HPWHs. Section 1 of this guideline provides a brief description of HPWHs and their operation. Section 2 highlights the cost and energy savings of HPWHs as well as the variables that affect HPWH performance, reliability, and efficiency. Section 3 gives guidelines for proper installation and maintenance of HPWHs, selection criteria for locating HPWHs, and highlights of important differences between ERWH and HPWH installations. Throughout this document, CARB has included results from the evaluation of 14 heat pump water heaters (including three recently released HPWH products) installed in existing homes in the northeast region of the United States.

Shapiro, C.; Puttagunta, S.; Owens, D.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Estimation of interstitial water in porous medium by capillary pressure measurements at various temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water to remove the salt. Ten pore volumes of distilled water were flushed through each core and diaphragm. They were then dried in the oven overnight and oooled. Finally they were saturated with kerosene. Run V was made at 75 F with the cores... saturated with kerosene. In this run kerosene was the wetting fluid instead of brine. A standard Du Nouy Tensiometer was used to measure surface tension of the brine solution at 75'F, 150'F and 200'F. Surface tension of kerosene, and brine solution...

Gupta, Mahesh Chander

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Direct measurement of activation time and nucleation rate in capillary-condensed water nanomeniscus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate real-time observation of nucleation of the single water nanomeniscus formed via capillary condensation. We directly measure (i) activation time by time-resolved atomic force microscopy and (ii) nucleation rate by statistical analysis of its exponential distribution, which is the experimental evidence that the activation process is stochastic and follows the Poisson statistics. It implies that formation of the water nanomeniscus is triggered by nucleation, which requires activation for producing a nucleus. We also find the dependence of the nucleation rate on the tip-sample distance and temperature.

Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Stambaugh, Corey; Chang, Sung-Jin; Jhe, Wonho, E-mail: whjhe@snu.ac.kr [Center for Nano-Liquid, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Nano-Liquid, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

130

A thermal method for measuring the rate of water movement in plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L?BP A 8 V a L ?BPA8B8 op A THERMAL METHOD FOR MEASURING THE RATE OF WATER MOVEMENT IN PLANTS A Dissertation By Morris Elkins Bloodworth Vao Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial... Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May, 1958 TLX Major Subject: Soil Physics p ^i???pP ??^i?? ??? ??p?????? ^i? ?p^? ?? WATER MOVEMENT IN PLANTS A Dissertation By Morris Elkins Bloodworth Approved as to style...

Bloodworth, Morris Elkins

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Proposal for a Vehicle Level Test Procedure to Measure Air Conditioning Fuel Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The air-conditioning (A/C) compressor load significantly impacts the fuel economy of conventional vehicles and the fuel use/range of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). A National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) vehicle performance analysis shows the operation of the air conditioner reduces the charge depletion range of a 40-mile range PHEV from 18% to 30% in a worst case hot environment. Designing for air conditioning electrical loads impacts PHEV and electric vehicle (EV) energy storage system size and cost. While automobile manufacturers have climate control procedures to assess A/C performance, and the U.S. EPA has the SCO3 drive cycle to measure indirect A/C emissions, there is no automotive industry consensus on a vehicle level A/C fuel use test procedure. With increasing attention on A/C fuel use due to increased regulatory activities and the development of PHEVs and EVs, a test procedure is needed to accurately assess the impact of climate control loads. A vehicle thermal soak period is recommended, with solar lamps that meet the SCO3 requirements or an alternative heating method such as portable electric heaters. After soaking, the vehicle is operated over repeated drive cycles or at a constant speed until steady-state cabin air temperature is attained. With this method, the cooldown and steady-state A/C fuel use are measured. This method can be run at either different ambient temperatures to provide data for the GREEN-MAC-LCCP model temperature bins or at a single representative ambient temperature. Vehicles with automatic climate systems are allowed to control as designed, while vehicles with manual climate systems are adjusted to approximate expected climate control settings. An A/C off test is also run for all drive profiles. This procedure measures approximate real-world A/C fuel use and assess the impact of thermal load reduction strategies.

Rugh, J. P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Water vapor and temperature inversions near the 0 deg C level over the tropical western Pacific. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Intensive Observation Period (IOP), several periods of water vapor and temperature inversions near the 0 deg C level were observed. Satellite and radiosonde data from TOGA COARE are used to document the large-scale conditions and thermodynamic and kinematic structures present during three extended periods in which moisture and temperature inversions near the freezing level were very pronounced. Observations from each case are synthesized into schematics which represent typical structures of the inversion phenomena. Frequency distributions of the inversion phenomena along with climatological humidity and temperature profiles are calculated for the four-month IOP.

Hart, K.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A measurement of the absorption of liquid argon scintillation light by dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume ...

Jones, Benjamin James Poyner

134

FLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT MEASURES FOR FLOOD MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT variability/change; risk assessment; flood management; water resources flexibility.) DiFrancesco, Kara N of Assessment Measures for Flood Management Systems. Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA

Tullos, Desiree

135

HIGH TEMPERATURE CONDUCTIVITY PROBE FOR MONITORING CONTAMINATION LEVELS IN POWER PLANT BOILER WATER.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A high temperature/high pressure flow through probe was designed to measure high temperature electrical conductivity of aqueous (aq) dilute electrolyte solutions, an application which can… (more)

Hipple, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Farm-Level Evaluation of Agricultural Profit and Ground Water Quality: Texas Seymour Aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Seymour Aquifer of north-central Texas is known to have elevated levels of nitrates. The design of economically sound policies for reducing agriculture's nitrate contribution to the aquifer suggests a need to evaluate alternative management...

Chowdhury, Manzoor; Lacewell, Ronald D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Ozuna, Teofilo Jr.; Benson, Verel W.; Harris, Billy L.; Dyke, Paul T.

137

Influence of the water content on X-ray fluorescence core-scanning measurements in soft marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Margins, University of Bremen, Leobener Strasse, D-28359 Bremen, Germany [1] The X-ray fluorescence (XRF properties such as density and water content on XRF core scanner data. Comparison of XRF scanner measurements of the measurements taken at the sediment surface to the amount of water in the sample volume analyzed by the XRF core

Tjallingii, Rik

138

The role of water vapor and solar radiation in determining temperature changes and trends measured at Armagh, 18812000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of water vapor and solar radiation in determining temperature changes and trends measured in atmospheric circulation, are discussed. Citation: Stanhill, G. (2011), The role of water vapor and solar radiation in determining temperature changes and trends measured at Armagh, 1881­2000, J. Geophys. Res., 116

139

Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

Avedisian, C. T. (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY); Presser, Cary (National Institute of Standard & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); DesJardin, Paul Edward (University at Buffalo, New York, NY); Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis and Calibration of CRF Raman Lidar Cloud Liquid Water Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Raman lidar (RL), located at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF), is a unique state-of-the-art active remote sensor that is able to measure profiles of water vapor, aerosol, and cloud properties at high temporal and vertical resolution throughout the diurnal cycle. In October 2005, the capability of the RL was extended by the addition of a new detection channel that is sensitive to the Raman scattering of liquid water. This new channel permits the system, in theory, to measure profiles of liquid water content (LWC) by the RL. To our knowledge, the ARM RL is the only operation lidar with this capability. The liquid water Raman backscattering cross-section is a relatively weak and spectrally broad feature, relative to the water vapor Raman backscatter signal. The wide bandpass required to achieve reasonable signal-to-noise in the liquid water channel essentially eliminates the ability to measure LWC profiles during the daytime in the presence of large solar background, and thus all LWC observations are nighttime only. Additionally, the wide bandpass increases the probability that other undesirable signals, such as fluorescence from aerosols, may contaminate the observation. The liquid water Raman cross-section has a small amount of overlap with the water vapor Raman cross-section, and thus there will be a small amount of ‘cross-talk’ between the two signals, with water vapor contributing a small amount of signal to the LWC observation. And finally, there is significant uncertainty in the actual strength of the liquid water Raman cross-section in the literature. The calibrated LWC profiles, together with the coincident cloud backscatter observations also made by the RL, can be used to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius. By combining these profiles of effective radius in the lower portion of the cloud with the aerosol extinction measurements made below the cloud by the RL, the first aerosol indirect effect can be investigated using a single instrument, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with aligning the different sampling periods and fields of view of multiple instruments. We have applied a “first principles” calibration to the LWC profiles. This approach requires that the relative differences in optical efficiency between the water vapor and liquid water channels be known; this relative difference is easily computed using the efficiency values of the beam splitters and interference filters in the lidar that were provided by the vendors of these components. The first principles approach then transfers the calibration from the water vapor mixing ratio to the LWC using the difference in the optical efficiency and an interpolated value of the liquid water Raman cross section from the literature, and the better established water vapor Raman cross section. After accounting for all known error sources, the vertical integral of LWC was compared against a similar value retrieved from a co-located ground-based infrared radiometer. The RL and infrared radiometer have significantly different fields of view; thus to compare the two sensors the data were averaged to 5 min intervals where only cloudy samples were included in the average of each. While there is fair scatter in the data (r=0.47), there is also a clear indication of a positive correlation between the infrared and the RL values. The value of the slope of the regression is 0.49, which indicates a tendency of the RL measurements to underestimate the total liquid amount with respect to the infrared retrieval. Research continues to investigate the source of the bias, but the most likely candidate is the large uncertainty in the liquid water Raman cross-section as there have been no direct measurements made of this parameter at the lidar’s laser wavelength of 355 nm. The calibrated LWC profile was then used together with the cloud backscatter coefficient profile from the RL to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius and cloud droplet number density. These profiles o

Turner, D.D.

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measurements and calculations of metastable level lifetimes in Fe X, Fe XI, Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XIV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lifetimes of metastable levels in the ground term of Fe ions within the 3s(2)3p(k), k=1-5, isoelectronic sequences have been measured. These measurements were performed utilizing ions that were selected by mass to charge ratio while transported from...

Moehs, D. P.; Bhatti, M. I.; Church, David A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

Wang, Zhien

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

143

Environmental Levels Of 129I Present In Bovine Thyroid And Fresh Water In Argentina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of {sup 129}I in bovine thyroid and fresh water samples coming from all over Argentina were analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and total iodine present in samples by Gas Chromatography (GC) and Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Once we complete this study, it will be the first set of data of this kind from an extended region of the south American subcontinent.

Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Carnellia, P. F. F.; Barbara, E. de; Figueira, J. M.; Fimiani, L.; Heimanna, D. M.; Zalazara, L. [Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fernandez Niello, J. [Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Campus Miguelete, B1650BWA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); La Gamma, A. M. [Gerencia Quimica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Wallner, A. [VERA-Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

144

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-­?Water  Interdependencies   and  the  Emerging  Energy  Demands  on  Water  Resources."  Report  SAND.  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic water level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Changes in chronology of seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding and erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Our 1985 pair count data indicated that 95 to 143 nests may have been present. Hatching success for 1985 nests (55%) was low compared to long-term averages for the region. Predation was the predominant cause of ground nest failure (25 nests); we documented 2 nest failures due to flooding. The maximum gosling count in the study area for 1985 was 197. Six key brood-rearing areas were identified. Most (80%) sites were located in the herbaceous or pasture cover type and the riparian bench landform. Analysis of aerial photographs taken prior to construction of Kerr Dam documented the loss of 1859 acres of habitat along the north shore of Flathead Lake. Losses were attributed to inundation and to continuing erosion due to operation of Kerr Dam. Lake and river water level regimes were compared with the chronology of important periods in the nesting cycle. Low lake levels in May and early June coincide with the breed-rearing period. Mudflats are heavily used by broods, but their effect on survival must still be documented. Preliminary recommendations to protect and enhance Canada goose habitat and production are being developed.

Casey, Daniel

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

On the theory of water level variations in lakes and seas induced by atmospheric disturbances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Boundary Conditions: u. (o. q, t) = u- C~, gt) = ~ (W, - K, t) = 0 au. 8u [ Q ? (y-g t) = -+ ? (w, o, t) = ? ? ~ Wpl~ %+ R eQ? x~v Initial Conditions; u. (e?q, o) = q (W, o) = 0 Solution: The expressions %q = co+ 'La ~ exp Q~ J ?= ?in Iy z(g ??p... ~ = constant) ~Q ~ ~ b~ at o~ a+ + \\ 0 a at C. F || I. 11* tl*o ~Co 0o1 Ilsed: In general, the response of a given body of homo- geneous water to atmospheric pressure grad1ents and winds depends on the eddy viscos1ty of the weter, the Coriolis force...

Sparger, Carter Reece

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

In situ measurements of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the water column off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial distributions of DDT and its primary metabolites (DDTs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the water column off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA, were measured in the winter and summer of 1997 using an in situ sampling method. The concentrations of DDTs ranged from 0.6 to 15.8 ng/L, while those of PCBs ranged from 0.06 to 15.8 ng/L, while those of PCBs ranged from 0.06 to 1.14 ng/L at eight sampling stations. The spatial distribution patterns of DDTs and PCBs as well as the DDT/PCB concentration ratio in the water column were similar to those found in the sediment, and the vertical profiles of DDTs and PCBs at both sampling seasons exponentially decreased with increasing distance from the sea floor. In addition, the partitioning characteristics of DDTs and selected PCB congeners indicated a tendency of mobilization from sediment to water. All of these findings strongly suggest that contaminated sediments are a main source of DDT and PCB inputs to the water column surrounding the study site.

Zeng, E.Y.; Yu, C.C.; Tran, K. [Southern California Coastal Research Project, Westminster, CA (United States)] [Southern California Coastal Research Project, Westminster, CA (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Direct Measurement of Competing Quantum Effects on the Kinetic Energy of Heavy Water upon Melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even at room temperature, quantum mechanics plays a major role in determining the quantitative behaviour of light nuclei, changing significantly the values of physical properties such as the heat capacity. However, other observables appear to be only weakly affected by nuclear quantum effects (NQEs): for instance, the melting temperatures of light and heavy water differ by less than 4 K. Recent theoretical work has attributed this to a competition between intra and inter molecular NQEs, which can be separated by computing the anisotropy of the quantum kinetic energy tensor. The principal values of this tensor change in opposite directions when ice melts, leading to a very small net quantum mechanical effect on the melting point. This paper presents the first direct experimental observation of this phenomenon, achieved by measuring the deuterium momentum distributions n(p) in heavy water and ice using Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS), and resolving their anisotropy. Results from the experiments, supple...

Romanelli, Giovanni; Manolopoulos, David E; Pantalei, Claudia; Senesi, Roberto; Andreani, Carla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hydrologic evaluation methodology for estimating water movement through the unsaturated zone at commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies key technical issues related to hydrologic assessment of water flow in the unsaturated zone at low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. In addition, a methodology for incorporating these issues in the performance assessment of proposed LLW disposal facilities is identified and evaluated. The issues discussed fall into four areas: estimating the water balance at a site (i.e., infiltration, runoff, water storage, evapotranspiration, and recharge); analyzing the hydrologic performance of engineered components of a facility; evaluating the application of models to the prediction of facility performance; and estimating the uncertainty in predicted facility performance. To illustrate the application of the methodology, two examples are presented. The first example is of a below ground vault located in a humid environment. The second example looks at a shallow land burial facility located in an arid environment. The examples utilize actual site-specific data and realistic facility designs. The two examples illustrate the issues unique to humid and arid sites as well as the issues common to all LLW sites. Strategies for addressing the analytical difficulties arising in any complex hydrologic evaluation of the unsaturated zone are demonstrated.

Meyer, P.D.; Rockhold, M.L.; Nichols, W.E.; Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Quantification of Hungry Horse Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1985 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act passed in 1980 by Congress has provided a mechanism which integrates and provides for stable energy planning in the Pacific Northwest. The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council and charged the Council with developing a comprehensive fish and wildlife program to protect and enhance fish and wildlife impacted by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Implementation of the plan is being carried out by the Bonneville Power Administration. The Hungry Horse Reservoir study is part of that Council's plan. This study proposes to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance principal gamefish species in Hungry Horse Reservoir. The specific study objects are listed below. (1) Quantify the amount of reservoir habitat available at different water level elevations; (2) Estimate recruitment of westslope cutthroat trout juveniles from important spawning and nursery tributaries; (3) Determine the abundance, growth, distribution and use of available habitat by major game species in the reservoir; (4) Determine the abundance and availability of fish food organisms in the reservoir; (5) Quantify the seasonal use of available food items by major fish species; (6) Develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat used by fish and fish food organisms; and (7) Estimate the impact of reservoir operation on major gamefish species.

May, Bruce

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding or erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Counts of indicated pairs suggest there were 73-125 occupied nests in the study area; 44 were located in 1984. Twenty were island ground nests, 19 were tree nests, and 5 were on man-made structures. Hatching success was 76 percent. Sixty-one percent of all nests were in deciduous forest habitat; 87 percent were on riparian bench or island landforms. Seventy-four percent of all nests were within 5 m of the seasonal high water mark (HWM) and 85 percent of ground nests were 1 m or less above the HWM. Production, habitat use, and distribution of broods were documented through aerial, boat, ground, and observation tower surveys. 28 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Casey, Daniel

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy Consumption Measuring and Diagnostic Analysis of Air-conditioning Water System in a Hotel Building in Harbin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper introduces an air-conditioning water system in a hotel building in Harbin, finishes its air-conditioning energy consumption measurement in summer conditions, and presents an estimation index of performance of chiller, pump and motor...

Zhao, T.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Contact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Heavy oil; Asphaltenes; Naphthenic acids; Wettability; Oil­waterContact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water RonaldoG.dosSantos a , Rahoma S. Mohamed a,F , Antonio C. Bannwart b , Watson Loh c

Loh, Watson

154

Implications of ground-water measurements at the Hoe Creek UCG site in northeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) promises to become an important source of synthetic fuels. In an effort to provide timely information concerning the environmental implications of the UCG process, we are conducting investigations in conjunction with the UCG experiments carried out in northeastern Wyoming by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. Cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection were also investigated, using surface and subsurface geotechnical instruments, post-burn coring, and hydraulic head measurements. We have found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. Fortunately, the concentrations of many of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, some of these materials seem likely to remain in the local groundwater, at low concentrations, for several years. We have attempted to interpret our results in terms of concepts that will assist in the development of effective and practicable control technologies.

Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.; Raber, E.; Ganow, H.C.; Stone, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Simulation studies of slow dynamics of hydration water in lysozyme : hydration level dependence and comparison with experiment using new time domain analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations using the GROMACS® package has been performed in this thesis. It is used to mimic and simulate the hydration water in Lysozyme with three different hydration levels (h = 0.3, ...

Kim, Chansoo, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

Beyond Corridor Reliability Measures: Analysis of Freeway Travel Time Reliability at the1 Segment Level for Hotspot Identification2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beyond Corridor Reliability Measures: Analysis of Freeway Travel Time Reliability at the1 Segment and particularly1 freeways. However, it has become evident that travel time reliability, taking into account at the directional corridor level for planning4 purposes and analyze the ways in which travel time reliability can

Bertini, Robert L.

158

Customer satisfaction for beef: home-use tests and objective measures to evaluate three retail cuts at different quality levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, participated in a six-week home-use test of the three cuts and four quality grade levels completing a questionnaire for each steak evaluated. Trained sensory panel and Wamer-Bratzler shear force determination (WBS) provided objective measures for each subprimal...

Neely, Tracey Renee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

159

Proposal for a Vehicle Level Test Procedure to Measure Air Conditioning Fuel Use: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure is described to measure approximate real-world air conditioning fuel use and assess the impact of thermal load reduction strategies in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Rugh, J.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Factors for converting dose measured in polystyrene phantoms to dose reported in water phantoms for incident proton beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Previous dosimetry protocols allowed calibrations of proton beamline dose monitors to be performed in plastic phantoms. Nevertheless, dose determinations were referenced to absorbed dose-to-muscle or absorbed dose-to-water. The IAEA Code of Practice TRS 398 recommended that dose calibrations be performed with ionization chambers only in water phantoms because plastic-to-water dose conversion factors were not available with sufficient accuracy at the time of its writing. These factors are necessary, however, to evaluate the difference in doses delivered to patients if switching from calibration in plastic to a protocol that only allows calibration in water. Methods: This work measured polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors for this purpose. Uncertainties in the results due to temperature, geometry, and chamber effects were minimized by using special experimental set-up procedures. The measurements were validated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results: At the peak of non-range-modulated beams, measured polystyrene-to-water factors ranged from 1.015 to 1.024 for beams with ranges from 36 to 315 mm. For beams with the same ranges and medium sized modulations, the factors ranged from 1.005 to 1.019. The measured results were used to generate tables of polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors. Conclusions: The dose conversion factors can be used at clinical proton facilities to support beamline and patient specific dose per monitor unit calibrations performed in polystyrene phantoms.

Moyers, M. F.; Vatnitsky, A. S.; Vatnitsky, S. M. [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Guthrie Clinic/Robert Packard Hospital, Sayre, Pennsylvania 18840 (United States); EBG MedAustron, Wiener Neustadt, Austria A2700 (Austria)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Modeling of board-level package by Finite Element Analysis and laser interferometer measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai be simulated by an equivalent Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model of the board-level package, in which detailed layer structure of the Print Circuit Board (PCB), signal wires and through-holes were ignored

Cao, Wenwu

164

Lessons and Measures Learned from Continuous Commissioning(SM) of Central Chilled/Hot Water Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water and hot water system operation. It can be performed before, during, or after building side continuous commissioning. Successful central chilled/hot water system CC not only results in improved production and distribution, but also achieves...

Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Bruner, H.; Chen, H.; Wei, G.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was initiated in the fall of 1981 to delineate the extent of successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake and determine the impacts of the historic and present operations of Kerr and Hungry Horse dams. An investigation of the quantity and quality of groundwater and other factors affecting kokanee reproductive success in Flathead Lake began in the spring of 1982. A total of 719 redds were counted in 17 shoreline areas of Flathead Lake in1983 compared to 592 in 1981 and 1,029 in 1982. Shoreline spawning contributed three percent to the total kokanee spawning in the Flathead drainage in 1983. Fifty-nine percent of the redds were located above 2883 ft, the operational minimum pool. The majority of those redds were constructed between 2885 and 2889 ft. In areas above minimum pool, intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were adequate for embryo survival and exhibited a decrease with depth. Limited data indicated apparent velocity may be the key in determining redd distribution. Seventy-five percent of the redds located below minimum pool were constructed in a zone between 2869 and 2883 ft. In individual areas, apparent velocity measurements and intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were related to redd density. The variation in intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Yellow Bay spawning area was partially explained by lake stage fluctuation. As lake stage declined, groundwater apparent velocity increased which increased intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations. Mean survival to the eyed stage in the three areas below minimum pool was 43 percent. Prior to exposure by lake drawdown, mean survival to the eyed stage in spawning areas above minimum pool was 87 percent. This indicated habitat most conducive to successful embryo survival was in gravels above 2883 ft. prior to significant exposure. Survival in redds exposed to either extended periods of drawdown or to temperatures less than -10% was significantly reduced to a mean of 20-30 percent. Survival in individual spawning areas exposed by lake drawdown varied from 0 to 65 percent. Groundwater reaction to lake stage explained some of the variation in individual spawning area survival. Three types of groundwater reaction to lake stage were identified. Increased survival in exposed redds resulted from two of the three types. A significant statistical relationship was determined between embryo survival and the number of days exposed by lake drawdown. The operation of Kerr Dam in 1983-84 was characterized by an early decline in lake stage, a longer period near minimum pool and a later and more rapid filling compared to the operation seen in 1981-82 and 1982-83. Based on the survival relationship observed in natural redds exposed by drawdown in 1983-84, complete mortality from exposure would have occurred to all redds constructed above 2884.7 ftor 90 percent of all redds constructed above minimum pool. Emergence traps placed over redds below minimum pool in Gravel, Blue, and Yellow bays captured fry in Gravel and Blue bays only. Duration of fry emergence in1984 was three weeks longer than in 1982 or 1983, but was not related to the date of initial redd construction. Survival to fry emergence in Gravel Bay was calculated to be 28.9 percent of egg deposition or 57,484 fry. Survival to fry emergence above and below the zone of greatest redd density was 33.6 and 245 percent, respectively, indicating a relationship between survival and spawner site selection. After analysis of the historic operation of Kerr Dam, it is believed that the dam has, and is continuing to have, a significant impact on successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake. Based on the evidence that prolonged exposure of salmonid embryo by dewatering causes significant mortality, the number of days the lake was held below various foot increments (2884 ft to 2888 ft) during the incubation period was investigated. The annual change in the number of days the lake was held below 2885 ft was further investigated because 80-90 percent of the redds cons

Decker-Hess, Janet; Clancey, Patrick (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Improvement design study on steam generator of MHR-50/100 aiming higher safety level after water ingress accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been studying on MHI original High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR), namely MHR-50/100, for commercialization with supported by JAEA. In the heat transfer system, steam generator (SG) is one of the most important components because it should be imposed a function of heat transfer from reactor power to steam turbine system and maintaining a nuclear grade boundary. Then we especially focused an effort of a design study on the SG having robustness against water ingress accident based on our design experience of PWR, FBR and HTGR. In this study, we carried out a sensitivity analysis from the view point of economic and plant efficiency. As a result, the SG design parameter of helium inlet/outlet temperature of 750 deg. C/300 deg. C, a side-by-side layout and one unit of SG attached to a reactor were selected. In the next, a design improvement of SG was carried out from the view point of securing the level of inherent safety without reliance on active steam dump system during water ingress accident considering the situation of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster on March 11, 2011. Finally, according to above basic design requirement to SG, we performed a conceptual design on adapting themes of SG structure improvement. (authors)

Oyama, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-1 Wadasaki-cho 1-Chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Minatsuki, I.; Shimizu, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 16-5, Konan 2-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

On the Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection, High-Level Cloud, and Upper Troposphere Water Vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF), also called ‘‘superparameterization’’, embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM) at each grid column of a general circulation model to replace traditional parameterizations of moist convection and large-scale condensation. This study evaluates the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere water vapor by applying an infrared (IR) brightness temperature (Tb) and a precipitation radar (PR) simulator to the CRM column data. Simulator results are then compared with IR radiances from geostationary satellites and PR reflectivities from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). While the actual surface precipitation rate in the MMF has a reasonable diurnal phase and amplitude when compared with TRMM observations, the IR simulator results indicate an inconsistency in the diurnal anomalies of high-level clouds between the model and the geostationary satellite data. Primarily because of its excessive high-level clouds, the MMF overestimates the simulated precipitation index (PI) and fails to reproduce the observed diurnal cycle phase relationships among PI, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere relative humidity. The PR simulator results show that over the tropical oceans, the occurrence fraction of reflectivity in excess of 20 dBZ is almost 1 order of magnitude larger than the TRMM data especially at altitudes above 6 km. Both results suggest that the MMF oceanic convection is overactive and possible reasons for this bias are discussed. However, the joint distribution of simulated IR Tb and PR reflectivity indicates that the most intense deep convection is found more often over tropical land than ocean, in agreement with previous observational studies.

Zhang, Yunyan; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Chuntao; Tian, Baijun; Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yuying; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

168

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water  from   Production  of  Crude  Oil,  Natural  Gas,  water  required  for  production  of  crude  oil  through  consumption  for  production   of  crude  oil  in  the  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consequential  life  cycle   assessment  (LCA). 11   Water  water  life  cycle  assessment  (LCA)   as  they  have  with  Life  Cycle  Assessment  (LCA)  methodologies  could  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restricti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restrictions or loss of the water supply is not likely

Lin, Zhiqun

171

Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions to Global Heat and Sea Level Rise Budgets*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions of recent warming of these regions in global heat and sea level budgets. The authors 1) compute warming produces a 0.053 (60.017) mm yr21 increase in global average sea level and the deep warming south

Johnson, Gregory C.

172

An alternate model for protective measurements of two-level systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article we propose an alternate model for the so called {\\it protective measurements}, more appropriately {\\it adiabatic measurements} of a spin 1/2 system where the {\\it apparatus} is also a quantum system with a {\\em finite dimensional Hilbert space}. This circumvents several technical as well as conceptual issues that arise when dealing with an infinite dimensional Hilbert space as in the analysis of conventional Stern-Gerlach experiment. Here also it is demonstrated that the response of the detector is continuous and it {\\it directly} measures {\\em expectation values without altering the state of the system}(when the unknown original state is a {\\it nondegenerate eigenstate of the system Hamiltonian}, in the limit of {\\em ideal} adiabatic conditions. We have also computed the corrections arising out of the inevitable departures from ideal adiabaticity i.e the time of measurement being large but finite. To overcome the {\\em conceptual} difficulties with a {\\it quantum apparatus}, we have simulated a {\\it classical apparatus} as a {\\em large} assembly of spin-1/2 systems. We end this article with a conclusion and a discussion of some future issues.

Anirban Das; N. D. Hari Dass

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of  Short  Rotation  Coppice  (SRC)  for  increased  of  Short  Rotation   Coppice  cultivation  on  water  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: I. Along-channel Water Level Variations, Pacific Ocean to Bonneville Dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-part paper provides comprehensive time and frequency domain analyses and models of along-channel water level variations in the 234km-long Lower Columbia River and Estuary (LCRE) and documents the response of floodplain wetlands thereto. In Part I, power spectra, continuous wavelet transforms, and harmonic analyses are used to understand the influences of tides, river flow, upwelling and downwelling, and hydropower operations ("power-peaking") on the water level regime. Estuarine water levels are influenced primarily by astronomical tides and coastal processes, and secondarily by river flow. The importance of coastal and tidal influences decreases in the landward direction, and water levels are increasingly controlled by river flow variations at periods from ?1day to years. Water level records are only slightly non-stationary near the ocean, but become increasingly irregular upriver. Although astronomically forced tidal constituents decrease above the estuary, tidal fortnightly and overtide variations increase for 80-200km landward, both relative to major tidal constituents and in absolute terms.

Jay, D. A.; Leffler, K.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

Lawrence, C B

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A comparison of terrestrial water storage variations from GRACE with in situ measurements from Illinois  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. -F. Yeh et al. , Ground- water storage changes inferredstorage variations at these spatial scales, a GRACE ground-

Swenson, Sean; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Wahr, John; Famiglietti, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The  United  States'  Biofuel  Policies   and  Compliance  Water  Impacts  of  Biofuel  Extend  Beyond   Irrigation."  for  assessing  sustainable  biofuel  production."  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Measurements on 5:1 Scale Abrasive Water Jet Cutting Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nozzle orifice s Isentropic (e.g. in w.jet.s) w.jet Water jet water Water Superscripts: * Symbol for non, an achievable accuracy also mentioned by Hashish in [7]. Improving the AWJ cutting process in a way that parts with precise accuracy of motion, a precisely manufactured tool (cutting head) and optimally set machining

179

Relative yields of U-235 fission products measured in a high level radioactive sludge at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at Savannah River Site. The 42 fision products make up 98% of the waste sludge. We used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for the analysis. The relative yields for most of the fission products are in complete agreement with the known relative yields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. Disagreements can be reconciled based on the chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses. This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 (98%) of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at the Savannah River Site. We analyzed the sludge with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The relative yields for most of the fission products agree completely with the known relative vields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric: branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. The chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses explain the differences in the measured and calculated results.

Bibler, N.E.; Coleman, C.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Kinard, W.F. [Charleston Coll., SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Relative yields of U-235 fission products measured in a high level radioactive sludge at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at Savannah River Site. The 42 fision products make up 98% of the waste sludge. We used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for the analysis. The relative yields for most of the fission products are in complete agreement with the known relative yields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. Disagreements can be reconciled based on the chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses. This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 (98%) of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at the Savannah River Site. We analyzed the sludge with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The relative yields for most of the fission products agree completely with the known relative vields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric: branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. The chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses explain the differences in the measured and calculated results.

Bibler, N.E.; Coleman, C.J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Kinard, W.F. (Charleston Coll., SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Design and Evaluation of Prototype Eco-Feedback Displays for Fixture-Level Water Usage Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the design of future water eco-feedback systems but also for other types of consumption (e.g., electricity ABSTRACT Few means currently exist for home occupants to learn about their water consumption: e.g., where to extract, water suppliers and governments are shifting their focus from finding new supplies to using

Anderson, Richard

182

Optomechanical effects of two-level systems in a back-action evading measurement of micro-mechanical motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the two-level systems (TLS) in lithographic superconducting circuits act as a power-dependent dielectric leading to non-linear responses in a parametrically coupled electromechanical system. Driven TLS shift the microwave resonance frequency and modulate the mechanical resonance through the optical spring effect. By pumping with two tones in a back-action evading measurement, these effects produce a mechanical parametric instability which limits single quadrature imprecision to 1.4 x{sub zp}. The microwave resonator noise is also consistent to a TLS-noise model. These observations suggest design strategies for minimizing TLS effects to improve ground-state cooling and quantum non-demolition measurements of motion.

Suh, J.; Weinstein, A. J.; Schwab, K. C. [Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

USING SCHUMANN RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS FOR CONSTRAINING THE WATER ABUNDANCE ON THE GIANT PLANETS-IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SOLAR SYSTEM'S FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and evolution of the solar system is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the solar system is therefore important for understanding not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets' water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Bromund, Kenneth; Martin, Steven; Rowland, Douglas [NASA/GSFC, Heliophysics Science Division, Space Weather Laboratory (Code 674), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Hamelin, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques [LATMOS/IPSL, UPMC, Paris (France); Beghin, Christian; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre [LPC2E, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans (France); Grard, Rejean [ESA/ESTEC, Research Scientific Support Department, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Sentman, Davis [Institute of Geophysics, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Takahashi, Yukihiro [Department of Geophysics, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yair, Yoav [Department Life Natural Sciences, Open University of Israel, Raanana (Israel)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Dual-energy synchrotron X ray measurements of rapid soil density and water content changes in swelling soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dual-energy synchrotron X ray measurements of rapid soil density and water content changes content and bulk density. A number of studies have used dual-energy gamma rays to investigate soil in moisture content and soil swelling shortly after infiltration is initiated. In this paper, we use the dual-energy

Walter, M.Todd

186

Method and apparatus for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux for analysis of same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A charged particle detector and method are disclosed providing for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux in a measurement cycle. The detector provides multiple and independently selectable levels of integration and/or gain in a fully addressable readout manner.

Denton, M. Bonner (Tucson, AZ); Sperline, Roger (Tucson, AZ), Koppenaal, David W. (Richland, WA), Barinaga, Charles J. (Richland, WA), Hieftje, Gary (Bloomington, IN), Barnes, IV, James H. (Santa Fe, NM); Atlas, Eugene (Irvine, CA)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

187

NREL's e-Ca Test: A Scalable, High-Sensitivity Water Permeation Measurement Methodology (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test method is described that uses the resistivity of a Calcium film to detect very small amounts of water permeating through a barrier material.

Dameron, A.; Kempe, M.; Reese, M.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 “When it comes to bioenergy, we have made the strategic2010).  WTO  Regulations  and  Bioenergy  Sustainability  Berndes,  G.  (2002).  "Bioenergy  and  water  -­?  the  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced  Oil  Recovery  (EOR)  is  used  once  additional  or  viscosity.  The  methods  for  EOR  vary  greatly.  In  Water  Flooding)   EOR  (Steam  injection)   EOR  (CO2  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements of wood chips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

making machine. The black liquor left over from the pulpingchips, brownstock, and black liquor. This report describes acellulose and water) and black liquor using the bench scale

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES MEASUREMENTS IN DRINKING WATER BY LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING. METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedure, standardized by International Standard Organization.4 On the contrary, total indicative dose in view of a large scale monitoring program. World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water

192

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fracturing,  or  “fracking. ”  In  this  process,  fluids  a  coal  bed  through  fracking  requires  between  50,000  gallons  of  water.  Fracking  to  create  a  well  in  a  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Protecting Our Water: Tracking Sources of Bacterial Contamination Numerous surface waterbodies in Texas are classified as having high levels of fecal coliform bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Texas are classified as having high levels of fecal coliform bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution. coli and other fecal coliform bacteria do not provide information on whether the source of pollution of pollution need to be identified to implement effective pollution control strategies to improve water quality

194

Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Reply to Soper: Density measurement of confined water with neutron scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a response to Soper's two comments (1) regarding our papers (2, 3) in PNAS that (a) the distribution of water across the pores is not uniform and (b) the majority of water may reside outside the pores. Here, we ...

Chen, Sow-Hsin

196

Measurements of water uptake and transport properties in anion-exchange membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cost of the fuel cell systems. Although promising, conventional liquid electrolyte- based alkaline fuel Keywords: Direct ethanol fuel cells Anion-exchange membrane Water uptake Water diffusivity Mass. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Alkaline fuel cells allow the use of non-platinum (Pt) catalysts

Zhao, Tianshou

197

Precision lifetime measurement of the cesium $6P_{3/2}$ level using ultrafast pump-probe laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the inherent timing stability of pulses from a mode-locked laser, we have precisely measured the cesium $6P_{3/2}$ excited state lifetime. An initial pump pulse excites cesium atoms in two counter-propagating atomic beams to the $6P_{3/2}$ level. A subsequent synchronized probe pulse ionizes atoms which remain in the excited state, and the photo-ions are collected and counted. By selecting pump pulses which vary in time with respect to the probe pulses, we obtain a sampling of the excited state population in time, resulting in a lifetime value of 30.462(46) ns. The measurement uncertainty (0.15%) is larger than our previous report of 0.12% [Phys. Rev. A 84, 010501(R) (2011)] due to the inclusion of additional data and systematic errors. In this follow-up paper we present details of the primary systematic errors encountered in the measurement, which include atomic motion within the intensity profiles of the laser beams, quantum beating in the photo-ion signal, and radiation trapping. Improvements to furt...

Patterson, Brian M; Ehrenreich, Thomas; Gearba, Mirela A; Brooke, George M; Scoville, James; Knize, Randy J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

Rudd, A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

WIPP WAC Equivalence Support Measurements for Low-Level Sludge Waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory - 12242  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) as an off-site disposal facility for low-level waste (LLW), including sludge waste. NNSS has issued a position paper that indicates that systems that are not certified by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste must demonstrate equivalent practices to the CBFO certified systems in order to assign activity concentration values to assayed items without adding in the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) when certifying waste for NNSS disposal. Efforts have been made to meet NNSS requirements to accept sludge waste for disposal at their facility. The LANL LLW Characterization Team uses portable high purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems for the nondestructive assay (NDA) of both debris and sludge LLW. A number of performance studies have been conducted historically by LANL to support the efficacy and quality of assay results generated by the LANL HPGe systems, and, while these detector systems are supported by these performance studies and used with LANL approved procedures and processes, they are not certified by CBFO for TRU waste disposal. Beginning in 2009, the LANL LLW Characterization Team undertook additional NDA measurements of both debris and sludge simulated waste containers to supplement existing studies and procedures to demonstrate full compliance with the NNSS position paper. Where possible, Performance Demonstration Project (PDP) drums were used for the waste matrix and PDP sources were used for the radioactive sources. Sludge drums are an example of a matrix with a uniform distribution of contaminants. When attempting to perform a gamma assay of a sludge drum, it is very important to adequately simulate this uniform distribution of radionuclides in order to accurately model the assay results. This was accomplished by using a spiral radial source tube placement in a sludge drum rather than the standard three source tubes seen in debris PDP drums. Available line sources (Eu-152) were placed in the spiral tubes to further accomplish the desired uniform distribution of radionuclides. The standard PDP drum (PDP matrix drum 005) and PDP sources were used to determine the lower limits of detection (LLD) and TMU. Analysis results for the sludge drum matrix case for two HPGe detectors were tabulated and evaluated. NNSS has accepted the methodology and results of the measurements towards demonstrating equivalence to CBFO certified systems. In conclusion, the WES-WGS and CMR-OPS gamma spectroscopy teams at LANL have defined and performed measurements that serve to establish and demonstrate equivalency with the processes used by CBFO certified NDA systems. The supplemental measurements address four key areas in Appendix A of DOE/WIPP-02-3122: Annual Calibration Confirmation and Performance Check measurements; LLD determination; and TMU definition. For these measurements the containers, matrices and activity loadings are selected to represent items being assayed in real LLW cases. The LLD and the TMU bounding measurements are to be performed one time and will not be required to be repeated in future campaigns. The annual calibration and performance check measurements were performed initially and planned to repeat in annual campaigns in order to maintain NNSS certification. PDP sources and a PDP sludge drum as well as Eu-152 line sources and a spiral sludge drum were used for the measurements. In all cases, the results for accuracy and precision (%R and %RSD, respectively) were within allowable ranges as defined by the WIPP PDP program. LLD (or MDC) results were established for all the ten WIPP reportable radionuclides and U-235, and the MDC for Pu-239 was established in all cases to be well under 100 nCi/g. Useful results for reducing estimated uncertainties were established and an interesting unexpected case of high bias was observed and will be applied toward this end. (authors)

Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M.; Bustos, Roland M.; Ferran, Scott G.; Gallegos, Lucas E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lucero, Randy P. [Pajarito Scientific Corporation, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87507 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Implementation of Simple Measures for Savings Water and Energy Consumption in Kuwait Government Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper gives in details the efforts made by the Public Services Department (PSD) to reduce water and energy consumptions in the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labour's (MOSAL) buildings in Kuwait. PSD manages around 125 buildings distributed...

Albaharani, H.; Al-Mulla, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Watering the slums : how a utility and its street-level bureaucrats connected the poor in Bangalore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation is about how urban water utilities behave and what makes them interested in serving the poor. The infrastructure literature tends to treat public service agencies as monolithic entities and to ignore the ...

Connors, Genevieve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

New line classifications in Ho I based on high-precision hyperfine-structure measurement of low levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doppler-free laser-fluorescence and laser-rf double-resonance studies have been made of the hyperfine structure (hfs) of four strong, previously unclassified visible lines in Ho I; all are shown to connect with low levels. The hfs of the 4f/sup 11/6s/sup 2/ /sup 4/I/sub 11/2,9/2/ levels is measured in detail, allowing evaluation of the dipole (a/sup 01/, a/sup 12/, a/sup 10/) and quadrupole (b/sup 02/,b/sup 11/,b/sup 13/) hfs radial integrals. The results are in close agreement with the ab initio values of Lindgren and Rosen (Case Stud. Atom. Phys. 4, 93--292 (1974). The value found for b/sup 02/ in the 4f/sup 11/6s/sup 2/ configuration is in reasonable agreement with that of Wyart and Camus (Physica 93C, 227-236 (1978)), thereby confirming their finding of a substantial dependence of this parameter on the number of 4f electrons in the core.

Childs, W.J.; Cok, D.R.; Goodman, L.S.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic level ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the past decade, research has been active in developing methods for measuring the levels of stress... in aquatic animals for the purpose of monitoring water pollution on...

204

Criminal sanctions applicable to Federal water pollution control measures. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overkill or not enough: Two decades ago, Congress realized that a system of civil remedies alone, devoid of any lasting punitive consequences, was inadequate to insure compliance with environmental protection statutes. Other than the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899, which was designed to protect navigation, Federal criminal sanctions were not applicable to water pollution offenses. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, more commonly known as the Clean Water Act (CWA), was twenty-four years old before Federal criminal enforcement of its provisions was allowed. But since the early 1970's, the criminal provisions of the CWA have been strengthened, the United States Department of Justice has beefed up its environmental enforcement efforts, and environmental polluters have been prosecuted. This Federal effort is now approaching overkill.

Thompson, J.C.

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Identification and correction of spectral contamination in 2 O measured in leaf, stem, and soil water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Deionized water was spiked with methanol and ethanol to create IRIS method were 0.18% for d18 O, and Ã?3.39% for d2 H. The inability to create an ethanol correction curve for d2 H probably caused the larger discrepancies. We conclude that ethanol and methanol

Minnesota, University of

206

Measurements and simulations of polarization states of underwater light in clear oceanic waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote Sensing Laboratory, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, New York 10031 under various atmospheric, surface, and water conditions, as well as solar and viewing geometries solar elevation. This implies that animals can use the DoLP signal for orientation. © 2011 Optical

Cummings, Molly E.

207

Investigation of water to ice phase change in porous media by ultrasonic and dielectric measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of water to ice phase change in porous media by ultrasonic and dielectric objective of this paper is to study the evolution of the ice content of porous media submitted to sub upon concrete structures is a source of main concern in cold climates (Pigeon 1984; Dash et al. 1995

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

MERCURY FLUX MEASUREMENTS OVER AIR AND WATER IN KEJIMKUJIK NATIONAL PARK, NOVA SCOTIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature, and this dependence was well described by an Arrhenius-type expression with an activation energy from the atmosphere are wet and dry deposition. Once entering a watershed via precipitation and dry deposition mercury can be transformed to more Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 122: 183­202, 2000. © 2000

Folkins, Ian

209

Effects of cysteamine on pituitary, MTTW15 tumor, and serum prolactin levels measured by rat lymphoma cell bioassay and radioimmunoassay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cysteamine (CSH), a sulfhydryl compound, reduces both serum and anterior pituitary (AP) PRL measured by RIA. We have used the Nb2 lymphoma cell bioassay (BIO) for PRL to evaluate possible CSH-related changes in PRL levels in sera and tissues of male and MtTW15 mammosomatotropic tumor-bearing female rats. Experimental animals received a single sc injection of CSH (300 mg/kg), and samples were collected 0.5-24 h later. Since CSH and serum from CSH rats were toxic in BIO, samples were dialyzed before assay. All samples were evaluated for PRL and GH by RIA as well. A significant decrease (P less than 0.05) in BIO serum PRL was evident in male rats 0.5 h after CSH; levels remained low for 24 h. Serum PRL by RIA was significantly depressed at 4 h but not at 0.5 h or 24 h. PRL in AP extracts was decreased (60-90%) at all times by BIO and RIA. Significant decreases of BIO- and RIA-detectable PRL were recorded in serum and tissues (AP and tumors) at 4 h in tumor rats. Sequentially bled (0.5-4 h) CSH-treated tumor-bearing rats showed 50% and 80% reductions in serum PRL at 1 and 4 h by both BIO and RIA. CSH had no effect on GH levels in sera and tissues of any animal studied at any time interval. Our results substantiate earlier reports on CSH-induced decreases in RIA-detectable PRL. They show that such changes cannot be attributed to assay effects alone, as significant decreases in circulating and stored PRL (both AP and tumor) were evident by BIO. Results with tissue extracts were the most dramatic. They suggest an action of CSH or a metabolic intermediate with stored PRL which reduces both extractable PRL and hormone release. Such an effect of CSH on PRL extraction has been suggested by others. Whatever the mechanism, it appears to be relatively specific, since GH cells were not affected.

Parsons, J.A.; Peterson, E.K.; Hartfel, M.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

An ECT/ERT dual-modality sensor for oil-water two-phase flow measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a new sensor for ECT/ERT dual-modality system which can simultaneously obtain the permittivity and conductivity of the materials in the pipeline. Quasi-static electromagnetic fields are produced by the inner electrodes array sensor of electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system. The results of simulation show that the data of permittivity and conductivity can be simultaneously obtained from the same measurement electrode and the fusion of two kinds of data may improve the quality of the reconstructed images. For uniform oil-water mixtures, the performance of designed dual-modality sensor for measuring the various oil fractions has been tested on representative data and the results of experiments show that the designed sensor broadens the measurement range compared to single modality.

Wang, Pitao [School of Electronic Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, 300072 and School of Electronic Engineering, University of Jinan (China); Wang, Huaxiang; Sun, Benyuan; Cui, Ziqiang [School of Electronic Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, 300072 (China); Huang, Wenrui [HuaDian Heavy Industries Co. Ltd, Beijing, 100077 (China)

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Measurement of biodegradation rate constants of a water extract from petroleum-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of biodegradation rate constants of petroleum products in water extract from contaminated soil presents an important component in the evaluation of bioremediation process. In this study, soil samples were gathered from an industrial site which was used for maintenance and storage of heavy equipment used in the oil and gas exploration and production industry. The petroleum contaminants were extracted from the soil using distilled water. This water extract was used as the substrate to acclimate a microbial community and also for the biological kinetic studies. Kinetic studies were carried out in batch reactors, and the biodegradation rates were monitored by a computer-controlled respirometer. The BOD data were analyzed by using the Monod equation. Experimental results give the average value of the maximum rate constant as 0.038 mg BOD/(mg VSS hr) and the average value of the substrate concentration of half rate as 746 mg BOD/l. A GC/MS analysis on the sample of the test solutions before and after 5 days of biological oxidation indicates that the hydrocarbons initially present in the solution were degraded.

Li, K.Y.; Kane, A.J.; Wang, J.J.; Cawley, W.A. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Spacecraft Habitation Systems, Water Recovery and Waste Active Charged Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-PMWC) Orbital Technologies Corporation Technical Abstract Model calculations and risk assessment estimates Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement Technologies Technical Abstract The innovative High Efficiency the resultant plastic tiles. This system requires access to power, data, and cooling interfaces. The system

213

Fundamental measure theory for the electric double layer: applications to blue-energy harvesting and water desalination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacitive mixing (CAPMIX) and capacitive deionization (CDI) are promising candidates for harvesting clean, renewable energy and for the energy efficient production of potable water, respectively. Both CAPMIX and CDI involve water-immersed porous carbon electrodes at voltages of the order of hundreds of millivolts, such that counter-ionic packing is important. We propose a density functional theory (DFT) to model the electric double layer which forms near the surfaces of these porous materials. The White-Bear mark II fundamental measure theory (FMT) functional is combined with a mean-field Coulombic and a MSA-type correction to describe the interplay between dense packing and electrostatics, in good agreement with MD simulations. Compared to less elaborate mean-field models our DFT calculations reveal a higher work output for blue-energy cycles and a higher energy demand for desalination cycles.

Andreas Härtel; Mathijs Janssen; Sela Samin; René van Roij

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Value of Irrigation Water with Alternative Input Prices, Product Prices and Yield Levels: Texas High Plains and Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

risen to record levels; because of the energy crisis and the rapid rate of inflation, prices of fertilizer and fuel have at least doubled, and the price of other farm inputs have risen substantially. These price changes, in absolute and relative terms...

Lacewell, R. D.; Sprott, J. M.; Beattie, B. R.

215

Measurements of the Distribution of Solutes between Liquid Water and Steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct measurements of the concentration of solutes in both liquid and steam phases in equilibrium with each other have been made in a static mode utilizing a platinum-lined autoclave to a maximum of 350 deg C. Partitioning constants were derived from these measurements based on existing experimental or estimated values of the stoichiometric mean activity coefficients for the solutes in the liquid phase. Independent measurements of the conductance of some of the solutes in dilute aqueous solutions to 600 deg C and 300MPa were also made. The combined results are discussed in terms of a speciated model and the implications of these results to industrial and natural hydrothermal processes are presented. PARTITIONING CONSTANT, ION-ASSOCIATION, CONDUCTIVITY, SPECIATION, CORROSION.

Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.; Ho, P.C.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electrosorption on carbon aerogel electrodes as a means of treating low-level radioactive wastes and remediating contaminated ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel separation process based upon carbon aerogel electrodes has been recently developed for the efficient removal of ionic impurities from aqueous streams. This process can be used as an electrical y- regenerated alternative to ion exchange, thereby reducing-the need for large quantities of chemical regenerants. Once spent (contaminated), these regenerants contribute to the waste that must be disposed of in landfills. The elimination of such wastes is especially beneficial in situations involving radioactive contaminants, and pump and treat processing of massive volumes of ground water. A review and analysis of potential applications will be presented.

Tran, Tri Duc; Farmer, Joseph C.; DePruneda, Jean H.; Richardson, Jeffery H.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Sub-critical telephone cord delamination propagation and adhesion measurements Alex A. Volinsky and Patrick Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for DLC films on magnetic media. Normally telephone cord blisters "run out of steam" and stop onceCrPtTi magnetic layer was coated with the sputter-deposited tungsten superlayer, 900 nm thick, with 1.9 GPa compressive residual stress. Adhesion values in a dry lab environment were measured by means of the superlayer

Volinsky, Alex A.

218

A measurement of the muon-induced neutron yield in lead at a depth of 2850 m water equivalent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from the measurement of the neutron production rate in lead by high energy cosmic-ray muons at a depth of 2850 m water equivalent (mean muon energy of 260 GeV). A tonne-scale highly segmented plastic scintillator detector was utilised to detect both the energy depositions from the traversing muons as well as the delayed radiative capture signals of the induced neutrons. Complementary Monte Carlo simulations reproduce well the distributions of muons and detected muon-induced neutrons. Absolute agreement between simulation and data is of the order of 25%. By comparing the measured and simulated neutron capture rates a neutron yield in pure lead of (5.78{sub ?0.28}{sup +0.21})×10{sup ?3} neutrons/muon/(g/cm{sup 2}) has been obtained.

Reichhart, L.; Ghag, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh, UK and High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh, UK and High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom); Lindote, A.; Chepel, V.; DeViveiros, L.; Lopes, M. I.; Neves, F.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal)] [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Akimov, D. Yu.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Stekhanov, V. N. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Araújo, H. M.; Bewick, A.; Currie, A.; Horn, M. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)] [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); and others

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

A comparison of measured and simulated soil water depletion in the crop root zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(w) aH/ax) - r(x). [1/s] (8) If a single value relationship between h and w is assumed, and the diffusivity D in m /s is represented by K(w). ah/aw, Eq. {8) becomes: 2 aw/at = a/ax (D(w) aw/ax) - ak(w)/ ax - r(x). [I/s] (9) Equation (9... by rL 2 C = T/( ] R(x)D(w)dx) [I/m ] (11) 0 where T is the transpiration rate per unit soil surface area (m water/(m soil, s)) and L is the depth to the bottom of the root zone 2 (m). The e+fective root distribution function is defined as a...

Lascano A., Roberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

Fundamental measure theory for the electric double layer: implications for blue-energy harvesting and water desalination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacitive mixing (CAPMIX) and capacitive deionization (CDI) are promising candidates for harvesting clean, renewable energy and for the energy efficient production of potable water, respectively. Both CAPMIX and CDI involve water-immersed porous carbon (supercapacitors) electrodes at voltages of the order of hundreds of millivolts, such that counter-ionic packing is important for the electric double layer (EDL) which forms near the surface of these porous materials. Thus, we propose a density functional theory (DFT) to model the EDL, where the White-Bear mark II fundamental measure theory functional is combined with a mean-field Coulombic and a mean spherical approximation-type correction to describe the interplay between dense packing and electrostatics, in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. We discuss the concentration-dependent potential rise due to changes in the chemical potential in capacitors in the context of an over-ideal theoretical description and its impact on energy harvesting and water desalination. Compared to less elaborate mean-field models our DFT calculations reveal a higher work output for blue-energy cycles and a higher energy demand for desalination cycles.

Andreas Härtel; Mathijs Janssen; Sela Samin; René van Roij

2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). 1. Introduction Water vapor is the key atmosphericTen Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to Deep Convection ZHENGZHAO LUO, DIETER KLEY,* AND RICHARD H. JOHNSON

Lombardi, John R.

222

Low-level wind maxima over the western Gulf of Mexico and their role in water vapor advection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and radiosonde observations from Brownsville, Texas are being compared 30 6 As in Figure 3 except for the NGM and a composite of observations from Gulf and coastal stations are being compared 31 7 Comparison of wind speeds from the NGM analysis and Gulf... transport than the eastern Gulf. The frequent strong low-level flow over the western Gulf was responsible for the difference. Wind speed and relative humidity from the NGM and special radiosonde observations over and around the Gulf of Mexico were...

Engel, Gregory Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Raman spectroscopic measurement of oxidation in supercritical water. 2: Conversion of isopropyl alcohol to acetone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of isopropyl alcohol in supercritical water has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy. Results for species concentration as a function of residence-time are presented for temperatures ranging from 400 to 480 C at constant pressure, 24.4 {+-} 0.3 MPa, and constant equivalence ratio, 0.88 {+-} 0.0. Acetone has been identified as the principal intermediate formed and subsequently destroyed, during the oxidation process. By assuming first-order kinetics for the destruction of both isopropyl alcohol and acetone, effective first-order rate constants have been determined from fits of the experimental data. Assuming Arrhenius behavior, the fits yield rate constants for isopropyl alcohol, k{sub eff,ipa} = 3.255 {times} 10{sup 22}(s{sup {minus}1}) exp [{minus}301.1 (kJ/mol)/RT], and for acetone, k{sub eff,ace} = 1.948 {times} 10{sup 10}(s{sup {minus}1}) exp[{minus}137.7(kJ/mol)/RT]. These results indicate that for temperatures greater than 425 C, the destruction of isopropyl alcohol proceeds faster than that of acetone.

Hunter, T.B.; Rice, S.F.; Hanush, R.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Measurements of the Infrared SpectraLines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4,Measurements of NO 2

225

Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Satellite Measurement of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor: Development and Applications and Applications for the ARM Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) measurements from the 6.7 micron channel on GOES (8, 9, 12) and GMS-5 satellites were employed to develop a near real-time UTH product that is now available from the ARM External Data Center (XDC). The UTH product is available in either gridded format (2.0 x 2.0 lat-lon resolution), full-disk pixel resolution, or individual pixel resolution for both the SGP and TWP sites. This product provides the basis for the instrument intercomparison and validation activities (Section 0.2), diurnal analysis and model evaluation (0.3), and cloud lifecycle studies (0.5); and is also an important component of the research proposed here. Full details regarding the retrieval algorithm for the ARM sites can be found in Soden et al. (2004a) and references therein.

Brian J. Soden

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Measurements of actinides in soil, sediments, water and vegetation in Northern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken during 1991 - 1998 to identify the origin of plutonium uranium in northern New Mexico Rio Grande and tributary stream sediments. Isotopic fingerprinting techniques help distinguish radioactivity from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and from global fallout or natural sources. The geographic area covered by the study extended from the headwaters of the Rio Grande in southern Colorado to Elephant Butte Reservoir in southern New Mexico. Over 100 samples of stream channel and reservoir bottom sediments were analyzed for the atom ratios of plutonium and uranium isotopes using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Comparison of these ratios against those for fallout or natural sources allowed for quantification of the Laboratory impact. Of the seven major drainages crossing LANL, movement of LANL plutonium into the Rio Grande can only be traced via Los Alamos Canyon. The majority of sampled locations within and adjacent to LANL have little or no input of plutonium from the Laboratory. Samples collected upstream and distant to L A N show an average (+ s.d.) fallout 240Pu/239Pauto m ratio of 0.169 + 0.012, consistent with published worldwide global fallout values. These regional background ratios differ significantly from the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio of 0.015 that is representative of LANL-derived plutonium entering the Rio Grande at Los Alamos Canyon. Mixing calculations of these sources indicate that the largest proportion (60% to 90%) of the plutonium in the Rio Grande sediments is from global atmospheric fallout, with an average of about 25% from the Laboratory. The LANL plutonium is identifiable intermittently along the 35-km reach of the Rio Grande to Cochiti Reservoir. The source of the LANL-derived plutonium in the Rio Grande was traced primarily to pre-1960 discharges of liquid effluents into a canyon bottom at a distance approximately 20 km upstream of the river. Plutonium levels decline exponentially with distance downstream after mixing with cleaner sediments, yet the LANL isotopic fingerprint remains distinct for at least 55 km from the effluent source. Plutonium isotopes in Rio Grande and Pajarito Plateau sediments are not at levels known to adversely affect public health. Activities of 239+240pwui thin this sample set ranged from 0.001- 0.046 pCUg in the Rio Grande to 3.7 pCi/g near the effluent discharge point. Levels in the Rio Grande are usually more than 1000 times. lower than prescribed cleanup standards. Uranium in stream and reservoir sediments is predominantly within natural concentration ranges and is of natural uranium isotopic composition. None of the sediments from the Rio Grande show identifiable Laboratory uranium, using the isotopic ratios. These results suggest that the mass of Laboratory-derived uranium entering the Rio Grande is small relative to the natural load carried with river sediments.

Gallaher, B. M. (Bruce M.); Efurd, D. W. (Deward W.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

An automatic method to detect defaults in the measurement chain of a sound level meter, used for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roger Hennequin, 78197 Trappes Cedex, France erik.aflalo@01db-metravib.com Proceedings of the Acoustics-frequency check offers the advantage of a better assessment of a possible degradation of the microphone membrane in the measurement chain. 1 Introduction The risk of wrong measurements in environmental noise assessment must

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

229

The influence of phosphorus nutrition and water stress on the osmotic adjustment and growth of loblolly pine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE REVIEW Water Stress Osmotic Adjustment Phosphorus MATERIALS AND METHODS Experimental Design Sowing Preparation Sowing and Seedling Cultivation Treatments . . . . . . . ~ Measurements . . . . . . - ~ ~ ~ Statistical Analysis RESULTS... three days. Fertilizer was applied every other time the seedlings received water. Treatments were initiated to provide three levels of phos- phorus nutrition (10, 100, 200 ppm) and three levels of water stress. Water stress was imposed...

Wilson, Alan Byron

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding project data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-resources data for the 1991 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 131 gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and water levels at 431 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio.

Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Guide to using Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX v.1.1) for Removal of River Stage Effects from Well Water Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A software tool was created in Fiscal Year 2010 (FY11) that enables multiple-regression correction of well water levels for river-stage effects. This task was conducted as part of the Remediation Science and Technology project of CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). This document contains an overview of the correction methodology and a user’s manual for Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX) v.1.1. It also contains a step-by-step tutorial that shows users how to use MRCX to correct river effects in two different wells. This report is accompanied by an enclosed CD that contains the MRCX installer application and files used in the tutorial exercises.

Mackley, Rob D.; Spane, Frank A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Allwardt, Craig H.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

MEASUREMENTS TAKEN IN SUPPORT OF QUALIFICATION OF PROCESSING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE LOW-LEVEL LIQUID WASTE INTO SALTSTONE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) immobilizes low-level liquid waste into Saltstone to be disposed of in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility, Class Three Landfill. In order to meet the permit conditions and regulatory limits set by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), both the low-level salt solution and Saltstone samples are analyzed quarterly. Waste acceptance criteria (WAC) are designed to confirm the salt solution sample from the Tank Farm meets specific radioactive and chemical limits. The toxic characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) is used to confirm that the treatment has immobilized the hazardous constituents of the salt solution. This paper discusses the methods used to characterize the salt solution and final Saltstone samples from 2007-2009.

Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, C.; Cozzi, A.; Staub, A.; Ray, J.

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Definition and Properties of Alternative Bus Service Reliability Measures at the Stop Level1 Meead Saberi4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meead Saberi4 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering5 Northwestern University6 600 Foster tables + 5 figures)51 52 #12;Saberi et al. 2 ABSTRACT1 2 The Transit Capacity and Quality of Service purposes.13 #12;Saberi et al. 3 INTRODUCTION1 2 Monitoring the performance measures of public

Bertini, Robert L.

235

Photosynthesis of a temperate fallow C3 herbaceous ecosystem: measurements and model simulations at the leaf and canopy levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Photosynthesis of a temperate fallow C3 herbaceous ecosystem: measurements and model, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 1, France Abstract The objectives of the study were to characterize photosynthesis of temperate fallow C3 herbaceous species and examine the performance of a simple photosynthesis model (based

Boyer, Edmond

236

Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and Methods for Mitigation and Management in the Southern Flathead Valley, Montana, 1983-1987 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kerr Hydroelectric Dam is located at the south end of Flathead Lake, controls water levels on the lake and the Flathead River below the dam, and is currently operated as a load control facility. Current operation of Kerr Dam creates the greatest yearly water level fluctuations on both the lake and river during the Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffitti) brood and nesting period. Data collected from 1980-1982 indicated that goose nest numbers on the river were lower than during the 1950's, and that brood habitat on the lake may be limiting the goose population there. Our study was conducted from 1983-1987 to determine the effects of Kerr Dam operation on Canada goose populations and habitat on the south half of Flathead Lake and the Flathead River, and to formulate management and mitigation recommendations. Nesting geese on the river appeared to be negatively affected by a lack of nest sites free from predators, and responded to available artificial nest structures with an increase in nest numbers and nesting success. Under current dam operation, river channel depths and widths do not discourage access to nesting islands by mammalian predators during some years and high predation on ground nests occurs. Intensively used brood areas on the lake and river were identified and described. Brood habitat on the lake was lower in quality and quantity than on the river due to dam operations. Gosling mortality on the lake was high, almost 2 times higher than on the river. Lake broods expended more energy obtaining food than river broods. Losses of brood habitat in the form of wet meadow marshes were documented and mitigation options developed. Management/mitigation alternatives and monitoring methods for nesting and brooding geese were identified.

Mackey, Dennis L.; Gregory, Shari K.; Matthews, William C. Jr.; Claar, James J.; Ball, I. Joseph

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and the Methodology for Mitigation and Enhancement in the Flathead Drainage, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lower Flathead System Canada Goose Study was initiated to determine population trends and the effects of water level fluctuations on nest and brood habitat on the southern half of Flathead Lake and the lower Flathead River as a result of the operations of Kerr Dam. This report presents data collected during the 1984 field season as part of an ongoing project. Geese used Pablo, Kicking Horse, Ninepipe Reservoirs heavily during late summer and fall. Use of the river by geese was high during the winter, when the reservoirs were frozen, and during the breeding period. Most breeding geese left the river after broods fledged. Thirteen percent of the artificial tree nest structures on the river were used by nesting geese. Goose nest initiation on the river peaked the last week in March through the first week in April, and hatching peaked the first week in May. Predation was the most significant cause of nest loss on the river, and nest loss by flooding was not observed. Avian predation was the single largest factor contributing to nest loss on the lake. Habitat use was studied in 4 brood areas on the river and 8 brood areas on the lake, and available habitat was assessed for 2 portions of both the lake and the river. Brood habitat use was significantly different from the available habitat in all areas studied. On the lower river, broods used wheat fields, gravel bars, and shrub habitats. On the upper river, coniferous forest and shrub habitats were preferred. On the West Bay of the lake, brood areas consisted primarily of lawns and tall herbaceous habitat, while on the South Bay, marshes dominated the brood areas studied. Water levels on the river and lake affect both accessibility of these areas to brooding geese, and the ecology of the habitats preferred by geese. 43 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs.

Mackey, Dennis L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management An investigation into the feasibility of using SWAT at the sub-basin level for simulating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management An investigation the potential for use in agricultural water scarcity management. Keywords: Hydrology, Streamflow, Basin., 2005). A pro-active approach to agricultural water scarcity management needs to take place through

Barthelat, Francois

239

Application of curium measurements for safeguarding at reprocessing plants. Study 1: High-level liquid waste and Study 2: Spent fuel assemblies and leached hulls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In large-scale reprocessing plants for spent fuel assemblies, the quantity of plutonium in the waste streams each year is large enough to be important for nuclear safeguards. The wastes are drums of leached hulls and cylinders of vitrified high-level liquid waste. The plutonium amounts in these wastes cannot be measured directly by a nondestructive assay (NDA) technique because the gamma rays emitted by plutonium are obscured by gamma rays from fission products, and the neutrons from spontaneous fissions are obscured by those from curium. The most practical NDA signal from the waste is the neutron emission from curium. A diversion of waste for its plutonium would also take a detectable amount of curium, so if the amount of curium in a waste stream is reduced, it can be inferred that there is also a reduced amount of plutonium. This report studies the feasibility of tracking the curium through a reprocessing plant with neutron measurements at key locations: spent fuel assemblies prior to shearing, the accountability tank after dissolution, drums of leached hulls after dissolution, and canisters of vitrified high-level waste after separation. Existing pertinent measurement techniques are reviewed, improvements are suggested, and new measurements are proposed. The authors integrate these curium measurements into a safeguards system.

Rinard, P.M.; Menlove, H.O.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ARM - Measurement - Precipitable water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARMnumber concentration

242

Measurements of Water and B4C Content of Rackable Can Storage Boxes for HEU Storage at the HEUMF at the Y-12 National Security Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive measurements at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with BoroBond{trademark} blocks of varying thickness, natural boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) content, and water content, and with a simplified mockup of the Rackable Can Storage Box (RCSB) of fixed natural B{sub 4}C and water content, have led to a method of quantifying the water content of RCSBs by fast neutron time-of-flight transmission measurements (NMIS)* and quantifying the B{sub 4}C content with gamma ray spectrometry assuming the water content is known. The time-of-flight transmission measurements results can also be used to assess the uniformity of the BoroBond{trademark} in the RCSB. The data from both measurements will be stored for future comparisons to initial measurements. These methods can also be implemented at the RCSB production site, or subsequently at the Y-12 National Security Complex during the operating lifetime of the RCSBs at the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility.

Neal, JS

2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

243

Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Heating Season Energy and Moisture Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two identical laboratory homes designed to model existing Florida building stock were sealed and tested to 2.5 ACH50. Then, one was made leaky with 70% leakage through the attic and 30% through windows, to a tested value of 9 ACH50. Reduced energy use was measured in the tighter home (2.5 ACH50) in the range of 15% to 16.5% relative to the leaky (9 ACH50) home. Internal moisture loads resulted in higher dew points inside the tight home than the leaky home. Window condensation and mold growth occurred inside the tight home. Even cutting internal moisture gains in half to 6.05 lbs/day, the dew point of the tight home was more than 15 degrees F higher than the outside dry bulb temperature. The homes have single pane glass representative of older Central Florida homes.

Vieira, R.; Parker, D.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of a standard for calculation and measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in water-moderated power reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contents of ANS 19.11, the standard for ``Calculation and Measurement of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity in Water-Moderated Power Reactors,`` are described. The standard addresses the calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) both at standby conditions and at power. In addition, it describes several methods for the measurement of the at-power MTC and assesses their relative advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it specifies a minimum set of documentation requirements for compliance with the standard.

Mosteller, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hall, R.A. [Virginia Power, Glen Allen, VA (United States). Innsbrook Technical Center; Apperson, C.E. Jr. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States); Lancaster, D.B. [TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., Vienna, VA (United States); Young, E.H. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States); Gavin, P.H. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); Robertson, S.T. [Framatome/COGEMA Fuels, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Quantitative comparison of processes of oil-and water-based mud-filtrate invasion and corresponding effects on borehole resistivity measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for hydrocarbon exploration and production, drilling fluids sustain a pressure higher than that of formationQuantitative comparison of processes of oil- and water-based mud-filtrate invasion-filtrate invasion on borehole resistivity measurements. We simulate the process of mud-fil- trate invasion

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

246

Drinking Water Problems: Copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

247

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

Saldin, Dilano

249

Influence of the pressure on the properties of chromatographic columns I. Measurement of the compressibility of methanol-water mixtures on a mesoporous silica adsorbent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compressibilities of aqueous solutions of methanol or acetonitrile containing 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% (v/v) organic solvent were measured with a dynamic chromatographic method. The elution volumes of thiourea samples (2 {micro} L) in these solutions were measured at different average column pressures, adjusted by placing suitable capillary restrictors on-line, after the detector. The reproducibility of the measurements was better than 0.2%. In the range of average pressures studied (10-350 bar), the maximum change in elution volume of thiourea is 1.3% (in pure water) and 4.0% (in pure methanol). This difference is due to the different compressibilities of these pure solvents. For mixtures, the plots of the elution volume of thiourea versus the pressure are convex downward, which is inconsistent with the opposite curvature predicted by the classical Tait model of liquid compressibility. This difference is explained by the variation of the amount of thiourea adsorbed with the pressure. The deconvolution of the two effects, adsorption of thiourea and solvent compressibility, allows a fair and consistent determination of the compressibilities of the methanol-water mixtures. A column packed with non-porous silica particles was also used to determine the compressibility of methanol-water and acetonitrile-water mixtures. A negative deviation by respect to ideal behavior was observed.

Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Influence of the pressure on the properties of chromatographic columns I. Measurement of the compressibility of methanol-water mixtures on a mesoporous silica adsorbent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compressibilities of aqueous solutions of methanol or acetonitrile containing 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% (v/v) organic solvent were measured with a dynamic chromatographic method. The elution volumes of thiourea samples (2 {micro} L) in these solutions were measured at different average column pressures, adjusted by placing suitable capillary restrictors on-line, after the detector. The reproducibility of the measurements was better than 0.2%. In the range of average pressures studied (10-350 bar), the maximum change in elution volume of thiourea is 1.3% (in pure water) and 4.0% (in pure methanol). This difference is due to the different compressibilities of these pure solvents. For mixtures, the plots of the elution volume of thiourea versus the pressure are convex downward, which is inconsistent with the opposite curvature predicted by the classical Tait model of liquid compressibility. This difference is explained by the variation of the amount of thiourea adsorbed with the pressure. The deconvolution of the two effects, adsorption of thiourea and solvent compressibility, allows a fair and consistent determination of the compressibilities of the methanol-water mixtures. A column packed with non-porous silica particles was also used to determine the compressibility of methanol-water and acetonitrile-water mixtures. A negative deviation by respect to ideal behavior was observed.

Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Measurements of the modified conversion ratio by gamma-ray spectrometry of fuel rods for water-moderated UO[sub 2] cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modified conversion ratio is defined as the ratio of [sup 238]U captures to total fission. Gamma-ray spectrometry of irradiated fuel rods has been introduced to measure this quantity in two types of water-moderated low-enriched UO[sub 2] cores: the standard core, called the 1.42S core, and a tight-lattice core, called the 0.56S core. The water moderator-to-fuel volume ratios V[sub m]/V[sub [line integral

Nakajima, Ken; Akai, Masanori; Suzaki, Takenori (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Fuel Cycle Safety Research)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Sensitivity study of borehole-to-surface and crosswell electromagnetic measurements acquired with energized steel casing to water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with energized steel casing to water displacement in hydrocarbon-bearing layers David Pardo1 , Carlos Torres- gized steel casing in the presence of subsurface variations of electrical resistivity. Casing- gized steel casing are performed with a goal-oriented hp- adaptive finite-element method

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

254

NMR evidence of a sharp change in a measure of local order in deeply supercooled confined water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in thermody- namical properties such as compressibility, isobaric heat capacity, and thermal expansion of maximum correlation length at 240 K, consistent with the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis for water received support from various theoretical studies (4­7) is the liquid-liquid (LL) critical point hypothesis

Stanley, H. Eugene

255

The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

2003-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Measurements of heat and mass transfer coefficients during absorption of water vapor by lithium bromide and (Li,K,Na)NO sub 3 mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A knowledge of heat and mass transfer coefficients in heat pump fluids, plays an important role in the design of absorption machines. Heat and mass transfer coefficients as well as subcooling are measured for absorption of water vapor in (Li, K, Na)No{sub 3} and Lithium Bromide (LiBr) mixtures.The rate of absorption of water vapor is obtained from the difference in concentration of mixtures between inlet and outlet streams across the absorber. In situ concentrations of aqueous salt mixtures over temperature ranges between 80 to 135 {degrees}C were calculated from density measurements. This technique of measurement is a reliable and convenient but not a very accurate ({plus minus}0.8 wt% salt) method of measuring the in situ salt concentration. Results show that the subcooling at the absorber exit is not only a property of the fluid, but depends strongly on the process conditions. The subcooling in LiBr mixtures without additive is shown to vary between 2.2 and 24.3 {degrees}C and the film heat transfer coefficient between 1365.2 and 801.1 W/m{sup 2}.K respectively, depending upon process conditions. These empirical results will prove to be of value to heat pump manufacturers because they have a strong bearing on costs and performance. Heat and mass transfer coefficients in aqueous salt solutions ate presented as a function of dimensionless numbers. 12 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Zaltash, A.; Ally, M.R.; Linkous, R.L.; Klatt, L.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

258

Measured Space Conditioning and Water Heating Performance of a Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump in a Residential Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to reduce residential building energy consumption, a ground-source integrated heat pump was developed to meet a home s entire space conditioning and water heating needs, while providing 50% energy savings relative to a baseline suite of minimum efficiency equipment. A prototype 7.0 kW system was installed in a 344 m2 research house with simulated occupancy in Oak Ridge, TN. The equipment was monitored from June 2012 through January 2013.

Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Quality indexes based on water measurements for low and medium energy x-ray beams: A theoretical study with PENELOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose : To study the use of quality indexes based on ratios of absorbed doses in water at two different depths to characterize x-ray beams of low and medium energies. Methods : A total of 55 x-ray beam spectra were generated with the codes XCOMP5R and SPEKCALC and used as input of a series of Monte Carlo simulations performed with PENELOPE, in which the percentage depth doses in water and thek{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} factors, defined in the TRS-398 protocol, were determined for each beam. Some of these calculations were performed by simulating the ionization chamber PTW 30010. Results : The authors found that the relation betweenk{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} and the ratios of absorbed doses at two depths is almost linear. A set of ratios statistically compatible with that showing the best fit has been determined. Conclusions : The results of this study point out which of these ratios of absorbed doses in water could be used to better characterize x-ray beams of low and medium energies.

Chica, U. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain and FISRAD S.A.S Carrera 64 a No 22-41, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia)] [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain and FISRAD S.A.S Carrera 64 a No 22-41, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A. M., E-mail: lallena@ugr.es [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Vilches, M. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario “San Cecilio”, Avda. Dr. Olóriz, 16, E-18012 Granada (Spain)] [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario “San Cecilio”, Avda. Dr. Olóriz, 16, E-18012 Granada (Spain)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/water interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental set-up for accurate measurement of hydrogen generation rate in Lithium-Lead (Li[sub 17]Pb[sub 83]) Steam or water interactions has been designed. The most important features of the design include a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature all stainless steel valve used to control the reaction time and the placement of most measuring devices below a water line to minimize leakage of the hydrogen collected. A PC based data acquisition and control system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all major components of the set-up. Initial tests indicate that the first design objective of maintaining leakproof gas collection chamber has been achieved. Initial pressure tests indicated that the pressure drop over a time span of 30 minutes was within the tolerance of the pressure transducer used to measure the pressure (within 0.690 kPa) at a nominal system pressure of 685 kPa. The experimental system hardware, data acquisition and control programs and data analysis program have been completed, tested and are currently functional.

Biney, P.O.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Optimal geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the global minima of water clusters (H2O)n, n=2-6, and several hexamer local minima at the CCSD(T) level of theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first optimum geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the ring pentamer and several water hexamer (prism, cage, cyclic and two book) at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. All five hexamer isomer minima previously reported by MP2 are also minima on the CCSD(T) potential energy surface (PES). In addition, all CCSD(T) minimum energy structures for the n=2-6 cluster isomers are quite close to the ones previously obtained by MP2 on the respective PESs, as confirmed by a modified Procrustes analysis that quantifies the difference between any two cluster geometries. The CCSD(T) results confirm the cooperative effect of the homodromic ring networks (systematic contraction of the nearest-neighbor (nn) intermolecular separations with cluster size) previously reported by MP2, albeit with O-O distances shorter by ~0.02 Å, indicating that MP2 overcorrects this effect. The harmonic frequencies at the minimum geometries were obtained by the double differentiation of the CCSD(T) energy using an efficient scheme based on internal coordinates that reduces the number of required single point energy evaluations by ~15% when compared to the corresponding double differentiation using Cartesian coordinates. Negligible differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) are found for the librational modes, while uniform increases of ~15 and ~25 cm-1 are observed for the bending and “free” OH harmonic frequencies. The largest differences between MP2 and CCSD(T) are observed for the harmonic hydrogen bonded frequencies. The CCSD(T) red shifts from the monomer frequencies (??) are smaller than the MP2 ones, due to the fact that the former produces shorter elongations (?R) of the respective hydrogen bonded OH lengths from the monomer value with respect to the latter. Both the MP2 and CCSD(T) results for the hydrogen bonded frequencies were found to closely follow the relation - ?? = s ? ?R, with a rate of s = 20.3 cm-1 / 0.001 Å. The CCSD(T) harmonic frequencies, when corrected using the MP2 anharmonicities obtained from second order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2), produce anharmonicCCSD(T) estimates that are within < 60 cm-1 from the measured infrared (IR) active bands of the n=2-6 clusters and furthermore trace the observed red shifts with respect to the monomer (??) quite accurately. The energetic order between the various hexamer isomers on the PES (prism has the lowest energy) previously reported at MP2 was found to be preserved at the CCSD(T) level, whereas the inclusion of anharmonic corrections further stabilizes the cage among the hexamer isomers.

Miliordos, Evangelos; Apra, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

262

Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sulfate (SO?²?) in forage and drinking water on the performance and mineral status of cattle and sheep. In Experiment 1, forty-eight late gestation crossbred cows were grazed on twelve 10...

Xie, Kehe

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite altimeter data and modeled discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to recording the periodic measurements of water level variations in the continental environment even in these remote places. The ability of radar altimeters to monitor continental water surfaces and measure station can be defined as any crossing of water body surface (i.e., large rivers) by radar altimeter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

265

What’s in Your Water?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Levels of Sulfate in Drinking Water Study. Centers forout  that  their  drinking  water  wells  contained  TCE  cleanup  the  town’s   drinking  water,  which  is  still  

Polasko, Alexandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

8Li electron spectrum versus 8B neutrino spectrum Implications for measuring solar neutrinos with a heavy water detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sensitivity of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) to measure the shape of the recoil electron spectrum in the charged-current reaction of $^{8}$B solar neutrinos interacting with deuterium can be improved if the results of a $^{8}$Li beta-decay calibration experiment are included in the test. We calculate an improvement in sensitivity, under certain idealistic assumptions, of about a factor of 2, sufficient to resolve different neutrino-oscillation solutions to the solar-neutrino problem. We further examine the role of recoil and radiative corrections on both the $^{8}$B neutrino spectrum and the $^{8}$Li electron spectrum and conclude that the influence of these effects on the ratio of the two spectra as measured by SNO is very small.

Jonkmans, G; Sur, B

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Vadose zone water fluxmeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

Faybishenko, Boris A.

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) detection of water storage changes in the Three Gorges Reservoir of China and comparison with in situ measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRACE and a land-atmosphere water balance, Geophys. Res.2008), Analysis of terrestrial water storage changes fromGRACE and GLDAS, Water Resour. Res. , 44, W02433, doi:

Wang, Xianwei; de Linage, Caroline; Famiglietti, James; Zender, Charles S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hydration-dependent dynamics of deeply cooled water under strong confinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured the hydration-level dependence of the single-particle dynamics of water confined in the ordered mesoporous silica MCM-41. The dynamic crossover observed at full hydration is absent at monolayer hydration. ...

Bertrand, C. E.

271

Neutron diffraction of hydrogenous materials: measuring incoherent and coherent intensities separately from liquid water - a 40-year-old puzzle solved  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(short version) Accurate determination of the coherent static structure factor of disordered materials containing proton nuclei is prohibitively difficult by neutron diffraction, due to the large incoherent cross section of $^1$H. This notorious problem has set severe obstacles to the structure determination of hydrogenous materials up to now, via introducing large uncertainties into neutron diffraction data processing. Here we present the first accurate separate measurements, using polarized neutron diffraction, of the coherent and incoherent contributions to the total static structure factor of 5 mixtures of light and heavy water, over an unprecedentedly wide momentum transfer range. The structure factors of H$_2$O and D$_2$O mixtures derived in this work may signify the beginning of a new era in the structure determination of hydrogenous materials, using neutron diffraction.

László Temleitner; Anne Stunault; Gabriel Cuello; László Pusztai

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Water Resources Research, Vol. 31, No. 5, pp. 1367-1372, May, 1995. Derived Estimation of Willingness-to-Pay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution of different shortage levels, allowing the valuation of different profiles of water supply- and short-term water conservation measures for customers to implement in response to such a shortage profile of probabilistic water shortages without the expense of situation-specific contingent valuation surveys

Pasternack, Gregory B.

274

Decreasing aqueous mercury concentrations to achieve safe levels in fish: examining the water-fish relationship in two point-source contaminated streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) and White Oak Creek (WOC) are two mercury-contaminated streams located on the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee. East Fork Poplar Creek is the larger and more contaminated of the two, with average aqueous mercury (Hg) concentrations exceeding those in reference streams by several hundred-fold. Remedial actions over the past 20 years have decreased aqueous Hg concentrations in EFPC by 85 %. Fish fillet concentrations, however, have not responded to this decrease in aqueous Hg and remain above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency s ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) of 0.3 mg/kg. The lack of correlation between aqueous and fish tissue Hg concentrations in this creek has led to questions regarding the usefulness of target aqueous Hg concentrations and strategies for future remediation efforts. White Oak Creek has a similar contamination history but aqueous Hg concentrations in WOC are an order of magnitude lower than in EFPC. Despite the lower aqueous Hg concentrations, fish fillet concentrations in WOC have also been above the AWQC, making the most recent aqueous Hg target of 200 ng/L in EFPC seem unlikely to result in an effective decrease in fillet Hg concentrations. Recent monitoring efforts in WOC, however, suggest an aqueous total Hg threshold above which Hg bioaccumulation in fish may not respond. This new information could be useful in guiding remedial actions in EFPC and in other point-source contaminated streams.

Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Valentine, Charles S [ORNL; Gregory, Scott M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

276

Comparison of predicted ground-level airborne radionuclide concentrations to measured values resulting from operation of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concentration ( m s) Meteorolo ical Parameters West Station Center Station Measured CAPBB-PC Predicted Measured CAPBB-PC Predicted Wind Dir Wind spd (De rees) (m s ' ) Temp @ 46 m Temp @ 23 m 269 1400 1. 59E-04 O. DOE+00 2. 77E-04 O. OOE+00 269 1... West Station Center Station Predicted Predicted Measured CAPBB-PC Measured CAPBB-PC Wind Dir Wind spd Temp @ Temp @ (De rees) lm s" ) 46 m 23 m 274 1400 7. 87E-04 9. 25E-03 7. 02E-05 7. 40E-03 274 1900 3. 22E-02 O. DOE+00 1. 02E-01 O. DOE+00 275 0...

Hoak, William Vandergrift

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

ARM - Measurement - Ice water content  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddroplet sizeGeometry ARMphasenuclei

278

ARM - Measurement - Ice water path  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddroplet sizeGeometry ARMphasenucleipath

279

ARM - Measurement - Liquid water content  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would

280

ARM - Measurement - Liquid water path  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontentcharacteristics ARM Data Discoveryalbedocarbon

282

Measurements of radioxenon in ground level air in South Korea following the claimed nuclear test in North Korea on October 9, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract Following the claimed nuclear test in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) on October 9, 2006, and a reported seismic event, a mobile system for sampling of atmospheric xenon was transported to the Republic of South Korea (ROK) in an attempt to detect possible emissions of radioxenon in the region from a presumed test. Five samples were collected in the ROK during October 11–14, 2006 near the ROK–DPRK border, and thereafter transported to the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI) in Stockholm, Sweden, for analysis. Following the initial measurements, an automatic radioxenon sampling and analysis system was installed at the same location in the ROK, and measurements on the ambient atmospheric radioxenon background in the region were performed during November 2006 to February 2007. The measured radioxenon concentrations strongly indicate that the explosion in October 9, 2006 was a nuclear test. The conclusion is further strengthened by atmospheric transport models. Radioactive xenon measurement was the only independent confirmation that the supposed test was in fact a nuclear explosion and not a conventional (chemical) explosive.

Ringbom, Anders; Elmgren, K.; Lindh, Karin; Peterson, Jenny; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Panisko, Mark E.; Williams, Richard M.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

283

An evaluation of the Gilian TRACEAIR Organic Vapor Monitoring Diffusive Badge in measuring short-term exposure levels of benzene under field conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations were measured in a Texas Gulf Coast refinery implementing two OVM I badges, an SKC charcoal tube, and a Tedlar bag used for gas chromatograph analyses. The results of the study indicated that a) no significant concentration differences were found...

Pierce, Mark Edward

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Water Conservation Best Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal sites across the country are incorporating water efficiency measures as part of their overall comprehensive UESC projects. As it becomes more difficult to secure internal funding for...

285

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 7). Nitrate ions are drawn through the membrane pores with elec- trical currents. The nitrate is pulled from the water into a brine waste stream. Ni trate-contaminated water Treated water Nitrate Chloride or hydroxide Exchange resin Figure 6. Ion... and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Texas Cooperative Extension, The Texas A&M University System B-6184 3-08 ' the safe levels of chemicals for U.S. drinking water. The EPA conducts research to determine the level of a contaminant in drinking water...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Transition in Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys and Updated Data and Correlations to Quantify the Effect of Aqueous Hydrogen on Primary Water SCC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alloys 600 and X-750 have been shown to exhibit a maximum in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility, when testing is conducted over a range of aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) levels. Contact electric resistance (CER) and corrosion coupon testing using nickel specimens has shown that the maximum in SCC susceptibility occurs in proximity to the nickel-nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition. The measured location of the Ni/NiO transition has been shown to vary with temperature, from 25 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 360 C to 4 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 288 C. New CER measurements show that the Ni/NiO transition is located at 2 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 260 C. An updated correlation of the phase transition is provided. The present work also reports CER testing conducted using an Alloy 600 specimen at 316 C. A large change in resistance occurred between 5 and 10 scc/kg H{sub 2}, similar to the results obtained at 316 C using a nickel specimen. This result adds confidence in applying the Ni/NiO transition measurements to Ni-Cr-Fe alloys. The understanding of the importance of the Ni/NiO transition to PWSCC has been used previously to quantify H{sub 2} effects on SCC growth rate (SCCGR). Specifically, the difference in the electrochemical potential (EcP) of the specimen or component from the Ni/NiO transition (i.e., EcP{sub Ni/NiO}-EcP) has been used as a correlating parameter. In the present work, these SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations, which were based on SCCGR data obtained at relatively high test temperatures (338 and 360 C), are evaluated via SCCGR tests at a reduced temperature (316 C). The 316 C data are in good agreement with the predictions, implying that the SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations extrapolate well to reduced temperatures. The SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations have been revised to reflect the updated Ni/NiO phase transition correlation. New data are presented for EN82H weld metal (also known as Alloy 82) at 338 C. Similar to other nickel alloys, SCC of EN82H is a function of the aqueous H{sub 2} level, with the SCCGR exhibiting a maximum near the Ni/NiO transition. For example, the SCCGR at 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} is {approx} 81 x higher than at 60 scc/kg H{sub 2}. The 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} condition is near the Ni/NiO transition (located at {approx} 14 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 338 C), while 60 scc/kg H{sub 2} is well into the nickel metal regime. A hydrogen-SCCGR correlation is provided for EN82H. The data and understanding obtained from the present work show that SCC can be mitigated by adjusting the aqueous H{sub 2} level. For example, SCCGR is typically minimized at relatively high aqueous H{sub 2} levels, that are well into the nickel metal regime (i.e., far from the Ni/NiO transition).

Steven A. Attanasio; David S. Morton

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Comparison of predicted ground-level airborne radionuclide concentrations to measured values resulting from operation of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison study of measured and predicted downwind radionuclide concentrations from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) was performed. The radionuclide emissions consist primarily of the radioisotopes 11C, 13N, and 150. The gases, vented to the outside environment by a stack located at the facility, potentially increase the radiation exposure at the facility boundary. Emission rate, meteorological, and radiation monitoring station data were collected between September 26, 1992 and October 3, 1992. The meteorological and emission data were input to the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88-PC) computer code. The downwind radionuclide air concentrations predicted by the code were compared to the air concentrations measured by the monitoring stations. The code was found to slightly over-predict downwind concentrations during unstable atmospheric conditions. For stable atmospheric conditions, the code was not useful for predicting downwind air concentrations. This is thought to be due to an underestimation of horizontal dispersion.

Hoak, W.V.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ?

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Point Defects in Pb-, Bi-, and In-Doped CdZnTe Detectors:Deep-Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied, by current deep-level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), point defects induced in CdZnTe detectors by three dopants: Pb, Bi, and In. Pb-doped CdZnTe detectors have a new acceptor trap at around 0.48 eV. The absence of a V{sub Cd} trap suggests that all Cd vacancies are compensated by Pb interstitials after they form a deep-acceptor complex [[Pb{sub Cd}]{sup +}-V{sub Cd}{sup 2-}]{sup -}. Bi-doped CdZnTe detectors had two distinct traps: a shallow trap at around 36 meV and a deep donor trap at around 0.82 eV. In detectors doped with In, we noted three well-known traps: two acceptor levels at around 0.18 eV (A-centers) and 0.31 eV (V{sub Cd}), and a deep trap at around 1.1 eV.

Bolotnikov A.; GUL, R.; KEETER, K.; RODRIGUEZ, R.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; HOSSAIN, A.; CAMARDA, G.S.; KIM, K.H.; YANG, Y.; CUI, Y.; CARCELEN, V.; FRANC, J.; LI, Z.; JAMES, R.B.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

Supercooling and freezing processes in nanoconfined water by time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (HD-OKE) measurements, we investigate the vibrational dynamics and the structural relaxation of water nanoconfined in Vycor porous silica samples (pore size $\\simeq~4~nm$ ) at different levels of hydration and temperatures. At low level of hydration, corresponding to two complete superficial water layers, no freezing occurs and water remains mobile at all the investigated temperatures with dynamic features similar, but not equal, to the bulk water. The fully hydrated sample shows formation of ice at about 248 K, this process does not involve all the contained water; a part of it remains in a supercooled phase. The structural relaxation times measured from the decay of the time-dependent HD-OKE signal shows temperature dependence largely affected by the hydration level; the low frequency ($\

A. Taschin; P. Bartolini; A. Marcelli; R. Righini; R. Torre

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

292

Tiltmeter leveling mechanism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Farris, Alvis (late of Byron, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Water Resources Restoration and Preservation Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act assigns water monitoring duties to the Department of Environmental Protection, and requires the Department to establish Total Daily Maximum Load (TDML) levels for water bodies throughout...

294

Beta ray flux measuring device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

What's In My Water?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.The salts in conductivity levels are conductivity levels. allow for too much water to evaporate water are not just table high, evaluate other from the surface, or where soils are salt, but are often a individual characteristics naturally high in salts...- tive safety margin. You can have your water analyzed by a government agency or a private company. 13 Salt: an organic or inorganic com- pound that is subject to dissociation when water is added, resulting in a dis- tinct increase in specific anions...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

Determination of cloud liquid water distribution using 3D cloud tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but they provide a less direct measurement of cloud water content (since radar reflectivity depends strongly, the number of scanning angles, the radiometer characteristics (e.g., noise level, beam width), the physical accuracy. For a setup consisting of four microwave radiometers of typical noise level 0.3 K, the tomography

297

Selected ground-water data for Yucca Mountain region, southern Nevada and eastern California, through December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey, in support of the US Department of Energy, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, collects, compiles, and summarizes hydrologic data in the Yucca Mountain region. The data are collected to allow assessments of ground-water resources during studies to determine the potential suitability of Yucca Mountain for storing high-level nuclear waste. Data on ground-water levels at 36 sites, ground-water discharge at 6 sites, and ground-water withdrawals within Crater Flat, Jackass Flats, Mercury Valley, and the Amargosa Desert are presented for calendar year 1996. Data collected prior to 1996 are graphically presented and data collected by other agencies (or as part of other programs) are included to further indicate variations of ground-water levels, discharges, and withdrawals through time. A statistical summary of ground-water levels at seven wells in Jackass Flats is presented to indicate potential effects of ground-water withdrawals in support of US Department of Energy activities near Yucca Mountain. The statistical summary includes the number of measurements, the maximum, minimum, and median water-level altitudes, and the average deviation of measured water-level altitudes for selected baseline periods and for calendar years 1992--96. At two water-supply wells and a nearby observation well, median water levels for calendar year 1996 were slightly lower (0.3 to 0.4 foot) than for the respective baseline periods. At four other wells in Jackass Flats, median water levels for 1996 were unchanged, slightly lower (0.2 foot), and slightly higher (0.2 and 0.7 foot) than for the respective baseline periods.

LaCamera, R.J.; Locke, G.L.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Taps: The Dangers of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels in Taiwan's drinking water. Journal of Toxicology andMagnesium and calcium in drinking water and death from acute31-36. Morris RD. Drinking water and cancer. Environmental

Burgess, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Snow water equivalent estimation using blackbox optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 7, 2011 ... Abstract: Accurate measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE) is an important factor in managing water resources for hydroelectric power ...

Stéphane Alarie

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gold, Copper, and Platinum Nanoparticles Dispersed on CeOx/TiO2(110) Surfaces: High Water-Gas Shift Activity and the Nature of the Mixed-Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At small coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the CeO{sub x} nanoparticles have an unusual coordination mode. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density-functional calculations point to the presence of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} dimers, which form diagonal arrays that have specific orientations of 0, 24, and 42{sup o} with respect to the [1 -1 0] direction of the titania substrate. At high coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the surface exhibits two types of terraces. In one type, the morphology is not very different from that observed at low ceria coverage. However, in the second type of terrace, there is a compact array of ceria particles with structures that do not match the structures of CeO{sub 2}(111) or CeO{sub 2}(110). The titania substrate imposes on the ceria nanoparticles nontypical coordination modes, enhancing their chemical reactivity. This phenomenon leads to a larger dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles (M = Au, Cu, Pt) and makes possible the direct participation of the oxide in catalytic reactions. The M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces display an extremely high catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that follows the sequence Au/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Pt/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110). For low coverages of Cu and CeO{sub x}, Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) is 8-12 times more active than Cu(111) or Cu/ZnO industrial catalysts. In the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) systems, there is a strong coupling of the chemical properties of the admetal and the mixed-metal oxide: The adsorption and dissociation of water probably take place on the oxide, CO adsorbs on the admetal nanoparticles, and all subsequent reaction steps occur at the oxide-admetal interface. The high catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces reflects the unique properties of the mixed-metal oxide at the nanometer level.

Park, J.; Graciani, J; Evans, J; Stacchiola, D; Senanayake, S; Barrio, L; Liu, P; Fdez. Sanz, J; Hrbek, J; Rodriguez, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gold, Copper and Platinum Nanoparticles Dispersed on CeOx/TiO2(110) Surfaces: High Water-Gas Shift Activity and the Nature of the Mixed-Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At small coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the CeO{sub x} nanoparticles have an unusual coordination mode. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density-functional calculations point to the presence of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} dimers, which form diagonal arrays that have specific orientations of 0, 24, and 42{sup o} with respect to the [1 -1 0] direction of the titania substrate. At high coverages of ceria on TiO{sub 2}(110), the surface exhibits two types of terraces. In one type, the morphology is not very different from that observed at low ceria coverage. However, in the second type of terrace, there is a compact array of ceria particles with structures that do not match the structures of CeO{sub 2}(111) or CeO{sub 2}(110). The titania substrate imposes on the ceria nanoparticles nontypical coordination modes, enhancing their chemical reactivity. This phenomenon leads to a larger dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles (M = Au, Cu, Pt) and makes possible the direct participation of the oxide in catalytic reactions. The M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces display an extremely high catalytic activity for the water-gas shift reaction that follows the sequence Au/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) < Pt/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110). For low coverages of Cu and CeO{sub x}, Cu/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) is 8-12 times more active than Cu(111) or Cu/ZnO industrial catalysts. In the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) systems, there is a strong coupling of the chemical properties of the admetal and the mixed-metal oxide: The adsorption and dissociation of water probably take place on the oxide, CO adsorbs on the admetal nanoparticles, and all subsequent reaction steps occur at the oxide-admetal interface. The high catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces reflects the unique properties of the mixed-metal oxide at the nanometer level.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Park, J.B.; Graciani, J.; Evans, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Senanayake, S.D.; Barrio, L.; Liu, P.; Sanz, J.F.; Hrbek, J.

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

302

Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction inCalifornia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study collected current water and waste water tariffsin California cities and counties where there is a high level of newresidential construction.

Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

303

Minerals leached into drinking water from rubber stoppers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drinking water and its delivery system are potential sources of variation in animal research. Concern arose that rubber stoppers used to cork water bottles might be a source of some nutritionally required minerals which could leach into drinking water. Six types of stoppers, each having different compositions, were cleaned with stainless-steel sipper tubes inserted into them and attached to polypropylene bottles filled with either deionized water (pH 4.5) or acidified-deionized water (pH 2.5). After six days of contact, water levels of copper, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, chromium, and selenium were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, three of the stopper types were analyzed for mineral content. Minerals were present in both stoppers and drinking water. Acidified-deionized water generally leached minerals from the stoppers than did deionized water. The black stopper which is commonly used in animal facilities contained and leached measurable levels of some minerals, but it still can be recommended for typical animal husbandry uses, although other types of stoppers would be more suitable for specific nutritional and toxicologic studies.

Kennedy, B.W.; Beal, T.S. (Carbohydrate Nutrition Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, MD (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Measuring Multimodal Transport Level of Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a set of inter-modal performance indicators in which serviceinter-modal performance indicators are more appropriate for

Kanafani, Adib; Wang, Rui

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Low_Level_RF_measurements.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail of a martian200858

306

Space Heaters The University recognizes that individuals have different levels of comfort associated with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for space heating. 14. Do not use space heaters or any other electric appliance around water. 15Space Heaters The University recognizes that individuals have different levels of comfort associated with temperature and heat. The use of electric space heaters as a temporary measure is permitted

de Lijser, Peter

307

Direct measurement of the energy thresholds to conformational isomerization. II. 3-indole-propionic acid and its water-containing complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-propionic acid IPA and its water-containing complex. By contrast with tryptamine Paper I , IPA has only two energies of the A and B minima, with E B -E A =46­210 cm-1 . Like the IPA monomer, the IPA-H2O complex.D. thesis, UCLA, 1991 have determined that these complexes retain the same IPA conformational structure

Zwier, Timothy S.

308

Drinking Water Standards Drinking water from a local public supply must  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drinking Water Standards Drinking water from a local public supply must meet federal and state standards for safe drink- ing water. Two sets of standards-primary drinking water and secondary drinking water- establish Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for a variety of contaminants. If the water sup- ply

Dyer, Bill

309

Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ultrasonic liquid-level detector for varying temperature and pressure environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use in varying temperature and pressure environments, such as a pressurized water nuclear reactor vessel, is provided. The detector employs ultrasonic extensional and torsional waves launched in a multiplexed alternating sequence into a common sensor. The sensor is a rectangular cross section stainless steel rod which extends into the liquid medium whose level is to be detected. The sensor temperature derived from the extensional wave velocity measurements is used to compensate for the temperature dependence of the torsional wave velocity measurements which are also level dependent. The torsional wave velocity measurements of a multiple reflection sensor then provide a measurement of liquid level over a range of several meters with a small uncertainty over a temperature range of 20 to 250/sup 0/C and pressures up to 15 MPa.

Anderson, R.L.; Miller, G.N.

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

312

Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Water purification in Borexino  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Astroparticle Physics and Underground experiments searching for rare nuclear events, need high purity materials to act as detectors or detector shielding. Water has the advantage of being cheap, dense and easily available. Most of all, water can be purified to the goal of obatining a high level of radiopurity. Water Purification can be achieved by means of a combination of processes, including filtration, reverse osmosis, deionization and gas stripping. The Water Purification System for the Borexino experiment, will be described together with its main performances.

Giammarchi, M. [Infn Milano (Italy)] [Infn Milano (Italy); Balata, M.; Ioannucci, L.; Nisi, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy)] [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Goretti, A.; Ianni, A. [Princeton University (United States)] [Princeton University (United States); Miramonti, L. [Dip. di Fisica dell'Università di Milano e Infn (Italy)] [Dip. di Fisica dell'Università di Milano e Infn (Italy)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

Measured Impact on Space Conditioning Energy Use in a Residence Due to Operating a Heat Pump Water Heater inside the Conditioned Space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact on space conditioning energy use due to operating a heat pump water heater (HPWH) inside the conditioned space is analyzed based on 2010-2011 data from a research house with simulated occupancy and hot water use controls. The 2700 ft2 (345 m2) house is located in Oak Ridge, TN (mixed-humid climate) and is equipped with a 50 gallon (189 l) HPWH that provided approximately 55 gallons/d (208 l/d) of hot water at 120 F (46 C) to the house during the test period. The HPWH has been operated every other week from December 2010 through November 2011 in two modes; a heat pump only mode, and a standard mode that utilizes 15355 Btu/hr (4500 W) resistance heating elements. The energy consumption of the air-source heat pump (ASHP) that provides space conditioning for the house is compared for the two HPWH operating modes with weather effects taken into account. Impacts during the heating and cooling seasons are compared.

Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

Forozani, Ghasem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Typical Clothing Ensemble Insulation Levels for Sixteen Body Parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Comfort.1994 CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen Bodya mesh arm chair whose insulation level was measured. FigureExperimental Conditions. CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen

Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/water interaction. Technical status progress report, October 1, 1991--March 15, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental set-up for accurate measurement of hydrogen generation rate in Lithium-Lead (Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}) Steam or water interactions has been designed. The most important features of the design include a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature all stainless steel valve used to control the reaction time and the placement of most measuring devices below a water line to minimize leakage of the hydrogen collected. A PC based data acquisition and control system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all major components of the set-up. Initial tests indicate that the first design objective of maintaining leakproof gas collection chamber has been achieved. Initial pressure tests indicated that the pressure drop over a time span of 30 minutes was within the tolerance of the pressure transducer used to measure the pressure (within 0.690 kPa) at a nominal system pressure of 685 kPa. The experimental system hardware, data acquisition and control programs and data analysis program have been completed, tested and are currently functional.

Biney, P.O.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Water Quality Measurement in Polishing Ponds of AMD Treatment Plants for Selection of Commercial District: WV 1 Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Waste Water, Treatment, Recreation Associated's Tygart River Mine. #12;1 Water Quality Measurement in Polishing Ponds of AMD Treatment Plants

319

Tritium Determination at Trace Level: Which Strategy to Determine Accurately HTO and OBT in Environmental Samples?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Focusing on environmental tritium levels, measurements have been made for several natural water and leaf samples from an area where no tritium industrial discharge was known to occur. Therefore, to obtain sufficiently accurate data tritium was determined from large samples. Moreover, tritium measurement at environmental level requires appropriate methodology to avoid any contamination. Both tissue free water tritium (TFWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT) were determined for biological samples and compared to preliminary or literature data. In this paper, the authors describe both: a mobile extraction water device allowing therefore to realise the extraction step under the sampling site conditions to get rid of any contamination; a sensitive method for low level non-exchangeable OBT determination by a combination of a suitable sample treatment, a large capacity combustion apparatus and low background liquid scintillation spectrometry. Then, owing to validate this approach the authors give an application of this methodology to the determination of both fractions determined on tree leaves originating from the lower Rhone valley. The results demonstrate both the suitability of the procedure as tritium concentration in leaves and natural waters exhibit environmental level concentration and also that the OBT background in the studied area is very close to the one measured in the south west of France.

Baglan, N.; Alanic, G.; Pointurier, F. [CEA (France)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Novel instrumentation for a scattering independent measurement of the absorption coefficient of natural waters, and a new diffuse reflector for spectroscopic instrumentation and close cavity coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and water visibility (Secchi depth); both of these change dramatically throughout the day, as the Sun traverses the sky. When discussing apparent optical properties it is often useful to specify the radiance L and the irradiance E. Radiance is the energy... and homogeneous field in the inner cavity. A fiber optic cable samples the inner cavity?s light field at the midpoint of the quartz tube. A reference signal is collected by a fiber optic cable located in the outer cavity. To obtain the raw absorption signal...

Musser, Joseph Alan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison of different global data sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the spatio-temporal variations of total terrestrial water storage (the sum of ground water, soil water1 Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison mass variations monitored by GRACE, simulated surface and total water storage from WGHM, water levels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

323

Results of a baseflow tritium survey of surface water in Georgia across from the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1991 the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR) issued a press release notifying the public that tritium had been measured in elevated levels (1,200 - 1,500 pCi/1) in water samples collected from drinking water wells in Georgia across from the Savannah River Site in Aiken Co. South Carolina. None of the elevated results were above the Primary Drinking Water Standard for tritium of 20,000 pCi/l. The GDNR initiated 2 surveys to determine the source and extent of elevated tritium: (1) baseflow survey of surface water quality, and (2) well evaluation program. Results from the 2 surveys indicate that the tritium measured in groundwater wells in Georgia is not the result of a groundwater flow from South Carolina under the Savannah River and into Georgia. Atmospheric transport and consequent rainout and infiltration has resulted in an increase of tritium in the water-table aquifer in the vicinity. Water samples collected from drinking water wells believed to have been installed in the aquifer beneath the water-table aquifer were actually from the shallower water-table aquifer. Water samples collected from the wells contain the amount of tritium expected for the water-table aquifer in the sample area. The measured tritium levels in the well samples and baseflow samples do not exceed Primary Drinking Water Standards. Tritium levels in the water-table in Georgia will decline as the atmospheric releases from SRS decline, tritium undergoes natural decay, and infiltration water with less tritium flushes through the subsurface.

Nichols, R.L.

1993-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

324

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of desalination research. The primary technological method of generating additional water supplies is through desalination and enhanced water reuse and recycling technologies....

325

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Isotopic exchange measurements of the rates of adsorption/desorption and interconversion of CO and CO/sub 2/ over chromia-promoted magnetite: implications for water-gas shift  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopic exchange measurements were used to investigate the adsorption/desorption and interconversion of CO and CO/sub 2/ on chromia-promoted magnetite at 565 and 627 K. The interconversion between CO and CO/sub 2/ was shown to take place through surface adsorbed species. Furthermore, the rate of interconversion was limited by the rates of adsorption/desorption, indicating either that adsorbed CO and CO/sub 2/ are in equilibrium on the surface or that the adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ leads to the same surface species, e.g., a surface carbonate species. A kinetic model for the water-gas shift over magnetite is proposed, and the results of the isotopic exchange measurements and volumetric adsorption data are used to estimate the rate and equilibrium constants for this model.

Tinkle, M.; Dumesic, J.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Molecular imaging of water binding state and diffusion in breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffusion weighted MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular imaging of water binding state and diffusion inChung et al. , “In vivo water state measurements in breastby measuring tis- sue water state using diffuse optical

Chung, So Hyun; Yu, Hon; Su, Min-Ying; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Nationwide water availability data for energy-water modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this effort is to explore where the availability of water could be a limiting factor in the siting of new electric power generation. To support this analysis, water availability is mapped at the county level for the conterminous United States (3109 counties). Five water sources are individually considered, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water (western U.S. only), municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped is projected growth in non-thermoelectric consumptive water demand to 2035. Finally, the water availability metrics are accompanied by estimated costs associated with utilizing that particular supply of water. Ultimately these data sets are being developed for use in the National Renewable Energy Laboratories' (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, designed to investigate the likely deployment of new energy installations in the U.S., subject to a number of constraints, particularly water.

Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Zemlick, Katie M.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recreational uses. ?The Commission will seek substantial additional public comment on any proposed changes to the standards before adopting them into the state admin- istrative code,? Davenport said. ?Because of the com- plexity and regulatory importance... Conservation Board?s state watershed coordinator, said the standards for contact recreation, with only a few exceptions, are uniformly applied regardless of water body type or the actual level of recreation use. ?Because a minimum of 10 water samples over a...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Marketing water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management, water conservation programs Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 17 public information programs and materials that increase awareness about regional water issues. The company recently opened the TecH2O, a water resource learning center...tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Biological pretreatment of produced water for reuse applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry represents a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced water is characterized by high levels of… (more)

Kwon, Soondong, 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

South Dakota-Minnesota Boundary Waters Commission (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes an interstate commission to set standards for water levels and quality, and to coordinate among local governments to maintain and preserve water resources on the...

333

Satisficing measures for analysis of risky positions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

general class of measures, called satisficing measures, which depend on the investor's aspiration level. ...... AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER CO INC. AA.

2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water, methanol + water, and ethanol + water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system methanol + ethanol + water and its constituent binary systems of methanol + water and ethanol + water at 323.15, 328.15, and 333.15 K. The apparatus that was used made it possible to control the measured temperature and total pressure by computer. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Takeda, Kouichi; Kojima, Kazuo [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry; Minoura, Tsuyoshi [Mitui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thermoelectrically cooled water trap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

Micheels, Ronald H. (Concord, MA)

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

336

Scenarios of Global Municipal Water-Use Demand Projections over the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper establishes three future projections of global municipal water use to the end of the 21st century: A reference business-as usual (BAU) scenario, a High Technological Improvement (High Tech) scenario and a Low Technological Improvement (Low Tech) scenario. A global municipal water demand model is constructed using global water use statistics at the country-scale, calibrated to the base year of 2005, and simulated to the end of the 21st century. Since the constructed water demand model hinges on socioeconomic variables (population, income), water price, and end-use technology and efficiency improvement rates, projections of those input variables are adopted to characterize the uncertainty in future water demand estimates. The water demand model is linked to the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a global change integrated assessment model. Under the reference scenario, the global total water withdrawal increases from 466 km3/year in 2005 to 941 km3/year in 2100,while withdrawals in the high and low tech scenarios are 321 km3/ year and 2000 km3/ year, respectively. This wide range (321-2000 km3/ year) indicates the level of uncertainty associated with such projections. The simulated global municipal demand projections are most sensitive to population and income projections, then to end-use technology and efficiency projections, and finally to water price. Thus, using water price alone as a policy measure to reduce municipal water use may substantiate the share of municipal water price of people’s annual incomes.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Davies, Evan; Eom, Jiyong

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Urban Water Conservation along the Rio Grande  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban Water Conservation along the Rio Grande THE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY An Inventory of Water Conservation Programs TR 269 SP 201 Valeen Silvy, 1 Ronald Kaiser, 2 Bruce Lesikar 3 and Craig Runyan... water running into the streets from irrigation systems. Urban water conservation incorporates water- saving measures and incentives for the home, on the landscape and throughout the city water distribution system. It is easy to differentiate be...

Silvey, Valeen; Kaiser, Ronald; Lesikar, Bruce; Runyan, Craig

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Technical background document for draft soil screening level guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides technical details of the derivation of the September 30, 1993, draft Soil Screening Levels (SSLs) Guidance for Superfund (PB93-963508). The document is presented in two sections. Section I defines SSL and provides background information on the development of SSLs and their application and implementation at Superfund sites, including sampling schemes for measuring SSL attainment. It also provides draft SSLs developed for 30 chemicals. Section II provides the technical basis for the development of SSLs addressing direct ingestion of soil, inhalation of volatiles and fugitive dust, and the soil-to-ground-water exposure pathway, including the assumptions and theories used the their development.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Baseline Control Measures.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Individual Permit Baseline Control Measures at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Poster, Individual Permit for Storm Water, NPDES Permit No. NM0030759 Author(s): Veenis, Steven J....

340

Williston Basin subsidence and sea level history: Chronological and lithofacies constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent is to use lithofacies information to identify the top-driven components of sediment accumulation-depositional environments, sediments supply, compaction, sediment and water load. Physical carbonate stratigraphy is used to determine sediment accumulation corrections. Physical stratigraphic geometric patterns are used to estimate the original thicknesses of dissolved salts and to determine absolute water depth. Seawater strontium chronostratigraphy constrains the ages and paleo-oceanographic setting of Devonian-Mississippian strata. The measured strontium stratigraphy can be used for correlation, age assignment and diagentic study. Removing sediment compaction, sediment/water load effects and using the newly derived Devonian-Mississippian chronostratigraphy to examine the behavior of the Williston Basin reveals a number of facts. (1) Temporal and spatial variation in the surficial components of sediment accumulation is significant and, unless removed, obscures tectonic subsidence and sea-level change patterns. (2) Both the corrected tectonic subsidence/sea level record and lithofacies patterns of the Devonian Williston Basin show flexural or in-plane stress interference reflecting plate boundary reorganization along the near edge of the Paleozoic North American craton, culminating the Antler orogeny. (3) The tectonic subsidence and sea level change record of the Williston Basin which has been corrected for sediment compaction, water and sediment load, has extremely linear subsidence through time. This is interrupted by changes in global sea level of 100-140 m over 25-35 my and apparent sea level change of 35-60 m over 2-4 my.

Lee Roark, C.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Now, Ze assumes |K|2 for water. But what about when we are looking at ice (Smith, 1984, J. Climate and Applied Met., 23, 1258-1260)?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure since the dielectric strength is incorporated as part of the radar constant). #12;Ice Water Water drops to radar 2. Dielectric factor decrease across melting level 3. Drop breakup and fall speed changesBZe Substituting values for |K|w 2 and |K|i 2, means we have to add 6.5 ­ 7.2 dB to our dBZe measurement to get

Rutledge, Steven

342

Water Dynamics and Interactions in Water-Polyether Binary Emily E. Fenn, David E. Moilanen, Nancy E. Levinger,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Dynamics and Interactions in Water-Polyether Binary Mixtures Emily E. Fenn, David E. Moilanen crystallization, and medical devices. PEO's versatility arises from its special interactions with water. Water-state measurements and theoretical studies of PEO's interactions with water abound, experiments measuring dynamic

Fayer, Michael D.

343

Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Steady-State Diffusion of Water through Soft-Contact Lens Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fig. 2 Measured steady-state water fluxes as a function ofTM hydrogels. Measured steady-state water fluxes are largestthe measured steady- state water fluxes increase with rising

Fornasiero, Francesco; Krull, Florian; Radke, Clayton J.; Prausnitz, John M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Value of Irrigation Water with Alternative Input Prices, Product Prices and Yield Levels: Texas Coastal Bend, Cross Timbers, Deep East, Edwards Aquifer, El Paso, Gulf Coast, Lower South Central, Rolling Plains, Trans Pecos and Winter Garden Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

risen to record levels; because of the energy crisis and the rapid rate of inflation, prices of fertilizer and fuel have at least doubled, and the price of other farm inputs have risen substantially. These price changes, in absolute and relative terms...

Sprott, J. M.; Lacewell, R. D.; Beattie, B. R.

346

Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP-TR-169 Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam- Water Relative Permeability Peter A. O by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative

Stanford University

347

UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................ Sidney Area Deals with Drought 6................ Water and Electricity Are Inseparable 10's East Campus. "Consolidating administration,faculty and staff and facilities is costeffectiveandper or commercial products constitute endorsement by the U.S. Government. WATER CURRENT Water Center University

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

348

UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSIDE UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT PROTECTING NEBRASKAíS WATER RESOURCES THROUGH RESEARCH with a vision, thereís an untapped market using resources right under our feet,î the University of Nebraska outdoors in India, Bangladesh, China and Viet- nam. Thousands of them have been grown to harvest

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

349

Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Natural Resources is responsible for ensuring that the quality and quantity of the water resources of the state are maintained at the highest level practicable to support present...

350

Water protection in coke-plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Tritium level along Romanian Black Sea Coast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Establishing the tritium level along the Romanian Black Sea Coast, after 10 years of exploitation of the nuclear power plant from Cernavoda, is a first step in evaluating its impact on the Black Sea ecosystem. The monitoring program consists of tritium activity concentration measurement in sea water and precipitation from Black Sea Coast between April 2005 and April 2006. The sampling points were spread over the Danube-Black Sea Canal - before the locks Agigea and Navodari, and Black Sea along the coast to the Bulgarian border. The average tritium concentration in sea water collected from the sampling locations had the value of 11.1 {+-} 2.1 TU, close to tritium concentration in precipitation. Although an operating nuclear power plant exists in the monitored area, the values of tritium concentration in two locations are slightly higher than those recorded elsewhere. To conclude, it could be emphasized that until now, Cernavoda NPP did not had any influence on the tritium concentration of the Black Sea Shore. (authors)

Varlam, C.; Stefanescu, I.; Popescu, I.; Faurescu, I. [National Inst. for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, PO Box 10, Rm. Valcea, 24050 (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Water Conservation and Water Use Efficiency (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wisconsin has several statutes that promote water conservation and controlled water use, and this legislation establishes mandatory and voluntary programs in water conservation and water use...

353

Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: Lutz J.D. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution

354

Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and maintenance savings and avoided water treatment costs, and improved recreation and fish and wildlife conditions due to higher reservoir levels. Oklahoma-Texas Area Office...

355

Water Quality Guide for Livestock and Poultry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication discusses some of the most common contaminants in the drinking water of livestock and poultry. A table lists the Maximum Contaminant Level of some harmful substances....

Mukhtar, Saqib

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

Chen, Tsuhan

357

Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 58 (2012) Volunteer Ground-Water Monitoring Coming to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Management Districts (WMDs) or the Florida Department of Environmental1 Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program being monitored for water levels by the state's water management districts

Florida, University of

358

Precision measurements of binary and multicomponent diffusion coefficients in protein solutions relevant to crystal growth: Lysozyme chloride in water and aqueous NaCl at pH 4.5 and 25{degree}C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate models of protein diffusion are important in a number of applications, including liquid-liquid phase separation and growth of protein crystals for X-ray diffraction studies. In concentrated multicomponent protein systems, significant deviations from pseudobinary behavior can be expected. Rayleigh interferometry is used to measure the four elements (D{sub if}){sub v} of the ternary diffusion coefficient matrix for the extensively investigated protein, hen egg-white lysozyme (component 1) in aqueous NaCl (component 2) at pH 4.5 and 25 C. These are the first multicomponent diffusion coefficients measured for any protein system at concentrations high enough to be relevant to modeling and prediction of crystal growth or other phase transitions, and the first for a system involving lysozyme at any concentration. The four ternary diffusion coefficients for the system lysozyme chloride/NaCl/water are reported for lysozyme chloride at 0.60 mM (8.6 mg/mL) and NaCl at concentrations of 0.25, 0.50, 0.65, 0.90, and 1.30 M (1.4, 2.8, 3.7, 5.1, and 7.2 wt %), with the latter two compositions being supersaturated. One cross-term, (D{sub 21}){sub v}, is 80--259 times larger than the main term (D{sub 11}){sub v} and 7--18 times larger than (D{sub 22}){sub v}. Standard interferometric diagnostic tests indicate that aggregation is unimportant in the experiments. The authors also present binary diffusion coefficients D{sub v} for lysozyme chloride/water at concentrations from 0.43 to 3.08 mM (6.2--44.1 mg/mL), at the same pH and temperature. The precision of the results is about 0.1% for the binary diffusion coefficients and diagonal ternary diffusion coefficients, and about 1--2% for the cross-terms. For the ternary systems investigated, they show that a single pseudobinary diffusion coefficient does not accurately describe diffusive transport, and predictions by simple models such as the Nernst-Hartley equations are inaccurate at the higher concentrations considered here. Finally, dynamic light-scattering diffusion coefficients, differing form both the interferometrically measured (D{sub ij}){sub v} and a theoretical prediction of light-scattering diffusion coefficients in multicomponent systems, are reported for the same solutions used for the ternary experiments at 1.30 M.

Albright, J.G.; Annunziata, O. [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Chemistry Dept.] [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Miller, D.G. [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Chemistry Dept.] [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Chemistry Dept.; [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Paduano, L. [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Chemistry Dept.] [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Chemistry Dept.; [Univ. di Napoli, Naples (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica; Pearlstein, A.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering] [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

How to Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level Policy and Planning in the Water Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Integrate Climate...

360

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, D.M.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

An Integrated Low Level Heat Recovery System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large amount of low level thermal energy is lost to air or water in a typical petroleum refinery. This paper discusses a complex integrated low level heat recovery system that is being engineered for installation in a large petroleum refinery...

Sierra, A. V., Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Computerized Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ing 2002?2005 and documented in TWRI?s Technical Report 284 released in January 2006, include: ? Capabilities for short-term reliability analyses based on current storage conditions (Or what is the likelihood of meeting water needs in the near... System Reference Manual. TWRI Technical Report 255, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Water Rights Analysis Package Modeling System Users Manual. TWRI Technical Report 256, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Fundamentals of Water Availability Modeling...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

365

Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Management This department applies multi-disciplinary science and technology-based modeling to assess complex environmental systems. It integrates ecology, anthropology, and...

366

Using fat and muscle measurements from different areas of the carcass in the prediction of yield of pork four lean cuts and primals as affected by cutting method and trim level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-in and boneless FLC progressively trimmed to .64,.32, and 0 cm, BLSFLC, and FFLFLC. Twelfth rib fat depth 3/4 measure (TW5) and M. longissimus area (TW7) accounted for 81% of the variation in RFLC. Twelfth rib fat and muscle depth 1/2 distance measures (TW3 and TW...

Harris, Shawn Dale

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF AEROSOLS AND WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

beam divergence of 0.4 mrad, telescope FOV 1.75 mrad and inclination angle between axis of about 0 #12;Embrapa Site ­ km30 AM-010 Embrapa Duke reserve ZF2 reserve Up wind from Manaus Paved road

Barbosa, Henrique

368

Increasing Thermoelectric Generation Water Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rights reserved. Water Is a Critical Resource · Fast growing demand for clean, fresh water · Increased and energy planning · More watershed/regional planning · New science and technology to support planning. Solving the problem Requires Science and Technology Monitoring & Measurement Science &Technology

Keller, Arturo A.

369

Cs-137 in the Savannah River and the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water-treatment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium-137 concentration measurements made in 1965 are reported for the Savannah River above and below the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants down river. These concentrations, measured when four SRP reactors (C, K, L, and P) were operating, were used to estimate Cs-137 reduction ratios for transport in the Savannah River and across each water treatment plant. In 1965 there was a 48% reduction in the Cs-137 concentration in the Savannah River between Highway 301 and the water treatment plant inlet points. Measured Cs-137 values in the finished water from Port Wentworth and the Beaufort-Jasper water treatment plants showed an 80% and 98% reduction in concentration level, respectively, when compared to Cs-137 concentration at Highway 301. The lower Cs-137 concentration (0.04 pCi/l) in the Beaufort-Jasper finished water is attributed to dilution in the canal from inflow of surface water (40%) and sediment cleanup processes that take place in the open portions of the canal (about 17 to 18 miles). Using the 1965 data, maximum Cs-137 concentrations expected in finished water in the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants following L-Reactor startup were recalculated. The recalculated values are 0.01 and 0.09 pCi/l for Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth, respectively, compared to the 1.05 pCi/l value in the Environmental Assessment.

Hayes, D.W.; Boni, A.L.

1983-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

371

Database of radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water, fish, waterfowl, gamebirds, and shellfish downstream of Hanford`s single-pass production reactors, 1960--1970. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from radionuclide emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The time periods of greatest interest to the HEDR study vary depending on the type of environmental media concerned. Concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River media from 1960--1970 provide the best historical data for validation of the Columbia River pathway computer models. This report provides the historical radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water (1960--1970), fish (1960--1967), waterfowl (1960--1970), gamebirds (1967--1970), and shellfish (1960--1970). Because of the large size of the databases (845 pages), this report is being published on diskette. A diskette of this report is available from the Technical Steering Panel (c/o K. CharLee, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, Department of Ecology, Technical Support and Publication Information Section, P.O. Box 47651, Olympia, Washington 98504-7651).

Thiede, M.E.; Duncan, J.P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Simulation of leveling in electrodeposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on a model of current distribution and electrode shape change for electrodeposition in the presence of diffusion-controlled leveling agents that have been developed. The system is treated as a special case of secondary current distribution, with the surface overpotential taken to depend on both the current density and the transport-limited flux of the leveling agent, according to an empirical relation adapted from polarization data measured at different conditions of agitation. The spatial variation of the leveling-agent flux is determined from a concentration field problem based on the assumption of a stagnant diffusion layer. The solution is obtained by the boundary element method, with a flexible moving-boundary algorithm for simulating the advancement of the electrode profile. To illustrate the model's performance, the evolution of a groove profile during deposition of nickel from a Watts-type bath containing coumarin is predicted and compared with measurements reported in the literature.

Dukovic, J.O.; Tobias, C.W. (Materials and Chemical Sciences Div., Lawrence Berkeley Lab. and Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Process for treating waste water having low concentrations of metallic contaminants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating waste water having a low level of metallic contaminants by reducing the toxicity level of metallic contaminants to an acceptable level and subsequently discharging the treated waste water into the environment without removing the treated contaminants.

Looney, Brian B; Millings, Margaret R; Nichols, Ralph L; Payne, William L

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

374

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Title: Development of a Kenaf-Based Biosorptive Water Treatment Process Project Number: B-20 Start surface waters and groundwaters currently undergoing treatment or scheduled for treatment contain organic contain contamination levels requiring treatment. The treatment of these waters pose both technical

375

Water quality management plan for Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management plan provides an assessment of Cherokee Reservoir's current water quality, identifies those factors which affect reservoir water quality, and develops recommendations aimed at restoring or maintaining water quality at levels sufficient to support diverse beneficial uses. 20 references, 8 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Kansas Water Office November 14, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adequate quantities of good quality water to meet future needs. #12;#12;Kansas Reservoir Loss of Capacity 0 that adversely affect the water quality of Kansas lakes and streams. Ensure that water quality conditions are maintained at a level equal to or better than year 2000 conditions. Reduce total nitrogen and phosphorus

377

ANALYIS OF WATER SITUATION IN JHAMBULWADI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geographical Location 4 How to reach 5 Resource Mapping 6 History of wadi 7 PWSS 7 Well analysis 10 Water usage The objective of this project ,undertaken by CATRA ,is to understand the water scenario at a wadi level. Besides exploring the water problems , socio and economic condition of the wadi was also analysed .The

Sohoni, Milind

378

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the northeastern U.S. (Frink 1991). Forested riparian areas are among the best management practices (BMPs in the Chipuxet Basin, studies the water demands in the Chipuxet water basin to determine the feasibility response to low levels of inorganic P, and its production and activityareinhibited by elevated levels

379

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................... 193 Lesson 11 Water and Pollution........................................................................................................................ 195 Activity 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere...! ............................................................................. 205 Record Sheet 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere! ..................................................................... 207 Activity 11.2, Pollution at Its Source...

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Water Privatisation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

Zölls, Elisa

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

382

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can accumulate to harmful levels in drinking water. As radionuclides decay, they emit radioactive parti- cles such as alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Each type of particle produces different effects on humans. Alpha particles... penetrating, alpha particles cause more damage per unit volume than do beta particles or gamma rays. Beta particles and gamma rays deposit their ener- gy over longer distances. Beta particles can be stopped by a piece of wood or a thin sheet of metal...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

383

Arsenic in public water supplies and cardiovascular mortality in Spain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: High-chronic arsenic exposure in drinking water is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. At low-chronic levels, as those present in Spain, evidence is scarce. In this ecological study, we evaluated the association of municipal drinking water arsenic concentrations during the period 1998-2002 with cardiovascular mortality in the population of Spain. Methods: Arsenic concentrations in drinking water were available for 1721 municipalities, covering 24.8 million people. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for cardiovascular (361,750 deaths), coronary (113,000 deaths), and cerebrovascular (103,590 deaths) disease were analyzed for the period 1999-2003. Two-level hierarchical Poisson models were used to evaluate the association of municipal drinking water arsenic concentrations with mortality adjusting for social determinants, cardiovascular risk factors, diet, and water characteristics at municipal or provincial level in 651 municipalities (200,376 cardiovascular deaths) with complete covariate information. Results: Mean municipal drinking water arsenic concentrations ranged from <1 to 118 {mu}g/L. Compared to the overall Spanish population, sex- and age-adjusted mortality rates for cardiovascular (SMR 1.10), coronary (SMR 1.18), and cerebrovascular (SMR 1.04) disease were increased in municipalities with arsenic concentrations in drinking water >10 {mu}g/L. Compared to municipalities with arsenic concentrations <1 {mu}g/L, fully adjusted cardiovascular mortality rates were increased by 2.2% (-0.9% to 5.5%) and 2.6% (-2.0% to 7.5%) in municipalities with arsenic concentrations between 1-10 and>10 {mu}g/L, respectively (P-value for trend 0.032). The corresponding figures were 5.2% (0.8% to 9.8%) and 1.5% (-4.5% to 7.9%) for coronary heart disease mortality, and 0.3% (-4.1% to 4.9%) and 1.7% (-4.9% to 8.8%) for cerebrovascular disease mortality. Conclusions: In this ecological study, elevated low-to-moderate arsenic concentrations in drinking water were associated with increased cardiovascular mortality at the municipal level. Prospective cohort studies with individual measures of arsenic exposure, standardized cardiovascular outcomes, and adequate adjustment for confounders are needed to confirm these ecological findings. Our study, however, reinforces the need to implement arsenic remediation treatments in water supply systems above the World Health Organization safety standard of 10 {mu}g/L.

Medrano, Ma Jose, E-mail: pmedrano@isciii.es [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Boix, Raquel; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Palau, Margarita [Subdireccion General de Sanidad Ambiental y Salud Laboral, Direccion General de Salud Publica y Sanidad Exterior, Ministerio de Sanidad y Politica Social, Madrid (Spain)] [Subdireccion General de Sanidad Ambiental y Salud Laboral, Direccion General de Salud Publica y Sanidad Exterior, Ministerio de Sanidad y Politica Social, Madrid (Spain); Damian, Javier [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Ramis, Rebeca [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain) [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); Barrio, Jose Luis del [Departamento de Salud Publica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (Spain)] [Departamento de Salud Publica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (Spain); Navas-Acien, Ana [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States) [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas-fired Storage Water Heater .. 418 Assess California’s Small Gas Storage Water Heaters Small Gas Storage Water Heater Market The objective of

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Tracer diffusion in compacted, water-saturated bentonite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compacted Na-bentonite clay barriers, widely used in theisolation of solid-waste landfills and other contaminated sites, havebeen proposed for a similar use in the disposal of high-level radioactivewaste. Molecular diffusion through the pore space in these barriers playsa key role in their performance, thus motivating recent measurements ofthe apparent diffusion coefficient tensor of water tracers in compacted,water-saturated Na-bentonites. In the present study, we introduce aconceptual model in which the pore space of water-saturated bentonite isdivided into 'macropore' and 'interlayer nanopore' compartments. Withthis model we determine quantitatively the relative contributions ofpore-network geometry (expressed as a geometric factor) and of thediffusive behavior of water molecules near montmorillonite basal surfaces(expressed as a contristivity factor) to the apparent diffusioncoefficient tensor. Our model predicts, in agreement with experiment,that the mean principal value of the apparent diffusion coefficienttensor follows a single relationship when plotted against the partialmontmorillonite dry density (mass of montmorillonite per combined volumeof montmorillonite and pore space). Using a single fitted parameter, themean principal geometric factor, our model successfully describes thisrelationship for a broad range of bentonite-water system, from dilute gelto highly-compacted bentonite with 80 percent of its pore water ininterlayer nanopores.

Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C.M.

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

387

Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources regulates the use and diversion of surface waters. An entity that creates additional stream volumes by releases from impoundments built and financed by...

388

High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operation. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and neutron radiography were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells under various operating conditions. Variables examined include: sub-freezing conditions, inlet relative humidities, cell temperature, current density and response transients, different flow field orientations and different component materials (membranes, GDLs and MEAs). Quantification of the water within the membrane was made by neutron radiography after equilibration to different humidified gases, during fuel cell operation and in hydrogen pump mode. The water content was evaluated in bare Nafion{reg_sign} membranes as well as in MEAs operated in both fuel cell and H{sub 2} pump mode. These in situ imaging results allow measurement of the water content and gradients in the PEFC membrane and relate the membrane water transport characteristics to the fuel cell operation and performance under disparate materials and operational combinations. Flow geometry makes a large impact on MEA water content. Higher membrane water with counter flow was measured compared with co-flow for sub-saturated inlet RH's. This correlates to lower HFR and higher performance compared with co-flow. Higher anode stoichiometry helps remove water which accumulates in the anode channels and GDL material. Cell orientation was measured to affect both the water content and cell performance. While membrane water content was measured to be similar regardless of orientation, cells with the cathode on top show flooding and loss of performance compared with similarly operated cells with the anode on top. Transient fuel cell current measurements show a large degree of hysteresis in terms of membrane hydration as measured by HFR. Current step transients from 0.01 A cm{sup -2} to 0.68 A cm{sup -2} consistently show PEM wetting occurring within 5 to 20 sec. Whereas the PEM drying response to the reverse step transient of 0.68 A cm{sup -2} to 0.01 A cm{sup -2}, takes several minutes. The observed faster wetting response is due to reaction water being produced in the cathode and back diffusing into the membrane. The slower PEM drying is due to the water slowly being removed out of the wetted GDLs. This rate of removal of water and hence the PEM hydration level was found to be influenced strongly by the PTFE loadings in the GDL substrate and Microporous layer (MPL). The drying of the membrane is influenced by both the anode and cathode GDL PTFE loadings. Lower PTFE loading in the anode GDL leads to better membrane hydration probably due to the easier incorporation of water from the anode GDL into the membrane. Similarly a lower PTFE loading in the cathode GDL also results in better membrane hydration probably due to the better water retention properties (less hydrophobic) of this GDL. Fuel cells operated isothermal at sub-freezing temperatures show gradual cell performance decay over time and eventually drops to zero. AC impedance analysis indicates that losses are initially due to increasing charge transfer resistance. After time, the rate of decay accelerates rapidly due to mass transport limitations. High frequency resistance also increases over time and is a function of the initial membrane water content. These results indicate that catalyst layer ice formation is influenced strongly by the MEA and is responsible for the long-term degradation of fuel cells operated at sub-freezing temperatures. Water distribution measurements indicate that ice may be fonning mainly in the GDLs at -10 C but are concentrated in the catalyst layer at -20 C.

Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fairweather, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs) · Audience: homeowners Outcome 4: Increase water reuse and recycling programs · Example program: Water harvesting ­ rain barrels and cisterns · Audience: home owners #12;: Water conservation. Conserve Florida's finite water resources by teaching rural, suburban and urban

Kane, Andrew S.

390

Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

391

Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Environmental Radioactivity Measurements in Harran Plain of Sanliurfa, Turkey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study aims to assess the environmental radioactivity levels of Harran Plain located within the boundaries of the south-eastern province of Sanliurfa, Turkey. In addition to being at the center of Turkey's major irrigation and development project (South Eastern Anatolian Project, GAP), this 1500 km2 region is famous for its historic attractions. The outdoor gamma dose rates were measured at selected points of the study area using a plastic scintillator. The activity concentrations in the soil samples collected from the study area were determined by gamma spectrometry for the natural radionuclides 238U, 232Th and 40K and the fission product 137Cs. The gross alpha and beta activities in the water samples collected from the region was measured using a low-level gamma spectrometry device. A comparison of the measurement results obtained in this study with those of national and world averages are presented in graphical and tabular forms.

Bozkurt, A.; Yorulmaz, N. [Harran University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Osmanbey Campus, 63300, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Kam, E. [TAEK, Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre, Altinsehir Yolu 5. km, Halkali, 34303 Istanbul (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

MANDATORY MEASURES DAYLIGHTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANDATORY MEASURES DAYLIGHTING Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1(d) #12;SECTION 4 Daylighting daylighting controls. · Lighting in daylit zones should have multi-level steps, per Table 130.1-A · Light levels provided at night should be available at all other times · When sufficient daylight is available

California at Davis, University of

394

MANDATORY MEASURES DAYLIGHTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANDATORY MEASURES DAYLIGHTING Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1(d) #12;SECTION 5 Daylighting daylighting controls. · Lighting in daylit zones should have multi-level steps, per Table 130.1-A · Light levels provided at night should be available at all other times · When sufficient daylight is available

California at Davis, University of

395

Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in water heater. Scale buildup in pipes and re duced water flow. Hard water due to calcium and magnesiumHousehold Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension Many areas have water containing impurities from natural or artificial sources. These impurities may

Liskiewicz, Maciej

396

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Perchlorate in Drinking Water During Pregnancy and Neonatal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Perchlorate in Drinking Water During Pregnancy and Neonatal Thyroid Hormone Levels associations between maternal drinking water per- chlorate exposure during pregnancy and newborn thyroid in the United States may have been drinking water with perchlorate concentrations greater than 4 g/L,4 a level

California at Berkeley, University of

397

Grabbing water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

398

Assessment of Seawater Intrusion Potential From Sea-level Rise in Coastal Aquifers of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009). Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Sea Water Intrusion inC. (1997). Global Sea Level Rise: A Redetermination. Surveys2007). Effects of sea-level rise on groundwater flow in a

Loáiciga, Hugo A; Pingel, Thomas J; Garcia, Elizabeth S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS OF RADIOXENON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive xenon (radioxenon) is produced by the fissioning of nuclear material, either via neutron-induced or spontaneous fission, and also via neutron activation of xenon gas and other reactions. The most abundant xenon isotopes in the atmosphere are 131mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe, having been measured at several locations in the northern hemisphere associated with reactor operation, medical isotope production, and more recently associated with the spontaneous fission of 240Pu from the legacy materials at plutonium production facility in Hanford, Washington. Radioactive xenon measurement at levels near the average atmospheric level (1-10 mBq/m3) is a “specialty” measurement, requiring specialized collection, separation, and nuclear measurement techniques. This paper describes the political and scientific drivers for making radioxenon measurements, background sources, and current techniques for these measurements.

Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.

2007-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report and its accompanying Microsoft Excel workbooksummarize water data we found to support efforts of the EnvironmentalProtection Agency s WaterSense program. WaterSense aims to extend theoperating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities and prolongthe availability of water resourcesby reducing residential andcommercial water consumption through the voluntary replacement ofinefficient water-using products with more efficient ones. WaterSense hasan immediate need for water consumption data categorized by sector and,for the residential sector, per capita data available by region. Thisinformation will assist policy makers, water and wastewater utilityplanners, and others in defining and refining program possibilities.Future data needs concern water supply, wastewater flow volumes, waterquality, and watersheds. This report focuses primarily on the immediateneed for data regarding water consumption and product end-use. We found avariety of data on water consumption at the national, state, andmunicipal levels. We also found several databases related towater-consuming products. Most of the data are available in electronicform on the Web pages of the data-collecting organizations. In addition,we found national, state, and local data on water supply, wastewater,water quality, and watersheds.

Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Higher levels of the transmon qubit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis discusses recent experimental work in measuring the properties of higher levels in transmon qubit systems. The first part includes a thorough overview of transmon devices, explaining the principles of the device ...

Bader, Samuel James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

DHV water pumping optimization Simon van Mourik1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 6 DHV water pumping optimization Simon van Mourik1 Joris Bierkens2 Hans Stigter1 Martijn for optimizing a drinking water network over a horizon of 48 hours, given variable water demands, energy prices and constraints on the pumping strategy and water levels in the reservoirs. Both the dynamic model and goal

Rottschäfer, Vivi

403

Impact Of Standing Bleed Water On Saltstone Placement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of water present during placement and subsequent curing of saltstone has the potential to impact several properties important for grout quality. An active drain water system can remove residual standing water and expose the surface of the placed saltstone to air. Oxidation of the saltstone may result in an increase in the leachability of redox sensitive elements. A dry surface can lead to cracking, causing an increase in hydraulic conductivity. An inactive drain water system can allow standing water that generates unnecessary hydrostatic head on the vault walls. Standing water that cannot be removed via the drain system will be available for potential incorporation into subsequent grout placements. The objective of this work is to study the impact of standing water on grout quality pertaining to disposal units. A series of saltstone mixes were prepared, and cured at ambient temperature to evaluate the impact of standing water on saltstone placement. The samples were managed to control drying effects on leachability by either exposing or capping the samples. The water to premix ratio was varied to represent a range of processing conditions. Samples were analyzed for density, leachability, and hydraulic conductivity. A monolith of each composition was cut into four sections to analyze the homogeneity of the sample with respect to vertical position within the sample. The density of each section was measured by two methods, helium pycnometry and by ASTM 642-06. The results show a trend of increasing density with increasing depth in the samples. This effect is more pronounced with the inclusion of excess bleed water and indicative of increased settling. The leachability of the eight different samples was analyzed by ANS/ANSI 16.1 method. These results indicate that drying of the saltstone during curing leads to decreased Leachability Indices (indicative of more release) for potassium, sodium, rhenium, nitrite, and nitrate. This may be caused by shrinkage cracking in the samples creating additional pathways for contaminant release. There was no noticeable effect on leachability by changing the water to premix ratio or by including excess bleed water. There was no detectable chromium release in any of the samples. Chromium and rhenium were added in equal amounts to determine whether rhenium might be an acceptable surrogate for chromium, a hazardous material. This testing shows no correlation between the behavior of the two elements, as chromium is not released at detectable levels and rhenium is released at a comparable rate to nitrate, the most prevalent and mobile species in saltstone.

Cozzi, A. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

404

41On the Water Front I Dr. Peter H. Gleick and Ms. Meena Palaniappan Palaniappan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water, peak renew- able water, peak non-renewable water, fresh water resources, climate change Purpose and local water challenges. Three different definitions are pro- vided: `peak renewable,' `peak non-renewable non-renewable water use to more sustainable levels and by restoring aquatic ecosystems as a way

405

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, A.P.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health). Water Safety Plans A Water Safety Plan (WSP) is a preventive management approach used to manage threats to a drinking water system--from catchment to consumer. It helps in the · Management of activities

409

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water Supply and Demand Jim Schneider, Ph · How Nebraska manages water · Dealing with uncertain water supplies: adaptive management #12;Regional-wide, systematic approach · Flexible--Adaptive Management Adaptive Manageme nt #12;Integrated Water Management

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

410

Geohydrology and ground-water geochemistry at a sub-Arctic Landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska. Water resources investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water-supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperatures, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of ground-water flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water-supply wells.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

CARD No. 53 Consideration of Underground Sources of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exposure of individuals and the possible levels of radioactive contamination of ground water due resulting from exposure to radioactive contaminants in underground sources of drinking water (USDWs.34, which implement the general containment requirements of the radioactive waste disposal regulations

412

The Current Water and Agriculture Context, Challenges, and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surveys the current policy environment for addressing water and agricultural issues in a changing climate, which is shaped by economic development plans at the national and provincial levels, sector plans for water and ...

Yu, Winston

413

Does water dope carbon nanotubes?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate the long-range perturbation to the electronic charge density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a result of the physisorption of a water molecule. We find that the dominant effect is a charge redistribution in the CNT due to polarisation caused by the dipole moment of the water molecule. The charge redistribution is found to occur over a length-scale greater than 30 Å, highlighting the need for large-scale simulations. By comparing our fully first-principles calculations to ones in which the perturbation due to a water molecule is treated using a classical electrostatic model, we estimate that the charge transfer between CNT and water is negligible (no more than 10{sup ?4}?e per water molecule). We therefore conclude that water does not significantly dope CNTs, a conclusion that is consistent with the poor alignment of the relevant energy levels of the water molecule and CNT. Previous calculations that suggest water n-dopes CNTs are likely due to the misinterpretation of Mulliken charge partitioning in small supercells.

Bell, Robert A.; Payne, Michael C. [Theory of Condensed Matter Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mostofi, Arash A. [Department of Materials and Department of Physics, and the Thomas Young Centre for Theory and Simulation of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

414

Hydration water dynamics and instigation of protein structuralrelaxation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until a critical hydration level is reached, proteins do not function. This critical level of hydration is analogous to a similar lack of protein function observed for temperatures below a dynamical temperature range of 180-220K that also is connected to the dynamics of protein surface water. Restoration of some enzymatic activity is observed in partially hydrated protein powders, sometimes corresponding to less than a single hydration layer on the protein surface, which indicates that the dynamical and structural properties of the surface water is intimately connected to protein stability and function. Many elegant studies using both experiment and simulation have contributed important information about protein hydration structure and timescales. The molecular mechanism of the solvent motion that is required to instigate the protein structural relaxation above a critical hydration level or transition temperature has yet to be determined. In this work we use experimental quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate hydration water dynamics near a greatly simplified protein system. We consider the hydration water dynamics near the completely deuterated N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA) solute, a hydrophobic amino acid side chain attached to a polar blocked polypeptide backbone, as a function of concentration between 0.5M-2.0M under ambient conditions. We note that roughly 50-60% of a folded protein's surface is equally distributed between hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains, domains whose lengths are on the order of a few water diameters, that justify our study of hydration dynamics of this simple model protein system. The QENS experiment was performed at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the disk chopper time of flight spectrometer (DCS). In order to separate the translational and rotational components in the spectra, two sets of experiments were carried out using different incident neutron wavelengths of 7.5{angstrom} and 5.5{angstrom} to give two different time resolutions. All the spectra have been measure at room temperature. The spectra were corrected for the sample holder contribution and normalized using the vanadium standard. The resulting data were analyzed with DAVE programs (http://www.ncnr.nist.gov/dave/). The AMBER force field and SPCE water model were used for modeling the NALMA solute and water, respectively. For the analysis of the water dynamics in the NALMA aqueous solutions, we performed simulations of a dispersed solute configuration consistent with our previous structural analysis, where we had primarily focused on the structural organization of these peptide solutions and their connection to protein folding. Further details of the QENS experiment and molecular dynamics simulations are reported elsewhere.

Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

2 Risk perceptions of arsenic in tap water and consumption 3 of bottled water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's sales, with nearly 10% growth in per capita consump- 27 tion between 1999 and 2005 and the share2 Risk perceptions of arsenic in tap water and consumption 3 of bottled water 4 Paul M. Jakus,1 W studies on bottled water consumption have used simple scale measures of 11 perceived risk that do

Shaw, W. Douglass

416

Regional water planning Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ irrigation: generally subsidized by state ­ poor households generally subsidized within community #12;CaseRegional water planning Milind Sohoni Pooja Prasad CTARA IIT Bombay #12;Need for planning · Rising Annual Gross Utilisation : 134.26 Mcft. 166.08 Mcft. 12 Top of Dam Level : 103.00 m. 134.00 m. 13 H

Sohoni, Milind

417

Water Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water...

418

Protected Water Sources (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter designates protected water sources, which are subject to additional special conditions regarding water use. Permit applications for water withdrawals from these sources may still be...

419

Storm Water Analytical Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL...

420

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2013 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

422

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

423

Efficient Water Use & Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goals Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL....

424

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition InformationInteractionsWater

425

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtectiveWaste to beswim WatchingWaterW

426

INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The systematic tests of the gasifier simulator were conducted in this reporting period. In the systematic test, two (2) factors were considered as the experimental parameters, including air injection rate and water injection rate. Each experimental factor had two (2) levels, respectively. A special water-feeding device was designed and installed to the gasifier simulator. Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was applied to the results of the systematic tests. The ANOVA shows that the air injection rate did have the significant impact to the temperature measurement in the gasifier simulator. The ANOVA also shows that the water injection rate did not have the significant impact to the temperature measurements in the gasifier simulator. The ANOVA analysis also proves that the thermocouple assembly we proposed was immune to the moisture environment, the temperature measurement remained accurate in moisture environment. Within this reporting period, the vibration application for cleaning purpose was explored. Both ultrasonic and sub-sonic vibrations were considered. A feasibility test was conducted to prove that the thermocouple vibration did not have the significant impact to the temperature measurements in the gasifier simulator. This feasibility test was a 2{sup 2} factorial design. Two factors including temperature levels and motor speeds were set to two levels respectively. The sub-sonic vibration tests were applied to the thermocouple to remove the concrete cover layer (used to simulate the solid condensate in gasifiers) on the thermocouple tip. It was found that both frequency and amplitude had significant impacts on removal performance of the concrete cover layer.

Seong W. Lee

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Wireless remote liquid level detector and indicator for well testing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An acoustic system is provided for measuring the fluid level in oil, gas or water wells under pressure conditions that does not require an electrical link to the surface for level detection. A battery powered sound transmitter is integrated with a liquid sensor in the form of a conductivity probe, enclosed in a sealed housing which is lowered into a well by means of a wire line reel assembly. The sound transmitter generates an intense identifiable acoustic emission when the sensor contacts liquid in the well. The acoustic emissions propagate up the well which functions as a waveguide and are detected by an acoustic transducer. The output signal from the transducer is filtered to provide noise rejection outside of the acoustic signal spectrum. The filtered signal is used to indicate to an operator the liquid level in the well has been reached and the depth is read from a footage counter coupled with the wire line reel assembly at the instant the sound signal is received.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Evans, Donald M. (Point Marion, PA); Ernest, John H. (Morgantown, WV)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

Liu, Guosheng

429

Elevated levels of plasma Big endothelin-1 and its relation to hypertension and skin lesions in individuals exposed to arsenic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic arsenic (As) exposure affects the endothelial system causing several diseases. Big endothelin-1 (Big ET-1), the biological precursor of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a more accurate indicator of the degree of activation of the endothelial system. Effect of As exposure on the plasma Big ET-1 levels and its physiological implications have not yet been documented. We evaluated plasma Big ET-1 levels and their relation to hypertension and skin lesions in As exposed individuals in Bangladesh. A total of 304 study subjects from the As-endemic and non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited for this study. As concentrations in water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The plasma Big ET-1 levels were measured using a one-step sandwich enzyme immunoassay kit. Significant increase in Big ET-1 levels were observed with the increasing concentrations of As in drinking water, hair and nails. Further, before and after adjusting with different covariates, plasma Big ET-1 levels were found to be significantly associated with the water, hair and nail As concentrations of the study subjects. Big ET-1 levels were also higher in the higher exposure groups compared to the lowest (reference) group. Interestingly, we observed that Big ET-1 levels were significantly higher in the hypertensive and skin lesion groups compared to the normotensive and without skin lesion counterpart, respectively of the study subjects in As-endemic areas. Thus, this study demonstrated a novel dose–response relationship between As exposure and plasma Big ET-1 levels indicating the possible involvement of plasma Big ET-1 levels in As-induced hypertension and skin lesions. -- Highlights: ? Plasma Big ET-1 is an indicator of endothelial damage. ? Plasma Big ET-1 level increases dose-dependently in arsenic exposed individuals. ? Study subjects in arsenic-endemic areas with hypertension have elevated Big ET-1 levels. ? Study subjects with arsenic-induced skin lesions show elevated plasma Big ET-1 levels. ? Arsenic-induced hypertension and skin lesions may be linked to plasma Big ET-1 levels.

Hossain, Ekhtear; Islam, Khairul; Yeasmin, Fouzia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Karim, Md. Rezaul [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mashiur; Agarwal, Smita; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Aziz, Abdul; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Sheikh, Afzal; Haque, Abedul; Hossain, M. Tofazzal [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh); Hossain, Mostaque [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh)] [Department of Medicine, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), Dhaka (Bangladesh); Haris, Parvez I. [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)] [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Ikemura, Noriaki; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770–8514 (Japan); Hossain, Khaled, E-mail: khossain69@yahoo.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi-6205 (Bangladesh)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

Surface Water Monitoring and Assessment (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This law establishes criteria for three levels of credible data for a surface water quality monitoring and assessment program and establishes the necessary training and experience for persons to...

432

Characterizing Water Risks and Solutions Cross-Culturally: Results from the Global Ethnohydrology Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) & quantity (lack of water ) · Solutions: individual behaviors, collective technologies & policies How doCharacterizing Water Risks and Solutions Cross-Culturally: Results from the Global Ethnohydrology State University Four Study Sites Classified by Water Scarcity & Development Levels Background

Hall, Sharon J.

433

The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

Zusman, Eric

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Hopi and the Black Mesa: An Argument for Protection of Sacred Water Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerous studies have documented the dropping water levels in Hopi sacred springs. From 1966 to 2005, Peabody Coal Mining Company has continually used the water located directly under the Hopi reservation. The use of water for religious and cultural...

Grimes, Tamisha

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

435

Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin: Statewide project data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Ohio each water year. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, 95 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and content records for 5 streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality for 40 streamflow-gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and (4) water levels for 431 observation wells.

Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ISEMP program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the spring 2008, PNW redeployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. This resumed previous data collection that was interrupted by river ice in early December 2007. Instruments were again removed from the river in early December 2008. This annual report covers the period from December 2007 through December 2008. The highest pH values occurred during the low-flow period from midsummer through the following midspring then dropped sharply during the annual snowmelt runoff period from late spring through early summer. Water temperature began rapidly increasing during the receding limb of the annual snowmelt hydrograph. Highest mean monthly temperatures occurred in July and August, while instantaneous maxima occurred during the period July-September. Dissolved oxygen reached its lowest levels during the period of highest water temperature in July-September. Specific conductivity remained very low at all sites throughout the year.

Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy [PNW Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Wenatchee, WA

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

STATE OF CALIFORNIA MANDATORY MEASURES SUMMARY: RESIDENTIAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System Measures: §110-§113: HVAC equipment, water heaters, showerheads, faucets and all other regulated): Mandatory Vapor barrier installed in Climate Zones 14 or 16. §150(l): Water absorption rate for slab edge insulation material alone without facings is no greater than 0.3%; water vapor permeance rate is no greater

438

Alternatives for reducing hot-water bills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two stage approach to reducing residential water heating bills is described. In Stage I, simple conservation measures were included to reduce the daily hot water energy consumption and the energy losses from the water tank. Once these savings are achieved, Stage II considers more costly options for further reducing the water heating bill. Four alternatives are considered in Stage II: gas water heaters; solar water heaters (two types); heat pump water heaters; and heat recovery from a heat pump or air conditioner. To account for variations within the MASEC region, information on water heating in Rapid City, Minneapolis, Chicago, Detroit, and Kansas City is presented in detail. Information on geography, major population centers, fuel prices, climate, and state solar incentives is covered. (MCW)

Bennington, G.E.; Spewak, P.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dissemination, and technology/knowledge transfer programs at the state, national, and international levels technology support staff. The Advisory Board includes representatives from major state and federal water, and (ii) other national and international funding agencies and organizations supporting research in water

440

Conductivity as applied to water analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the "Dionio Water Tester11. 1. Detection of condenser leaks. 2. Measurement of the priming of boilers. 3. Estimation of the hardness of water. 6. 4. Softening water. 5. Detection of sewage pollution. 6. Test of sewage effluent. 7. Estimation... of the purity of distilled water. 8. Checking the purity of a water supply. In most cases, conductivity is a very satisfactory means of detecting condenser leaks and may also he used in estimating the extent of the leakage. The conductivity of a sample...

Godfrey, Truman M.

1913-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

442

ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

Cadeddu, Maria

443

Water watch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Forestry and Water -An Update on Water Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and water quality objectives Comparison of cost effectiveness of different groundwater protection measures, cumecs Case Impact of Crims on flood risk #12;17/11/1110 Timber `minibunds' may be a more cost-effective Turbidity(NTU) Lower Halladale Middle Halladale Bealach Burn Upper Halladale Allt a Bhealaich BBLFperiods

445

Water Resources Policy & Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

Buehrer, R. Michael

446

Water Sustainability Program Challenges to Sustainable Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Drought, Climate Change · Growth and the need for additional supplies · Water and Energy · Water the Southwest, nation, semi-arid and arid regions, and the world. · Today's program provides just a glimpse to and utilization of renewable supplies · Transboundary water issues · The surface water/groundwater interface

Cushing, Jim. M.

447

Water Footprint | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Footprint Blue water represents water withdrawn from surface water and groundwater for feedstock irrigation and refinery processing. Blue water represents water withdrawn from...

448

Engaging Irrigation Organizations in Water Reallocation Ronald C. Griffin*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conservation measures, but the status of agriculture as an energy user, food supplier, and bioenergy supplier in water markets, efficiency in urban use is achievable by scarcity-inclusive water rates and new

Griffin, Ronald

449

FINAL REPORT FOR TRITIUM WATER MONITOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Plant Directed Research and Demonstration (PDRD) task was to develop a system to safetly analyze tritium in moisture collected from glovebox atmospheres in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facility. In order to minimize potential radiation exposures that could occur in handling and diluting high-tritium-content water, SRS sought alternatives to liquid-scintillation counting. The proposed system determines tritium concentrations by measuring Bremsstrahlung radiation induced by low-energy beta interactions in liquid samples. Results show that, after a short counting period (30 seconds), detection limits are three orders of magnitude below the described concentration of tritiated water in the zeolite beds. Additionally, this report covers the analysis of process samples and the investigation of several cell window materials including beryllium, aluminum, and copper. Final tests reveal that alternate window materials and thicknesses can be used to obtain useful results. In particular, a window of stainless steel of moderate thickness (0.3 cm) can be used for counting relatively high levels of tritium.

Sigg, R.; Ferguson, B.; DiPrete, D.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

450

Orifice flow measurement uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer program is now available from Union Carbide that evaluates the total flow uncertainty of orifice flowmeter systems. Tolerance values for every component in the system and the sensitivity of the measured flowrate to each component can be established using historical data and published hardware specifications. Knowing the tolerance and sensitivity values, a total measurement uncertainty can be estimated with a 95% confidence level. This computer program provides a powerful design tool to ensure correct component matching and total metering system optimization.

Samples, C.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

In vivo blood oxygenation level measurements using photoacoustic microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density and PA signal generated. Rewriting the above equation in terms of the inverted quantities: HbHbO HbO CC C SO + = 2 2 2 ; HbHbOHbT CCC += 2 ; HbTHbO CSOC ×= 2 2 ; HbTHb CSOC ×?= )1( 2 ))1(( ,2,2 2 iii HbHbTHbOHbT CSOCSOKPA ??? ??...

Sivaramakrishnan, Mathangi

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

452

Measuring Residential Segregation in Urban Mexico: Levels and Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tlaxcala; the south, Campeche, Chiapas, Guerrero, Oaxaca,Tlaxcala; the south, Campeche, Chiapas, Guerrero, Oaxaca,Tlaxcala; the south, Campeche, Chiapas, Guerrero, Oaxaca,

Monkkonen, Paavo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

EM Corporate Performance Measures - Site Office Level | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOEDisabilityContractors for Capital Asset

454

Improved freezing level retrieval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRMM Microwave Imager(TMI)-based passive microwave retrieval techniques result in biased estimates of the freezing level and rainfall over the east Pacific in the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Passive microwave rainfall estimates...

Hong, Sungwook

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Clemson University Water System Clemson, SC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental the results of our water-quality analyses. Every regulated contaminant that was detected in the water, even of such contamination, footnotes explaining our findings, and a key to units of measurement. Definitions of MCL and MCLG

Duchowski, Andrew T.

456

Fant's Grove Water System Clemson, SC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control have strict the results of our water-quality analyses. Every regulated contaminant that was detected in the water, even of such contamination, footnotes explaining our findings, and a key to units of measurement. Definitions of MCL and MCLG

Duchowski, Andrew T.

457

Modeling Integrated Decisions for a Municipal Water System with Recourse and Uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a municipal water system to cost-effectively accommodate a distribution of water shortages. Alternative robust in action costs, life spans, water volumes gained or saved, shortage levels, and shortage probabilities make water shortages pressing or impending realities for Amman, Jordan and many other urban water

Pasternack, Gregory B.

458

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have been caused to a lack of water; rather it is believedconsider how, given a lack of clear water management goals,incomplete due to a lack of surface water measurements. Not

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Arsenic exposure from drinking water and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Bangladesh: prospective cohort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH Arsenic exposure from drinking water and mortality from cardiovascular disease the association. Design Prospective cohort study with arsenic exposure measured in drinking water from wells was 214.3 per 100 000 person years in people drinking water containing

van Geen, Alexander

460

Geo-Measurements with Metallic TDR Cable Technology for Infrastructure Surveillance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements: soil moisture, subgrade water content and density, piezometric water pressure, leaking liquids or soil: bridge abutments, landslides, scour, coal mine subsidence, and sink hole formation. Now TDR

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water level measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14 Water Pollution #12;Factory-style hog farms in North Carolina Each pig produces, September 1999. #12;Hogs killed by flooding #12; Water pollution Common water pollutants Treating water pollution Wastewater treatment and renovation Learning Objectives #12; Water pollution refers

Soerens, Thomas

463

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

464

Grains, Water Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grains, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near the Shore Surf Induced Sand Dynamics Discussion Dry Granular Flows, Water Waves & Surf, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

465

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

466

Apparatus and process for water treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed utilizing permeable treatment media for treatment of contaminated water, along with a method for enhanced passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media. The apparatus includes a treatment cell including a permeable structure that encloses the treatment media, the treatment cell may be located inside a water collection well, exterior to a water collection well, or placed in situ within the pathway of contaminated groundwater. The passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media is maintained by a hydraulic connection between a collecting point of greater water pressure head, and a discharge point of lower water pressure head. The apparatus and process for passive flow and groundwater treatment utilizes a permeable treatment media made up of granular metal, bimetallics, granular cast iron, activated carbon, cation exchange resins, and/or additional treatment materials. An enclosing container may have an outer permeable wall for passive flow of water into the container and through the enclosed treatment media to an effluent point. Flow of contaminated water is attained without active pumping of water through the treatment media. Remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and other water contaminants to acceptable regulatory concentration levels is accomplished without the costs of pumping, pump maintenance, and constant oversight by personnel.

Phifer, Mark A. (North Augusta, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Ultrasonic liquid level detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

468

Optimal arrangement of structural and functional parts in a flat plate integrated collector storage solar water heater (ICSSWH)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameters that affect the efficiency of a flat plate integrated collector storage solar water heater (ICSSWH) are examined experimentally and numerically. This specific ICSSWH contains water that is not refreshed. The service water is heated indirectly through an immersed heat exchanger (HE) in contact with the front and back major surfaces. A forced convection mechanism consisting of a pump that brings the storage water into motion by recirculation is used for heat transfer intensification. The two major (front and back) flat plate surfaces need to be well interconnected so that they are not deformed by the weight of the contained water and the exerted high-pressure. Two main factors that influence the performance are optimized: the position and size of the recirculation ports and the arrangement and size of the interconnecting fins. Both factors are explored to maximize the velocity flow field of the recirculated storage water. Consequently, the heat transfer rate between the two water circuits is maintained at high levels. Various 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are developed using the FLUENT package. An experimental model, made by Plexiglas, is used for the visualization of the flow field. Flow velocities are measured using a laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) system. The optimal arrangement increases the mean storage water velocity by 65% and raises the outlet temperatures up to 8 C. (author)

Gertzos, K.P.; Caouris, Y.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics, University of Patras, 265 00 Patras (Greece)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

ENRAF gauge reference level calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the method for calculating reference levels for Enraf Series 854 Level Detectors as installed in the tank farms. The reference level calculation for each installed level gauge is contained herein.

Huber, J.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

470

An Improved Stochastic Optimization Model for Water Supply ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conservation of energy and water resources so that they are available for ..... activated during the planning period may be used as an alternative measure to ...

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

471

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Focus Category #2 Water Quality Focus Category #3 Treatment Lead Institution University of Kansas reservoirs, as well as the effectiveness of drinking water treatment processes when extremely high levels managers of water supply reservoirs, treatment plant superintendents, and others to control geosmin

472

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Drought Management of Western Water Resources l River-Basin Level Nonpoint Source Pollution Control l Management l Impacts of Air Pollution on Recharge and Quality of Surface Water and Ground Water Supplies l, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington State and Wyoming. Twenty

474

From: "Cheryl Beecroft" Subject: Drinking Water Results-ITB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From: "Cheryl Beecroft" Subject: Drinking Water Results-ITB