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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

2

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

3

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

4

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

5

Water chemistry of the system for cooling the electrical generator’ stator of the power unit at a thermal power station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from studies of the water chemistry used in the system for cooling the stator windings of alternators used in supercritical-pressure power units are presented, and a solution is ... suggested using which ...

B. M. Larin; A. B. Larin; A. N. Korotkov; M. Yu. Oparin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

7

Next Generation Rooftop Unit | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Generation Rooftop Unit A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit:...

8

Experience of using the turbine-generator units of the Kolyma hydroelectric station for idle discharge of water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. Before the start of reservoir drawdown it is necessary to clean the trash racks and water surface in front of...

B. N. Yurkevich; A. Ya. Afonin; S. G. Kukarskii; I. N. Lukin

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Constrained water cloud generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fast generation of large cloudy volumes with imposed cloud cover fractions and ambient vertical profiles is very important for the realistic simulation of atmospheric scenes. The model proposed here is the second step of a two-step model composed on the one hand of a volume generator based on a Fourier filtering method and on the other hand of a physical generator filling the volume with physical parameters. After a description of the general generation scheme, this paper focuses on the simulation of vertical profiles of water content (liquid, vapour) coupled with other state parameters (temperature, pressure, vertical velocity) via thermodynamic and hydrodynamic equations by local forcing of ambient conditions. The method for solving these equations is explained and applied to practical cases. First, by assuming that the actual temperature at the cloud base is equal to the dew temperature and by imposing a moist pseudo-adiabatic temperature gradient between the cloud top and bottom, the temperature profile in the cloud is found. When conditional instability occurs, the initial temperature profile between the ground and the cloud base is iteratively shifted to lower values until absolute stability is reached. Then the liquid water content is calculated by integrating the equation of water conservation, and the water vapour content by assuming that the cloud is everywhere saturated. Eventually, the vertical velocity is estimated by integration of the momentum equation. This method gives results in good agreement with published measurements, analytical and numerical models. Eventually, further developments of the column model, including the effects of phase transitions, turbulence, horizontal motions and mixing with the surrounding medium, are proposed in the concluding section.

Roland P.H. Berton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Next Generation Rooftop Unit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research in a next generation rooftop unit (RTU). More than half of U.S. commercial building space is cooled by packaged heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. Existing rooftop HVAC units consume more than 1.3% of the United States' annual energy usage annually. Project Description This project seeks to evaluate optimal design strategies for significantly improving the efficiency of rooftop units. The primary market for this project is commercial buildings, such as supermarkets and hotels. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National

11

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Water Management Power Plant Water Management The availability of clean and reliable sources of water is a critical issue across the United States and throughout the world. Under the Innovations for Existing Plants Program (IEP), the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has pursued an integrated water-energy R&D program that addresses water management issues relative to coal-based power generation. This initiative intended to clarify the link between energy and water, deepen the understanding of this link and its implications, and integrate current water-related R&D activities into a national water-energy R&D program. Please click on each research area for additional information. Non-Traditional Sources of Process and Cooling Water Non-Traditional Sources of Process and Cooling Water

12

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

13

Ground water contamination in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...volume of ground water in storage exceeds the vol-ume...geo-thermal water; intruded seawater; water affected by evapotranspiration...pressure and the volume in storage may fluctuate according...Estimates of ground water in storage in the United States...communities have over-pumped their freshwater aquifers...

VI Pye; R Patrick

1983-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

14

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States Analysis of Water Rate Escalations Across the United States Report describes an analysis of water rate escalations...

15

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - 2013 Peer Review | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

emrgtech11shen040313.pdf More Documents & Publications A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Next Generation Rooftop Unit...

16

Simulation of a generator for a wind-power unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of excitation systems of generators for wind-power units is carried out, a software package for generator simulation is presented, and the sequence of the...

I. M. Kirpichnikova; A. S. Mart’yanov; E. V. Solomin

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Water generator replaces bottled water in nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WaterPure International Incorporated of Doylestown, Pennsylvania, USA, has announced that it has placed its atmospheric water generator (AWG) inside a selected nuclear power plant.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water Washington, D. C. 20460 United States) OF THE CLEAN WATER ACT I. PURPOSE AND SCOPE. The United States Department of the Army (Army) and the United they determine the geographic jurisdictional scope of waters of the United States for purposes of section 404

US Army Corps of Engineers

19

Property:NbrGeneratingUnits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NbrGeneratingUnits NbrGeneratingUnits Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NbrGeneratingUnits Property Type Number Description Number of Generating Units. Pages using the property "NbrGeneratingUnits" Showing 12 pages using this property. B BLM Geothermal Facility + 3 + Blundell 1 Geothermal Facility + 1 + Blundell 2 Geothermal Facility + 1 + E ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility + 2 + F Faulkner I Energy Generation Facility + 6 + N Navy I Geothermal Facility + 3 + Navy II Geothermal Facility + 3 + Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant + 3 + North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant + 5 + P Puna Geothermal Facility + 10 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 1 + Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center + 1 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:NbrGeneratingUnits&oldid=400184#SMWResults"

20

Legal Definition of "Traditional Navigable Waters" Waters that Qualify as Waters of the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) "Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Following the U.S. Supreme.F.R. § 230.3(s)(1). The guidance also states that, for purposes of the guidance, these "(a)(1) waters" are the "traditional navigable waters." These (a)(1) waters include all of the "navigable waters of the United States

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Study of the UEO-50-4/12. 5 electrodialysis unit for use in providing coolant water for hydraulic turbine generators  

SciTech Connect

Methods for obtaining water suitable for cooling hydraulic turbines in hydroelectric power plants are discussed. These methods are ionite desalination and electrodialysis. The desalination method was found to be unsatisfactory but the electrodialysis method was largely free of the disadvantages of the desalination method. The performance of the electrodialysis method is discussed.

Vysotskii, S.P.; Parykin, V.S.; Vlasova, S.A.; Keshelava, V.G.; Khodorchenko, Z.G.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7" 7" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

23

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

24

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9" 9" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

25

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6" 6" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

26

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10" 10" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

27

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8" 8" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

28

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

29

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5" 5" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

30

Treatment of produced water using chemical and biological unit operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water generated along with oil and gas during coal bed methane and oil shale operations is commonly known as produced water, formation water, or oilfield… (more)

Li, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

EIS-0362: Colorado Springs Utilities' Next Generation CFB Coal Generating Unit, CO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve Colorado Springs Utilities design, construction, and operation of their Next- Generation Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Coal Generating Unit demonstration plant near Fountain, El Paso County, Colorado.

32

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Unit Commitment Considering Generation Flexibility and Environmental Constraints  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a new framework for power system unit commitment process, which incorporates the generation flexibility requirements and environmental constraints into the existing unit commitment algorithm. The generation flexibility requirements are to address the uncertainties with large amount of intermittent resources as well as with load and traditional generators, which causes real-time balancing requirements to be variable and less predictable. The proposed flexibility requirements include capacity, ramp and ramp duration for both upward and downward balancing reserves. The environmental constraints include emission allowance for fossil fuel-based generators and ecological regulations for hydro power plants. Calculation of emission rates is formulated. Unit commitment under this new framework will be critical to the economic and reliable operation of the power grid and the minimization of its negative environmental impacts, especially when high penetration levels of intermittent resources are being approached, as required by the renewable portfolio standards in many states.

Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.; Zhu, Yunhua; Lu, Ning; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Chakrabarti, Bhujanga B.

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fuel from Water: The Photochemical Generation of Hydrogen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel from Water: The Photochemical Generation of Hydrogen from Water ... Hydrogen can be generated from fossil fuels using well established industrial scale chem.; while this is clearly not green, it can provide the transitional capacity as infrastructure is developed and alternate ways of generating hydrogen using solar, nuclear, hydro, wind, or wave energy come to the fore. ... Our renewed interest in alternative energy has fuelled research in understanding this simplest, in terms of active site organization, of the known hydrogenases over the last two decades. ...

Zhiji Han; Richard Eisenberg

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy...

36

System analysis of membrane facilitated water generation from air humidity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The use of water vapor selective membranes can reduce the energy requirement for extracting water out of humid air by more than 50%. We performed a system analysis of a proposed unit, that uses membranes to separate water vapor from other atmospheric gases. This concentrated vapor can then be condensed specifically, rather than cooling the whole body of air. The driving force for the membrane permeation is maintained with a condenser and a vacuum pump. The pump regulates the total permeate side pressure by removing non-condensable gases that leak into the system. We show that by introducing a low-pressure, recirculated, sweep stream, the total permeate side pressure can be increased without impairing the water vapor permeation. This measure allows energy efficiency even in the presence of leakages, as it significantly lowers the power requirements of the vacuum pump. Such a constructed atmospheric water generator with a power of 62 kW could produce 9.19 m3/day of water (583 MJ/m3) as compared to 4.45 m3/day (1202 MJ/m3) that can be condensed without membranes. Due to the physical barrier the membrane imposes, fresh water generated in this manner is also cleaner and of higher quality than water condensed directly out of the air.

D. Bergmair; S.J. Metz; H.C. de Lange; A.A. van Steenhoven

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

38

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7" 7" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

39

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8" 8" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

40

Generation risk assessment in volatile conditions with wind, hydro, and natural gas units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies a generating company (GENCO)’s midterm (a few months to a year) scheduling payoffs and risks in volatile operating conditions. The proposed algorithm considers the integration of intermittent wind units into a GENCO’s generation assets and coordinates the GENCO’s hourly wind generation schedule with that of natural gas (NG) units (with volatile gas prices) and hydro units (with water inflow forecast) for maximizing the GENCO’s payoff. The proposed midterm GENCO model applies market price forecasts to the risk-constrained stochastic price-based unit commitment (PBUC) for calculating the GENCO’s risk in energy and ancillary services markets. The proposed PBUC minimizes the cost of (a) NG contracts, storage, startup and shutdown, (b) startup and shutdown of cascaded hydro units, and (c) penalty for defaulting on the scheduled power delivery. Simulation results show that the diversification of generating assets including bilateral contracts (BCs) could enhance the GENCO’s midterm planning by increasing the expected payoff and decreasing the financial risk.

Cem Sahin; Mohammad Shahidehpour; Ismet Erkmen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States Elisabeth Giever Kate McMordie Stoughton Susan Loper October 2010 Executive Summary This document provides an overview of an analysis that examined changes in water rates across the country to develop a basic understanding of water rate escalations and how water rates are impacted from outside influences. The analysis investigated how water rates are influenced by the geographic region, water source, and drought tendencies. For example, one observation of the analysis found that cities located in regions of long term drought may have higher escalation rates than cities in water rich environments. Typical escalation rates were found to be between 4 and 8%. This information can be

42

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

09" 09" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

43

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10" 10" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

44

Design and Operation of Fan-Coil Units in Using River Water as Chilled Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the case research for China's first central air conditioning system utilizing natural cool river water as chilled water, this paper analyzes the technical design-and-innovation process and operating characteristics of Fan-Coil Units (FCUs...

Jiang, A.; Chen, H.; Ma, W.; Zhu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator S to the atmosphere. Soil water sensors routinely are used in applications such as research on crop production, water-3120, United States 1. Introduction Knowledge of soil water content is critical to agricultural, hydrological

Johnson, Peter D.

46

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

47

Quantifying Avoided Fuel Use and Emissions from Solar Photovoltaic Generation in the Western United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantifying Avoided Fuel Use and Emissions from Solar Photovoltaic Generation in the Western United States ... National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd, Golden, Colorado 80401 ...

Paul Denholm; Robert M. Margolis; James M. Milford

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hydrogen Generation through Static Feed Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Systems’ Static Feed Water Electrolysis System (SFWES) concept, developed under NASA...2...) production. The SFWES concept uses (1) an alkaline electrolyte to minimize power requirements and materials compat...

F. C. Jensen; F. H. Schubert

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The water factors presented may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available. Major findings of the report include: water withdrawal and consumption factors vary greatly across and within fuel technologies, and water factors show greater agreement when organized according to cooling technologies as opposed to fuel technologies; a transition to a less carbon-intensive electricity sector could result in either an increase or a decrease in water use, depending on the choice of technologies and cooling systems employed; concentrating solar power technologies and coal facilities with carbon capture and sequestration capabilities have the highest water consumption values when using a recirculating cooling system; and non-thermal renewables, such as photovoltaics and wind, have the lowest water consumption factors. Improved power plant data and further studies into the water requirements of energy technologies in different climatic regions would facilitate greater resolution in analyses of water impacts of future energy and economic scenarios. This report provides the foundation for conducting water use impact assessments of the power sector while also identifying gaps in data that could guide future research.

J Macknick; R Newmark; G Heath; K C Hallett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

USE OF PRODUCED WATER IN RECIRCULATING COOLING SYSTEMS AT POWER GENERATING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. Deliverable 1 presents a general assessment of produced water generation in the San Juan Basin in Four Corners Area of New Mexico. Oil and gas production, produced water handling and disposal, and produced water quantities and chemistry are discussed. Legislative efforts to enable the use of this water at SJGS are also described.

Michael N. DiFilippo

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Text to Text : plot unit searches generated from English  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The story of Macbeth centers around revenge. World War I was started by an act of revenge. Even though these two stories are seemingly unrelated, humans use the same concept to draw meaning from them. Plot units, revenge ...

Nackoul, David Douglas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Solar generator performance with load matching to water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 7 W generator, based on monocrystalline silicon solar cells, was directly wired to an electronic load, simulating the current-voltage characteristic of an advanced water electrolyser. System performance was ...

K. Freudenberg

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Autonomous Control of Inverter-Interfaced Distributed Generation Units for Harmonic Current Filtering and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous Control of Inverter-Interfaced Distributed Generation Units for Harmonic Current-interfaced Distributed Generation (DG) units, which can autonomously share harmonic currents and resonance damping, such that harmonic resonances and voltage distortions can be damped. To autonomously share harmonic currents, a droop

Chen, Zhe

54

Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions Tao Xie1 of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105 Abstract. Unit testing, a common step in software development, presents a chal- lenge. When produced manually, unit test suites are often insufficient to identify defects. The main

Xie, Tao

55

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

56

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011). Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download February 17, 2012 EIS-0476: Notice of Adoption of Final Environmental Impact Statement Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4, Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Support Funding for Construction, Burke County, GA

57

EPA and the Army Corps' Proposed Rule to Define "Waters of the United States"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA and the Army Corps' Proposed Rule to Define "Waters of the United States" Claudia Copeland.crs.gov R43455 #12;EPA and the Army Corps' Proposed Rule to Define "Waters of the United States regulatory definition of "waters of the United States" consistent with legal rulings--especially the Supreme

Gilbes, Fernando

58

Materials for Hydrogen Generation via Water Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented of materials that could be utilized as electrolytes (and their associated electrodes and interconnect materials) in solid-state electrolysis cells to convert water (or steam) into hydrogen and oxygen. Electrolytes that function as oxygen ion conductors or proton conductors are considered for various operating temperatures from approximately 80 °C to 1000 °C. The fundamental electrochemical reactions are reviewed with some discussion of special sources of steam and DC electricity (advanced nuclear) to drive the reactions at the higher temperatures.

Paul A. Lessing

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Membrane-based processes for sustainable power generation using water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 18 GW of salinity-gradient power. Although 800 GW of power is currently obtained from hydroelectric processes globally, salinity-gradient energy remains a large and untapped resource. Capturing this energy ... not ions — through the membranes to produce pressurized water that generates electricity using mechanical turbines. RED uses membranes for ion — but not water — transport, and the electrical ...

Bruce E. Logan; Menachem Elimelech

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

STOCHASTIC FLOW SEQUENCE GENERATION AND ASPINALL UNIT OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the University of Colorado in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Science by Professor Balaji Rajagopalan The Aspinall Unit is comprised of three reservoirs that lie on the western for the Colorado River Basin, paleo reconstructed flows dating back to the 1500's suggest that such events

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Siting and sizing of distributed generation units using GA and OPF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the important task of finding the optimal siting and sizing of Distributed Generation (DG) units for a given distribution network so that the cost of active and reactive power generation can be minimized. The optimization technique ... Keywords: distributed generation, genetic alghorithm(GA), optimal power flow(OPF)

M. Hosseini Aliabadi; M. Mardaneh; B. Behbahan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Backgrounder: Geothermal resource production, steam gathering, and power generation at Salton Sea Unit 3, Calipatria, California  

SciTech Connect

The 10,000-kilowatt Salton Sea Unit 1 power plant was designed to demonstrate that electrical power generation, using the highly saline brines from the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir, was technically and economically feasible. Unit 1, owned by Earth Energy, a Unocal subsidiary, began operating in 1982, initiating an intensive testing program which established the design criteria necessary to construct the larger 47,500-kilowatt Unit 3 power plant, unit 3 contains many of the proprietary or patented technological innovations developed during this program. Design, construction and start-up of the Unit 3 power generating facility began in December, 1986, and was completed in 26 months. By the end of 1988, the brine handling system was in full operation, and the turbine had been tested at design speed. Desert Power Company, a Unocal subsidiary, owns the power generating facility. Unocal owns the brine resource production facility. Power is transmitted by the Imperial Irrigation District to Southern California Edison Company.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

64

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

65

Hydrogen Generation from Dimethyl Ether for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Generation from Dimethyl Ether for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units ... Vehicle manufacturers are rushing ahead with research into alternative fuels such as dimethyl ether (DME), biodiesel, methanol, ethanol, and hydrogen. ...

Marita Nilsson; Lars J. Pettersson; Bård Lindström

2006-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Energy Conversion Unit with Optimized Waveform Generation Sally Sajadian and Euzeli C. dos Santos Jr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conversion Unit with Optimized Waveform Generation Sally Sajadian and Euzeli C. dos Santos to increase the efficiency of the devices dealing with energy conversion. The power supplies devices able and interleaved converters. This paper proposes an energy conversion unit constituted by a single-phase DC

Zhou, Yaoqi

67

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water  

SciTech Connect

An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface E&WR - Water-Energy Interface Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation: A Modeling Framework The purpose of this study, conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center at West Virginia University, is to develop and demonstrate a framework for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects, and environmental benefits of using mine water for thermo-electric power generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering, and environmental factors to be considered and evaluated in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. Development and demonstration of the framework involves the following activities: A field investigation and case study conducted for the proposed Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. This 300 megawatt power plant has been proposed to burn coal refuse from the Champion coal refuse pile, which is the largest coal waste pile in Western Pennsylvania. The field study, based on previous mine pool research conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC), identifies mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2,000 to 3,000 gpm power plant water requirement.

69

Water chemistry of breeder reactor steam generators. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

The water quality requirements will be described for breeder reactor steam generators, as well as specifications for balance of plant protection. Water chemistry details will be discussed for the following power plant conditions: feedwater and recirculation water at above and below 5% plant power, refueling or standby, makeup water, and wet layup. Experimental data will be presented from tests which included a departure from nucleate boiling experiment, the Few Tube Test, with a seven tube evaporator and three tube superheater, and a verification of control and on-line measurement of sodium ion in the ppB range. Sampling and instrumentation requirements to insure adherence to the specified water quality will be described. Evaporator cleaning criteria and data from laboratory testing of chemical cleaning solutions with emphasis on flow, chemical composition, and temperature will be discussed.

Simpson, J.L.; Robles, M.N.; Spalaris, C.N.; Moss, S.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

71

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5" 5" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

72

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

73

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6" 6" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

74

Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown from the existing SJGS Unit 3 tower--during the summer months of 2005. If successful, there may be follow-on testing using produced water. WSAC is discussed in this deliverable. Recall that Deliverable 4, Emerging Technology Testing, describes the pilot testing conducted at a salt water disposal facility (SWD) by the CeraMem Corporation. This filtration technology could be a candidate for future demonstration testing and is also discussed in this deliverable.

Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Precipitation Trends and Water Consumption Related to Population in the Southwestern United States, 1930–83  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possible effects of climatic fluctuations on renewable water supplies in the western United States was examined, especially as it is impacted by the growth of population and water consumption in recent decades.

Henry F. Diaz; Ronald L. Holle; Joe W. Thorn Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Application of membrane technology to power generation waters  

SciTech Connect

Three membrane technlogies (reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, and electrodialysis) for wastewater treatment and reuse at electric generating power plants were examined. Recirculating condenser water, ash sluice water, coal pile drainage, boiler blowdown and makeup treatment wastes, chemical cleaning wastes, wet SO/sub 2/ scrubber wastes, and miscellaneous wastes were studied. In addition, membrane separation of toxic substances in wastewater was also addressed. Waste characteristics, applicable regulations, feasible membrane processes, and cost information were analyzed for each waste stream. A users' guide to reverse osmosis was developed and is provided in an appendix.

Tang, T.L.D.; Chu, T.J.; Boroughs, R.D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Self-Excited ac High Voltage Generation Using Water Droplets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By letting water drops fall through rings into cans high voltage can be spontaneously generated with no external electrical excitation. Previous work concerning this type of electric influence machine for dc and three-phase ac high voltage generation is extended to include multiphase multifrequency operation by considering N streams and N cans. A distributed equivalent circuit representation is used to calculate the natural frequencies of the system where it is found that many overstable modes are present. Experimental observations with up to five cans are presented. This device can serve as a model for phenomena concerned with atmospheric electricity.

Markus Zahn

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Pseudo-random number generators for Monte Carlo simulations on Graphics Processing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic uniform pseudo-random number generators are implemented on ATI Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The performance results of the realized generators (multiplicative linear congruential (GGL), XOR-shift (XOR128), RANECU, RANMAR, RANLUX and Mersenne Twister (MT19937)) on CPU and GPU are discussed. The obtained speed-up factor is hundreds of times in comparison with CPU. RANLUX generator is found to be the most appropriate for using on GPU in Monte Carlo simulations. The brief review of the pseudo-random number generators used in modern software packages for Monte Carlo simulations in high-energy physics is present.

Demchik, Vadim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Pseudo-random number generators for Monte Carlo simulations on Graphics Processing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic uniform pseudo-random number generators are implemented on ATI Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The performance results of the realized generators (multiplicative linear congruential (GGL), XOR-shift (XOR128), RANECU, RANMAR, RANLUX and Mersenne Twister (MT19937)) on CPU and GPU are discussed. The obtained speed-up factor is hundreds of times in comparison with CPU. RANLUX generator is found to be the most appropriate for using on GPU in Monte Carlo simulations. The brief review of the pseudo-random number generators used in modern software packages for Monte Carlo simulations in high-energy physics is present.

Vadim Demchik

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

MHK Technologies/Water Current Generator Motor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Motor Generator Motor < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Global Energies Inc Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Simple Vertical Axis fully submerged open design flow through unit operating an onboard Pump unit that drives an on shore power generation system Slow turning swim through for Marine life Anchoring depends on topography and composition of resource bed Removable Scalable Please note that the Website is very old and needs updating In 2007 we hired Independent Engineering firm in Seattle to conduct extensive fluid dynamic testing or our design concepts and overall system Tests were completed much more extensively than we envisioned and were very positive for our needs and build out of a full size model We have been stuck and broke as it s all out of pocket in this position ever since as those Engineering costs were much more than anticipated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Application of CFB technology for large power generating units and CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect

Data on the development of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology for combustion of fuels in large power generating units are examined. The problems with raising the steam parameters and unit power of boilers with a circulating fluidized bed are examined. With the boiler system at the 460 MW unit at Lagisza (Poland) as an example, the feasibility of raising the efficiency of units with CFB boilers through deep recovery of the heat of the effluent gases and reducing expenditure for in-house needs is demonstrated. Comparative estimates of the capital and operating costs of 225 and 330 MW units are used to determine the conditions for optimum use of CFB boilers in the engineering renovation of thermal power plants in Russia. New areas for the application of CFB technology in CO{sub 2} capture are analyzed in connection with the problem of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Ryabov, G. A., E-mail: georgy.ryabov@gmail.com; Folomeev, O. M.; Sankin, D. A.; Khaneev, K. V.; Bondarenko, I. G.; Mel'nikov, D. A. [JSC 'All-Russian Thermotechnical Institute' ('VTI') (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

MHK Technologies/OCGen turbine generator unit TGU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OCGen turbine generator unit TGU OCGen turbine generator unit TGU < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage OCGen turbine generator unit TGU.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Renewable Power Company Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal *MHK Projects/Nenana Rivgen *MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal *MHK Projects/Western Passage OCGen Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description he OCGen turbine-generator unit (TGU) is unidirectional regardless of current flow direction. Two cross flow turbines drive a permanent magnet generator on a single shaft. OCGen modules contain the ballast/buoyancy tanks and power electronics/control system allowing for easier installation. The OCGen TGU can be stacked either horizontally or vertically to form arrays.

83

Increased salinization of fresh water in the northeastern United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Term Ecological Research (LTER) project. Samples were collected weekly...sampling stations for tributaries to Liberty Reservoir, a drinking water supply...program in Water and Watersheds (Project No. GAD-R825792), and the A...

Sujay S. Kaushal; Peter M. Groffman; Gene E. Likens; Kenneth T. Belt; William P. Stack; Victoria R. Kelly; Lawrence E. Band; Gary T. Fisher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Solar Water Splitting To Generate Hydrogen Fuel:? Photothermal Electrochemical Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A photoelectrolysis system can contain multiple photoharvesting units and electrolysis units, where the ratio of electrolysis to photovolatic units is defined as R. ...

Stuart Licht

2003-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

86

Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A0-44073 A0-44073 November 2008 Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Prepared under Task No. PVB7.6301 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A0-44073 November 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

87

Technical evaluation of a small-scale reverse osmosis desalination unit for domestic water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tunisian standards for drinking water tolerate a maximum Total Dissolved Salts (TDS) of 1.5 g/L. The domestic water presents usually a salinity greater than 0.5 g/L. In the last few years, several small capacity reverse osmosis desalination prototypes have been marketed. They are used to desalinate brackish water with TDS lower than 1.5 g/L. The performances of such type of RO units with respect to the Tunisia tap waters are needed. A technico-economical evaluation of small-scale (100 L/day) reverse osmosis desalination unit has been studied. Water pre-treatment is composed of three filtration operations. Water is pumped through the RO membrane with maximum pressure of 6 bars. Before use, the desalinated water is treated with UV light. The salinity and the temperature of the tested domestic water are located respectively between 0.5 and 1.3 g/L and between 12 and 29°C. The pre-treatment allows eliminating all the suspension matters, as the turbidity and the Solid Density Index are reduced to zero FTU and surrounding one unit respectively. No chemicals are used in the pre-treatment, so membrane scaling can not be avoided if reject water presents a high scaling power. The supersaturation relative to calcium carbonate and gypsum were estimated for reject water. Their values indicate that the tested waters have no risk to scale the RO membrane. The recovery rate of the RO unit was evaluated vs. different operating conditions such as applied pressure, raw water TDS and water temperature. The small capacity unit was able to deliver a treated water of a 100 mg/L TDS with a conversion rate ranging between 25 and 37%. The water treatment cost was evaluated at 0.01 €/L which is roughly the tenth of that of bottled table water.

H. Elfil; A. Hamed; A. Hannachi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A unit commitment study of the application of energy storage toward the integration of renewable generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To examine the potential benefits of energy storage in the electric grid a generalized unit commitment model of thermal generating units and energy storage facilities is developed. Three different storage scenarios were tested—two without limits to total storage assignment and one with a constrained maximum storage portfolio. Given a generation fleet based on the City of Austin’s renewable energy deployment plans results from the unlimited energy storage deployment scenarios studied show that if capital costs are ignored large quantities of seasonal storage are preferred. This operational approach enables storage of plentiful wind generation during winter months that can then be dispatched during high cost peak periods in the summer. These two scenarios yielded $70 million and $94 million in yearly operational cost savings but would cost hundreds of billions to implement. Conversely yearly cost reductions of $40 million can be achieved with one compressed air energy storage facility and a small set of electrochemical storage devices totaling 13?GWh of capacity. Similarly sized storage fleets with capital costs service lifetimes and financing consistent with these operational cost savings can yield significant operational benefit by avoiding dispatch of expensive peaking generators and improving utilization of renewable generation throughout the year. Further study using a modified unit commitment model can help to clarify optimal storage portfolios reveal appropriate market participation approaches and determine the optimal siting of storage within the grid.

Chioke Harris; Jeremy P. Meyers; Michael E. Webber

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Relevance of Generation The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Sari Fink, Kevin Porter, and Jennifer Rogers Exeter Associates, Inc. Columbia, Maryland Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48987 October 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Sari Fink, Kevin Porter, and Jennifer Rogers Exeter Associates, Inc. Columbia, Maryland

90

Evaluation of performance of combined heat and power systems with dual power generation units (D-CHP).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this research, a new combined heat and power (CHP) system configuration has been proposed that uses two power generation units (PGU) operating simultaneously… (more)

Knizley, Alta Alyce

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Changing the spatial location of electricity generation to increase water availability in areas with drought: a feasibility study and quantification of air quality impacts in Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility, cost, and air quality impacts of using electrical grids to shift water use from drought-stricken regions to areas with more water availability were examined. Power plant cooling represents a large portion of freshwater withdrawals in the United States, and shifting where electricity generation occurs can allow the grid to act as a virtual water pipeline, increasing water availability in regions with drought by reducing water consumption and withdrawals for power generation. During a 2006 drought, shifting electricity generation out of the most impacted areas of South Texas (~10% of base case generation) to other parts of the grid would have been feasible using transmission and power generation available at the time, and some areas would experience changes in air quality. Although expensive, drought-based electricity dispatch is a potential parallel strategy that can be faster to implement than other infrastructure changes, such as air cooling or water pipelines.

Adam P Pacsi; Nawaf S Alhajeri; Mort D Webster; Michael E Webber; David T Allen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Title 33 CFR 328 Definition of the Waters of the United States...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the territorial seas." To provide clarity and to avoid confusion with other Corps of Engineer regulatory programs, the term "waters of the United States" is used throughout 33 CFR...

93

United: How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Story by Leslie Lee Summer 2013 tx H2O 3 Photo by Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife UNITED How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible Managing surface water supplies in Texas is complex, to say the least. Multiple... of conditions. W#15;P enables surface water managers throughout Texas to allocate water resources, plan for the future and ensure there is enough water for environmental as well as human needs. A statewide surface water permitting system is born Prior...

Lee, Leslie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Water Loss Test Results: West Main Canal United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR-329 2008 Water Loss Test Results: West Main Canal United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County Eric Leigh Texas AgriLife Extension Associate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station... Guy Fipps Texas AgriLife Extension Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, College Station April 6, 2006 W 1 ATER LOSS TEST RESULTS: WEST MAIN CANAL UNITED IRRIGATION...

Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

95

Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association's Springverville unit 3 earns POWER's highest honor  

SciTech Connect

It is said that pioneers take the arrows. In the case of Springerville Unit 3 - a 418 MW(net) expansion of a Tucson Electric Power facility in Arizona and the first pulverized coal-fired units built in the US in more than decade, the arrows were many. Although Tri-State (the developer), Tuscon Electric (the host), and Bechtel Power (the EPC contractor) were wounded by delayed deliveries of major equipment, bankruptcy of a major supplier, and a labor shortage, the companies showed their pioneering spirit and completed the project ahead of schedule. For ushering in a new generation of clean and desperately needed baseload capacity, Springerville Unit 3 is POWER magazine's 2006 Plant of the Year. 9 figs.

Peltier, R.

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Vibrant fault diagnosis for hydroelectric generator units with a new combination of rough sets and support vector machine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fault diagnosis for hydroelectric generator unit (HGU) is significant to prevent dangerous accidents from occurring and to improve economic efficiency. The faults of HGU involve overlapping fault patterns which may denote a kind of faults in the ... Keywords: Fault diagnosis, Hydroelectric generator unit, Rough sets, Support vector machine

Xiaoyuan Zhang; Jianzhong Zhou; Jun Guo; Qiang Zou; Zhiwei Huang

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Single-bridge unit-connected HVDC generation with increased pulse number  

SciTech Connect

A true unit-connected generator-HVdc convertor scheme is proposed which removes the need to use two bridges in series to achieve twelve-pulse operation. Moreover, the combination of a single main bridge and an auxiliary feedback dc ripple reinjection bridge is shown to increase the pulse number from 6 to 18. This is achieved purely by natural commutation and is equally valid for rectification and inversion. The theoretical waveforms are validated by extensive experimental verification.

Villablanca, M.; Arrillaga, J. (Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

SYSTEM OPTIMIZTION OF HOT WATER CONCENTRATED SOLAR THERMOELECTRIC GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report, we describe the design of a concentrated solar thermoelectric (TE) system which can provide both electricity and hot water. Today’s thermoelectric materials have a relatively low efficiency (~6 % for temperature difference across the thermoelement on the order of 300 o C). However since thermoelectrics don’t need their cold side to be near room temperature, (in another word, one can chose the particular thermoelectric material to match to the operational temperature) it is possible to use the waste heat to provide hot water and this makes the overall efficiency of the combined system to be quite high. A key factor in the optimization of the thermoelectric module is the thermal impedance matching with the incident solar radiation, and also with the hot water heat exchanger on the cold side of the thermoelectric module. We have developed an analytic model for the whole system and optimized each component in order to minimize the material cost. TE element fill factor is found to be an important parameter to optimize at low solar concentrations (generated per mass of the thermoelectric elements. Similarly the co-optimization of the microchannel heat exchanger and the TE module can be used to minimize the amount of material in the heat exchanger and the pumping power required for forced convection liquid cooling. Changing the amount of solar concentration, changes the input heat flux and this is another parameter that can be optimized in order to reduce the cost of heat exchanger (by size), the tracking requirement and the whole system. A series of design curves for different solar concentration are obtained. It is shown that the overall efficiency of the system can be more than 80 % at 200x concentration which is independent of the material ZT (TE figure-of-merit). For a material with ZThot~0.9, the electrical conversion efficiency is ~10%. For advanced materials with ZThot ~ 2.8, the electrical conversion efficiency could reach ~21%. 1.

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

99

"Table HC3.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,74.5,60.9,4,1.8,2.2,5.5 "2 or More",3.7,3.3,3,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,"Q","Q","N","Q","Q"

100

"Table HC4.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,31.9,7.9,3.4,5.8,13.7,1.1 "2 or More",3.7,0.4,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.7,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water May 26, 2010 - 12:11pm Addthis San Diego’s Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison Just north of the U.S.-Mexican border, San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant processes up to 34 million gallons of water a day. Thanks to the city's ambitious solar energy program, the facility may soon be able to do that with net zero electricity consumption. In early April, workers activated a 945-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) energy

102

Qualidex – A New Software for Generating Water Quality Indice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water quality indice are necessary for resolving lengthy, multi-parameter, water analysis reports into single digit scores. This, in turn, is essential for comparing the water quality of different sources and ...

Chinmoy Sarkar; S. A. Abbasi

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Design of Micro-grid System Based on Renewable Power Generation Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Micro-grid system is currently a conceptual solution to fulfill the commitment of reliable power delivery for future power systems. Renewable power sources such as wind and hydro offer the best potential for emission free power for future micro-grid systems. This paper presents a micro-grid system based on wind and hydro power sources and addresses issues related to operation, control, and stability of the system. The micro-grid system investigated in this paper represents a case study in Newfoundland, Canada. It consists of a small hydro generation unit and a wind farm that contains nine variable- speed, double-fed induction generator based wind turbines. Using Matlab/Simulink, the system is modeled and simulated to identify the technical issues involved in the operation of a micro-grid system based on renewable power generation units. The operational modes, technical challenges and a brief outline of conceptual approaches to addressing some of the technical issues are presented for further investigation.

Dr. K. Ravich; M. Manasa; Mr. P. Yohan Babu; G. V. P. Anjaneyulu

104

Numerical simulation of solitary wave generation in a wind-water annular tunnel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We briefly describe laboratory experiments demonstrating wind-water solitary wave generation in a wind-water annular tunnel. A mathematical model of this phenomenon is constructed in the context of a shallow-w...

T. G. Elizarova; M. A. Istomina…

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Regional ground-water mixing and the origin of saline fluids: Midcontinent, United States  

SciTech Connect

Ground waters in three adjacent regional flow systems in the midcontinent exhibit extreme chemical and isotopic variations that delineate large-scale fluid flow and mixing processes and two distinct mechanisms for the generation of saline fluids. Systematic spatial variations of major ion concentrations, H, O, and Sr isotopic compositions, and ground-water migration pathways indicate that each flow system contains water of markedly different origin. Mixing of the three separate ground waters exerts a fundamental control on ground-water composition. The three ground waters are: (i) dilute meteoric water recharged in southern Missouri; (ii) saline Na-Ca-Cl water in southeastern Kansas of far-traveled meteoric origin that acquired its salinity by halite dissolution; and (iii) Na-Ca-Cl brines in north-central Oklahoma that may have originated as Paleozoic seawater. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Musgrove, M.; Banner, J.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1993-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Gabrielle Wong-Parodi James McMahon Victor Franco Date: May 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the new single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this study, the authors use a life-cycle cost analysis approach that accounts for uncertainty and variability of inputs to assess the economic benefits of installing different gas furnace and water heater combinations. Among other factors, it assesses the economic feasibility of eliminating the traditional metal vents and replacing them with vents made of plastic materials used in condensing and power vent

107

Cross section generation strategy for high conversion light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High conversion water reactors (HCWR), such as the Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR), are being designed with axial heterogeneity of alternating fissile and blanket zones to achieve a conversion ratio of ...

Herman, Bryan R. (Bryan Robert)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with hydrogen economy scenario. 4. Research Approach and Results Survey of fuel cell water ASU lab fuel cell Capacity (kW) 5 ­ 150 5 ­ 250 5 50 ­ 1100 100 ­ 2000 100 ­ 250 PEM Fuel cell Oxygen (From air) Hydrogen Implications of Using water from Fuel Cells in a Hydrogen Economy · Hydrogen as an energy and water carrier

Keller, Arturo A.

109

Financial analysis of the implementation of a Drain Water Heat Recovery unit in residential housing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the ways of diminishing energy consumption for hot water heating is the use of Drain Water Heat Recovery (DWHR) units. The aim of the use of these devices is thermal energy recovery from warm drain water and transferring it to incoming cold water. This paper presents the calculation model that allows the estimation of the financial efficiency of the project involving the construction of a shower Drain Water Heat Recovery system in a single-family dwelling house. The presented method of investment risk assessment can be used for decision making by individual users, designers and others. The study of the financial performance was carried out for the various parameters of the installation and the different heat recovery system configurations. From investors point of view the most beneficial option of heat recovery system installation is the system in which preheated water is fed to both the hot water heater and shower mixing valve. Additionally, it was proved that obtained financial results are affected by showering time and water consumption. DWHR units will be therefore particularly beneficial to apply in case of swimming pools, sports facilities or fitness clubs, where high rotation of users is observed.

Daniel S?y?; Sabina Kordana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Biological and Atmospheric Relevant Interfaces: Lipids, Organosulfur Species and Interfacial Water Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Biological and Atmospheric Relevant Interfaces frequency generation is employed to investigate the ordering of water at phospholipid/water interfaces: Lipids, Organosulfur Species and Interfacial Water Structure DISSERTATION Presented in Partial

111

Solar desalination in the southwest United States| A thermoeconomic analysis utilizing the sun to desalt water in high irradiance regions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in the… (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Feasibility Study of Developing a Virtual Chilled Water Flow Meter at Air Handling Unit Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a virtual Air handling unit (AHU) level water flow meter is explored by using a control valve as a measurement device. The flow through the valve is indirectly calculated using differential pressure over both the valve and its...

Song, L.; Swamy, A.; Shim, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Update report on the performance of 400 megawatt and larger nuclear and coal-fired generating units. Performance through 1977  

SciTech Connect

Forty-seven nuclear generating units and 125 coal-fired generating plants that have had at least one full year of commercial operation are covered in this report. Their performances are evaluated using the capacity factor, availability factor, equivalent availability, and forced outage rate. The data are arranged by state and utility. (DLC)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hydroelectric Voltage Generation Based on Water-Filled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydroelectric Voltage Generation Based on Water-Filled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes ... The hydroelectric voltage generator can be expressed by the model illustrated in Figure 6a and b. ... Individual water-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes as hydroelectric power converters ...

Quanzi Yuan; Ya-Pu Zhao

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Macroscopic three-dimensional physical simulation of water flooding in multi-well fracture-cavity unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A macroscopic three-dimensional physical simulating model of multi-well fracture-cavity units was designed and constructed based on similarity theory. The characteristics and the water breakthrough pattern of fracture-cavity reservoirs developed in bottom water depletion and water injection modes were investigated by the model. The results show that, in bottom water drive, under the effect of bottom water depletion and water breakthrough, the wells had high productivity in early stage and fast decline. After energy supplement by injecting water, the productivity rebounded in a short time and then began a slow decline. The bottom water tended to coning to the wells at the place of bottom water entry. The water breakthrough pattern is spot pattern and the water breakthrough time is controlled by the well's connectivity to the bottom water; the water injection can inhibit coning and intrusion of bottom water, turning the spot pattern water breakthrough in bottom water drive period into planar line form, and the water breakthrough time in water injection period was mainly influenced by the well depth. The water cut of wells in water flooding multi-well fracture-cavity units changes in three patterns: slow rise, staircase rise and abrupt watered-out, which is influenced by the reservoir type and the coordination number. When the well encounters cavity, the water cut increasing rate slows down with the increase of the coordination number; when the well drilled fractures, the water cut changes in staircase pattern with the increase of coordination number.

Jirui HOU; Haibo LI; Yu JIANG; Ming LUO; Zeyu ZHENG; Li ZHANG; Dengyu YUAN

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A practical design for an integrated HVDC unit - connected hydro-electric generating station  

SciTech Connect

To date, several authors (see reference list) have proclaimed benefits which can be achieved by integrating HVDC converter stations directly with generating units. The cost of a significant amount of plant and facilities found in conventional schemes is thereby eliminated. So far as is known however, no detailed studies have been done to quantify these benefits. This paper outlines the results of a study made recently by the Manitoba HVDC Research Centre to determine the practicality of such a scheme. To give credence to the results an actual hydro station design was used incorporating a HVDC thyristor valve scheme in a hypothetical situation. Financial and other benefits were determined for this example together with conclusions and recommendations for future specific projects and further areas of study.

Ingram, L. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg (CA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Optimization of Water Consumption in Second Generation Bioethanol Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the treatment and recycling of wastewater. 7 In the recent past systematic methods for minimizing water of the ethanol production processes are designed by determining water consumption, reuse and recycle and wastewater treatment an important topic with new economic incentives for implementing technologies

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

118

Stability of steady gravity waves generated by a moving localised pressure disturbance in water of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disturbance in water of finite depth. The steady waves take the form of a downstream wavetrain for subcritical and , the subcritical solutions were wavetrains solutions similar to those found in deep water, and became dragStability of steady gravity waves generated by a moving localised pressure disturbance in water

119

Planning for a multi-generational future : policies, regulations, and designs for multi-generational housing in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-generational housing is a rising trend that is increasingly being considered as a viable housing option for the Boomerang generation, Baby Boomers and the aging population, and immigrant families. Cultural preferences, ...

Shin, Stephanie H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hydrogen Generation by Solid Polymer Electrolyte Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The General Electric Company -water electrolysis technology, which is based on a solid ... The inherent system advantages of the acid SPE electrolysis technology are explained. System performance predictions are....

L. J. Nuttall; A. P. Fickett; W. A. Titterington

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Removal of phenol and chlorophenols from water by new ozone generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Presence of phenol in river water occasionally disturbs the production of drinking water. Phenol often originated from coal power plants or pesticides. New ozone generator [Kuraica et al., Vacuum, 73 (2004) 705] was used for removal of phenol and chlorophenols from water. The ozone generator was based on coaxial dielectricbarrier-discharge and operated in the air at an atmospheric pressure. Flowing water was one of dielectric layers. Ozone and ozonized water were generated in the same volume of the discharge. This type of ozone generator has considerable advantages in comparison with the classical ones. In this paper five experiments were described, three with bidistilled water and two with different water samples from river Danube. In all cases, 5L of water containing 6mg/L of corresponding phenol was passed once through the ozonizer. The concentration of dissolved ozone in water was 7–40mg/L. The ozonization lasted 1 h, but the total contact time was up to 94 h. In all cases, before and after the treatment of water with ozone, the concentration of corresponding phenol [Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater, method 510 B, Chloroform Extraction Method, American Public Health Association, Washington, 1985, p. 558], dissolved and residual ozone [Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater, Methods 2-41, 2-42 (dissolved ozone) Iodometric Method; method 4-104 (ozone residual) Indigo Colorimetric Method, American Public Health Association, Washington, 1995] were determined by standard methods. In experiments with distilled water most of the phenol was removed during ozonization (89.5%). After 24 and 96 h the percentage of removed phenol increased to 93.3 and 98.9%, respectively. With 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, 99.8 and 98.9% of corresponding phenols were removed. In experiments with two different water samples from Danube, the phenol was also mostly removed during ozonization, 76.7 and 80.0%, respectively.

D. Manojlovic; D.R. Ostojic; B.M. Obradovic; M.M. Kuraica; V.D. Krsmanovic; J. Puric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A novel KICA–PCA fault detection model for condition process of hydroelectric generating unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fault detection and diagnosis of hydroelectric generating unit (HGU) have significant importance to the security of hydropower plant and the power system. In recent years, many fault detection methods based on spectral characteristic of vibration signals have been published. However, some faults cannot be effectively recognized just with spectral features for condition process monitoring of HGU. Thus, this study presents a novel fault detection model based on kernel independent component analysis and principal component analysis (KICA–PCA) monitoring model for condition process of HGU. Each of the condition processes is equivalent to a multivariate statistical process monitoring (MSPM). KICA–PCA model of the specific MSPM is trained by normal condition process data at first. Then, confidence limits of two monitoring indices (Hotelling’s T2 statistic and SPE statistic) of the trained KICA–PCA model are used to monitor the same condition process and detect fault online. Moreover, the proposed monitoring model is applied to a real condition process of HGU. Compared to ICA–PCA and PCA monitoring model, the proposed model has superior performance in fault detection.

Wenlong Zhu; Jianzhong Zhou; Xin Xia; Chaoshun Li; Jian Xiao; Han Xiao; Xinxin Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy spectrum of cascade showers generated in water by near-horizontal muons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss measuring cascade shower energy using the NEVOD Cherenkov water detector with ... applied to showers generated by near-horizontal high-energy muons selected using the DECOR coordinate detector deployed...

S. S. Khokhlov; N. S. Barbashina…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, Daniel J. (Export, PA); Schrader, Kenneth J. (Penn Hills, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Propagation of the low-frequency noise generated by power station water-cooling towers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The propagation of low-frequency noise generated by air turbulent motion in water-cooling towers is investigated by the use of geometrical acoustics of moving media. It is shown that a cooling tower plum acts ...

Sergei P. Fisenko

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A guide to RBF-generated finite differences for nonlinear transport: shallow water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A guide to RBF-generated finite differences for nonlinear transport: shallow water simulationsInstitute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences, National Center for Atmospheric Research , Boulder, CO 80305 USA b of nodes. RBF- generated finite differences (RBF-FD) are conceptually similar to standard finite

Wright, Grady B.

129

Water Research 39 (2005) 49614968 Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Research 39 (2005) 4961­4968 Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial September 2005 Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new method for treating animal wastewaters indicated that electricity could be generated from swine wastewater containing 83207190 mg/L of soluble

130

Colloidal Petcoke-in-Water Suspensions as Fuels for Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colloidal Petcoke-in-Water Suspensions as Fuels for Power Generation ... In this work, it is shown that, despite the low reactivity of petroleum coke (petcoke) and the presence of 40% water, a petcoke suspension having a large colloidal population burned with unprecedented high efficiencies (>99%) without a support fuel. ... Combustion tests of a typical heavy fuel oil (HFO) were carried out to produce baseline data for comparison to the colloidal petcoke in water suspension (CPW) performance. ...

Gustavo A. Núñez; María I. Briceño; Cebers Gómez; Takeshi Asa; Hamid Farzan; Shengteng Hu; Daniel D. Joseph

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Assessing How Renewables Affect Water Used for Thermoelectric...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

The Science Water use and energy production are intrinsically linked. Most electric power plants in the United States generate electricity by means of a steam generator....

132

High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Life cycle water use for electricity generation: a review and harmonization of literature estimates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article provides consolidated estimates of water withdrawal and water consumption for the full life cycle of selected electricity generating technologies, which includes component manufacturing, fuel acquisition, processing, and transport, and power plant operation and decommissioning. Estimates were gathered through a broad search of publicly available sources, screened for quality and relevance, and harmonized for methodological differences. Published estimates vary substantially, due in part to differences in production pathways, in defined boundaries, and in performance parameters. Despite limitations to available data, we find that: water used for cooling of thermoelectric power plants dominates the life cycle water use in most cases; the coal, natural gas, and nuclear fuel cycles require substantial water per megawatt-hour in most cases; and, a substantial proportion of life cycle water use per megawatt-hour is required for the manufacturing and construction of concentrating solar, geothermal, photovoltaic, and wind power facilities. On the basis of the best available evidence for the evaluated technologies, total life cycle water use appears lowest for electricity generated by photovoltaics and wind, and highest for thermoelectric generation technologies. This report provides the foundation for conducting water use impact assessments of the power sector while also identifying gaps in data that could guide future research.

J Meldrum; S Nettles-Anderson; G Heath; J Macknick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nonlinear Adaptive Control of Networked Power Generators with Remote Measurement Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by Phasor Measurement Units (PMU). The proposed control system is designed in a robust way illustrate its good behavior, and suggest that the new measurement and data transmission devices can bring Measurement Units (PMU). These devices are far beyond SCADA, and let one envisage the use of real time remote

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

135

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

Application of CFB technology for large power generating units and CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the development of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology for combustion of fuels in large ... feasibility of raising the efficiency of units with CFB boilers through deep recovery of the heat ......

G. A. Ryabov; O. M. Folomeev; D. A. Sankin…

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modelling a feed-water control system of a steam generator in the framework of the dynamic reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling a feed-water control system of a steam generator in the framework of the dynamic with the exploration of an industrial complex system behaviour and its prob- abilistic safety assessment (PSA critical systems), the feed-water control system of a steam generator of a pressurised water nuclear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

139

Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve  

SciTech Connect

A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to determine if WSAC technology could cool process water at cycles of concentration considered highly scale forming for mechanical draft cooling towers. At the completion of testing, there was no visible scale on the heat transfer surfaces and cooling was sustained throughout the test period. The application of the WARMF decision framework to the San Juan Basis showed that drought and increased temperature impact water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry) and lead to critical shortages. WARMF-ZeroNet, as part of the integrated ZeroNet decision support system, offers stakeholders an integrated approach to long-term water management that balances competing needs of existing water users and economic growth under the constraints of limited supply and potential climate change.

C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ozonized water generator based on coaxial dielectric-barrier-discharge in air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A coaxial dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) as an ozonized water reactor system has been developed and described. It operates in the air at an atmospheric pressure. In the reactor one of the dielectric layers is flowing water. Ozone and ozonized water are generated in the same volume of the discharge. The ozone production and its dissolution in the water simultaneously occur leading to increases of the reactor efficiency. Filamentary 50 Hz DBD has been performed using up to 20 kV applied voltage. The obtained ozone concentrations correspond to the values typically suggested for the treatment of potable and wastewater. The efficiency can be further increased by addition of small amount of the oxygen in the DBD device. The periodical time dependence of the dissolved ozone concentration in Danube water is found and discussed.

Milorad M. Kuraica; Bratislav M. Obradovi?; Dragan Manojlovi?; Daliborka R. Ostoji?; Jagoš Puri?

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Stochastic Real-Time Scheduling of Wind-thermal Generation Units ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power produced by thermal unit i in time t (MW). Pps,t. Power .... problem is presented in Section V. Simulation results are pre- sented in section VI ...... operation of a virtual power plant using two stage stochastic programming,”. Energy, vol.

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Study of Linear Equivalent Circuits of Electromechanical Systems for Turbine Generator Units.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thesis utilizes the analogy in dynamic equations between a mechanical and an electrical system to convert the steam-turbine, micro-turbine, wind-turbine and hydro-turbine generator mechanical… (more)

Tsai, Chia-Chun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Impact of unit commitment constraints on generation expansion planning with renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing use of renewables pushes thermal generators against operating constraints - e.g. ramping, minimum output, and operating reserves - that are traditionally ignored in expansion planning models. We show how including ...

Palmintier, Bryan Stephen

145

Electrodeposited Cobalt-Sulfide Catalyst for Electrochemical and Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Generation from Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the use of strong acids and bases, thus reducing their environmental impact and increasing Generation from Water Yujie Sun,,,, Chong Liu,, David C. Grauer,, Junko Yano, Jeffrey R. Long,*,, Peidong, and long-term aqueous stability, offer promising features for potential use in solar energy applications

146

Water Research 39 (2005) 16751686 Electricity generation using membrane and salt bridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Research 39 (2005) 1675­1686 Electricity generation using membrane and salt bridge microbial Hydrogen Energy (H2E) Center, The Pennsylvania State University, 212 Sackett Bld., University Park, PA, USA also examined power output in a MFC with a salt bridge instead of a membrane system. Power output

147

Generation and Initial Evolution of a Mode Water S Anomaly* GREGORY C. JOHNSON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation and Initial Evolution of a Mode Water ­S Anomaly* GREGORY C. JOHNSON NOAA/Pacific Marine. Corresponding author address: Dr. Gregory C. Johnson, NOAA/PMEL, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Bldg. 3, Seattle, WA 98115-6349. E-mail: gregory.c.johnson@noaa.gov APRIL 2006

Johnson, Gregory C.

148

InGaN working electrodes with assisted bias generated from GaAs solar cells for efficient water splitting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen generation through water splitting by n-InGaN working electrodes with bias generated from GaAs solar cell was studied. Instead of using an external bias provided by power...

Liu, Shu-Yen; Sheu, J K; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Tong; Tu, S J; Lee, M L; Lai, W C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Unit commitment with wind power generation: integrating wind forecast uncertainty and stochastic programming.  

SciTech Connect

We present a computational framework for integrating the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulations that account for wind power uncertainty. We first enhance the WRF model with adjoint sensitivity analysis capabilities and a sampling technique implemented in a distributed-memory parallel computing architecture. We use these capabilities through an ensemble approach to model the uncertainty of the forecast errors. The wind power realizations are exploited through a closed-loop stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulation. We discuss computational issues arising in the implementation of the framework. In addition, we validate the framework using real wind speed data obtained from a set of meteorological stations. We also build a simulated power system to demonstrate the developments.

Constantinescu, E. M.; Zavala, V. M.; Rocklin, M.; Lee, S.; Anitescu, M. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Univ. of Chicago); (New York Univ.)

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

Electric co-generation units equipped with wood gasifier and Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of industrial waste such as oil sludges, waste plastic, lubricant oils, paper and wood poses serious problems due to the ever increasing amount of material to be disposed of and to the difficulty in finding new dumping sites. The interest in energy recovery technologies is accordingly on the increase. In particular, large amounts of waste wood are simply burned or thrown away causing considerable environmental damage. In this context the co-generation technique represents one of the possible solutions for efficient energy conversion. The present paper proposes the employment of a Stirling engine as prime mover in a co-generation set equipped with a wood gasifier. A Stirling engine prototype previously developed in a joint project with Mase Generators, an Italian manufacturer of fixed and portable electrogenerators, is illustrated and its design is described.

Bartolini, C.M.; Caresana, F.; Pelagalli, L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Analysis of the operational reliability of a power-generating unit with a BN-600 reactor during the period 1980–1993  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The high quality of the design and the additional improvements to separate units of the main equipment and systems at the initial stage of operation (first main circulation pump, steam generators, safety and c...

N. N. Oshkanov; A. G. Sheinkman; P. P. Govorov

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Restoration of the graphite memory of a reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The restoration of the graphite masonry of cell 52-16 in the reactor in the third power-generating unit of the Leningrad nuclear power plant is described. The process reduces to moving...

V. I. Lebedev; Yu. V. Garusov; M. A. Pavlov; A. N. Peunov; E. P. Kozlov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Meteotsunami in the Great Lakes and on the Atlantic coast of the United States generated by the “derecho” of June 29–30, 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tsunami-like intense sea-level oscillations, associated with atmospheric activity (meteorological tsunamis), are common in the Great Lakes and on the East Coast of the United States. They are generated by vari...

Jadranka Šepi?; Alexander B. Rabinovich

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

An integrated computer-based training simulator for the operative personnel of the 800-MW power-generating unit at the Perm District Power Station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integrated computer-based training simulator for an 800-MW power-generating unit is described. Its capacities for training the personnel of the boiler-turbine and chemical departments are shown.

N. Yu. Pevneva; V. N. Piskov; A. N. Zenkov

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Renewable Energy Futures (REF) calculations performed by: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research, and to the results of international agreements and mitigation. Further, assessments of possible societal

Reuter, Martin

157

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 192.174.37.50 This content was downloaded on 04/11/2013 at 23:01 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2012 Environ. Res. Lett. 7 045802 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/4/045802) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 045802 (10pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/045802 Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies:

158

An environment friendly and efficient lignite-fired power generation process based on a boiler with an open pulverizing system and the recovery of water from mill-exhaust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper advances a novel lignite-fired power generation process based on a OPSB (boiler with an open pulverizing system) and the recovery of water from mill-exhaust after the comprehensive analysis of the open pulverizing system used for high-moisture coals and heat/water recovery from boiler exhaust. Then, the thermal calculation method that applies to OPSB is presented based on heat and mass balance analyses of the boiler. Finally, an efficient unit applying the OPSB process is compared with a conventional 600 MW lignite-fired power unit, and the performance of the efficient unit is calculated and discussed in detail. The results show that the efficient unit not only yields a notable increase in the boiler's (2.6%) and the power plant's (1.3%) thermal efficiency but also provides a remarkable advantage in water recovery due to the mass of water vapor concentrated in mill-exhaust. In the efficient unit, the volume fraction of water vapor in mill-exhaust reaches 34%, the water reclaimed from mill-exhaust is so much that a lignite-fired power plant with zero water consumption can be expected, while the pollutant emissions can be reduced in proportion to the increase in boiler thermal efficiency.

Youfu Ma; Yichao Yuan; Jing Jin; Hua Zhang; Xiaohong Hu; Dengyu Shi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation of military field-water quality: Volume 7, Performance evaluation of the 600-gph reverse osmosis water purification unit (ROWPU): Reverse osmosis (RO) components  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this work is to ascertain whether the performance of the current 600-gph reverse osmosis water-purification unit (ROWPU) is adequate to meet the water-quality standards recommended in Volume 4 of this study. A secondary objective is to review the design of the treatment units used in the ROWPU, as well as the prescribed mode of operation, and to make constructive recommendations. Reverse osmosis (hyperfiltration) is a complicated water-treatment process that is not described easily with a few process parameters. Furthermore, published literature on the type of membrane currently used in the ROWPU was scarce. Therefore, we required a mathematical model that could be used to extrapolate existing information to different operating conditions. It was successful for seawater and single-salt solutions, but it proved to be unsuccessful for just any mix of salts that might be encountered in nature. 99 refs., 69 figs., 60 tabs.

Marinas, B.J.; Ungun, Z.; Selleck, R.E.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pump and control unit for a solar heating installation for a water tank and particularly for a swimming pool  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to a pump and control unit for a solar heating installation system for a water tank, particularly for a swimming pool. The system contains a solar collector, a hydraulic circuit which includes an outward-flow pipe, a return-flow pipe, a pump, a derivative-action control unit and two sensors mounted on the outward-flow pipe and on the return-flow pipe, respectively. The pump, the control unit and the two sensors are integrated into a single case. The case is provided in its top wall with a transparent opening which faces the return-flow sensor and through which said sensor can be exposed to solar radiation, such that the pump may be automatically activated during periods of sunshine, i.e., when the solar collector is heating the water returning to the tank, and stopped due to lack of sunshine.

Cannaux, G.; Calvet, G.

1985-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Estimating Water Needs to Meet 2025 Electricity Generating Capacity Forecasts by NERC Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL-2006/1235 NETL-2006/1235 August 2006 Revised April 8, 2008 Estimating Freshwater Needs to Meet Future Thermoelectric Generation Requirements Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

162

Assess of physical antiscale-treatments on conventional electrodialysis pilot unit during brackish water desalination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In electrodialysis (ED) desalination plants, calcium carbonate is the main component of meted scales. To prevent its formation several treatments were proposed. For more efficiency, treatments must be assessed at experimental conditions close to real ones. Thus, this work is a contribution to understand and evaluate three anti-calcareous physical treatments for ED desalination systems simulating real conditions. Magnetic field (MF) and ultrasonic field (UF) were applied to concentrate solution, compartment where scaling is imminent in the used ED pilot unit. The third treatment was a pulsed electric field (PEF) application. Tested solution was a synthetic brackish water. Results show that magnetic and ultrasonic treatments accelerate the precipitation of CaCO3 by reducing the nucleation time and the metastable domain. It is also shown that pulsed electric treatment accelerates CaCO3 precipitation resulting from desalination improvement comparing to stationary mode. However, all these treatments favor the homogeneous precipitation which prevents scale formation on membrane surfaces. It seems that MF improves the desalination only by preventing membrane scaling. However, UF and PEF application improve desalination by preventing membrane scaling and by improving the ions transfer during desalination; UF application acts on ions mobility or diffusion, while PEF application reduces the concentration polarization layer.

Ilhem BEN SALAH SAYADI; Philippe SISTAT; Mohamed Mouldi TLILI

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Improvement design study on steam generator of MHR-50/100 aiming higher safety level after water ingress accident  

SciTech Connect

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been studying on MHI original High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR), namely MHR-50/100, for commercialization with supported by JAEA. In the heat transfer system, steam generator (SG) is one of the most important components because it should be imposed a function of heat transfer from reactor power to steam turbine system and maintaining a nuclear grade boundary. Then we especially focused an effort of a design study on the SG having robustness against water ingress accident based on our design experience of PWR, FBR and HTGR. In this study, we carried out a sensitivity analysis from the view point of economic and plant efficiency. As a result, the SG design parameter of helium inlet/outlet temperature of 750 deg. C/300 deg. C, a side-by-side layout and one unit of SG attached to a reactor were selected. In the next, a design improvement of SG was carried out from the view point of securing the level of inherent safety without reliance on active steam dump system during water ingress accident considering the situation of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster on March 11, 2011. Finally, according to above basic design requirement to SG, we performed a conceptual design on adapting themes of SG structure improvement. (authors)

Oyama, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-1 Wadasaki-cho 1-Chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Minatsuki, I.; Shimizu, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 16-5, Konan 2-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Don't water down: Enhance content learning through the unit organizer routine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The writer considers a content enhancement routine called the unit organizer routine. This routine focuses on how a teacher introduces, builds, and gains closure on a content area unit's critical ideas and information. In ...

Bouda, Daniel J.; Lenz, B. Keith; Bulgren, Janis A.; Schumaker, Jean B.; Deshler, Donald D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Causes of Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water in the United States from 1971 to 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waterborne disease in the United States. INTRODUCTION Statistical...outbreaks (WBDOs) in the United States have been collected...in U.S. states, territories, localities, and Freely...Federated States of Micronesia, and the Republic of...

Gunther F. Craun; Joan M. Brunkard; Jonathan S. Yoder; Virginia A. Roberts; Joe Carpenter; Tim Wade; Rebecca L. Calderon; Jacquelin M. Roberts; Michael J. Beach; Sharon L. Roy

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

167

Optimal sizing study of hybrid wind/PV/diesel power generation unit  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a methodology of sizing optimization of a stand-alone hybrid wind/PV/diesel energy system is presented. This approach makes use of a deterministic algorithm to suggest, among a list of commercially available system devices, the optimal number and type of units ensuring that the total cost of the system is minimized while guaranteeing the availability of the energy. The collection of 6 months of data of wind speed, solar radiation and ambient temperature recorded for every hour of the day were used. The mathematical modeling of the main elements of the hybrid wind/PV/diesel system is exposed showing the more relevant sizing variables. A deterministic algorithm is used to minimize the total cost of the system while guaranteeing the satisfaction of the load demand. A comparison between the total cost of the hybrid wind/PV/diesel energy system with batteries and the hybrid wind/PV/diesel energy system without batteries is presented. The reached results demonstrate the practical utility of the used sizing methodology and show the influence of the battery storage on the total cost of the hybrid system. (author)

Belfkira, Rachid; Zhang, Lu; Barakat, Georges [Groupe de Recherche en Electrotechnique et Automatique du Havre, University of Le Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 1123, 76063 Le Havre (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Causes of Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water in the United States from 1971 to 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...weighted more heavily than water quality data. Outbreaks without water...E., is an environmental engineer in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Centers for...is a licensed professional engineer and provides outbreak support...

Gunther F. Craun; Joan M. Brunkard; Jonathan S. Yoder; Virginia A. Roberts; Joe Carpenter; Tim Wade; Rebecca L. Calderon; Jacquelin M. Roberts; Michael J. Beach; Sharon L. Roy

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Board (2005). Water Resources Management onEnvironmental Valuation and Its Economic Critics. Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management,Environmental Cooperation Commission, has encouraged unilateral decision making, as water management

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Power estimation and reliability evaluation of municipal waste water and self-excited induction generator-based micro hydropower generation system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents power estimation and reliability evaluation of the micro hydro power generation system based on municipal waste water. Self-excited induction generator was used in the developed power plant, situated at IIT (BHU) campus, Varanasi, India. The hydro potential of the waste water flowing through sewage system of the Banaras Hindu University has been determined for annual flow duration and daily flow duration curves by ordering the recorded waste water from maximum to minimum flows. This paper estimates output power and determines reliability indices like: failure rate, repair rate, MTTF, MTTR and MTBF of the MWW-based developed generation plant. Design parameters of the SEIG with suitable values of the capacitor have been used and recommended for improvement of the power generation quality and reliability of the system.

Lokesh Varshney; R.K. Saket; Saeid Eslamian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Efficiency of producing additional power in units of nuclear power stations containing water-cooled-water-moderated reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a basic possibility to raise the maximum power of a unit containing the VVÉR-1000 reactor in the course of the fuel charge burn-up and with lowering the coefficient of the energy-release nonuniformity...

R. Z. Aminov; V. A. Khrustalev; A. A. Serdobintsev…

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Water footprint of electric power generation : modeling its use and analyzing options for a water-scarce future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interdependency between water and energy, sometimes called the water-energy nexus, is growing in importance as demand for both water and energy increases. Energy is required for water treatment and supply, while virtually ...

Delgado Martín, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Testing Thermo-acoustic Sound Generation in Water with Proton and Laser Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments were performed at a proton accelerator and an infrared laser acility to investigate the sound generation caused by the energy deposition of pulsed particle and laser beams in water. The beams with an energy range of 1 PeV to 400 PeV per proton beam spill and up to 10 EeV for the laser pulse were dumped into a water volume and the resulting acoustic signals were recorded with pressure sensitive sensors. Measurements were performed at varying pulse energies, sensor positions, beam diameters and temperatures. The data is well described by simulations based on the thermo-acoustic model. This implies that the primary mechanism for sound generation by the energy deposition of particles propagating in water is the local heating of the media giving rise to an expansion or contraction of the medium resulting in a pressure pulse with bipolar shape. A possible application of this effect would be the acoustical detection of neutrinos with energies greater than 1 EeV.

K. Graf; G. Anton; J. Hoessl; A. Kappes; T. Karg; U. Katz; R. Lahmann; C. Naumann; K. Salomon; C. Stegmann

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mapping water availability, projected use and cost in the western United States  

SciTech Connect

New demands for water can be satisfied through a variety of source options. In some basins surface and/or groundwater may be available through permitting with the state water management agency (termed unappropriated water), alternatively water might be purchased and transferred out of its current use to another (termed appropriated water), or non-traditional water sources can be captured and treated (e.g., wastewater). The relative availability and cost of each source are key factors in the development decision. Unfortunately, these measures are location dependent with no consistent or comparable set of data available for evaluating competing water sources. With the help of western water managers, water availability was mapped for over 1200 watersheds throughout the western US. Five water sources were individually examined, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water, municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped was projected change in consumptive water use from 2010 to 2030. Associated costs to acquire, convey and treat the water, as necessary, for each of the five sources were estimated. These metrics were developed to support regional water planning and policy analysis with initial application to electric transmission planning in the western US.

Vincent C. Tidwell; Barbara D. Moreland; Katie M. Zemlick; Barry L. Roberts; Howard D. Passell; Daniel Jensen; Christopher Forsgren; Gerald Sehlke; Margaret A. Cook; Carey W. King

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy, Water and Fish: Biodiversity Impacts of Energy-Sector Water Demand in the United States Depend on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption would more rapidly increase by 26% due to increased biofuel production, going from 16 is evaporation from hydroelectric reservoirs, followed by irrigation water for biofuel feedstocks and water used, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: Most authors had no specific research grants

Olden, Julian D.

176

Performance of a new micro-bubble generator with a spherical body in a flowing water tube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new micro-bubble generator with a spherical body in a flowing water tube has been invented, and its trial products have been tested. In the generator, pressurized water is introduced into a pipe with a spherical body in the core. From conservation equations of mass and energy, the water velocity around the body especially in a downstream region becomes higher than the inlet velocity, and thus the pressure there becomes lower. If the pressure becomes less than atmospheric pressure, air is automatically sucked into the water stream through a number of small holes drilled on the pipe wall in the lower pressure region downstream from the center of the body. Since the water flow there is highly-turbulent and shear flow, the air sucked is well broken into a great number of micro-bubbles. In the tests of its trial products, experimental data on air suction rate, hydraulic power needed to introduce water, bubble generation efficiency, and variation of dissolved oxygen in water after bubbling were obtained by changing water supply rate systematically. From the tests, we found an optimum diameter ratio of spherical body to pipe, and confirmed that the generator could generate micro-bubbles with a lesser energy consumption rate within 40 W and raise effectively the dissolved oxygen, etc.

M. Sadatomi; A. Kawahara; K. Kano; A. Ohtomo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Blue energy: Current technologies for sustainable power generation from water salinity gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract “Salinity energy” stored as the salinity difference between seawater and freshwater is a large-scale renewable resource that can be harvested and converted to electricity, but extracting it efficiently as a form of useful energy remains a challenge. With the development of membrane science and technology, membrane-based techniques for energy extraction from water salinity, such as pressure-retarded osmosis and reverse electro-dialysis, have seen tremendous development in recent years. Meanwhile, many other novel methods for harvesting exergy from water mixing processes, such as electrochemical capacitor and nano-fluidic energy harvesting systems, have been proposed. In this work, an overview and state-of-the-art of the current technologies for sustainable power generation from the water salinity gradient are presented. Characteristics of these technologies are analyzed and compared for this particular application. Based on these entropic energy extracting methods, the water salinity, as the “blue energy”, will be another source of renewable energy to satisfy the ever-growing energy demand of human society.

Zhijun Jia; Baoguo Wang; Shiqiang Song; Yongsheng Fan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Break-even Cost for Residential Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48986 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. SS10.2110 Technical Report

179

International Environmental Evaluation for the Helical Screw Expander Generator Unit Projects in Cesano, Italy and Broadlands, New Zealand  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Helical Screw Expander (HSE) Generator Program are (1) to accelerate the development of geothermal resources by introducing this advanced conversion technology, (2) to provide operating experience to prospective users of the equipment, and (3) to collect data on the performance and reliability of the equipment under various geothermal resource conditions. The participants hope to achieve these goals by testing a small-scale, transportable HSE generator at existing geothermal test facilities that produce fluids of different salinity, temperature and pressure conditions. This Environmental Evaluation has been prepared, using available information, to analyze the environmental consequences of testing the HSE generator. Its purpose is to support a decision on the need for a complete environmental review of the HSE program under the terms of Executive Order 121 14, ''Environmental Effects Abroad of Major federal Actions''. This Executive Order requires review of projects which involve the release of potentially toxic effluents that are strictly regulated in the United States, or which may have significant environmental effects on the global commons, on natural or ecological resources of international significance, or on the environment of non-participating countries. The final guidelines implementing the provisions of the Executive Order for DOE have been published. This evaluation deals with testing to be conducted at Cesano, Italy by the designated contractor of the Italian government, the Ente Narionale per l'Energia Ellectrica (ENEL), and at Broadlands, New Zealand by the Ministry of Works and Development of New Zealand. Testing at Cerro Prieto, Mexico has already been completed by the Comision Federal de Electricidad and is not evaluated in this report.

Webb, J.W.; Mezga, L.J.; Reed, A.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A novel method of hydrogen generation by water electrolysis using an ultra-short-pulse power supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method of hydrogen generation by water electrolysis using ultra-short-pulse power supply is ... pulse with the width of 300 ns, electrolysis takes place with a mechanism dominated by ... from the conventi...

Naohiro Shimizu; Souzaburo Hotta; Takayuki Sekiya…

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system for a diesel engine. The sprays were injected… (more)

Payne, Stephen Ellis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system for a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with quartz...

Payne, Stephen Ellis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Solar Energy Water Desalination in the United States and Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect

Five solar energy water desalination systems are described. The systems will each deliver 6000 m3/day of desalted water from either seawater or brackish water. After the system definition study is completed in August 1981, two systems will be selected for pilot plant construction. The pilot plants will have capacities in the range of 1 00 to 400 m3/day.

Luft, W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hydordesulfurization of dibenzothiophene using hydrogen generated in situ by the water-gas shift reaction in a trickle bed reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis BRUCE DAVID HOOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis by BRUCE...

Hook, Bruce David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

Emergency Water Treatment with Bleach in the United States: The Need to Revise EPA Recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) However, research has dispelled this myth, showing instead that populations have increased waterborne illness risk only in those emergencies that cause flooding or displacement,(3, 4) or when infrastructure systems are damaged and do not provide safe, chlorinated water. ... Colorado ... It should be noted that surface water supplies had by far the most total coliforms contamination, and thus surface water supplies (and in particular flood waters) should only be used if there are no other options for water supply by the emergency-affected population. ...

Daniele Lantagne; Bobbie Person; Natalie Smith; Ally Mayer; Kelsey Preston; Elizabeth Blanton; Kristen Jellison

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.  

SciTech Connect

As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie M.; Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Water | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Water Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 77.7 KiB)

188

Discharge source coupled to a deceleration unit for anion beam generation: Application to H{sub 2}{sup ?} photodetachment  

SciTech Connect

A cathode discharge source coupled to a deceleration unit for anion beam generation is described. The discharge source, made of stainless steel or duralumin electrodes and Macor insulators, is attached to the exit nozzle valve plate at one end, and to an Einzel lens to the other end. Subsequently, a cylindrical retardation unit is attached to the Einzel lens to decelerate the ions in order to optimize the laser beam interaction time required for spectroscopic investigations. The compact device is able to produce beam intensities of the order of 2 × 10{sup 12} anions/cm{sup 2} s and 20 ?rad of angular divergence with kinetic energies ranging from 30 to 120 eV. Using distinct gas mixtures for the supersonic expansion together with a linear time-of-flight spectrometer, anions of great relevance in molecular astrophysics like, for example, H{sub 2}{sup ?}, C{sub 3}H{sup ?}, C{sub 2}{sup ?}, C{sub 2}H{sup ?}, HCN{sub 2}{sup ?}, CO{sub 2}{sup ?}, CO{sub 2}H{sup ?}, C{sub 4}{sup ?}, C{sub 4}H{sup ?}, C{sub 5}H{sub 4}{sup ?}, C{sub 5}H{sub 6}{sup ?}, C{sub 7}N{sup ?}, and C{sub 10}N{sup ?} were produced. Finally, in order to demonstrate the capability of the experimental technique the photodetachment cross-section of the metastable H{sub 2}{sup ?}, predominantly in the (v = 0, J = 26) state, was measured following laser excitation at ?{sub exc}= 565 nm obtaining a value of ?{sub ph}= 0.04 Å. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that this anion cross-section has been measured.

Rudnev, V.; Ureña, A. González [Unidad de Láseres y Haces Moleculares, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Universidad Complutense, Juan XXIII-1, Madrid 28040 (Spain)] [Unidad de Láseres y Haces Moleculares, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Universidad Complutense, Juan XXIII-1, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Stability of gravity-capillary waves generated by a moving pressure disturbance in water of finite depth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stability of gravity-capillary waves generated by a moving pressure disturbance in water of finite pressure distribution moving with constant speed U in water of finite depth h . Localized solitary waves can only exist in subcritical flows where the Froude number F = U/(gh)1/2

190

The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in water and energy efficient technologies and policies of integrated water and energy efficiency. CWEE AFFILIATE GIFT PROGRAM Supporting innovations in integrated

California at Davis, University of

191

Causes of Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water in the United States from 1971 to 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...outbreak occurrence and transmission dynamics. J. Clin...Intelligence Service (EIS) officer, assigned...of waterborne disease transmission in the United States...Intelligence Service (EIS) officer in 2001 and...Diseases epidemiology transmission Disease Outbreaks Disease...

Gunther F. Craun; Joan M. Brunkard; Jonathan S. Yoder; Virginia A. Roberts; Joe Carpenter; Tim Wade; Rebecca L. Calderon; Jacquelin M. Roberts; Michael J. Beach; Sharon L. Roy

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

Comparison of Advanced Residential Water Heating Technologies in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage, gas tankless, condensing, electric storage, heat pump, and solar water heaters were simulated in several different climates across the US installed in both conditioned and unconditioned space and subjected to several different draw profiles. While many preexisting models were used, new models of condensing and heat pump water heaters were created specifically for this work.

Maguire, J.; Fang, X.; Wilson, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector entities. The photoelectrochemical hydrogen task included formal collaborations with three universities and one national laboratory. The formal participants in these two tasks are listed above. Informal collaborations in both projects included one additional university (the University of Nevada, Reno) and two additional national laboratories (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory).

Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants  

SciTech Connect

Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the US Jeff Maguire 4/30/13 Outline * Why HPWHs? * US Water Heating Market * Overview of HPWHs * Model Description * Results o HPWH Performance o Energy Savings Potential o Breakeven Cost 2 Heat Pump Water Heaters Save $300 a year over standard electric? Save $100 a year over standard gas? Heat Pump Electric Gas 3 Questions about HPWHs * Are HPWHs a good replacement for typical gas and electric storage water heaters? o In different locations across the country? o In conditioned/unconditioned space? o Source energy savings?

198

Haloacetic acids in swimming pool and spa water in the United States and China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to investigate the occurrence of haloacetic acids (HAAs), a group of disinfection byproducts, in swimming pool and spa water. The samples were collected from six indoor pools, six o...

Xiaomao Wang; Garcia Leal M I; Xiaolu Zhang…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Laser-driven shock experiments in pre-compressed water: Implications for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets  

SciTech Connect

Laser-driven shock compression of pre-compressed water (up to 1 GPa precompression) produces high-pressure, -temperature conditions in the water inducing two optical phenomena: opacity and reflectivity in the initially transparent water. The onset of reflectivity at infrared wavelengths can be interpreted as a semi-conductor to electronic conductor transition in water and is found at pressures above {approx}130 GPa for single-shocked samples pre-compressed to 1 GPa. This electronic conduction provides an additional contribution to the conductivity required for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets like Uranus and Neptune.

Lee, K; Benedetti, L R; Jeanloz, R; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Moon, S J; Mackinnon, A; Henry, E; Koenig, M; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Collins, G W

2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

EIS-0086: Conversion to Coal, New England Power Company, Salem Harbor Generating Station Units 1, 2, and 3 Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Units I, 2, and 3 of the Salem Harbor Generating Station from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EIS-0105: Conversion to Coal, Baltimore Gas & Electric Company, Brandon Shores Generating Station Units 1 and 2, Anne Arundel County, Maryland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Economic Regulatory Administration Office of Fuels Program, Coal and Electricity Division prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with prohibiting the use of petroleum products as a primary energy source for Units 1 and 2 of the Brandon Shores Generating Station, located in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

202

Water Loss Test Results for the West Main Pipeline United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measured from the original canal we see an average water savings of 78%. While this would be considered much improvement, the district?s expectations for their new pipeline were higher. Following minor repairs, due to the apparent leakage occurring... measured from the original canal we see an average water savings of 78%. While this would be considered much improvement, the district?s expectations for their new pipeline were higher. Following minor repairs, due to the apparent leakage occurring...

Leigh, E.; Fipps, G.

203

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Definition: British thermal unit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal unit thermal unit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png British thermal unit The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit; often used as a unit of measure for the energy content of fuels.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The British thermal unit (BTU or Btu) is a traditional unit of energy equal to about 1055 joules. It is the amount of energy needed to cool or heat one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. In scientific contexts the BTU has largely been replaced by the SI unit of energy, the joule. The unit is most often used as a measure of power (as BTU/h) in the power, steam generation, heating, and air conditioning industries, and also as a measure of agricultural energy production (BTU/kg). It is still used

205

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States *Barbara L. Rowe1 , Patricia L. Toccalino2 , Michael J. Moran1 , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA

206

Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

International cooperation between the United States and Mexico: addressing water quality of the Lower Rio Grande  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerns, and later concentrates on the United States/Mexico border and transboundary issues in the Rio Grande Basin. Policy Building and Sttstainable Development Ascher and Healy (1990), focusing their analysis on third world nations, approach... provides insight into pitfalls of policy development in third world nations. The 19 pitfalls often are apparent in natural resource depletion, environmental degradation, and inefficiencies in aiding populations, usually poor, who were to benefit from...

Crouch, Kellie Gene

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Belgian approach to steam generator tube plugging for primary water stress corrosion cracking  

SciTech Connect

For a number of years, three Belgian nuclear power plants have experienced primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in the expansion transition area on a very large number of tubes. One of the plants has part depth rolled tubes and the others have full depth expansion. The report presents a review of the leakage experience associated with (PWSCC) in the Doel 2, Doel 3 and Tihange 2 Nuclear Power Plants and illustrates the type of cracking observed on pulled tubes from Doel 2 and Doel 3. The Belgian units operate with numerous through wall cracks without impairing the safety and the reliability of the plants. This is achieved by a safety approach based on the extensive use of advanced non-destructive examination (NDE) techniques and the development of new plugging limits. These limits are derived from a realistic interpretation of NRC Regulatory Guide 1.121 and are backed up by a substantial experimental program. The report summarizes the establishment of plugging limits for both axial and circumferential cracks in the roll transition area of full depth rolled tubes. The LABORELEC eddy current rotating probe (RPC) technology and associated crack sizing methodology are also described. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Frederick, G. (TRACTEBEL, Brussels (Belgium)); Hernalsteen, P.; Dobbeni, D. (Laboratoire Belge de l'Industrie Electrique (LABORELEC), Linkebeek (Belgium))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW (low level waste) disposal units: Annual report, October 1985-September 1986  

SciTech Connect

In the humid eastern part of the United States, trench covers have, in general, failed to prevent some of the incident precipitation from percolating downward to buried wastes. It is the purpose of the present work to investigate and demonstrate a procedure or technique that will control water infiltration to buried wastes regardless of above or below ground disposal. Results to date show the proposed procedure to be very promising and are applicable to shallow land burial as well as above ground disposal (e.g., Tumulus). In essence, the technique combines engineered or positive control of run-off, along with a vegetative cover, and is named ''bioengineering management''. To investigate control of infiltration, lysimeters are being used to make complete water balance measurements. The studies have been underway at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky, low-level waste disposal facility for the past three seasonal years. When the original Maxey Flats site closure procedure is followed, it is necessary to pump large amounts of water out of the lysimeters to prevent the water table from rising closer than 2 meters from the surface. Using the bioengineering management procedure, no pumping is required. As a result of the encouraging initial findings in the rather small-scale lysimeters at Maxey Flats, a large-scale facility for demonstration of the bioengineering management technique has been constructed at Beltsville, Maryland. This facility is now operational with the demonstration and data collection underway. 6 refs., 15 figs.

Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O'Donnell, E.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Impacts of Water Loop Management on Simultaneous Heating and Cooling in Coupled Control Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impacts of the water loop management on the heating and cooling energy consumption are investigated by using model simulation. The simulation results show that the total thermal energy consumption can be increased by 24% for a typical AHU in San...

Guan, W.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Potentially Pathogenic Bacteria in Shower Water and Air of a Stem Cell Transplant Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...E-mail: la249cornell.edu 1 Department of Energy, Environmental Chemical Engineering...141-147. 14 Chate, R. A. 2006. An audit improves the quality of water within the...in background levels. | Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering...

Sarah D. Perkins; Jennie Mayfield; Victoria Fraser; Largus T. Angenent

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Generation of a novel 1 km NDVI data set over Canada, the northern United States, and Greenland based on historical AVHRR data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time series of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from satellite observations provide important information on the state of terrestrial vegetation over a wide range of spatiotemporal scales. For understanding long-term changes in terrestrial ecosystems (post-1981), data collected by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board the satellites of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) series is a unique source of information. In this paper, we describe a new processing methodology for a comprehensive AVHRR data set at 1 km spatial resolution acquired over Canada, the northern United States and Greenland post-1981. The methodology incorporates a pre-processing algorithm, Canadian AVHRR Processing System (CAPS), recently developed by the Canada Centre of Remote Sensing (CCRS), which enables highly accurate geolocation and ortho-rectification at efficiency rates of > 90%. Once image navigation is completed, our approach consists of five key steps: first, two clear-sky composites for each 10 day interval are generated from the forward or backward scattering hemisphere; second, AVHRR Channel 1 and 2 reflectances are normalized to the AVHRR/3 on board NOAA-17 to account for differences in the spectral response function among the AVHRR sensors; third, atmospheric correction is performed using the Simplified Method for Atmospheric correction (SMAC) algorithm, using standard meteorological data sets (water vapor, surface level air pressure, ozone); fourth, NDVI is calculated based on atmospherically corrected Channel 1 and 2 reflectances; and finally, the NDVI is adjusted for directional effects based on the Ross-Thick Li-Sparse Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model. The processed NDVI data are compared to an equivalent spatially and temporally overlapping MODIS NDVI data set from 2001 to 2005 for validation. Results at continental scale indicate that time series of MODIS and AVHRR were similar for a wide range of biomes and generalized ecoregions. Analysis stratified by land cover indicated that the correlation was strongest for homogeneous land cover types, such as cropland, when compared to structurally more diverse classes, such as deciduous broadleaf forests. The comparison of the NDVI at the local scale at seven sites of the Fluxnet Canada Research Network resulted in the correlation coefficient r = 0.95. Given confidence in the processing approach, this NDVI data set can be a valuable source of information for climate and vegetation-related studies over Canada and the northern United States.

Fabio M.A. Fontana; Nicholas C. Coops; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov; Alexander P. Trishchenko; Michael Riffler; Michael A. Wulder

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluates water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria.

214

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein was not carried out in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation

Columbia University

215

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein of Bio in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation and Disposition

216

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge  

SciTech Connect

Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

217

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010...

218

Asymptotic models for the generation of internal waves by a moving ship, and the dead-water phenomenon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotic models for the generation of internal waves by a moving ship, and the dead occurs when a ship sails in a stratified fluid, and experiences an important drag due to waves below is then provided, in order to predict the behavior of the flow and in which situations the dead-water effect

Boyer, Edmond

219

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 C-617-A Sanitarv Waterline- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: - REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Between southeast corner of C-531 Switchyard and C-617-A Water Treatment Facility. 4 feet...

220

Solving chemical and mechanical problems of PWR steam generators  

SciTech Connect

Steam generators in power plants, based on pressurized water reactors (PWRs), transfer heat from a primary coolant system (pressurized water) to a secondary coolant system. Primary coolant water is heated in the core and passes through the steam generator that transfers heat to the secondary coolant water to make steam. The steam then drives a turbine that turns an electric generator. Steam is condensed and returned to the steam generator as feedwater. Two types of PWR steam generators are in use: recirculating steam generators (RSGs) and once-through steam generators (OTSGs). Since most of the units are vertical, only vertical units are discussed in this article. Some vertical units have operated with a minimum of problems, while others have experienced a variety of corrosion and mechanically-induced problems that have caused unscheduled outages and expensive repairs.

Green, S.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States: A review of current understanding  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves between water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be adsorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rates commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: (1) polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides; (2) carbamate and organophosphorus; (3) herbicides; (4) phenols; (5) halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (6) phthalate esters; (7) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and (8) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Process that influence the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate process are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison to concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where sufficient data exist, regional and temporal contamination trends in the US are discussed. 699 refs., 26 figs., 47 tabs.

Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, P.J.; Fusillo, T.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Sustainability: U.S. Electricity Consumption for Water116 Table 38: Electricity Consumption/Generation at SWPattributional LCA of electricity consumption in the United

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermo-acoustic Sound Generation in the Interaction of Pulsed Proton and Laser Beams with a Water Target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The generation of hydrodynamic radiation in interactions of pulsed proton and laser beams with matter is explored. The beams were directed into a water target and the resulting acoustic signals were recorded with pressure sensitive sensors. Measurements were performed with varying pulse energies, sensor positions, beam diameters and temperatures. The obtained data are matched by simulation results based on the thermo-acoustic model with uncertainties at a level of 10%. The results imply that the primary mechanism for sound generation by the energy deposition of particles propagating in water is the local heating of the medium. The heating results in a fast expansion or contraction and a pressure pulse of bipolar shape is emitted into the surrounding medium. An interesting, widely discussed application of this effect could be the detection of ultra-high energetic cosmic neutrinos in future large-scale acoustic neutrino detectors. For this application a validation of the sound generation mechanism to high accur...

Lahmann, R; Graf, K; Hößl, J; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Mecke, K; Schwemmer, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Foreign offshore worker injuries in foreign waters: why a United States forum  

SciTech Connect

When foreigners are injured or killed in offshore oil operations in foreign jurisdictional waters, US laws do not always apply as they would if the plaintiffs are American or resident aliens. The courts must first consider whether the Jones Act, Death on the High Seas Act, general maritime law, or a combination of laws applies and whether the court should assume jurisdiction or use the doctrine of forum non conveniens. Cases involving foreign offshore workers are used to illustrate the factors involved in each application and to consider the foreign-policy implication when foreign nationals assume that American laws and morality accompany multinational business. Congress has yet to resolve the issues, although a bill was proposed in 1980. 75 references. (DCK)

Sutterfield, J.R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Solar Generator Performance with Load Matching to Water Electrolysis Longterm Averages and Range of Instantaneous Efficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficiency of producing hydrogen by solar energy conversion via solar cells and water electrolysis is determined by the performance of the ... wired to an electronic simulation of an advanced water electrolys...

K. Freudenberg

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The role of water in generation of group II kimberlite magmas: Constraints from multiple saturation experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...segregation occurred within the studied range of water concentrations, the water solubility in the kimberlite melt exceeded 9 wt%, and...Surovtsev, N.V. (2007) Incongruent melting of gallium nitride at 7.5 GPa. Diamond and Related Materials...

Alexander G. Sokol; Alexey N. Kruk; Yury N. Palyanov

227

Life Cycle Water Consumption and Wastewater Generation Impacts of a Marcellus Shale Gas Well  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relative importance of water consumption was analyzed by integrating the method into the Eco-indicator-99 LCIA method. ...

Mohan Jiang; Chris T. Hendrickson; Jeanne M. VanBriesen

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

229

Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-point Source Water Pollution Motor vehicles are a majorpreventing water pollution from motor vehicles would be muchcosts of controlling water pollution from motor vehicles. It

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

Robertson, Eric P

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

Control of water infiltration into near surface low-level waste disposal units. Final report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

This study`s objective was to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work was carried out in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (70 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration were investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management.

Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O`Donnell, E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Trade-offs of Water Use for Hydropower Generation and Biofuel Production in the Zambezi Basin in Mozambique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the Zambezi basin in Mozambique, hydropower production is an important economic resource, with substantial development envisaged for the next decades. Irrigated agriculture currently plays a minor role, but irrigation development has a large potential and is an important government policy goal, especially aiming at the cultivation of biofuel crops. This contribution assesses interrelations and trade-offs between these two water-dependent development options. Scenario simulations under different climate and development assumptions show that adverse impacts of irrigation withdrawal on hydropower are low. Consequently, the use of water for irrigated agriculture can generate higher economic benefits than the use for hydropower production.

Philipp Stanzel; Harald Kling; Kit Nicholson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@BCL@A8059DC2.DOC (DO NOT DELETE) 8/17/2009 7:50 AM 428 COMPARATIVE WATER LAW AND MANAGEMENT: THE YELLOW RIVER BASIN IN WESTERN CHINA AND THE STATE OF KANSAS IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Burke W. Griggs Counsel, Division of Water Resources... Kansas Department of Agriculture John C. Peck Professor of Law, University of Kansas School of Law Special Counsel, Foulston Siefkin, LLP Xue Yunpeng Deputy Division Chief / Senior Engineer Department of Water Resources Management and Regulation Yellow...

Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

An integrated model to compare net electricity generation for CO?- and water-based geothermal systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Utilization of supercritical CO2 as a geothermal fluid instead of water has been proposed byBrown in 2000 and its advantages have been discussed by him… (more)

Agarwal, Vikas, 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Bio-Inspired Polymer Composite Actuator and Generator Driven by Water Gradients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we describe the development of a water-responsive polymer film. Combining both a rigid matrix (polypyrrole) and a dynamic network (polyol-borate), strong and flexible polymer films were developed that can exchange ...

Ma, Mingming

236

Decomposition Mechanism of Fluorinated Compounds in Water Plasmas Generated Under Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed a DC water plasma torch which with a cathode of...16...]. The hafnium used as cathode material can overcome the erosion problems and achieve a long operating time in oxidation atmospheric. The torch ...

Narengerile; Hironori Saito; Takayuki Watanabe

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

investigating the source, transport, and isotope fractionation of water vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigating the source, transport, and isotope fractionation of water vapor in the atmospheric cospectral similarity for temperature and water vapor isotope fluxes. mixing ratio generator Routine field use in water vapor isotope research. The unit generates a stable water vapor mixing ratio by measuring

Minnesota, University of

238

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

239

Removal of Filter Cake Generated by Manganese Tetraoxide Water-based Drilling Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three effective solutions to dissolve the filter cake created by water-based drilling fluids weighted with Mn3O4 particles were developed. Hydrochloric acid at concentration lower than 5 wt% can dissolve most of Mn3O4-based filter cake. Dissolving...

Al Mojil, Abdullah Mohammed A.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Vorticity Generation in the Shallow-Water Equations as Applied to Hydraulic Jumps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors attempt to find a bridge between the vorticity dynamics of a finite cross-stream length hydraulic jump implied by the Navier-Stokes equations and that given by the shallow-water approximation (SWA) with the turbulence of the hydraulic ...

Richard Rotunno; Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Generating Singlet Oxygen Bubbles: A New Mechanism for Gas–Liquid Oxidations in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our interest in developing a singlet oxygen [1O2 (1?g)]-sparging reactor came from small-scale devices for disinfection of, for example, municipal and well water, but which used filtration, ozone, and/or UV light. ... In front of the A10449 mechanical shutter of the detector was placed either a 25-mm-diameter, 1150 nm long pass filter (FEL1150, Thorlabs Inc.) or one of three 25-mm-diameter NIR bandpass filters centered at 1220, 1270, and 1315 nm (OD4 blocking, fwhm = 15 nm, Omega, Brattleboro, VT). ... (19) Drying of the composite was done at 50 °C for 10 h to avoid destruction of the confined phthalocyanine molecules, producing an aerogel that shrunk ?10% where some, but not all adsorbed water was removed. ...

Dorota Bartusik; David Aebisher; BiBi Ghafari; Alan M. Lyons; Alexander Greer

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

242

AIR-FLOW STRUCTURE IN THE VERY CLOSE VICINITY OF WIND GENERATED WATER-WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to : , with the air-density, u and w the horizontal and vertical components of the wind speed, u* the friction and the viscous drag at the sea sur- face, we build two new microphysical devices: 1) the wind-speed vertical of the vertical profile of the normalized phase-averaged wind-speed in the air-viscous layer (1mm above water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

243

The Trans-Africa Pipeline: Building a Sustainable Water Generation and Distribution Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Trans-Africa Pipeline (TAP), the vision of University of Toronto professor emeritus Rod Tennyson, aims to mitigate poverty, disease, desertification, and conflict in Africa’s Sahel1 region through the daily provision of roughly one billion litres of fresh water to 20 million people for domestic and agricultural use (Tennyson, n.d; Tennyson et al, n.d). As the effects of climate change become more pronounced,

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Large Field Erected and Packaged High Temperature Water (HTW) Generators for Coal Firing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and closer temperature control. The heat storage capacity of water per cubic foot is considerably greater than steam at equivalent saturation pressures, as shown in Table No. II (below). This inherent reserve or "fly wheel" effect permits closer... furnace and convection section. Coal ash fouling characteristics will have a bearing on the convection section tube spacing. Low grade coals should be reviewed for their slagging and fouling characteristics. For example, lignite and low grade coals...

Boushell, C. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Graphite-moderated, gas-cooled, and water-moderated, water-cooled reactors as power units in nuclearelectric power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article reviews a number of papers submitted at the Second International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy bearing on water-cooled, water-moderated, graphite-moderated, and gas-coole...

Yu. I. Koryakin

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

United States Environmental Protection Agency Perchlorate Method 332.0 via Microbore and Capillary Chromatographic Formats: Statistical Evaluation of the Use of 18O-Perchlorate Internal Standard with Deionized-Water Matrices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with a deionized-water matrix. The evaluation...matography (LC) and atmospheric-pressure-ionization...organic pollutants in water at trace levels...pump, an eluent generator, a conductivity...supplied by an eluent generator. Electrolytic suppressors...prepared in deionized water at 0.25, 0......

L.E. Vanatta; R.W. Slingsby

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Main Report and Appendix A: Evaluates water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects.

248

GENERAL SUPERSTRUCTURE AND GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION FOR THE DESIGN OF INTEGRATED PROCESS WATER NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of multiple sources of water, water-using processes, wastewater treatment and pre-treatment operations water re-use, water regeneration and re-use, water regeneration recycling, local recycling around, etc. These processes in turn generate wastewater, which is usually processed in treatment units before

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

249

Internal wave generation by convection in water. Part 2. Numerical simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water's density maximum at 4C makes it well suited to study internal gravity wave excitation by convection: an increasing temperature profile is unstable to convection below 4C, but stably stratified above 4C. We present numerical simulations of water near its density maximum in a two dimensional tank, similar to the experiment described in a companion paper (Le Bars et al. 2015). The simulations agree very well with the experiments, despite differences in lateral boundary conditions in the two systems. We successfully model the damping of waves in the simulations using linear theory, provided we do not take the weak damping limit typically used in the literature. In order to isolate the physical mechanism exciting internal waves, we use the novel spectral code Dedalus to run several simulations of the simulation. We use data from the full simulation as source terms in two simplified models of internal wave excitation by convection: bulk excitation by convective Reynolds stresses, and interface forcing via th...

Lecoanet, Daniel; Burns, Keaton J; Vasil, Geoffrey M; Brown, Benjamin P; Quataert, Eliot; Oishi, Jeffrey S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

1-Methyl Naphthalene Reorientation at the Air-Liquid Interface upon Water Saturation Studied by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will encounter gas-phase water molecules or may react with atmospheric oxidants. The uptake and reaction1-Methyl Naphthalene Reorientation at the Air-Liquid Interface upon Water Saturation Studied by Vibrational Broad Bandwidth Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Elizabeth L. Hommel and Heather C. Allen

251

Analysis of the behavior of an experimental absorption heat transformer for water purification for different mass flux rates in the generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, first and second laws of thermodynamics have been used to analyse the performance of an experimental absorption heat transformer for water purification. Irreversibilities, coefficients of performance (COP) and exergy coefficients of performance (ECOP) were determined as function of the mass flow of hot water supplied to the generator and as function of the overall thermal specific energy consumption (OSTEC) parameter defined in this paper. The results showed that the system irreversibilities increase meanwhile the coefficients of performance and the exergy coefficient of performance decrease with an increment of the mass flow of hot water supplied to the generator. Also it was shown that the system performance is better when the production of purified water increases due to the increment of the heat recycled to the generator and evaporator.

Armando Huicochea; Wilfrido Rivera; Hiram Martínez; Javier Siqueiros; Erasmo Cadenas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Integrated assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) climate change projections on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In response to a congressional mandate, the US Global Change Research Program organized a National Assessment of Climate Change focusing on geographic regions (e.g. Alaska, Great Plains) and sectors (e.g. public health, agriculture, water resources). This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory contributing to the water sector analysis. The subsequent paper makes use of the water supply results to estimate the climate change impacts on irrigated agriculture. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous US to climate changes in 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095 as projected by the Hadley/United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) general circulation model (GCM; HadCM2) were modeled using the Hydrologic Unit Model for the United States (HUMUS). HUMUS, a biophysically based hydrology model, consists of a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the eight-digit United States Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Unit Area (HUA) of which there are 2101 in the conterminous US. Results are aggregated to the four- and two-digit (major water resource region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of maximum/minimum temperature and precipitation (PPT) from 1961 to 1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY), used as a measure of water supply for irrigation, increases from the 1961–1990 baseline period over most of the US in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm (35%) from baseline in the Pacific Northwest. Driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation, WY is projected to decrease in the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins. The HadCM2 (2095) scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in water yield increases of 38% on average. Water yield increases are projected to be significant throughout the eastern US—39% in the Ohio basin, for example. Water yields increase significantly in the western US, as well—57 and 76% in the Upper and Lower Colorado, respectively. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased water yields in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations [CO2] to account for the potential impacts of the ‘CO2-fertilization’ effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated [CO2] but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Norman J Rosenberg; Robert A Brown; R.Cesar Izaurralde; Allison M Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature RPSEA Final Report Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration for Ways to Reduce Operating Costs for Small Producers Project: 08123-10 April 30, 2012 Loy Sneary, President Robin Dahlheim, Sales Gulf Coast Green Energy 1801 7th St, Ste 230 Bay City, TX 77414 RPSEA 08123-10 Final Report Signature LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Gulf Coast Green Energy as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO

254

Energy Management in Olefins Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit...

Wells, T. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The role of the United States Water Resources Engineering Community in responding to the water related needs of the developing world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 5 Structure of Research. ? II DEVELOPING COUNTRIES AND THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS. . . . . 2. 1 Defining Development. . 2. 2 Defining World Regions. 2. 3 Development Indicators . . 2. 4 The Process of Development. 20 34 IH THE ROLE OF WATER... Benefits. . 4. 3 The Interrelationship of Benefits. . 57 57 63 CHAPTER V U. S. INVOLVEMENT IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES??. 5. 1 Need For U. S. Involvement. . 5. 2 General Assistance 5. 3 Water Resources Sector. Page 66 66 71 VI CHANNELS...

Ormond, Timothy Paul

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; preventionUnited States Environmental Protection Agency Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry/R-02/008 January 2002 Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry, and Assessment of Nitrogen

257

Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Learn about the Energy Department's commitment to develop and deploy clean, domestic power generation from hydropower, waves, and tides.

258

90-MW single-shaft power generating steam-gas unit based on the GTÉ-65 gas turbine and K-30-60 steam turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is an examination of a variant of the monoblock PGU-90 steam-gas unit developed at the “Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod” (LMZ) branch of “Silovye mashiny” based on a GTÉ-65 gas turbine unit and a K-30-...

A. S. Lebedev; O. V. Antonyuk; V. A. Mart’yanov…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units. Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland: Volume 8  

SciTech Connect

This study`s objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (75 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care.

Schulz, R.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ridky, R.W. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Geology; O`Donnell, E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units: Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

This study`s objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (70 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care.

Schulz, R.K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ridky, R.W. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; O`Donnell, E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor  

SciTech Connect

700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Nabhikiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai, PIN-400094 (India)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Scale-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations: Volume 5, North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5  

SciTech Connect

ANSI/ANS 8.1 requires that calculational methods for away-from- reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experiment. This report summarizes part of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial PWRs. Codes and data in the SCALE-4 code system were used. This volume documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. The KENO V.a criticality calculations for the North Anna 1 Cycle 5 beginning-of-cycle model yielded a value for k{sub eff} of 1. 0040{+-}0.0005.

Bowman, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Suto, T. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template A remotely-operated lidar for aerosol, temperature, and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template A remotely-operated lidar for aerosol, temperature, and water vapor profiling in the High Arctic. G. J. Nott, T. J. Duck, J. G. Doyle, M. E. W. Coffin, C. Perro, C. P. Thackray, and J. R. Drummond Department of Physics and Atmospheric

Duck, Thomas J.

264

The combined system for fuel supply of fuel cells on the basis of the aluminum-water hydrogen generator and the metal hybride hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The system for fuel supply of a hydrogen-air fuel cell on the basis of the aluminum-water hydrogen generator and hydride-forming alloy as an intermediate gas storage has been developed. For a series of...4.5 ? x ...

I. V. Yanilkin; Ye. I. Shkol’nikov; S. N. Klyamkin; M. S. Vlaskin…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Measurements of photon ionizing radiation fields in the reactor room of the 4th power-generating unit of the chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radiation examination of the reactor room of the damaged fourth unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was performed. The most strongly radiating surfaces...

A. G. Volkovich; V. N. Potapov; S. V. Smirnov; L. I. Urutskoev…

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evaluation of Selective Ion Exchange Resins for Removal of Mercury from the H-Area Water Treatment Unit  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated the ability of seven ion exchange (IX) resins, some of which were mercury specific, to remove mercury in H-Area WTU waters from three sources (Reverse Osmosis (RO) Feed, RO Permeate from Train A, and a mercury ''hot spot'' extraction well HEX 18). Seven ion exchange resins, including ResinTech CG8 and Dowex 21K (the cation and anion exchange resins currently used at the H-Area WTU) were screened against five alternative ion exchange materials plus an experimental blank. Mercury decontamination factors (DFs), mercury breakthrough, and post-test contaminant concentrations of IX resins were determined for each IX material tested.

Serkiz, S.M.

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

From Emergency to Fix: Point-of-Use Water Filtration Technology in Colonias Along the United States-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sanitation, health care, electricity and paved roads (Korc and Ford 2013, pg. 80). In August 2011, the EPA supported and promoted POU devices in a regional conference (“BienESTAR”) attended by stakeholders and researchers at the University of Texas – El... of the millions of people across the globe without access to it. In September 2010, the UN Human Rights Council confirmed that it was legally binding upon states to respect, protect, and fulfill the human “right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation...

Vandewalle, Emily Lauren

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Evaluation of cracking in feedwater piping adjacent to the steam generators in Nine Pressurized Water Reactor Plants  

SciTech Connect

Cracking in ASTM A106-B and A106-C feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to the steam generators in a number of pressurized water reactor plants. We received sections with cracks from nine of the plants with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Variations were observed in piping surface irregularities, corrosion-product, pit, and crack morphology, surface elmental and crystal structure analyses, and steel microstructures and mechanical properties. However, with but two exceptions, namely, arrest bands and major surface irregularities, we were unable to relate the extent of cracking to any of these factors. Tensile and fracture toughness (J/sub Ic/ and tearing modulus) properties were measured over a range of temperatures and strain rates. No unusual properties or microstructures were observed that could be related to the cracking problem. All crack surfaces contained thick oxide deposits and showed evidence of cyclic events in the form of arrest bands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fatigue striations on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces from one plant and possibly from three others. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a value of ..delta..sigma = 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses. Although surface irregularities and corrosion pits were sources for crack initiation and corrosion may have contributed to crack propagation, it is proposed that the overriding factor in the cracking problem is the presence of unforeseen cyclic loads.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.; Scott, R.G.

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

270

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Effect of Water on Hydrolytic Cleavage of Non-Terminal ?-Glycosidic Bonds in Cyclodextrins To Generate Monosaccharides and Their Derivatives in a Dimethyl Sulfoxide–Water Mixture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(4) Moreover, for the purpose of the high-yield production of such target chemicals as 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (5-HMF) and anhydrous saccharides, the DMSO–water mixture, in which the water–water hydrogen bonds are dramatically broken by the dipolar aprotic solvent, was found to be a promising binary mixture solvent. ... (20-26) This is because 5-HMF is regarded as a potential platform chemical with a wide application profile. ... (18, 19) Once we succeed in obtaining the reactive monomer from such biomass as starch (edible) and cellulose (inedible), this can meet the increasing demand for green and sustainable chemistry. ...

Hiroshi Kimura; Masaki Hirayama; Ken Yoshida; Yasuhiro Uosaki; Masaru Nakahara

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

Effect on the condition of the metal in A K-300-3.5 turbine owing to multicycle fatigue from participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation  

SciTech Connect

The effect on the condition of the rotor material owing to multicycle fatigue caused by variable stresses during participation of a power generating unit in grid frequency and power regulation is evaluated using the K-300-23.5 steam turbine as an example. It is shown that during normalized primary frequency regulation the safety factor is at least 50, while during automatic secondary regulation of frequency and power there is essentially no damage to the metal.

Lebedeva, A. I.; Zorchenko, N. V.; Prudnikov, A. A.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nanomaterial Composites for Next Generation Water Filters: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-197  

SciTech Connect

Under this CRADA, the Parties will produce and test a composite filter element that will remove particles, bacteria and viruses to produce safe drinking water.

Ginley, D.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Effects of draw solutions and membrane conditions on electricity generation and water flux in osmotic microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

membrane processes such as microfil- tration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, and reverse osmosis con. Such a water movement does not require external energy input like that in reverse osmosis; thus, FO is a low Keywords: Forward osmosis Osmotic microbial fuel cell Wastewater treatment Water flux Draw solution a b

276

Microfluidic system with integrated electroosmotic pumps, concentration gradient generator and fish cell line (RTgill-W1)--towards water toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidic system with integrated electroosmotic pumps, concentration gradient generator and fish that incorporates electroosmotic pumps, a concentration gradient generator and a fish cell line (rainbow trout gill concentration distribution of toxicant in a cell test chamber, (2) an electroosmotic (EO) pump chip

Le Roy, Robert J.

277

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4047 4047 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142254047 Varnish cache server Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The water factors presented may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

278

The desulfurization of flue gas at the Mae Moh Power Plant Units 12 and 13  

SciTech Connect

As pollution of air, water and ground increasingly raises worldwide concern, the responsible national and international authorities establish and issue stringent regulations in order to maintain an acceptable air quality in the environment. In Thailand, the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) takes full responsibility in environmental protection matters as well as in generating the electricity needed to supply the country`s very rapid power demand growth. Due to the rapidly increasing electricity demand of the country, EGAT had decided to install two further lignite-fired units of 300 MW each (Units 12 and 13) at the Mae Moh power generation station and they are now under construction. The arrangement and the capacity of all the power plant units are as shown. In 1989, EGAT started the work on the flue gas desulfurization system of Mae Moh power plant units 12 and 13 as planned. A study has been conducted to select the most suitable and most economical process for flue gas desulfurization. The wet scrubbing limestone process was finally selected for the two new units. Local limestone will be utilized in the process, producing a by-product of gypsum. Unfortunately, natural gypsum is found in abundance in Thailand, so the produced gypsum will be treated as landfill by mixing it with ash from the boilers of the power plants and then carrying it to the ash dumping area. The water from the waste ash water lake is utilized in the process as much as possible to minimize the requirement of service water, which is a limited resource. The Mae Moh power generation station is situated in the northern region of Thailand, 600 km north of Bangkok and about 30 km east of the town of Lampang, close to the Mae Moh lignite mine. Three lignite-fired units (Units 1-3) of 75 MW each, four units (Units 4-7) of 150 MW each and four units (Units 8-11) of 300 MW each are in operation.

Haemapun, C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

A preliminary evaluation model for reservoir hydrocarbon-generating potential established based on dissolved hydrocarbons in oilfield water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large number of oilfield water samples were analyzed in this work. Research ... relationship between the concentrations and distribution of dissolved hydrocarbons suggested that the contents and composition of ...

Hongjing Zhao; Weilin Sun; Baotian He; Bowen Mei…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Generation of non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in hetero-phase media of air with water aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of experimental investigations on non-thermal plasma generation using of high-voltage discharge in hetero-phase media of airflow at atmospheric pressure with liquid aerosol are presented in...B. subti...

Yu. S. Akishev; G. I. Aponin; M. E. Grushin…

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

CONVERT 15 WELLS TO BORS PUMPING UNITS AND TEST/COMPARE TO CONVENTIONAL UNITS  

SciTech Connect

A new type of fluid lifting equipment called Balanced Oil Recovery System (trade named BORS Lift{trademark}) was installed on several idle oil wells to demonstrate the operating efficiency of this innovative equipment technology. The BORS Lift system is designed to bring oil to the surface without the accompanying formation water. The BORS Lift system uses an innovative strap mechanism that takes oil from the top of the downhole oilwater column and lifts it to the surface, eliminating production of the formation water. Eliminating salt water production could potentially increase oil production, reduce operational costs, benefit the environment, and cut salt water disposal costs. Although the BORS Lift units did not function as intended, lessons learned during the course of the field demonstration project resulted in improvements in the technology and redesign of subsequent generation BORS Lift units which are reported to have significantly improved their performance characteristics. BORS Lift units were installed on 15 temporarily abandoned wells which had been shut down due to low oil production, high water production, and uneconomic operating conditions. The wells had been producing with artificial lift at a high watercut from a shallow (850-900 feet), pressure depleted oil sand reservoir prior to being shut down. The electrical motor driven BORS Lift units provided a possible approach for economically returning the shallow, low-volume oil wells to production. The BORS Lift units used in this field demonstration were designed to recover up to roughly 22 barrels of fluid per day from depths ranging to 1,700 feet, ideal for many marginal stripper well operations. The BORS units were first-production-model test units, operated under oil field conditions for the first time, and were naturally expected to experience some design problems. From the onset, the operator experienced mechanical, design, and operational problems with the BORS Lift units and was unable to maintain un-interrupted production operations. The inventor provided considerable on-site technical support in an ongoing effort to correct the problems with the units and the inventor worked extensively with the operator to make design and manufacturing changes to the units to try to improve their reliability and performance. The operational problems were mostly related to the durability of the various components under oil field operating conditions such as inadequate mechanical, electrical, and electronic design for rough service, extended operation, and severe weather conditions. During the course of the demonstration project, it further appeared that the producing formation lacked sufficient reservoir energy and/or favorable oil properties to mobilize and displace oil from the formation into the well bore in order to recharge the oil column in the well. The BORS Lift units were then moved to a second lease which appeared to have more favorable WTI quality oil properties. Eight of these units were reported to have been installed and placed in operation on the second lease, however, operational difficulties continued. It was determined that the units were inadequately designed and would need to be replace by improved second generation units. Due to the lack of success with the first generation units and the extra cost to replace them with the redesigned units, the operators decided not to continue with the project and the project was terminated at that point.

Walter B. North

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

282

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTV-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and TVA. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a frequency of approximately 60 hertz at the outgoing terminals of the Cumberland

283

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTVI-1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

284

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule JW-2-F Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Florida Power Corporation (or Progress Energy Florida, hereinafter called the Company). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric energy generated at the Jim Woodruff Project (hereinafter called the Project) and sold to the Company in wholesale quantities. Points of Delivery: Power sold to the Company by the Government will be delivered at the connection of the Company's transmission system with the Project bus. Character of Service: Electric power delivered to the Company will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 cycles per second.

285

Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

286

Unitized Design for Home Refueling Appliance for Hydrogen Generation to 5,000 psi - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Timothy Norman (Primary Contact), Monjid Hamdan Giner, Inc. (formerly Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC) 89 Rumford Avenue Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0556 Email: tnorman@ginerinc.com DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0001486 Project Start Date: August 15, 2010 Project End Date: August 14, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Detail design and demonstrate subsystems for a unitized * electrolyzer system for residential refueling at 5,000 psi to meet DOE targets for a home refueling appliance (HRA) Fabricate and demonstrate unitized 5,000 psi system * Identify and team with commercialization partner(s) * Technical Barriers

287

Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

288

High pressure water pyrolysis of coal to evaluate the role of pressure on hydrocarbon generation and source rock maturation at high maturities under geological conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the effect of water pressure on hydrocarbon generation and source rock maturation at high maturities for a perhydrous Tertiary Arctic coal, Svalbard. Using a 25 ml Hastalloy vessel, the coal was pyrolysed under low water pressure (230–300 bar) and high water pressure (500, 700 and 900 bar) conditions between 380 °C and 420 °C for 24 h. At 380 °C and 420 °C, gas yields were not affected by pressure up to 700 bar, but were reduced slightly at 900 bar. At 380 °C, the expelled oil yield was highest at 230 bar, but reduced significantly at 900 bar. At 420 °C cracking of expelled oil to gas was retarded at 700 and 900 bar. As well as direct cracking of the coal, the main source of gas generation at high pressure at both 380 °C and 420 °C is from bitumen trapped in the coal, indicating that this is a key mechanism in high pressure geological basins. Vitrinite reflectance (VR) was reduced by 0.16 %Ro at 380 °C and by 0.27 %Ro at 420 °C at 900 bar compared to the low pressure runs, indicating that source rock maturation will be more retarded at higher maturities in high pressure geological basins.

Clement N. Uguna; Andrew D. Carr; Colin E. Snape; Will Meredith

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Water Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency Water Efficiency Water is one of our most precious natural resources, and although the United States has an abundant supply, it is not evenly distributed...

290

Breakout Group 3: Water Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ideas: - Water imaging, (with that of other cell component substances) - diffusivity measurement (2) - Confirmed diagnostics to map water at full-size unit cell in-situ (water...

291

API unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

API unit [An arbitrary unit of the American Petroleum Institute for measuring natural radioactivity; used in certain well logging methods] ? API-Einheit f

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

According to the United Nations, universities have a vital role to play in shaping the way in which future generations cope with the complexi-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are key in relation to sustainability in order to decide whether specific initiatives, for example energy future generations cope with the complexi- ties of sustainable development. Aarhus University's BSc programme in Economics and Business Administration ­ Sustainability combines classic business administration

293

Specific activity of243Am and243Cm in the fuel of the 4th power-generating unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activity ratios241Am/241Am.243Cm/244Cm, and242Cm/244Cm in core samples taken at the industrial site of the object “Cover” were measured. The content of243Am and243Cm in the fuel in the 4th power-generating un...

V. A. Ageev; S. L. Vyrichek; A. P. Lashko; T. N. Lashko; A. A. Odintsov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect

Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

An Assessment of Use, Need for, and Capacity to Integrate Climate Information Among Water Managers in Southeastern United States and the ACF Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Assessment of Use, Need for, and Capacity to Integrate Climate Information Among Water Managers-year droughts, floods, and associated water management decisions have long concerned water managers in Western states. Similar concerns are now facing water managers in Southeastern states, including those in Georgia

Miami, University of

296

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

297

MHK Technologies/Syphon Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Syphon Wave Generator Syphon Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Syphon Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Syphon Wave Generator is composed of a horizontal pipe containing a propeller driven generator mounted above the highest normal wave at high tide and two or more vertical pipes at least one at each end of the horizontal pipe Each vertical pipe must extend below the water surface at all times and have openings below the surface All the air must be removed from the pipe thus filling the unit completely with water When the crest of a wave reaches the first vertical pipe the water level will be higher at that pipe than at the second vertical pipe This causes water to flow up the first pipe and through the horizontal pipe thus turning the propeller and generator to produce electricity and then down the second vertical pipe due to the siphon effect When the crest of the wave moves to the second vertical pipe the water level is higher there than at the first pipe This will cause the water to flow up the second pipe and through the system in the opposite direction again prod

298

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

Not Available

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/MBR system to remove carboxylates and BTEX from produced water in a field trial. Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide a better understanding of each component of the SMZ/VPB and SMZ/MBR process. Laboratory VPB studies were designed to address the issue of influent variability and periodic operation (see DE-FC26-02NT15461). These experiments examined multiple influent loading cycles and variable concentration loadings that simulate air sparging as the regeneration option for the SMZ system. Two pilot studies were conducted at a produced water processing facility near Farmington, New Mexico. The first field test evaluated SMZ adsorption, SMZ regeneration, VPB buffering, and VPB performance, and the second test focused on MBR and SMZ/MBR operation. The design of the field studies were based on the results from the previous field tests and laboratory studies. Both of the biological treatment systems were capable of removing the BTEX constituents in the laboratory and in the field over a range of operating conditions. For the VPB, separation of the BTEX constituents from the saline aqueous phase yielded high removal efficiencies. However, carboxylates remained in the aqueous phase and were not removed in the combined VPB/SMZ system. In contrast, the MBR was capable of directly treating the saline produced water and simultaneously removing the BTEX and carboxylate constituents. The major limitation of the MBR system is the potential for membrane fouling, particularly when the system is treating produced water under field conditions. The combined process was able to effectively pretreat water for reverse osmosis treatment and subsequent downstream reuse options including utilization in power generation facilities. The specific conclusions that can be drawn from this study are summarized.

Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Redox cycle stability of mixed oxides used for hydrogen generation in the cyclic water gas shift process  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified with CaO, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in cyclic water gas shift reactor. • For the first time stability of such oxides were tested for 100 redox cycles. • Optimally added oxides significantly improved the activity and the stability of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Increased stability was attributed to the impediment of neck formation. - Abstract: Repeated cycles of the reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with reductive gas, e.g. hydrogen and subsequent oxidation of the reduced iron material with water vapor can be harnessed as a process for the production of pure hydrogen. The redox behavior of iron oxide modified with various amounts of SiO{sub 2}, CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated in the present study. The total amount of the additional metal oxides was always below 15 wt%. The samples were prepared by co-precipitation using urea hydrolysis method. The influence of various metal oxides on the hydrogen production capacity and the material stability was studied in detail in terms of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET analysis. Furthermore, the activity and the stability of the samples were tested in repeated reduction with diluted H{sub 2} and re-oxidation cycles with H{sub 2}O. The results indicate that combination of several oxides as promoter increases the stability of the iron oxide material by mitigating the sintering process. The positive influence of the oxides in stabilizing the iron oxide material is attributed to the impediment of neck formation responsible for sintering.

Datta, Pradyot, E-mail: pradyot.datta@gmail.com

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A study of the future water requirements of the state of Texas and the projected plan to meet them as presented by the United States Study Commission - Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that my education could be continued. G. W. August, 1963 111 CONTENTS Page List of Tables List of Plates Chapter vi I. Introduction II. Water Resources I II. Water Requirements IV. The Water Development Plan 15 31 34 V. Views and Comments... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Sanuary, 1964 Major Subject Business Adzninistration A STUDY OF THE FUTURE WATER REQUIREMENTS. OF THE STATE OF TEXAS AND THE PROJECTED PLAN TO MEET...

Wortham, Gene Rye

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

303

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

304

Hot water geothermal development: opportunities and pilot plant results  

SciTech Connect

It has been projected that up to 11,000 MW of geothermal electric capacity may be on line in the United States by the year 2000. The majority of this capacity will come from hot water geothermal plants, as dry steam resources are limited. Currently, no commercial hot water geothermal capacity exists in the U.S., although, substantial capacity does exist in other countries. Large hot, high temperature resources exist in Southern California's Imperial Valley. Early research work has led to the technical success of a 10 MW unit at Brawley, and to the construction of second generation pilot unit at the Salton Sea resource.

Crane, G.K.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effects of water addition on OH radical generation and plasma properties in an atmospheric argon microwave plasma jet  

SciTech Connect

Water vapor was added to the feeding gas of a continuous atmospheric argon (Ar) microwave plasma jet to study its influence on plasma shape, plasma gas temperature, and OH radical concentrations. The plasma jet was created by a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma source operating at constant power of 104 W with H{sub 2}O-Ar mixture flow rate of 1.7 standard liter per minute (slm). With an increase in the H{sub 2}O/Ar ratio from 0.0 to 1.9%, the plasma jet column length decreased from 11 mm to 4 mm, and the plasma jet became unstable when the ratio was higher than 1.9%; elevation of plasma gas temperature up to 330 K was observed in the plasma temperature range of 420-910 K. Optical emission spectroscopy showed that the dominant plasma emissions changed from N{sub 2} in the pure Ar plasma jet to OH with the addition of water vapor, and simulations of emission spectra suggested non-Boltzmann distribution of the rotational levels in the OH A-state (v'=0). Spatially resolved absolute OH number densities along the plasma jet axis were measured using UV cavity ringdown spectroscopy of the OH (A-X) (0-0) band in the H{sub 2}O/Ar ratio range of 0.0-1.9%. The highest OH number density is consistently located in the vicinity of the plasma jet tip, regardless of the H{sub 2}O/Ar ratio. OH number density in the post-tip region follows approximately an exponential decay along the jet axis with the fastest decay constant of 3.0 mm in the H{sub 2}O/Ar ratio of 1.5%. Given the low gas temperature of 420-910 K and low electron temperature of 0.5-5 eV along the jet axis, formation of the OH radical is predominantly due to electron impact induced dissociation of H{sub 2}O and dissociative recombination of H{sub 2}O{sup +} resulting from the Penning ionization process.

Srivastava, Nimisha; Wang Chuji [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Energy Institute, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

Holinga IV, G.H.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Invited paper in the Proceedings of the United Engineering Foundation Conference on Risk-Based Decision-Making in Water Resources IX, "20-Year Retrospective and Prospective of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Invited paper in the Proceedings of the United Engineering Foundation Conference on Risk- Based with information from other sources, in the form of a business case [Bowles 2000b] for proceeding with dam safety

Bowles, David S.

308

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Several legislative acts are in place that could potentially impact water quality requirements and water use for fossil energy production as well as electricity generation. These acts regulate pollutant discharge and water intake directly and indirectly. Under regulations established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), these Acts serve to maintain and improve the Nation's water resources for uses including but not limited to agricultural, industrial, nutritional, and recreational purposes. The Clean Water Act - The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, more commonly known as the Clean Water Act, provides for the regulation of discharges to the nation's surface waters. To address pollution, the act specifies that the discharge of any pollutant by any person is unlawful except when in compliance with applicable permitting requirements. Initial emphasis was placed on "point source" pollutant discharge, but 1987 amendments authorized measures to address "non-point source" discharges, including stormwater runoff from industrial facilities. Permits are issued under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), which designates the highest level of water pollution or lowest acceptable standards for water discharges. NPDES permits are typically administered by the individual states. With EPA approval, the states may implement standards more stringent than federal water quality standards, but may not be less stringent. Certain sections of the Act are particularly applicable to water issues related to power generation. These include:

309

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

310

Local Generation Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Limited Place: United Kingdom Sector: Biomass Product: UK-based biomass firm developing anaerobic digestion plants. References: Local Generation Limited1 This article...

311

Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State  

SciTech Connect

There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Integrated solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an integral solar heating unit with an integral solar collector and hot water storage system, the unit comprising: (a) a housing; (b) a flat plate solar collector panel mounted in the housing and having a generally horizontal upper edge and an uninsulated, open back surface; (c) a cylindrical hot water tank operatively connected to the solar collector panel and mounted in the housing generally parallel to and adjacent to the upper edge; (d) the housing comprising a hood around the tank a pair of side skirts extending down at the sides of the panel. The hood and side skirts terminate at lower edges which together substantially define a plane such that upon placing the heating unit on a generally planar surface, the housing substantially encapsulates the collector panel and hot water tank in a substantially enclosed air space; (e) the collector including longitudinally extended U-shaped collector tubes and a glazed window to pass radiation through to the collector tubes, and a first cold water manifold connected to the tubes for delivering fresh water thereto and a second hot water manifold connected to the tubes to remove heated water therefrom. The manifolds are adjacent and at least somewhat above and in direct thermal contact with the tank; and, (f) the skirts and hood lapping around the collector panel, exposing only the glazed window, such that everything else in the heating unit is enclosed by the housing such that heat emanating from the uninsulated, open back face of the collector and tank is captured and retained by the housing to warm the manifolds.

Larkin, W.J.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Solar in Remote Applications in the United States | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

in Remote Applications in the United States Solar in Remote Applications in the United States Renewable energy and distributed generation resources have a critical role to play in...

314

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River...

315

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

174 10 12 92 UNIT NAME: C-745-K Low Level Storage Area REGULATORY STAU: -AOC LOCATION: Inside Security Fence , South of C-333 Cascade Building. APPROXIMATE...

316

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Diesel Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately southeast of C-611 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 1000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL...

317

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 KOW Toluene SDill Area UNIT NAME: REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southwest of plant site APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 feet wide by 800 feet ong FUNCTION: Storage of Toluene...

318

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 UNIT NAME C-746-Al REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Northwest corner of C-746-A APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 4000 gallons FUNCTION: Underground storage tanks OPERATIONAL STATUS:...

319

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Gasoline Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately east of C-61l APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 50 ga on FUNCTION: Gasoline storage OPERATIONAL...

320

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagram 1: A Typical Tank Water Heater Source: http://to-unit comparisons of tank versus tankless water heaters.Energy Use MJ/(unit*year) Tank Tankless MJ/(unit*year) Tank

Lu, Alison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.8,0.1,0.2,0.6,0.1 1,108.1,67.5,6.5,8.8,18.5,6.8 "2 or More",2.7,2.5,0.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,69.5,6.5,8.9,18.6,6.8 1,3.1,2.2,0.2,0.2,0.5,"Q"

322

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Security Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Water Security Program Water Security CustomersPartners Awards Key Publications Staff Biographies Water Security In many areas of the United States and multiple regions of...

323

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use Photo of a Temperate Wetland. Photo of a Temperate Wetland Applied Ecological Services, Inc. (AES) will study the use of restored wetlands to help alleviate the increasing stress on surface and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling requirements. The project will develop water conservation and cooling strategies using restored wetlands. Furthermore, the project aims to demonstrate the benefits of reduced water usage with added economic and ecological values at thermoelectric power plant sites, including: enhancing carbon sequestration in the corresponding wetlands; improving net heat rates from existing power generation units; avoiding limitations when low-surface

324

Analysis of field-test data from domestic solar-water heaters in the southern United States, period through September 1982  

SciTech Connect

The monitored performance data used here was gathered from 137 solar water heaters. All but 51 are located in Florida. The gathered data accumulated from weekly mailers consists of the following measurements: total gallons of hot water consumed; total kWh of electricity used; total hours the circulating pump operated; hot and cold water temperatures at the top; number of household members at home since last reading; tank thermostat setting and any changes to it; total number of hours that the tank's backup heating element had power available; and problems or comments concerning system operational status or component reliability and maintenance. The data analysis is described and results are presented. (MHR)

Jones, W.M.; Fenner, M.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The challenges of a water system management handover in eastern Ethiopia : from the United Nations Refugee Agency to a local community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the height of a political crisis in the late 1980s, hundreds of thousands of Somali refugees crossed into eastern Ethiopia. A humanitarian crisis soon unfolded as water was in short supply in the arid region. In ...

Chung, Christophe (Christopher J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Use of combined steam-water and organic rankine cycles for achieving better efficiency of gas turbine units and internal combustion engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Innovative concepts of recovering waste heat using low-boiling working fluids, due to which the the efficiency can be increased to 28–30%, are presented. If distributed generation of electricity or combined pr...

M. A. Gotovskiy; M. I. Grinman; V. I. Fomin; V. K. Aref’ev…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Kansas Corporation Commission This legislation permits the KCC to determine rate-making principles that will apply to a utility's investment in generation or transmission before constructing a facility or entering into a contract for purchasing power. There is no restriction on the type or the size of electric generating unit

328

TVA generating unit modeling using MATLAB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present paper, the numerical evaluation of Markov model transient behavior is considered. It is focused on finding the transient-state probabilities of well-known four Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) models. Three computational approaches are examined to find the three transient probabilities after modeling. These approaches are the Laplace Transforms, curve fitting and Neuro-Fuzzy. The MATLAB Simulink 7.10 package is used to obtain the transient state-probabilities for the four TVA models and at the same interval of time these solutions are reproduced by Laplace Transforms. For each model the three-state probabilities of the TVA models are derived. Each model is considered as a 3-state model, where its equations are obtained using the curve fitting and Neuro-Fuzzy techniques. All techniques used and applied in the present study are used to formulate and obtain the TVA models, where the Laplace Transforms is re-derived and re-used for a double check to model and obtain the results.

Mohamed Y. Al-Hamad; Isa S. Qamber

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Next Generation Radioisotope Generators | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

» Next Generation Radioisotope Generators » Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) - The ASRG is currently being developed as a high-efficiency RPS technology to support future space missions on the Martian surface or in the vacuum of space. This system uses Stirling convertors, which have moving parts to mechanically convert heat to electricity. This power conversion system, if successfully deployed, will reduce the weight of each RPS and the amount of Pu-238 needed per mission. A HISTORY OF MISSION SUCCESSES For over fifty years, the Department of Energy has enabled space exploration on 27 missions by providing safe reliable radioistope power systems and radioisotope heater units for NASA, Navy and Air Force.

330

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- I - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

332

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-333 North Side PCB Soil Contamination REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: North side of C-333 Building APPROXIMATE OIMENSIONS: 150 ft by 100 ft FUNCTION: Dust Palliative...

333

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 KPDES Outfall Ditch 017 Flume- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: - REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: South of plant on the west side of the access road APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 30 feet wide...

334

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME C-720 Inactive TCE Oegreaser REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: C-720 Building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: Approx. 10 ft by 10 ft by 20 f1: deep FUNCTION: Used for cleaning...

335

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 46 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: 2000 ft southwest of curve on Kentucky Highway 473- near east end of Mitchell Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: About 100 ft...

336

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME Rubble oile 45 REGULATORY STATUS AOC LOCATION: West end of Mitche Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 2000 ft long, ft thick 4 ft wide FUNCTION: Control erosion on face of dam...

337

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 43 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West end of Happy Ho ow Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long by 4 ft wide -concrete 4-6 in thickness FUNCTION:...

338

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 UNIT NAME C-740 TCE Soill Site REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Northwest corner C-740 concrete pad area) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 5 ft by 5 ft spill FUNCTION: Drum storage area...

339

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 C-I00 South Side Berms UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: South Side C-IOO APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 2 berms approximately 200 ft long by SO ft wide eac FUNCTION:...

340

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 UNIT NAME: C-331 PCB Soil Contamination -West Side REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West side C-331 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 100 feet wide by 420 feet long FUNCTION: Dust...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 C-750B Diesel UST UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-750 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 10,000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL STATUS: Removed...

342

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-633 PCB So111 Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-633 Transformer area (Mac location 75) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS I Unknown FUNCTION Soill site OPERATIONAL STATUS...

343

1.2 What pressure difference must be generated across the length of a 15 cm vertical drinking straw in order to drink a water-like liquid of density 1.0 g cm-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in order to drink a water-like liquid of density 1.0 g cm-3 ? 1.6 Charles' law is sometimes expressed1.2 What pressure difference must be generated across the length of a 15 cm vertical drinking straw

Findley, Gary L.

344

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 feet wide by 30 feet long FUNCTION: Provide cooling water for computer systems and HVAC systems various plant buildings. OPERATIONAL STATUS: Active DATES OPERATED: 1953 to...

345

Regional terrestrial water storage change and evapotranspiration from terrestrial and atmospheric water balance computations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like to thank Illinois State Water Survey for providing thecollected by the Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS) fromSurface water balance of the continental United States,

Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Famiglietti, J. S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

WATER CONSERVATION PLAN  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

i WATER CONSERVATION PLAN TONOPAH TEST RANGE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY January 10, 2011 Prepared for: Tonopah Test Range Post Office Box 871 Tonopah, Nevada 89049 (702)...

347

Alternative Water Resources for Utility-scale Solar Energy Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electricity generated from solar energy continues to increase throughout the United States, and several states in the southwestern United States are interested in the development of utility-scale solar energy to meet their established renewable energy portfolios. Water use by utility-scale solar facilities can be quite significant for some technologies, however, which is problematic considering that the best location for solar energy development—the southwestern United States—tends to be an arid environment. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility of using alternative water resources (reclaimed wastewater and produced water in this study) to meet water demands for utility-scale solar energy development, focusing specifically on Solar Energy Zones (SEZs) and Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZs). Our results indicate that, on average, 100% of the projected demand for water at most \\{SEZs\\} and \\{CREZs\\} could be met by reclaimed wastewater if photovoltaics (PV) are installed. If concentrating solar power (CSP) is installed, fewer \\{SEZs\\} could meet their potential water demand from alternative sources. Only 10 of the \\{CREZs\\} were located near sources of produced water, but of those, 100% of the water demand at the CREZ was met in 8 cases, regardless of the technology installed. Overall, the results from this analysis indicate that alternative waters can play a prominent role in meeting water demand at solar zones in the arid southwest.

D.J. Murphy; B.L. O’Connor; D.T. Mayhorn; L.I. Almer; E.E. Bowen; E.M. White; C. Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

SWMU ASSESSMENT REPORT UNIT NUMBER: AOC 205 I} UNIT NAME: Eastern...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNIT NUMBER: AOC 205 - I UNIT NAME: Eastern Portion of Yellow Water Line (tot f1 A DATE: AOC 205 notification submitted on June 10, 1996 u tI l'JO . REGULATORY STATUS:...

349

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,68.7,7.4,7.6,15.9,6.7 "2 or More",3.7,3.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater"

350

Changing the spatial location of electricity generation to increase water availability in areas with drought: a feasibility study and quantification of air quality impacts in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility, cost, and air quality impacts of using electrical grids to shift water use from drought-stricken regions to areas with more water availability were examined. Power plant cooling represents a large portion ...

Pacsi, Adam P

351

Water Loss Test Results for the Pipeline Units: I-19/I-18, I-7A, and I-22 Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................... ..9 Acknowledgements........................................................................................................................................... 13 List of Figures Figure 1. Photo of leaking pipeline control structure... I-19/I-18 52080 63653 58.4 71.3 SJ17 I-7A 50193 61347 56.2 68.7 J18 I-22 36490 44599 40.9 50.0 * Water loss rates given are based on an in-service use of 24 hours/day and 365 days/year. Figure 1 shows a leaking pipeline control structure...

Fipps, G.; Leigh, E.

352

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

353

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

354

Abstract 4475: New water-soluble and stable N-mustard-benzeneconjugates with potent antitumor activity, BO-2094, generated via leadoptimization by bioisostere approach.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2013; Washington, DC Abstract 4475: New water-soluble and stable N-mustard-benzeneconjugates...Biomedical Sci., Taipei, Taiwan. The water solubility of drug candidate plays an important...Previously, we have synthesized a series of water-soluble N-mustards, in which the phenyl...

Tsann-Long Su; Satishkumar Tala; Tai-Hsin Ou; Kiranben Tala; Rajesh Kakadiya; Yi-wen Lin; Chi-Wei Chen; Te-Chang Lee

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Biorefinery Grey Water Analysis | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

options for grey water generated from a biorefinery with fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating Wastewater treatment options for grey water generated from a biorefinery...

356

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

357

A NEW MULTIPLE-UNIT ELECTRODIALYSIS APPARATUS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...NEW MULTIPLE-UNIT ELECTRODIALYSIS APPARATUS 10.1126...NEW MULTIPLE-UNIT ELECTRODIALYSIS APPARATUS. | Journal...maturity, variety and treatment on the iodine value...CHICAGO, ILLINOIS WATER SOLUBLE MAGNESIUM...NEW MULTIPLE-UNIT ELECTRODIALYSIS ous fields of science...

Aasulv Löddesöl

1932-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

The water footprint of humanity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...America (the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Argentina...Ehrlich PR ( 1996 ) Human appropriation of renewable fresh water . Science 271 : 785 – 788 . 6...domestic water supply sector. Water use in energy production is included in the figures...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Mesfin M. Mekonnen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The water footprint of humanity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the United Arab Emirates (571), Egypt (527), Libya...policies (aimed to increase water use efficiency) versus consumption policies...domestic water supply sector. Water use in energy production is included in the figures...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Mesfin M. Mekonnen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The water footprint of humanity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the United Arab Emirates (571), Egypt (527...Ehrlich PR ( 1996 ) Human appropriation of renewable fresh water . Science 271 : 785 – 788 . 6...domestic water supply sector. Water use in energy production is included in the figures...

Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Mesfin M. Mekonnen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water H. R. Warman In...the geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Earth's deeper water areas, an attempt...United Kingdom 1981 Hydrocarbon potential of deep water Warman H. R. Author...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Water purification by electrical discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a continuing need for the development of effective, cheap and environmentally friendly processes for the disinfection and degradation of organic pollutants from water. Ozonation processes are now replacing conventional chlorination processes because ozone is a stronger oxidizing agent and a more effective disinfectant without any side effects. However, the fact that the cost of ozonation processes is higher than chlorination processes is their main disadvantage. In this paper recent developments targeted to make ozonation processes cheaper by improving the efficiency of ozone generation, for example, by incorporation of catalytic packing in the ozone generator, better dispersion of ozone in water and faster conversion of dissolved ozone to free radicals are described. The synthesis of ozone in electrical discharges is discussed. Furthermore, the generation and plasma chemical reactions of several chemically active species, such as H2O2, O•, OH•, HO2•, O3*, N2*, e-, O2-, O-, O2+, etc, which are produced in the electrical discharges are described. Most of these species are stronger oxidizers than ozone. Therefore, water treatment by direct electrical discharges may provide a means to utilize these species in addition to ozone. Much research and development activity has been devoted to achieve these targets in the recent past. An overview of these techniques and important developments that have taken place in this area are discussed. In particular, pulsed corona discharge, dielectric barrier discharge and contact glow discharge electrolysis techniques are being studied for the purpose of cleaning water. The units based on electrical discharges in water or close to the water level are being tested at industrial-scale water treatment plants.}

Muhammad Arif Malik; Abdul Ghaffar; Salman Akbar Malik

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr. OBERSTAR, Mr. BEDELL. Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB, Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL; Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JACT. Mr. TRAKLER, and Mr. Vxrrro. H. Con. Res. 107: Mr. KASICH. Mr. AUCOIN. Mr. CARPER, and Mr. SIZHFIJER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH. Mr. LANTOS.

365

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ongrees;ional Record ongrees;ional Record United States of America __._ -.. I. :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9tth CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmcqton. Cl C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $300 Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Governme3n:jPnntmg OfIce SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' June 28, 1983 -: I H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WA-. Mr. OBERSTAFC, M' r. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB. Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL,. Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JAGT. Mr. TRAKLER. and Mr. VENTO. H. Con. Res. iO7: Mr. KASICH. Mr. ALCOIN. Mr. CARPER. and Mr. SCHEUER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH, Mr. LANTOS. Mr. KILDEE. Mr. SOLARZ Mr. Bmrr, Mr. BELWLL, Mr. RANG~L, Mr. DYMALLY. Mr.

366

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

367

Using Membrane Sets Incorporated into a Crossflow Electrofiltration/Electrodialysis Treatment Module to Treat CMP Wastewater and Simultaneously Generate Electrolytic Ionized Water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, membrane set(s) had been incorporated into different crossflow electrofiltration (CEF) /electrodialysis (ED) treatment modules for treating various CMP wastewaters and simultaneously generating… (more)

Yang, Tsung-Yin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Geothermal Generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geothermal Generation This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Geothermal Energy Generation Global Geothermal Electricity Generation in 2007 (in millions of kWh):[1] United States: 14,637 Philippines: 12,080 Indonesia: 6,083 Mexico: 5,844 (Note: Select countries are listed; this is not an exhaustive list.) United States Geothermal Energy Generation U.S. geothermal energy generation remained relatively stable from 2000 to 2006, with more than 3% growth in 2007 and 2008.[1] U.S. geothermal electricity generation in 2008 was 14,859 GWh.[1] References ↑ 1.0 1.1 1.2 (Published: July 2009) "US DOE 2008 Renewable Energy Data Book" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Generation&oldid=599391"

369

The formation of volcanic centers at the Colorado Plateau as a result of the passage of aqueous fluid through the oceanic lithosphere and the subcontinental mantle: New implications for the planetary water cycle in the western United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We provide new petrological evidence for the strong influence of water on the formation of the oceanic lithospheric mantle, the subcontinental mantle above, and the continental lithosphere. Our analysis throws new light on the hypothesis that new continental lithosphere was formed by the passage of silicate-rich aqueous fluid through the sub-continental mantle. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed a representative collection of lherzolite and harzburgite xenoliths from the sample volcano known as “The Thumb”, located in the center of the Colorado Plateau, western United States. The studied sample collection exhibits multi-stage water enrichment processes along point, line and planar defect structures in nominally anhydrous minerals and the subsequent formation of the serpentine polymorph antigorite along grain boundaries and in totally embedded annealed cracks. Planar defect structures act like monomineralic and interphase grain boundaries in the oceanic lithosphere and the subcontinental mantle beneath the North American plate, which was hydrated by the ancient oceanic Farallon plate during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic eras. We used microspectroscopical, petrological, and seismological techniques to confirm multi-stage hydration from a depth of ?150 km to just below the Moho depth. High-resolution mapping of the water distribution over homogeneous areas and fully embedded point, line and planar defects in olivine crystals of lherzolitic and harzburgitic origin by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy enabled us to resolve local wet spots and thus reconstruct the hydration process occurring at a depth of ?150 km (T ? 1225 °C). These lherzolites originated from the middle part of the Farallon mantle slab; they were released during the break up of the Farallon mantle slab, caused by the instability of the dipping slab. The background hydration levels in homogeneous olivines reached ?138 ppm wt H2O, and the water concentration at the planar defects could reach up to ?1000 ppm wt H2O. However, the formation of antigorite in grain boundaries was found to be the primary hydration mechanism for harzburgitic samples originating from the subcontinental mantle (for hydration, T ? 600 °C). Additionally, the formation of antigorite in lherzolites could be found in annealed cracks. From these observations, we conclude that hydration induces multi-stage water enrichment of the mantle wedge by a process that is dominated by the growth and movement of ubiquitous cracks, which acts as planar defects. Cracks in the mantle seem to be the an important feature in both the water cycle of the subduction zone and the formation of the continental lithosphere.

Holger Sommer; Klaus Regenauer-Lieb; Biliana Gasharova; Haemyeong Jung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reorientation of the ‘free OH’ group in the top-most layer of air/water interface of sodium fluoride aqueous solution probed with sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Many experimental and theoretical studies have established the specific anion, as well as cation effects on the hydrogen-bond structures at the air/water interface of electrolyte solutions. However, the ion effects on the top-most layer of the air/water interface, which is signified by the non-hydrogen-bonded so-called ‘free O-H’ group, has not been discussed or studied. In this report, we present the measurement of changes of the orientational angle of the ‘free O-H’ group at the air/water interface of the sodium fluoride (NaF) solutions at different concentrations using the interface selective sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the ssp and ppp polarizations. The polarization dependent SFG-VS results show that the average tilt angle of the ‘free O-H’ changes from about 35.3 degrees ± 0.5 degrees to 43.4 degrees ± 2.1degrees as the NaF concentration increase from 0 to 0.94M (nearly saturated). Such tilt angle change is around the axis of the other O-H group of the same water molecule at the top-most layer at the air/water interface that is hydrogen-bonded to the water molecules below the top-most layer. These results provide quantitative molecular details of the ion effects of the NaF salt on the structure of the water molecules at the top-most layer of the air/water interfacial, even though both the Na+ cation and the F- anion are believed to be among the most excluded ions from the air/water interface.

Feng, Ran-Ran; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hongfei

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

The abundance and distribution of macro-invertebrates in the cooling-water canal system of the P. H. Robinson Generating Station located on Galveston Bay, Texas, with emphasis on the effect of supplemental cooling towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Goodyear 1972; Raney et al. 1973; Belts et al. 1974). There is aslo increasing awareness and concern for other power plant related problems such as mechanical and pressure stress due to entrainment through the condenser tubes, impingement upon intake... to determine the abundance, distribution and survival rate of macro- invertebrates present in the cooling-water canal system of Houston Lighting 6 Power Company's P. H. Robinson Generating Station. Surface and bottom, day and night collections were taken...

Margraf, F. Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Diophantine Generation,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diophantine Generation, Horizontal and Vertical Problems, and the Weak Vertical Method Alexandra Shlapentokh Diophantine Sets, Definitions and Generation Diophantine Sets Diophantine Generation Properties of Diophantine Generation Diophantine Family of Z Diophantine Family of a Polynomial Ring Going Down Horizontal

Shlapentokh, Alexandra

374

Quadrennial Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Slides Preliminary Slides for Alternative Generation Workshop including Carbon Capture and Sequestration, Nuclear Power, Wind Power, Water Power, Geothermal...

375

Arsenic Epidemiology and Drinking Water Standards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...occurrences of arsenic in ground water." Dictionaries and...History, Study and Remediation is an Arsenic Project...also provided. The Ground Water and Drinking Water Division...resource page on arsenic in ground water of the United States...

Allan H. Smith; Peggy A. Lopipero; Michael N. Bates; Craig M. Steinmaus

2002-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

376

The U.S. Generation IV Implementation Strategy  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to respond to Congressional direction contained in Senate Report 107-220 from the Senate Committee on Appropriations regarding the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 2003. In that report, the Committee instructed the Department to prepare a report regarding how it intends to carry out the results of the Generation IV Roadmap. This report is the U.S. Department of Energy's response to the Congressional directive. It summarizes results from the Generation IV Technology Roadmap and the strategy for implementing of the Generation IV program in the United States. Planning for the implementation of the Generation IV program is based on (1) the long-term outlook for nuclear energy in the United States, (2) the advice of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee during the two-year development of the Generation IV Technology Roadmap, and (3) the need for the Generation IV program to be integrated with other nuclear energy research programs of the Department. Considerable emphasis is given to developing the priorities and necessary timelines for the U.S. Generation IV Program, as well as developing international R&D cooperation that will benefit the program and strengthen U.S. leadership in nuclear technology R&D.

None

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

378

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters"

379

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TexMex Energy, LLC TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) . On August 25,2004, DOE issued Order No. EA-294 authorizing TexMex Energy LLC (TexMex) to transmit electric energy fiom the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 25, 2006. On September 8, 2006, TexMex applied to renew the electricity export authority

380

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tenaslta Power Services Co. Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) ( Z 6 U. s.c.824a(e)j1. On August 16,2001, DOE issued Order No. EA-243 authorizing Tenaska Power Scrvices Co. (Tenaska) to transmit electric cncrgy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 16,2003. On August 14,2006, Teilaska applied to renew the electricity export authority

382

Reusing Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reusing Water Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. April 12, 2012 Water from cooling the supercomputer is release to maintain a healthy wetland. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We reuse the same water up to six times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. How many times does LANL reuse water? Wastewater is generated from some of the facilities responsible for the Lab's biggest missions, such as the cooling towers of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, one of the Lab's premier science research

383

ADVANCED CO2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-02NT41621 to develop a conceptual design and determine the performance characteristics of a new IGCC plant configuration that facilitates CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This new configuration will be designed to achieve CO{sub 2} sequestration without the need for water gas shifting and CO{sub 2} separation, and may eliminate the need for a separate sequestration compressor. This research introduces a novel concept of using CO{sub 2} as a working fluid for an advanced coal gasification based power generation system, where it generates power with high system efficiency while concentrating CO{sub 2} for sequestration. This project supports the DOE research objective of development of concepts for the capture and storage of CO{sub 2}.

A. Nehrozoglu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

ADVANCED CO2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-02NT41621 to develop a conceptual design and determine the performance characteristics of a new IGCC plant configuration that facilitates CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This new configuration will be designed to achieve CO{sub 2} sequestration without the need for water gas shifting and CO{sub 2} separation, and may eliminate the need for a separate sequestration compressor. This research introduces a novel concept of using CO{sub 2} as a working fluid for an advanced coal gasification based power generation system, where it generates power with high system efficiency while concentrating CO{sub 2} for sequestration. This project supports the DOE research objective of development of concepts for the capture and storage of CO{sub 2}.

A. Nehrozoglu

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

2 Risk perceptions of arsenic in tap water and consumption 3 of bottled water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.htm). In the United States today bottled water 25 constitutes a significant proportion of the beverage indus- 26 try water is safe to drink in most areas of the United States, so 36 one could question why people in the United States drink 37 bottled water, especially when bottled water can be 240 and 38 10,000 times more

Shaw, W. Douglass

386

California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

387

REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

position in the power generation field. It is the second largest commercial supplier of power generation gas turbines in the United States and the fourth single largest supplier...

388

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

389

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Salem Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Salem Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

390

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit:...

391

Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

before the United States House of before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to appear before you today to discuss the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 budget request for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development More Documents & Publications

392

Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications. 2 figs.

Hart, M.M.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

Hart, Mark M. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A multi-level simulation platform of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell–gas turbine hybrid generation system – Part II. Balancing units model library and system simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following our integrated hierarchical modeling framework of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC), this paper firstly introduces the model libraries of main balancing units, including some state-of-the-art achievements and our specific work. Based on gPROMS programming code, flexible configuration and modular design are fully realized by specifying graphically all unit models in each level. Via comparison with the steady-state experimental data of Siemens–Westinghouse demonstration system, the in-house multi-level SOFC–gas turbine (GT) simulation platform is validated to be more accurate than the advanced power system analysis tool (APSAT). Moreover, some units of the demonstration system are designed reversely for analysis of a typically part-load transient process. The framework of distributed and dynamic modeling in most of units is significant for the development of control strategies in the future.

Cheng Bao; Ningsheng Cai; Eric Croiset

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Impact of Distributed Generation and Series Compensation on Distribution Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are investigated. A doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG)-based DG unit and a series capacitor (SC) and a thyristor DFIG units. The converter of the DFIG is modeled as an unbalanced harmonic-generating source

Pota, Himanshu Roy

396

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) – Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of United Irrigation District’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 3 Detailed Location of United Irrigation District’s Office in Mission, TX . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 4 Illustrated Layout of United Irrigation District...-2003 . . . . . . . . . . 55 2 Historic Water Use (acre-feet) for United Irrigation District, 1999-2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 3 Selected Summary Information for United Irrigation District, 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 4 Data Summary for United Irrigation...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

397

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

398

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

399

Global land and water grabbing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ratio between blue water and irrigation efficiency. Values per unit area refer to green and max blue water per...Arab Emirates, India, United Kingdom, Egypt, China, and Israel (Table 2...land and water grabbing enhance food and energy availability in the grabbing country...

Maria Cristina Rulli; Antonio Saviori; Paolo D’Odorico

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Milliwatt Generator Project  

SciTech Connect

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

402

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

403

A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water Reactor Cooling System Components A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water Reactor Cooling System Components In the United States currently there are approximately 104 operating light water reactors. Of these, 69 are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and 35 are boiling water reactors (BWRs). In 2007, the 104 light-water reactors (LWRs) in the United States generated approximately 100 GWe, equivalent to 20% of total US electricity production. Most of the US reactors were built before 1970 and the initial design lives of most of the reactors are 40 years. It is expected that by 2030, even those reactors that have received 20-year life extension license from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

404

Thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect

A thermoelectric generator unit is described comprising: a hot side heat exchanger including a plate having extruded retention posts projecting from one surface of the plate, and fins adapted for contact with a heating source. The fins are positioned between two of the retention posts. Retention rods are inserted between the retention posts and the base of the fins to retain the fin in thermal contact with the plate surface upon insertion of the retention rod between the engaging surface of the post and the corresponding fin. Thermoelectric semi-conductor modules are in thermal contact with the opposite side of the hot side heat exchanger plate from the contact with the fins. The modules are arranged in a grid pattern so that heat flow is directed into each of the modules from the hot side heat exchanger. The modules are connected electrically so as to combine their electrical output; and a cold side heat exchanger is in thermal contact with the modules acting as a heat sink on the opposite side of the module from the hot side heat exchanger plate so as to produce a thermal gradient across the modules.

Shakun, W.; Bearden, J.H.; Henderson, D.R.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hydro Generation Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro Generation Ltd Place: Devon, United Kingdom Zip: EX16 9EU Sector: Hydro, Services Product: Micro hydropower company. Provides technical services such as feasibility studies,...

406

Integrated assessment of Hadley Center (HadCM2) climate-change impacts on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: Part II. Regional agricultural production in 2030 and 2095  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A national assessment (NA) evaluated the potential consequences of climate change and variability on the agriculture, water resources, as well as other economic and natural resource sectors in the United States. As part of this process, we used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate-change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from national records for 1961–1990. The scenario runs for 2025–2034 and 2090–2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Crops were simulated under both dryland and irrigated management, with irrigation water supply estimates taken from the HUMUS simulations in Paper 1. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the northeast. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. Regionally, dryland corn yields could increase, decrease or remain unchanged under the two scenarios. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward trends under scenarios of climate-change. Evapotranspiration in dryland corn is expected to increase in both future periods while water-use efficiency will decrease. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization. Irrigation requirement by irrigated crops declines under these scenarios as transpiration is suppressed.

R.César Izaurralde; Norman J. Rosenberg; Robert A. Brown; Allison M. Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Other Construction Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate See Page Four of Utility Application: $100-$50,000/customer/year depending on utility and remaining funding Custom:40% of project cost Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Trap Repair or Replacement: $50/unit Boilers: $1-$1.50/MBH Furnace Replacement: $1.50/MBH or $150/unit Boiler Modulation Burner Control Retrofit: $1000/unit Boiler Water Reset Control: $300/unit

408

Water purification and monitoring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purification of water for the next century is paramount. As global demand for energy increases new ways of generating energy have been discovered and… (more)

Maguire Boyle, Samuel James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests with Outdoor Fan Coil Unit ............. ................. 2 1.2.1 Space and water heating ....................... ... ........ .......................... 10 4. Outdoor Fan Coil Unit Tests ...... ......... ......... . ........................ . 11 4

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

410

Synthesis of Longtime Water/Air-Stable Ni Nanoparticles and Their High Catalytic Activity for Hydrolysis of Ammonia?Borane for Hydrogen Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soluble starch (amylose), a renewable polymer, is the main component of starch which is the main energy reserve of all higher plants, and can form a dispersion in water. ... The TEM samples were prepared by depositing one or two droplets of the nanoparticle suspensions onto the amorphous carbon coated copper grids, which were dried in argon atmosphere. ... Nitrogen sorption measurements were carried out on an automatic volumetric adsorption equipment (BEL mini, Japan) using the Brunauer?Emmett?Teller (BET) method to test the surface areas of the in situ synthesized catalysts with/without starch after washing with water and vacuum drying at 90 °C. ...

Jun-Min Yan; Xin-Bo Zhang; Song Han; Hiroshi Shioyama; Qiang Xu

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

Corrective Action Management Units and Temporary Units. RCRA Information Brief  

SciTech Connect

On February 16, 1993 the EPA published a final rule that allows either the EPA Regional Administrator or the authorized State to designate areas as corrective action management units (CAMUs) at hazardous waste management facilities for the specific purpose of managing remediation waste that has been generated as part of the facility`s corrective action activities. According to the rule, placement of remediation wastes into or within a CAMU does not constitute land disposal of hazardous waste and is not subject to RCRA land disposal restrictions. In addition, waste disposal units located within CAMUs are not required to be designed in accordance with RCRA minimum technological requirements applicable to land disposal units. This Information Brief explains the advantages of a CAMU designation, defines a Temporary Unit (TU) and explains the advantages of a TU designation. The process for initiating a CAMU or TU designation is described for DOE sites and interim status facilities.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Termination unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-B 3-B Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina to whom power may be scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and Carolina Power & Light Company (hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer. The Government is responsible for providing the scheduling. The Customer is responsible for providing a transmission arrangement. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude modifications to the aforementioned contracts to allow an eligible customer to elect service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the John H. Kerr and Philpott Projects (hereinafter

414

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-E 1-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter call the Customer) in South Carolina to whom power may be wheeled and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and South Carolina Public Service Authority (hereinafter called the Authority). Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude an eligible customer from electing service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B. Russell Projects and sold under appropriate contracts between the Government and

415

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duke-4-E Duke-4-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina served through the transmission facilities of Duke Energy Company (hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer. The Customer is responsible for providing a scheduling arrangement with the Government and for providing a transmission arrangement with the Company. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude modifications to the aforementioned contracts to allow an eligible customer to elect service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter

416

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-E 2-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available public bodies and cooperatives (any one of which is hereinafter called the Customer) in South Carolina to whom power may be wheeled pursuant to contracts between the Government and the South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (hereinafter called the Company). The customer is responsible for providing a scheduling arrangement with the Government. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude an eligible customer from electing service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B.

417

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MISS-1-N MISS-1-N Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the South Mississippi Electric Power Association (hereinafter called the Customer) to whom power may be wheeled pursuant to contracts between the Government and PowerSouth Energy Cooperative (hereinafter called PowerSouth). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B. Russell Projects and sold under appropriate contracts between the Government and the Customer. This rate schedule does not apply to energy from pumping operations at the Carters and Richard B. Russell Projects.

418

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-E 4-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available public bodies and cooperatives (any one of which is hereinafter called the Customer) in South Carolina served through the transmission facilities of South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (hereinafter called the Company). The customer is responsible for providing a scheduling arrangement with the Government and for providing a transmission arrangement. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude an eligible customer from electing service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B.

419

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-A 1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, South Carolina, or North Carolina to whom power is provided pursuant to contracts between the Government and the Customer. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale energy generated from pumping operations at the Carters and Richard B. Russell Projects and sold under appropriate contracts between the Government and the Customer. The energy will be segregated from energy from other pumping operations. Character of Service: The energy supplied hereunder will be delivered at the delivery points provided for under appropriate contracts between the Government and the Customer.

420

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-E 3-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina to whom power may be scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and Duke Energy Company (hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer. The Customer is responsible for providing a transmission arrangement. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude modifications to the aforementioned contracts to allow an eligible customer to elect service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-E 2-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to contracts between the Government and Duke Energy Company (hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer. The Customer is responsible for providing a scheduling arrangement with the Government. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude modifications to the aforementioned contracts to allow an eligible customer to elect service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter

422

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-E 3-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida to whom power may be scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and Southern Company Services, Incorporated (hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer. The Customer is responsible for providing a transmission arrangement. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude modifications to the aforementioned contracts to allow an eligible customer to elect service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter

423

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SOCO-4-E SOCO-4-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida served through the transmission facilities of Southern Company Services, Inc. (hereinafter called the Company) or the Georgia Integrated Transmission System. The Customer is responsible for providing a scheduling arrangement with the Government and for providing a transmission arrangement. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude modifications to the aforementioned contracts to allow an eligible customer to elect service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter

424

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALA-1-N ALA-1-N Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the PowerSouth Energy Cooperative (hereinafter called the Cooperative). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters, and Richard B. Russell Projects and sold under contract between the Cooperative and the Government. This rate schedule does not apply to energy from pumping operations at the Carters and Richard B. Russell Projects. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 Hertz and shall be delivered at the

425

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duke-1-E Duke-1-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina to whom power may be transmitted and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and Duke Energy Company (hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude modifications to the aforementioned contracts to allow an eligible customer to elect service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B.

426

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-E 3-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter call the Customer) in South Carolina to whom power may be scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and South Carolina Public Service Authority (hereinafter called the Authority). The customer is responsible for providing a transmission arrangement. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude an eligible customer from electing service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B.

427

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pump-2 Pump-2 Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives who provide their own scheduling arrangement and elect to allow Southeastern to use a portion of their allocation for pumping (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, South Carolina, or North Carolina to whom power is provided pursuant to contracts between the Government and the Customer. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale energy generated from pumping operations at the Carters and Richard B. Russell Projects and sold under appropriate contracts between the Government and the Customer. This energy will be segregated from energy from other pumping operations.

428

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-E 2-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to contracts between the Government and Southern Company Services, Incorporated (hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer. The Customer is responsible for providing a scheduling arrangement with the Government. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude modifications to the aforementioned contracts to allow an eligible customer to elect service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter

429

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-E 4-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter call the Customer) in South Carolina served through the transmission facilities of South Carolina Public Service Authority (hereinafter called the Authority). The customer is responsible for providing a scheduling arrangement with the Government and for providing a transmission arrangement. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude an eligible customer from electing service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B.

430

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SOCO-1-E SOCO-1-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida to whom power may be transmitted and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and Southern Company Services, Incorporated (hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer. Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude modifications to the aforementioned contracts to allow an eligible customer to elect service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B.

431

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCE&G-1-E SCE&G-1-E Availability: This rate schedule shall be available public bodies and cooperatives (any one of which is hereinafter called the Customer) in South Carolina to whom power may be wheeled and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and the South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (hereinafter called the Company). Nothing in this rate schedule shall preclude an eligible customer from electing service under another rate schedule. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of power and accompanying energy generated at the Allatoona, Buford, J. Strom Thurmond, Walter F. George, Hartwell, Millers Ferry, West Point, Robert F. Henry, Carters and Richard B. Russell Projects and sold under appropriate contracts between the Government and

432

Water watch  

SciTech Connect

The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

New Mexico grape growers unite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico grape growers unite, increase production New Mexico grape growers unite, increase production Grape Growers Association enlivens agriculture Growers association unites small parcels of land, enlivens production, protects water rights for Northern New Mexico agriculturists. August 6, 2012 Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Association The NMSBA Entrepreneurial Networking program is helping Lucia Sanchez (C) Tim Martinez (R) and Robert Naranjo, the Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Association, put small parcels of land back into production in Rio Arriba County. Contact Mariann Johnston (505) 667-4391 Email New Mexico grape growers unite to increase production, with help of Northern New Mexico Connect Over the last decade, a string of wineries has come to grace the scenic High Road to Taos. In 2010, Robert Naranjo, network facilitator for the

434

1. Generation 1 1. Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Generation 1 _________________________________________________________________________ 1. Generation Sound and vibrations or, in more general terms, oscillations of matter (solids or fluids) are generated in many different dynamic processes. The basic mechanisms which underlie these oscillations

Berlin,Technische Universität

435

A power supply unit for discharging the plasma electron source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A power supply unit for discharging a low-temperature plasma generator based on discharge in the crossed electric and magnetic fields is described. The unit operates in a stationary mode with a preset stabiliz...

D. A. Antonovich; V. A. Gruzdev; V. G. Zalesskii…

436

This map shows seven earthquake-generated tsunami events in the United States from the years 900 to 1964. The earthquakes that caused these tsunamis are: Prince William Sound,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the December 26, 2005, Indian Ocean tsunami, lies crumpled in a building in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. (USGS photo/Guy Gelfenbaum) Following the December 26, 2005, Indian Ocean tsunami, debris and standing water are the only

437

Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

T Sant; D Buhagiar; R N Farrugia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,45.5,18.2,21.6,21 "2 or More",3.7,1,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,39.4,17.4,21,21.8 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,7.1,1.4,1.5,"Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q"

439

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01-1 · Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

440

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous radiological monitoring of the pool water. The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System, Site-Generated Radiological Waste Handling System, Site Radiological Monitoring System, Waste Handling Building Electrical System, Site Water System, and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System.

V. King

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

442

United Nations A/67/L.75* General Assembly Distr.: Limited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and related fields Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize water resources, Appreciating the ongoing work of the organizations of the United Nations system

Cambridge, University of

443

Water-splitting using photocatalytic porphyrin-nanotube composite devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generating hydrogen by photocatalytic decomposition of water using porphyrin nanotube composites. In some embodiments, both hydrogen and oxygen are generated by photocatalytic decomposition of water.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Miller, James E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wang, Zhongchun (Albuquerque, NM); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

What's your water footprint?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) of gasoline = 18?45 gallons Because between 1 and 2.5 gallons of water are needed to refine a single gallon of gasoline, the 384 million gallons of gasoline used each day in the United States translate to more than 1 billion total gallons of water per...) of gasoline = 18?45 gallons Because between 1 and 2.5 gallons of water are needed to refine a single gallon of gasoline, the 384 million gallons of gasoline used each day in the United States translate to more than 1 billion total gallons of water per...

Jordan, Leslie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the United States Senate Committee...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

associated with occupational medical services and tank farm vapor exposures at the Hanford Site. During the Cold War, the United States' nuclear weapons complex generated large...

446

Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BNL 52608 Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water Supply Wells Under Contract with the United States Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 #12;BNL 52608 Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water Supply Wells December 27, 2000

447

Water Use in the Development and Operation of Geothermal Power...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

...48 Appendix C - Summary of Water Consumption for Electricity Generation Technologies ...51 v FIGURES 1 Example GIS Map: Geothermal Water...

448

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS Rivers are major generators of electrical power and support a rapidly growing population and economy. Water resource management activities such as water rights adjudication, groundwater resources assessment

449

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Program Plan Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas- emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow by more than 30% from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license, for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power

450

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty++++ Afzal Siddiqui  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty++++ Afzal Siddiqui University's decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit fuelled by natural gas. While the long. KEYWORDS. OR in Energy; Distributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment. 1. INTRODUCTION

Guillas, Serge

451

Evaluation of stack criteria pollutant gas absorption in the new generation thermoelectric water condenser fitted with laminar impinger type heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorized the Environmental Protection Agency to establish an Acid Rain Program to reduce the adverse effects of acidic deposition. The Act specifically stipulated that CEMS (continuous emissions monitoring systems) be used to measure the stack emissions under this program. Along with these rules, comes the task of the Stack Tester (Reference Method) to routinely perform RATA (Relative Accuracy Test Audit) tests on the installed CEMS. This paper presents a laboratory and field test sequence to evaluate the signal attenuation through the gas sample conditioning, water condensation removal process, using laminar flow impinger heat exchangers. This method is compared to the EPA CFR 40, Part 60, Appendix A, Method 6, glass impinger train, commonly used by RATA stack testers. CFR 40, Part 75 revisions as of the CAAA 1990, requires more stringent certification and CEMS performance standards. These standards are summarized and related to gas absorption in both the thermoelectric cooler heat exchanger and the Method 6 glass impinger train system. As an incentive to reduce the frequency of RATA tests required per year, emitters are encouraged to achieve relative accuracies of 7.5% or less compared to the reference method. This incentive requires better reference method test apparatus definition. This paper will explore these alternatives and provide test data for comparison to the currently available apparatus. Also discussed is the theory of Electronic Gas Sample Coolers and their practical application to the removal of water from stack gas.

Baldwin, T. [Baldwin Environmental, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Water Use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Geology of U.S. Stimulation Projects, Water Costs, and Alternative Water Use Policies  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), geothermal energy generation in the United States is projected to more than triple by 2040 (EIA 2013). This addition, which translates to more than 5 GW of generation capacity, is anticipated because of technological advances and an increase in available sources through the continued development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) and low-temperature resources (EIA 2013). Studies have shown that air emissions, water consumption, and land use for geothermal electricity generation have less of an impact than traditional fossil fuel?based electricity generation; however, the long-term sustainability of geothermal power plants can be affected by insufficient replacement of aboveground or belowground operational fluid losses resulting from normal operations (Schroeder et al. 2014). Thus, access to water is therefore critical for increased deployment of EGS technologies and, therefore, growth of the geothermal sector. This paper examines water issues relating to EGS development from a variety of perspectives. It starts by exploring the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects. It then examines the relative costs of different potential traditional and alternative water sources for EGS. Finally it summarizes specific state policies relevant to the use of alternative water sources for EGS, and finally explores the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

453

Water Use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Geology of U.S. Stimulation Projects, Water Costs, and Alternative Water Use Policies  

SciTech Connect

According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), geothermal energy generation in the United States is projected to more than triple by 2040 (EIA 2013). This addition, which translates to more than 5 GW of generation capacity, is anticipated because of technological advances and an increase in available sources through the continued development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) and low-temperature resources (EIA 2013). Studies have shown that air emissions, water consumption, and land use for geothermal electricity generation have less of an impact than traditional fossil fuel?based electricity generation; however, the long-term sustainability of geothermal power plants can be affected by insufficient replacement of aboveground or belowground operational fluid losses resulting from normal operations (Schroeder et al. 2014). Thus, access to water is therefore critical for increased deployment of EGS technologies and, therefore, growth of the geothermal sector. This paper examines water issues relating to EGS development from a variety of perspectives. It starts by exploring the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects. It then examines the relative costs of different potential traditional and alternative water sources for EGS. Finally it summarizes specific state policies relevant to the use of alternative water sources for EGS, and finally explores the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects.

Jenna N. Schroeder

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Integrated facility for municipal solid waste disposal, electrical generation, and desalination. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design was completed for a facility that uses municipal solid waste as fuel for generating electricity and cogeneration steam for a seawater desalination unit. An average city of 100,000 population is the basis of the design. The design showed that heat from the combustion of municipal solid waste will provide nearly 2% of per capita electrical power needs and 7% of fresh water requirements. This thesis proposes a new arrangement of known technologies for use in Public Works.

Hanby, G.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UOEF 1325.8 UOEF 1325.8 (5831 , - a.. L . . L. . c ,, . . . t ,' <, .* -,. .--1^ a "-2 (J 7 , pe-;L, United States Government memorandum Departmen: of Energy DATEAUG 1 0 1984 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: NE-20 SUBJECT: Action Description Memorandum (ADM) Review: Wayne, New Jersey Proposed 1984 Remedial Actions at TO: File After reviewing all of the pertinent facts including the attached Action Description Memorandum (ADM), I have determined that the remedial action described in the subject ADM is an action which in and of itself will have a clearly insignificant impact on the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq. The Conference Report accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act

456

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 - Iq \ b- United States Government memorandum pJ .T\ \b Department of Energy DATE: OCT 9 1984 REPLY TO NE-20 All-N OF: .- Authorizations for Actions Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action SUBJECT: Program (FUSRAP) at the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, MO. and the W. R. Grace Site at Curtis Bay, Md. To: J. LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office St. Louis Airport Storage Site, MO The House and Senate Reports for the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act (P.L. 98-360) directed the Department of Energy "...to take the necessary steps to consolidate and dispose of the waste material from the Latty Avenue site and nearby St. Louis Airport vicinity properties locally, by reacquiring, stabilizing, and using the old 21.7

457

Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling: Cooling: Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Water Cooling Typical water cooled condenser used for condensing steam Water or liquid cooling is the most efficient cooling method and requires the smallest footprint when cold water is readily available. When used in power generation the steam/vapor that exits the turbine is condensed back into water and reused by means of a heat exchanger. Water cooling requires a water resource that is cold enough to bring steam, typically

458

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'.... '|le , * f C. '.... '|le , * f C. Office Memorandum · UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT .-- J TO ' Leo Graup, Chief, DATE: September 29, 1958 Property Management Branch rFi0 : M. S. Weinstein Industrial Hygiene Branch, HASL SUBJBT: SURVEY AT HAIST PROPETIY SYMBOL: HSH:MSW. Thisl property was purchased during MED operation and used as a dumping ground for refinery residues generated by Linde Air Products during their period of participation in the refinery operations program. \It 2 consists of 10 acres in addition to a perpetual .ease- ment right to a strip of land, 10 feet wide and 3600 feet long. The area is located in North Tonawanda, New York near the Niagara River. Because of the growth of adjacent industries, this particular piece of property has appreciated in value. During its tenure as responsible property management office, Oak

459

Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators.

Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Power Demand Options in Regions of Water Stress and Future Carbon Management Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a regional modeling assessment of non-traditional water sources for use in thermoelectric power plants. The assessment includes the development of a model to characterize water quantity and quality from several sources of non-traditional water, initially focused within the Southeastern United States. The project includes four primary tasks: (1) identify water sources, needs, and treatment options; (2) assess and model non-traditional water quantity and quality; (3) identify and characterize water treatment options including an assessment of cost; and (4) develop a framework of metrics, processes, and modeling aspects that can be applied to other regions of the United States.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "water generating units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,28.8,33.4,17.4,15.3,11.4 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,1.1,0.8,0.5,0.6 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,25.3,31.8,16.6,14.6,11.3 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,4.2,2.7,1.6,1.2,0.6

462

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

463

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

464

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,5.8,6.2,2.8,2.8,1.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

465

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,3.7,6.2,4.7 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

466

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,9.6,5,2.2,1.5,0.8 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

467

Generation Planning (pbl/generation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Generation Planning Thumbnail image of BPA White Book BPA White Book (1998 - 2011) Draft Dry...

468

Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

Hart, Paul John (Indiana, PA); Miller, Bruce G. (State College, PA); Wincek, Ronald T. (State College, PA); Decker, Glenn E. (Bellefonte, PA); Johnson, David K. (Port Matilda, PA)

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

469

Water Footprint of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If energy use is split into two categories, stationary and transportation, it is clear from the breakdown in ref 14 that water already plays a major role in stationary energy production: thermoelectric power generation is responsible for approximately 49% of total freshwater withdrawals in the United States (see the Supporting Information (SI) Figure S1 for complete breakdown). ... These more GHG-intensive water supplies serve a variety of users: in California, 18% of total desalination capacity provides freshwater for power plants with closed-loop cooling systems, 23% serves industrial facilities, 1% goes to crop irrigation, 57% goes to municipal customers, and 1% goes to other users. ... Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H. C.Life-Cycle Uses of Water in U.S. Electricity Generation Renewable Sustainable Energy Rev. 2010, 14 ( 7) 2039– 2048 ...

Corinne D. Scown; Arpad Horvath; Thomas E. McKone

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Shaft generator transmissions  

SciTech Connect

Economical on-board power can be generated from two-stroke, low-speed engines by installing a multistage hollow-shaft gearbox on the propeller intermediate shaft to drive the generator. Gearbox manufacturer Asug, based in Dessau, Germany, has designed units specifically for this purpose. The Asug shaft generator drive concept for generator drives at the front end of the engine is designed to reduce installation costs and uses an integrated engine-gearbox foundation. The complete propulsion system, consisting of the diesel engine, gear with coupling and generator, can be completely or partially preassembled outside the ship`s engine room to reduce onboard assembly time. A separate foundation for this arrangement is not necessary. The company offers a full range of gearboxes to generate power from 500 kW up to 5000 kW. Gearboxes driven from the forward engine end often incorporate an additional gear stage to gain energy from an exhaust turbine. This arrangement feeds part of the exhaust energy back into the system to increase efficiency. Latest installations of Asug shaft generator gears are in container ships and cargo/container ships built in Turkey and China.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

472

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

473

Studying the advisability of using gas-turbine unit waste gases for heating feed water in a steam turbine installation with a type T-110/120-12.8 turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of calculation studying of a possibility of topping of a steam-turbine unit (STU) with a type T-110/120-12.8 turbine of the Urals Turbine Works (UTZ) by a gas-turbine unit (GTU) of 25-MW capacity the wast...

A. D. Trukhnii; G. D. Barinberg; Yu. A. Rusetskii

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Water, water everywhere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... available water resources, either locally or globally, are by no means exhausted. At present desalination -- the removal of salt from sea water or brackish water -- is very ... or brackish water -- is very expensive, mainly because it consumes so much energy. Desalination provides less than 0.2 per cent of all the water used in the world ...

Philip Ball

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

475

MELCOR Model of the Spent Fuel Pool of Fukushima Dai-ichi Unit 4  

SciTech Connect

Unit 4 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered a hydrogen explosion at 6:00 am on March 15, 2011, exactly 3.64 days after the earthquake hit the plant and the off-site power was lost. The earthquake occurred on March 11 at 2:47 pm. Since the reactor of this Unit 4 was defueled on November 29, 2010, and all its fuel was stored in the spent fuel pool (SFP4), it was first believed that the explosion was caused by hydrogen generated by the spent fuel, in particular, by the recently discharged core. The hypothetical scenario was: power was lost, cooling to the SFP4 water was lost, pool water heated/boiled, water level decreased, fuel was uncovered, hot Zircaloy reacted with steam, hydrogen was generated and accumulated above the pool, and the explosion occurred. Recent analyses of the radioisotopes present in the water of the SFP4 and underwater video indicated that this scenario did not occur - the fuel in this pool was not damaged and was never uncovered the hydrogen of the explosion was apparently generated in Unit 3 and transported through exhaust ducts that shared the same chimney with Unit 4. This paper will try to answer the following questions: Could that hypothetical scenario in the SFP4 had occurred? Could the spent fuel in the SPF4 generate enough hydrogen to produce the explosion that occurred 3.64 days after the earthquake? Given the magnitude of the explosion, it was estimated that at least 150 kg of hydrogen had to be generated. As part of the investigations of this accident, MELCOR models of the SFP4 were prepared and a series of calculations were completed. The latest version of MELCOR, version 2.1 (Ref. 1), was employed in these calculations. The spent fuel pool option for BWR fuel was selected in MELCOR. The MELCOR model of the SFP4 consists of a total of 1535 fuel assemblies out of which 548 assemblies are from the core defueled on Nov. 29, 2010, 783 assemblies are older assemblies, and 204 are new/fresh assemblies. The total decay heat of the fuel in the pool was, at the time of the accident, 2.284 MWt, of which 1.872 MWt were from the 548 assemblies of the last core discharged and 0.412 MWt were from the older 783 assemblies. These decay heat values were calculated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the ORIGEN2.2 code (Ref. 2) - they agree with values reported elsewhere (Ref. 3). The pool dimensions are 9.9 m x 12.2 m x 11.8 m (height), and with the water level at 11.5 m, the pool volume is 1389 m3, of which only 1240 m3 is water, as some volume is taken by the fuel and by the fuel racks. The initial water temperature of the SFP4 was assumed to be 301 K. The fuel racks are made of an aluminum alloy but are modeled in MELCOR with stainless steel and B4C. MELCOR calculations were completed for different initial water levels: 11.5 m (pool almost full, water is only 0.3 m below the top rim), 4.4577 m (top of the racks), 4.2 m, and 4.026 m (top of the active fuel). A calculation was also completed for a rapid loss of water due to a leak at the bottom of the pool, with the fuel rapidly uncovered and oxidized in air. Results of these calculations are shown in the enclosed Table I. The calculation with the initial water level at 11.5 m (full pool) takes 11 days for the water to boil down to the top of the fuel racks, 11.5 days for the fuel to be uncovered, 14.65 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen and 19 days for the pool to be completely dry. The calculation with the initial water level at 4.4577 m, takes 1.1 days to uncover the fuel and 4.17 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen. The calculation with the initial water level at 4.02 m takes 3.63 days to generate 150 kg of hydrogen this is exactly the time when the actual explosion occurred in Unit 4. Finally, fuel oxidation in air after the pool drained the water in 20 minutes, generates only 10 kg of hydrogen this is because very little steam is available and Zircaloy (Zr) oxidation with the oxygen of the air does not generate hydrogen. MELCOR calculated water levels and hydrogen generated in the SFP4 as a function of time for initial water le

Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Low-grade geothermal energy conversion by organic Rankine cycle turbine generator  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports results of a demonstration project which helped determine the feasibility of converting low-grade thermal energy in 49/sup 0/C water into electrical energy via an organic Rankine cycle 2500 watt (electrical) turbine-generator. The geothermal source which supplied the water is located in a rural Alaskan village. The primary reasons an organic Rankine cycle turbine-generator was investigated as a possible source of electric power in rural Alaska are: high cost of operating diesel-electric units and their poor long-term reliability when high-quality maintenance is unavailable; and the extremely high level of long-term reliability reportedly attained by commercially available organic Rankine cycle turbines. The important contribution made by this project is data provided on the thermal and electrical operating characteristics of an experimental organic Rankine cycle turbine-generator operating at a uniquely low vaporizer temperature.

Zarling, J.P.; Aspnes, J.D.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Choosing the Right Backup Generator Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business Owners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business Owners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business Owners Identify essential systems and equipment-What do you need to keep your business operating? These may include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems; industrial equipment and major appliances, such as refrigerators and freezers; lights (interior and exterior), computers, and other office equipment; pumps, including sump pumps, sprinkler system pumps, and well water pumps; and alarm systems. Some of these systems and equipment may have to operate continuously, while others may be needed only during normal business hours. Choose the generator's fuel source-Backup generators are

478

Tidal Generation Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Generation Ltd Address University Gate East Park Row Place Bristol, United Kingdom Zip BS1 5UB Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product Tidal Generation is developing a 1MW fully submerged tidal turbine to generate electricity from tidal currents in water depths up to 50m. Phone number 4.41E+11 Website http://www.tidalgeneration.co. Coordinates 42.55678°, -88.050449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.55678,"lon":-88.050449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

479

Feasibility of rainwater harvesting for urban water management in Salt Lake City.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water managers in the western United States are being challenged by rapid urban growth and limited water availability. The development of new water resources is… (more)

Jensen, Mark A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind